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Search results - "Diana"
DenPClodius.jpg
20 viewsDenarius - 42 BC.
P. CLODIVS M.f. - Gens Claudia
Obv.: Laureate head of Apollo right, lyre behind
Rev.: Diana "Lucifera" standing facing, with bow and quiver over shoulder, holding lighted torch in each hand; P CLODIVS right, M F on left.
Gs. 3,3 mm. 19x18
Craw. 494/23, Sear RCV 492

Maxentius
DenMNAquillius.jpg
34 viewsDenarius - 109/108 BC. Rome mint.
MN. AQVILLIVS - Gens Aquillia
Obv.: Radiate head of Sol right. Before, X
Rev.: Luna (or Diana) in biga right; crescent moon and three stars above. Below, one star and MN (in monogram) AQVIL. In ex. ROMA
Gs. 3,7 mm. 18,81
Craw. 303/1, Sear RCV 180, Grueber II 645
1 commentsMaxentius
gallienvs.jpg
28 viewsRIC 180 Gallienus Billon Antoninianus. 157-158 A.D. IMP GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right / DIANAE CONS AVG, antelope walking right. G, V or X in ex, or no mintmark. RSC 163.
1 commentsPatrick O3
Sogdiana_Kamyshev-48.jpg
35 viewsSpongeBob
02gallieno_diana.jpg
15 viewstetrico
01gallieno_diana.jpg
16 viewstetrico
gal176b.jpg
Gallienus, RIC 176 Rome20 viewsGallienus, AE antoninianus
Obverse: IMP GALLIENVS radiate, bust right.
Reverse: DIANAE CONS AVG, doe running right and looking backwards.
Rome mint, 19 mm., 2.9 g.
NORMAN K
rjb_gal32_09_06.jpg
72736 viewsAntoninianus
Rome
Issue 10
DIANAE CONS AVG
G 727
mauseus
rjb_gall1_09_06.jpg
72830 viewsAntoninianus
Rome
Issue 10
DIANAE CONS AVG
G 728
1 commentsmauseus
gal181.jpg
Gallienus, RIC 181 Rome19 viewsGallienus, AE antoninianus
Obverse: GALLIENVS, radiate, bust right.
Reverse:DIANAE CONS AVG, antelope walking right.
XI in ex. Rome mint, 17.2mm., 2.6 g.
NORMAN K
3420493.jpg
P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus32 viewsMoneyer issues of Imperatorial Rome. P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus. 42 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.89 g, 1h). Rome mint. Laureate head of Apollo right; lyre behind / Diana Lucifera standing right, bow and quiver on her shoulder, holding torch in each hand. Crawford 494/23; CRI 184; Sydenham 1117; Claudia 15. Good VF, toned, a few minor scratches beneath the toning.

From the RAJ Collection. Ex CNG Inventory 914993 (2012 NYINC); Sincona 4 (25 October 2011), lots 4160 or 4161 (part of), includes ticket from a French Collectio
1 commentsecoli
0191-a00.JPG
Plautilla, overview295 viewsThere are five main types of portrait for Plautilla’s denarii at the Rome mint :

A - With a draped bust right, hair coiled in horizontal ridges and fastened in bun in high position. Her facial expression is juvenile
B - Hair being coiled in vertical ridges, with bun in low position. Plautilla looks here more like a young beautiful woman
C - The third bust shows a thinner face of Plautilla with hair in vertical ridges and no bun but braids covering her neck
D - The fourth type has a similar appearance with the former, but the vertical ridges disappear, hair being plastered down, still showing the right ear
E - Plautilla appears with mid long hair plastered down and covering her ears

In the mean time there are seven different reverses :

1 - CONCORDIAE AETERNAE
2 - PROPAGO IMPERI
3 - CONCORDIA AVGG
4 - CONCORDIA FELIX
5 - PIETAS AVGG
6 – DIANA LVCIFERA

Not every combination exists, but some of the above reverses can be shared by several obverse portraits. Noticeable also is an evolution of the obverse legend, being PLAVTILLAE AVGVSTAE (a) in 202, and becoming PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA (b) soon after

You can see the evolution of this interesting coinage in my Plautilla's gallery.
3 commentsPotator II
00012x00~1.jpg
15 viewsROME
PB Tessera (20mm, 4.24 g, 12h)
Bacchus standing right, holding thrysus; panther to right(?)
AVG
Cf. Rostovtsev 92 (smaller)

The obverse might alternately depict Diana with a stag, but she is not generally shown holding a staff.
Ardatirion
00026x00~3.jpg
10 viewsROME
PB Tessera (14x20mm, 3.17 g, 3h)
Diana advancing right, drawing bow
Deer running right
Cf. Rostowzew 2113 (circular examples)

Ex Classical Numismatic Group 55 (13 September 2000), lot 1201 (part of)
Ardatirion
00018x00~0.jpg
31 viewsROME
PB Tessera (20mm, 4.62 g, 12h)
Diana Ephesia
DIA
Rostowzew 2151, pl. VIII 51 (cast from same mold)
Ardatirion
DSC_0197.jpg
20 viewsROME
PB Tessera (13mm, 1.58 g, 12 h)
Diana advancing right, drawing bow
Stag leaping right
Rostowzew -
Ardatirion
Ephesus_cult_statue_tessera.JPG
35 viewsIONIA, Ephesos
PB Tessera (17mm, 2.98 g, 7 h)
Diana Ephesia, uncertain legend around
Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm frond
Gülbay & Kireç -
Ardatirion
kyHWAyT.jpg
19 viewsUNITED STATES, Hard Times. Political issues.
CU Token (28.5mm, 8.53 g, 12h). Belleville (New Jersey) mint. Dated 1838.
AM I NOT A WOMAN & A SISTER, hained female slave kneeling right, raising arms in supplication; * 1838 * below UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, LIBERTY/ 1838 within wreath
Rulau HT 81; Low 54

Ex Album 33 (17 January 2019), lot 2542

June 1900 saw a brief flurry of journalistic interest in the "Am I Not A Woman & A Sister" tokens. A specimen had been found in a garden in Indiana, apparently in one of the many towns that claim a connection to the Underground Railroad, and received a glowing and fanciful write up in the local newspaper. The paper claimed that it was a "Talisman of Slavery," and used as a token to ensure safe passage along the escaped slave's route, and that it was a very rare piece. The following week a newspaper in Maine recorded that a local collector had another example, again drawing a purported connection to the Underground Railroad. Astutely, the July 1900 edition of the American Journal of Numismatics pointed out that, while an isolated use like this was possible, it was not what the tokens were originally intended for.
Ardatirion
00036x00~0.jpg
33 viewsFaustina Junior . Augusta, AD 147-175
PB Denarius (18mm, 2.76 g, 10 h)
Cast imitation? Copying a Rome mint issue of circa AD 161-175
Draped bust right
Diana Lucifera standing facing, head left, holding transverse torch
Cf. RIC III 674 (Pius)

Iron(?) inclusion in center of reverse
1 commentsArdatirion
faustina_diana_sester.jpg
(0145) FAUSTINA II17 views(wife of Marcus Aurelius, mother of Commodus)
176-180 AD.
AE Sestertius, 31 mm 23.30 g
O: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
R: DIANA LVCIF S-C, Diana standing right with long torch. RIC 1628.
ROME
laney
faustina_ii.jpg
(0145) FAUSTINA II32 views(wife of Marcus Aurelius, mother of Commodus)
Faustina II
AE Sestertius, 31 mm 23.30 g
176-180 AD.
O: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
R: DIANA LVCIF S-C, Diana standing right with long torch. RIC 1628.
ROME
laney
normal_faustina_ii_b3xx.jpg
(0145) FAUSTINA II12 views(wife of Marcus Aurelius, mother of Commodus)
Faustina II
176-180 AD.
AE Sestertius, 31 mm 23.30 g
O: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
R: DIANA LVCIF S-C, Diana standing right with long torch. RIC 1628.
ROME
laney
0034.jpg
0034 - Denarius Postumia 81 BC45 viewsObv/Bust of Diana r., draped, with bow and quiver over shoulder; above brucanium.
Rev/A POST A F S N ALBIN, rock on which stands lighted altar, bull on l., togate figure holding aspergillum over bull on r.

Ag, 19.8mm, 3.95g
Moneyer: A.Postumius A.f. S.n Albinus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 372/1 [dies o/r: 90/100] - BMCRR Rome 2836 - RSC Postumia 7 - Syd. 745.
ex-Herbert Grün, auction 47, lot 1594
dafnis
25i6ueo.jpg
01.- A. Postumius Serrate Denarius (81 BC)12 viewsA. Postumius A.f. Sp.n. Albinus. 81 BC. AR Serrate Denarius (18.7 mm, 3.85 g.). Draped bust of Diana right, with bow and quiver over shoulder; bucranium above / Togate figure standing left on rock, holding aspergillum over head of ox standing right; lighted altar between them. VF, toned.
Purchased at Aureo & Calico auction in 2015.
1 commentsOscar D
0140.jpg
0140 - Denarius Plancia 55 BC39 viewsObv/ Head of Diana Planciana r., wearing causia; before, CN PLANCIVS; behind, AED CVR S C.
Rev/ Cretan ibex standing r., bow and quiver behind.

Ag, 18.5 mm, 4.00 g
Moneyer: Cn. Plancius.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 432/1 [dies o/r: 99/110] - Syd. 933 - RSC Plancia 1
ex-NAC, jul 2011 - art. #01062q00
dafnis
Galienus_luna.jpg
017 - Gallienus (253-268 AD), Antoninianus - RIC 609 F30 viewsObv: GALLIENVS AVG, Radiate and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: LVNA LVCIF, Diana walking right, holding torch, PXV in exe.
Minted in Antioch 267 AD.
pierre_p77
Antíoco I, Soter.jpg
02-02 - Antioco I Soter (281 - 261 A.C.)42 viewsDespués de la muerte de Alejandro Magno, sus generales se repartieron el imperio, siendo protagonistas durante veinte años de grandes luchas y peleas por obtener el poder. Fueron los llamados diádocos, (διάδοχοι) o sucesores. La lucha entre ellos para obtener el poder y la hegemonía duró casi cincuenta años, hasta el 281 adC en que murió el último de los diádocos, Seleuco I Nikátor. Después de estos antiguos generales gobernaron los llamados epígonos (επίγονοι), que significa los nacidos después.
Antíoco I Sóter (que quiere decir 'salvador') (324 adC-261 adC) era hijo del fundador de la dinastía Seléucida, Seleuco I Nicátor y de Apame, princesa sogdiana y nieta de Espitamenes. Se casó con su madrastra, Estratónice. Era uno de estos epígonos a que se refiere la Historia. Se le conoce sobre todo por su triunfo frente a los gálatas en Asia Menor (pueblo galo procedente de Europa que se asentó aquí en el siglo III adC), cuya invasión supo detener a tiempo. Los gálatas venían de una expedición contra los griegos y habían sido vencidos por ellos. Pero al amparo de esta invasión frustrada se fueron formando pequeños Estados independientes que se irán consolidando durante los reinados de los reyes sucesores de Antíoco. Fue enemigo de otro de los epígonos, Ptolomeo II de Egipto y en las luchas que mantuvo contra él Antíoco perdió grandes extensiones de terreno además de que el rey egipcio consiguiera también la hegemonía sobre el mar Mediterráneo. Murió en combate durante la guerra que mantuvo contra Eumenes I, gobernador del reino de Pérgamo en Asia Menor. A Antíoco I le sucedió su hijo Antíoco II Teos (el dios).(Wikipedia)
AE 17 mm 5.8 gr.

Anv: Busto con diadema viendo a derecha.
Rev: "BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY" - Zeus de pié de frente viendo a izquierda sosteniendo estrella ? en mano derecha extendida y cetro en izquierda.

Ceca: Antioquía en Orontes
Referencias:
mdelvalle
03-Gordian-III-RIC-127.jpg
03. Gordian III / RIC 127.16 viewsDenarius, 240 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG / Laureate bust of Gordian.
Reverse: DIANA LVCIFERA / Diana standing, holding lighted torch.
2.70 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #127; Sear #8673.
Callimachus
gordianant.JPG
034. Gordian III, 238-244AD. AR Antoninianus.31 viewsAR Antoninianus. Rome mint.
Obv. Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust seen from right or slightly back IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG.
Rev. Laetitia standing left LAETITIA AVG.

RSC 118, RIC 221
LordBest
Faustina-fil_AE-Dup_FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL_S-C_RIC-1405b-A-Pius-_C-207_Rome_145-146-AD_Q-001_5h_27mm_13,86ga-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!, #199 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!, #1
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head, band of pearls and necklace.
revers: No legend - Diana standing left, holding arrow and resting hand on bow, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 27mm, weight: 13,86g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 145-146 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1405b (Antoninus Pius), p-194, C-207,209,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Faustina-fil_AE-Dup_FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL_S-C_RIC-1405b-A-Pius-_C-207_Rome_145-146-AD_Q-002_6h_25-26mm_13,01ga-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!, #274 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!, #2
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head, band of pearls and necklace.
revers: No legend - Diana standing left, holding arrow and resting hand on bow, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 25-26mm, weight: 13,01g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 145-146 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1405b (Antoninus Pius), p-194, C-207,209,
Q-002
2 commentsquadrans
043_B_C_,_P_Accoleius_Lariscolus,_AR-den-Head-Diana-r_-P_ACCOLEIVS_–_LARISCOLVS_Triple-cult_Cr_486-1_Syd-1148_43-BC_Q-001_6h_17-18mm_3,74g-s.jpg
043 B.C., P.Accoleius Lariscolus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 486/1, Rome, Diana-Hecate-Selene faceing,129 views043 B.C., P.Accoleius Lariscolus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 486/1, Rome, Diana-Hecate-Selene facing,
avers: Bust of Diana Nemorensis right draped, behind P•ACCOLEIVS upwards, before LARISCOLVS downwards, border of dots.
reverse: Triple cult statue of Diana Nemorensis (Diana-Hecate-Selene) faceing, behind, cypress grove, border of dots.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5-17,5mm, weight: 3,74g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 43 B.C., ref: Crawford 486/1, Sydenham 1148, Sear Imperators 172, B. Accoleia 1.
Q-001
quadrans
RI 048j img.jpg
048 - Antoninus Pius denarius (as Caesar) - Hadrian RIC 05140 viewsObv: IMP T AEL CAES ANTONINVS, Bare head right
Rev: TRIB POT COS, Diana standing right, holding bow & arrow
Minted in Rome. January 1st to February 28th A.D. 138
Ref:– BMC (Hadrian) 1006. RIC (Hadrian) 447a. RSC 1058. 14 examples in RD.
maridvnvm
Rep_AR-Den_L_HOSTILIVS-SASERNA_Crawford-448-3_Syd-953_Rome_48-BC_Q-001_axis-6h_18mm_3,93g-s.jpg
048 B.C., L.Hostilius Saserna, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 448/3, L•HOSTILIVS SASERNA, Diana of Ephesus standing faceing,223 viewsL.Hostilius Saserna (48 B.C.), Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 448/3, L•HOSTILIVS SASERNA, Diana of Ephesus standing facing,
avers: Head of Gallia right, Gallic trumpet (carnyx) behind.
reverse: L•HOSTILIVS SASERNA, Diana of Ephesus standing facing, holding spear and stag by its antler.
exergue: - /-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,93g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 48 B.C., ref: Crawford 448/3, Sydenham 953, CRI 19, Hostilia 4,
Q-001
8 commentsquadrans
RIC_IV-I_373A_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_PIA_FELIX_AVG,_DIANA_LVCIFERA,_Roma,_RSC-32,_BMC-1,_Sear-7100,_211-217-AD,_Q-001,_0h,_18,0-20,0mm,_3,02gk-s.jpg
050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 373A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Denar, DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, #161 views050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 373A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Denar, DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, #1
avers: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, Draped bust right
reverse: DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, holding the long torch with both hands.
exergue:-/-//--, diameter: 18,0-20,0mm, weight: g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 211-217 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-373A (Caracalla), p-, RSC-32, (Caracalla), BMC-1, Sear-7100,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
RIC_IV-I_373A_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_PIA_FELIX_AVG,_DIANA_LVCIFERA,_Roma,_RSC-32,_BMC-1,_Sear-7100,_211-217-AD,_Q-002,_7h,_18,5-19,0mm,_3,57gk-s.jpg
050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 373A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Denar, DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, #260 views050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 373A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Denar, DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, #2
avers: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, Draped bust right
reverse: DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, holding the long torch with both hands.
exergue:-/-//--, diameter: 18,5-19,0mm, weight: 3,57g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 211-217 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-373A (Caracalla), p-, RSC-32, (Caracalla), BMC-1, Sear-7100,
Q-002
quadrans
RIC_IV-I_373A_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_PIA_FELIX_AVG,_DIANA_LVCIFERA,_Roma,_RSC-32,_BMC-1,_Sear-7100,_211-217-AD,_Q-003,1h,_18,0-18,5mm,_3,38g-s.jpg
050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 373A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Denar, DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, #360 views050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 373A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Denar, DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, #3
avers: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, Draped bust right
reverse: DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, holding the long torch with both hands.
exergue:-/-//--, diameter: 18,0-18,5mm, weight: 3,38g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 211-217 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-373A (Caracalla), p-, RSC-32, (Caracalla), BMC-1, Sear-7100,
Q-003
quadrans
normal_yyyy~2.jpg
0716 b (239)16 viewsAtelier : ROME
Droit : GALLIENVS AVG
Revers : DIANAE CONS AVG
3,92 mm ; 20mm ; 5h
Ségusiaves
normal_dianae~0.jpg
0727b (20)12 viewsAtelier : ROME
Droit : GALLIENVS AVG
Revers : DIANAE CONS AVG
3,16 g ; 20 mm ; 12h
Ségusiaves
normal_cerf~0.jpg
0744b (157)22 viewsAtelier : ROME
Droit : GALLIENVS AVG
Revers : DIANAE CONS AVG
2,05g ; 19mm ; 5h
Ségusiaves
015.JPG
0750b (194)16 viewsAtelier : ROME
Droit : GALLIENUS AVG
Revers : DIANAE CONS AVG
3,40 g ; 21mm ; 7h
Ségusiaves
33_bmp10.jpg
0750b (194)18 viewsAtelier : ROME
Droit : GALLIENUS AVG
Revers : DIANAE CONS AVG
3,15g ; 21mm ; 12 h
Ségusiaves
Republica_AR-Den_S-dot-C_A-dot-CXXIIII_TI-dot-CLAVD-dot-TI-dot-F_A-dot-N_Xx_Xx_Q-001_18mm_3_79g-s.jpg
079 B.C., Ti. Claudius Nero, Republic AR-Denarius Serratus, Crawford 383/1, Rome, Denarius serratus, TI.CLAUD TI.F AP.N TI., A. CXXIIII, Victory in biga right,83 viewsRepublic, TI.CLAUD TI.F AP.N TI. Claudius Nero, 79 BC. Claudia-5,
avers:- Bust of Diana r., draped, with bow and quiver over shoulder; before S dot C, Border of dots.
revers:- Victory in biga right, holding wreath in right hand and reins and palm-branch in left hand; below, control-letter "A" with dot on the right and numeral CXXIIII ; TI dot CLAVD dot TI dot F / AP dot N dot
exe: -/-// TI•CLAVD•TI•F / AP•N•, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,79g, axis: 4h,
mint: Rome, date 79 B.C., ref: Crawford 383/1, Sydenham 770a,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
081_B_C_,_A_Postumius_A_f_Sp_n_Albinus__AR-Den-_Serratus,_Bust_of_Diana_r_,_Bull,_Altar_Cr372-1,_Syd_745,_Postumia-7,Q-001,_2h,18,5-20mm,3,91g-s.jpg
081 B.C., A. Postumius A.f. Sp.n. Albinus., AR-Denarius-Serratus, Crawford 372/1, Rome, Togate figure, ox an altar, #1133 views081 B.C., A. Postumius A.f. Sp.n. Albinus., AR-Denarius-Serratus, Crawford 372/1, Rome, Togate figure, ox an altar, #1
avers:- Bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder, bucranium above.
revers:- A•POST•A•F-S•N•ALBIN, Togate figure standing left on a rock before a lighted altar, ox standing right about to be sacrificed.
exerg: -/-/--, diameter: 18,5-20,0mm, weight: 3,91g, axis: 2h,
mint: Rome, date: 81 B.C., ref: Crawford-372-1, Sydenham-745, Postumia-7,
Q-001
quadrans
92Hadrian__RIC825.jpg
0825 Hadrian AS Roma 134-38 AD Diana standing.21 viewsReference.
RIC 825d

Obv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P
laureate head right.

Rev. S-C
Diana standing left holding bow & arrows.

12.82 gr
26 mm
7h
okidoki
468Hadrian_RIC825.jpg
0825 Hadrian AS Roma 134-38 AD Diana standing.17 viewsReference.
RIC 825;

Obv.HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P
Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder.

Rev. S-C
Diana standing left holding bow & arrows.

10.41 gr
25 mm
6h

Note.
minor variant on my other Diana bow otherway.
okidoki
Aemilianus_AR-Ant_IMP-AEMILIANVS-PIVS-FEL-AVG_DIANAE-VICTRI_RIC-IV-III-2b-p195_C-10_253-AD_Rare_Q-001_0h_19,5-21,5mm_3,28g-s.jpg
085 Aemilian (253 A.D.), AR-Antoninianus, RIC IV-III 002b, Rome, DIANAE VICTRI, Diana standing left, Rare!87 views085 Aemilian (253 A.D.), AR-Antoninianus, RIC IV-III 002b, Rome, DIANAE VICTRI, Diana standing left, Rare!
avers:- IMP-AEMILIANVS-PIVS-FEL-AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- DIANAE-VICTRI, Diana standing left, holding bow and arrow.
exerg: , diameter: 19,5-21,5 mm, weight: 3,28 g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 253 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-III-2b, p195, C-10, Sear5-9831, Rare!,
Q-001
quadrans
A-19_Rep_AR-Den_C_Hosidius-C_f_Geta_Bust-Diana-r_-GETA-III_-VIR_Boar-r_-C_HOSIDI_C_F__Crawford-407-1_Syd-904_Rome_68-BC_Q-001_axis-11h_17mm_3,89g-s.jpg
086 B.C., C Hosidius Cf Geta, Rebublic AR-Denarius, Crawford-407-1, Rome, C HOSIDI C F, Wild boar,128 views086 B.C., C Hosidius Cf Geta, Rebublic AR-Denarius, Crawford-407-1, Rome, C HOSIDI C F, Wild boar,
avers:- GETA before, III VIR behind, diademed and draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver on shoulder.
revers: - C HOSIDI C F, Wild boar of Calydon right, pierced by spear and attacked by dog.
exerg: -/-//C HOSIDI C F, diameter: 17mm, weight: 3,89g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date:086 B.C., ref:Crawford-407-1, Syd-904, Hosidia 2,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
RI_089ad_img.jpg
087 - Gordian III, Denarius - RIC 12721 viewsObv:– IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed
Rev:– DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing right, holding long transverse torch.
Minted in Rome
Reference:– RIC 127. RSC 69.

Weight 2.54g. 19.83mm.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Gallienus_AE-Ant_IMP-GALLIENVS-AVG_DIANAE-CONS-AVG-(Doe)_E_RIC-_Göbl-728z_Rome_253-268-AD_Q-001_0h_19-20mm_3,15g-s.jpg
090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 176, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//E, DIANAE CONS AVG, Doe right,111 views090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 176, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//E, DIANAE CONS AVG, Doe right,
avers:- IMP-GALLIENVS-AVG, Radiate head right.
revers:- DIANAE-CONS-AVG, Doe standing right, head turned left over shoulder.
exergo:-/-//E, diameter: 19-20mm, weight: 3,15g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 260-268 A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-176, p-, Sear 10199 var. RSC 154.
Q-001
quadrans
Gallienus_AE-Ant_GALLIENVS-AVG_DIANAE-CONS-AVG_XI_RIC-179_C-_Rome_253-268-AD__Q-001_1h_18,5-21mm_2,83g-s.jpg
090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 179, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//XI, DIANAE CONS AVG, Gazelle walking right,141 views090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, Gobl 747b, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//XI, DIANAE CONS AVG, Gazelle walking right,
avers:- GALLIENVS-AVG, radiate head right.
revers:- DIANAE-CONS-AVG, Gazelle walking right, officina mark XI below.
exergo: -/-//XI, diameter: 18-20,5mm, weight: 2,56g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 267-268 A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-179, p-146, Gobl (747b) and Cunetio (1401),
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Gallienus_AE-Ant_GALLIENVS-AVG_DIANAE-CONS-AVG_XII_RIC-V-I-181,_Rome_AD__Q-001_0h_15,5-18,5mm_1,62g-s.jpg
090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 181, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//XII, DIANAE CONS AVG, Gazelle walking left,64 views090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 181, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//XII, DIANAE CONS AVG, Gazelle walking left,
avers:- GALLIENVS-AVG, Radiate head right.
revers:- DIANAE-CONS-AVG, Gazelle walking left.
exergo: -/-//XII, diameter: 15,5-18,5mm, weight: 1,62g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 267-268 A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-181, Goebl 0750u; Sear --
Q-001
quadrans
Gallienus_AE-Ant_GALLIENVS-AVG_DIANAE-CONS-AVG_Gamma_RIC-181var_C-_Rome_253-268-AD__Q-001_19-20mm_2,84g-s.jpg
090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 181var., Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//Γ, DIANAE CONS AVG, Antelope left, #1150 views090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 181var., Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//Γ, DIANAE CONS AVG, Antelope left, #1
avers:- GALLIENVS AVG, Radiate head right.
revers:- DIANAE CONS AVG, Antelope walking left, right legs forwards.
exergo: -/-//Γ (=3). (officina mark), diameter: 19-20mm, weight: 2,84g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 267-268 A.D., ref: RIC V-I 181var., p-146, Göbl 0716b,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Gallienus_AE-Ant_GALLIENVS-AVG_DIANAE-CONS-AVG_Gamma_RIC-181var_C-_Rome_253-268-AD__Q-002_7h_20mm_2,58g-s.jpg
090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 181var., Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//Γ, DIANAE CONS AVG, Antelope left, #2139 views090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 181var., Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//Γ, DIANAE CONS AVG, Antelope left, #2
avers:- GALLIENVS AVG, Radiate head right.
revers:- DIANAE CONS AVG, Antelope walking left, right legs forwards. Γ in exergo.
exergo: -/-//Γ (=3). (officina mark), diameter: 20mm, weight: 2,58g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 267-268 A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-181var., p-146, Göbl 0716b,
Q-002
quadrans
Gallienus_AE-Ant_GALLIENVS-AVG_DIANAE-CONS-AVG_Gamma_RIC-181var_C-_Rome_253-268-AD__Q-0yx_7h_18-20,5mm_2,56g-s.jpg
090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 207, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//ς, IOVI CONS AVG, Goat right, #3141 views090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 207, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//ς, IOVI CONS AVG, Goat right, #3
avers:- GALLIENVS AVG, Radiate head right.
revers:-IOVI CONS AVG, Goat standing or walking right,
exergo:-/-//ς (=). (officina mark), diameter: 18-20,5mm, weight: 2,56g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 260-268 A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-207, p-, RSC-341, Sear(2005)Vol.III.-10236, Göbl-0731b,
Q-003
quadrans
Clodius_Den_-_Crawford_494_23_-_sm2.jpg
1) The Caesarians: Clodius58 viewsP. Clodius M.f. Turrinus
42 B.C. AR denarius (19.4 mm, 3.51 g, 2 h). Rome.
Laureate head of Apollo right; lyre behind / ·M·F·, P·CLODIVS, Diana Lucifera standing right, holding two long torches.
Crawford 494/23; CRI 184; Sydenham 1117; RSC 15. gFine.
Ex Agora Auctions #1 - Nov 2013
3 commentsSosius
Hostilius_Saserna_Den_2.jpg
1) The Caesarians: L. Hostilius Saserna AR denarius28 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC
L. Hostilius Saserna
AR denarius (20mm, 3.79 g, 12h). 48 BC

Head of Gallia r., hair in disarray; carnyx (Gallic trumpet) behind / L. HOSTILIVS [S]ASERNA, Diana (Artemis) of Ephesus standing facing, holding spear and stag by its antler.

Crawford 448/3. CRI 19. RSC Hostilia 4. Obverse flan flaw, otherwise ~EF

Ex Heritage
RM0028
1 commentsSosius
RI_107ah_img.jpg
107 - Gallienus - RIC 18135 viewsObv:- GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right
Rev:- DIANAE CONS AVG, gazelle walking left.
Minted in Rome. //XII
Refence:- RIC 181
maridvnvm
RI_107ad_img.jpg
107 - Gallienus - RIC 60916 viewsAntoninianus
Obv:– GALLIENVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– LVNA LVCIF, Diana walking right holding torch
Minted in Asia. (PXV in exe)
Reference:– Göbl 1665i. RIC 609.
maridvnvm
rjb_gallienus78_08_05.jpg
114616 viewsAntoninianus
Milan
Issue 4
DIANA FELIX
G 1146
mauseus
rjb_gor127_01_07.jpg
12718 viewsDenarius
Rome mint
DIANA LVCIFERA
RIC 127
mauseus
0010-068np_noir.jpg
1296 - C. Postumius, Denarius126 viewsRome mint, 74 BC
Bust of Diana right, bow and quiver above shoulder
Hound running right, C POSTVMI and TA (ligate) at exergue
4.0 gr
Ref : RCV # 330, RSC, Postumia # 9
The only coin here belonging to my wife, because of the greyhound she's had for almost two decades
5 commentsPotator II
14-Gordian-III-RIC-116.jpg
13. Gordian III / RIC 116.24 viewsDenarius, 240 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG / Laureate bust of Gordian.
Reverse: VIRTVTI AVGVSTI / Hercules standing, resting right hand on hip and left hand club set on rock; lion-skin beside club.
3.58 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #116; Sear #8684.

The chronology of the denarii coinage of Gordian III has been poorly understood because Roman Imperial Coinage (RIC) has it mixed up in its listings. For example, it will tell you that 5 denarii (Diana, Pietas, Salus, Securitas, and Venus) were issued in the summer of 241 to commemorate the marriage of Gordian and Tranquillina. Recent thinking tells another entirely different story. The following summary is based on a posting by Curtis Clay, November 25, 2011, on the Forum Ancient Coins Classical Numismatics Discussion Board.
Although antoniniani were issued for a while under Caracalla and Elagabalus, the denarius was the standard silver denomination throughout the reigns of Severus Alexander, Maximinus Thrax, and into the first part of the joint reign of Balbinus & Pupienus. (This, by the way, is when the PIETAS AVGG denarius of Gordian as Caesar was issued.) Sometime during the short reign of Balbinus & Pupienus, the antoninianus supplanted the denarius as the standard silver denomination. When Gordian III became emperor (July 238), his administration continued to follow the then current practice of issuing only antoniniani.

Early in 240, Gordian apparently decided to revert back to the traditional coinage of the Empire and began to issue only denarii. The denarii issued at this time were the following:

P M TR P III COS P P / Horseman
DIANA LVCIFERA
PIETAS AVGVSTI
SALVS AVGVSTI
SECVRITAS PVBLICA
VENVS VICTRIX

No antoniniani exist with these reverse types.

The next issue of denarii was issued in the summer of 240 after Gordian became COS II, and consists of these types:

P M TR P III COS II P P / Emperor standing
P M TR P III COS II P P / Apollo seated
AETERNITATI AVG
IOVIS STATOR
LAETITIA AVG N
VIRTVTI AVGVSTI

Within a short time, however, it was decided to go back to having the antoninianus as the standard silver denomination. Antoniniani were issued again, at first with the same reverse types as the second issue of denarii. That is why these reverse types exist on denarii and antoniniani even though they were not issued at the same time.

So the period the mint issued denarii rather than antoniniani as the standard silver denomination lasted from about March through August, 240. This was the last time denarii were issued for general circulation. The antoninianus lasted until Diocletian’s coinage reform of 295, after which Roman coinage was so vastly different that there was no question of returning to the denarius.

The 13 denarii of Gordian III are presented in this album in this order:
Gordian III as Caesar denarius - 1 coin.
First issue of denarii - 6 coins.
Second issue of denarii - 6 coins.
Callimachus
931_P_Hadrian_RPC1329.jpg
1329 Hadrian, Cistophorus IONIA Ephesus mint, Ephesian Artemis33 viewsReference
RPC III, 1329; Metcalf 6; RIC II 525

Obv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P
Bust draped r. seen from behind

Rev. DIANA EPHESIA
Cult image of Ephesian Artemis flanked by stags

10.02 gr
27 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki
rjb_pius_10_07.jpg
13819 viewsAntoninus Pius 138-61 AD
AR denarius
Obv "IMP T AEL CAES HADRI ANTONINVS"
Bare head right
Rev "AVG PIVS PM TRP COS DES II"
Diana standing right holding bow and arrow
Rome mint
RIC 7
mauseus
258Hadrian_RIC147.jpg
147 Hadrian Denarius Roma 125-28 AD Diana standing27 viewsReference.
Strack 153; RIC 147d; C. 315; BMC 334

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS.
Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder

Rev. COS III
Diana standing right, with Bow and Arrow.

2.74 gr
19 mm
okidoki
commodus den01-.jpg
177-192 AD - COMMODUS AR denarius - struck 191 AD39 viewsobv: M COMM ANT P FEL AVG BRIT PP
rev: CONC COM PM TRP XVI COSVI (Concordia standing left, holding patera & scepter)
ref: RIC III 219, C.45 (30frcs)
2.41gms, 17mm
Rare

History: In 190 AD Commodus named Rome after himself, Colonia Commodiana, adding the prenomina of LUCIA ANTONINIANA. This coin is belong to the group of the loyalty of the cohorts, Concordia Commodi Augusti.
berserker
1795_GLAMORGAN_HALF-PENNY_TOKEN.JPG
1795 AE Halfpenny, Glamorgan, South Wales.64 viewsObverse: JESTYN • AP • GWRGAN • TYWYSOG • MORGANWG • 1091•. Crowned and robed bust of Jestyn ap Gwrgan facing left, wearing a small shield bearing the St George's cross suspended on a chain round his neck.
Reverse: Y • BRENHIN • AR • GYFRAITH •. Britannia facing left, seated on a globe, her right hand pointing to a ship, her left supporting a shield and a spear; behind her a cippus with a crown on top and a laurel branch leaning against it; in exergue, 1795.
Edge: "GLAMORGAN HALFPENNY" in raised letters, followed by three leaves.
Diameter: 29mm
Dalton & Hamer:3b (Glamorganshire)

This token is thought to have been engraved and manufactured by John Stubbs Jordan, a Birmingham ironfounder for his father, William Jordan, who had returned to South Wales, possibly to Merthyr Tydfil. The Jordens were of Welsh descent and had come to Staffordshire earlier in the century. The father, William Jorden, a victualler from Weaman Street, Birmingham, retired and moved back to South Wales in the early 1780s and in 1794 his son, John Stubbs Jorden, who had remained back in Birmingham, made this Welsh token for his father as a private piece.
This is the only eighteenth century token with Welsh legends.

Jestyn ap Gwrgan, or Gwrgant, was the last Prince and Lord of Glamorgan of British blood. He was of the royal house of Morganwg, which had a lineage stretching back over five centuries to Tewdrig (c.550-584 C.E.). The members of this royal house had links to the other royal houses of Wales through marriage, and were descendants of the celebrated Rhodri Mawr. Jestyn ap Gwrgan's base is believed to have been at Dinas Powis, south of Cardiff. He probably ruled Glamorgan for a little less than a decade around 1081-1090 C.E.
The popular version of historical events is that Jestyn, following a dispute with his rival Einion ap Collwyn, invited the Norman ruler Robert Fitzhamon, lord of Gloucester, and his twelve knights into the region to settle the matter. Once invited in, the Normans refused to leave, Jestyn was deposed and Fitzhamon, having established a lordship based in Cardiff, subsequently conquered the lowlands of Glamorgan, which was parcelled out to his followers. The undesirable mountainous parts of Glamorgan Fitzhamon left in Welsh control. However this story, dating from at least the 15th century, where it touches known historical facts, is demonstrably wrong.
Nowadays there are many people living in South Wales with the surname of Williams who claim to be descended from Jestyn ap Gwrgan. This is not impossible because Jestyn ap Gwrgan had a large family. Notable people who may have been descended from Jestyn ap Gwrgan are the Tudor Monarchs of England, Oliver Cromwell (whose real surname was Williams) and also, being of Welsh descent, Winston Churchill, Princess Diana and several Presidents of The United States of America.
1 comments*Alex
LHostiliusSasDenGallia.jpg
1ba Caesar's Siege of Massilia11 viewsL Hostilivs Saserna, moneyer
49-44 BC

Denarius, 48 BC

Head of Gallia, right, Gaulish trumpet behind
HOSTILIVS SASTERNA, Diana of Ephesus with stag

Seaby, Hostilia 4

This piece appears to refer to Julius Caesar's siege of Massilia (Marseille) during the civil war in 49 BC.

In The Civil Wars, Julius Caesar recorded: While this treaty was going forward, Domitius arrived at Massilia with his fleet, and was received into the city, and made governor of it. The chief management of the war was intrusted to him. At his command they send the fleet to all parts; they seize all the merchantmen they could meet with, and carry them into the harbor; they apply the nails, timber, and rigging, with which they were furnished to rig and refit their other vessels. They lay up in the public stores, all the corn that was found in the ships, and reserve the rest of their lading and convoy for the siege of the town, should such an event take place. Provoked at such ill treatment, Caesar led three legions against Massilia, and resolved to provide turrets, and vineae to assault the town, and to build twelve ships at Arelas, which being completed and rigged in thirty days (from the time the timber was cut down), and being brought to Massilia, he put under the command of Decimus Brutus; and left Caius Trebonius his lieutenant, to invest the city.
Blindado
coins51.JPG
201a. JULIA DOMNA30 viewsLuna

In Greek mythology, Selene was an ancient lunar deity and the daughter of the titans Hyperion and Theia. She was identified with the Roman moon goddess, Luna.

Like most moon deities, Selene plays a fairly large role in her pantheon. However, Selene was eventually largely supplanted by Artemis, and Luna by Diana. In the collection known as the Homeric hymns, there is a Hymn to Selene (xxxii), paired with the hymn to Helios. Selene is described in Apollodorus 1.2.2; Hesiod's Theogony 371; Nonnius 48.581; Pausanias 5.1.4; and Strabo 14.1.6, among others.

The Roman goddess of the moon, Luna, had a temple on the Aventine Hill. It was built in the 6th century BC, but was destroyed in the Great Fire of Rome during Nero's reign. There was also a temple dedicated to Luna Noctiluca ("Luna that shines by night") on the Palatine Hill. There were festivals in honor of Luna on March 31, August 24 and August 28

JULIA DOMNA, - 217 AD. Antoninianus, Rome, 215 - 217 AD Bust, no crescent, right / Luna Lucifera in biga left. Rare. RIC 379.
1 commentsecoli
Craw_494_23_Denario_P_CLODIUS_TURRINUS.jpg
24-01 - P. CLODIUS M.f. TURRINUS (42 A.C.)21 viewsAR Denarius 20 mm 3.7 gr

Anv: Busto de joven Apolo laureado viendo a derecha, Lira detrás.
Rev: Diana Lucífera estante a derecha, portando largas antorchas en sus manos y arco y carcaj en su hombro - "M·F" delante, "P·CLODIVS" detrás.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #492 Pag.163 - Craw RRC #494/23 - Syd CRR #1117 - BMCRR #4290 - Sear CRI #184 - RSC Vol.1 Claudia 15 Pag.32 - Babelon I #15 Pag.356 - Catalle 2001 #793
mdelvalle
rjb_post_8_01_05.jpg
243029 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
DIANAE LVCIFERAE
Diana standing right holding torch
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 4
Cunetio 2430
mauseus
rjb_aemil3_02_06.jpg
25324 viewsAemilian 253 AD
AR antoninianus
Obv "IMP AEMILIANVS PIVS FEL AVG"
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "DIANAE VICTRI"
Diana standing left
Rome mint
RIC 2b
mauseus
rjb_2012_02_16.jpg
27015 viewsQuintillus 270 AD
AE antoninianus
Milan Mint
IMP QVINTILLVS AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
DIANA LVCIF
Diana walking right holding torch
-/-//P
RIC 49
mauseus
AS FAUSTINA DVM 28.jpg
32-16 - FAUSTINA MADRE (138 - 141 D.C.)35 viewsAE AS ó Dupondio 24 mm 8.5 gr.
Según cuál sea el material en que fué acuñada Cobre u oricalco (metal amarillo)

Anv: "DIVA FAVSTIN[A]" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "AVGVSTA - S C" - Aeternitas (La eternidad) o Diana (? Cohen)avanzando a izquierda, sosteniendo una antorcha corta con mano izquierda sobre su hombro y con la derecha sostiene su velo que vuela sobre y detrás de su cabeza.

Acuñada 141 - 161 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III #1183 Pag.168 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #4650 Pag.276 - BMCRE #1587 - Cohen Vol.II #77 Pag.419/420
mdelvalle
RIC_1183_AS_Faustina_I.jpg
32-16 - FAUSTINA MADRE (138 - 141 D.C.)10 viewsAE AS ó Dupondio 24 mm 8.5 gr.
Según cuál sea el material en que fué acuñada Cobre u oricalco (metal amarillo)

Anv: "DIVA FAVSTIN[A]" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "AVGVSTA - S C" - Aeternitas (La eternidad) o Diana (? Cohen) avanzando a izquierda, sosteniendo una antorcha corta con mano izquierda sobre su hombro y con la derecha sostiene su velo que vuela sobre y detrás de su cabeza.

Acuñada 141 - 161 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III #1183 Pag.168 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #4650 Pag.276 - BMCRE IV #1587 Pag.253 (Plate 38 #4) - Cohen Vol.II #77 Pag.419/420
mdelvalle
33009.jpg
33009 Gallienus/Antelope16 viewsGallienus, AE antoninianus, sole reign.
Obv:GALLIENVS AVG,
radiate head right.
Rev:DIANAE CONS AVG,
Antelope walking left.
Gamma in Exergue
Mint: Rome 19.3mm 2.4g
Cunetio hoard 1344; Minster hoard 69; Bassaleg Hoard 175;
Appleshaw hoard 82; Lavilledieu hoard 61 to 63. RIC V-1,
Rome 181 var (officina letter).
Blayne W
AS o Dupondio FAUSTINA II RIC 1405a.jpg
34-12 - FAUSTINA HIJA (147 - 176 D.C.)46 viewsAE Dupondio 25 mm 12.6 gr.
Hija de Antonino Pio y Faustina, esposa de Marco Aurelio

Anv: "FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL" - Busto con rodete viendo a derecha.
Rev: "S C" - Diana de pié a izquierda portando una flecha en la mano derecha y descansando su cuerpo sobre la izquierda apoyada sobre su arco.

Acuñada 154 - 156 D.C.
Emisión realizada por su padre Antonino Pio
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Antonino Pio) #1405a Pag.194 - Sear RCTV Vol.II (Antonino Pio) #4733 Pag.286 - BMCRE #2191 - Cohen Vol.III #207 Pag.153 - DVM #52a Pag.154
mdelvalle
RIC_1405a_Dupondio_Faustina_Jr.jpg
34-12 - FAUSTINA HIJA (147 - 176 D.C.)10 viewsAE Dupondio 25 mm 12.6 gr.
Hija de Antonino Pio y Faustina, esposa de Marco Aurelio

Anv: "FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL" - Busto con rodete viendo a derecha.
Rev: "S C" - Diana de pié a izquierda portando una flecha en la mano derecha y descansando su cuerpo sobre la izquierda apoyada sobre su arco.

Acuñada 154 - 156 D.C.
Emisión realizada por su padre Antonino Pio
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Antonino Pio) #1405a Pag.194 - Sear RCTV Vol.II (Antonino Pio) #4733 Pag.286 - BMCRE IV #2191 Pag.380 - Cohen Vol.III #207 Pag.153 - DVM #52a Pag.154
mdelvalle
rjb_albin2_03_08.jpg
37229 viewsA Postumius AF SN Albinus c.81 BC
AR denarius
Obv Bust of Diana right, draped, with bow and quiver over shoulder; above bucranium
Rev "A POST A F S N ALBIN"
Rock on which stands a lighted altar; to the left a bull stands right, on the right a figure stands left
Rome mint
Crawford 372
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_repub1_10_08.jpg
38331 viewsTI CLAUD TI.F AP.N c.79 BC
AR denarius
Obv "SC"
Bust of Diana right with bow and quiver over shoulder
Rev "TI CLAVD TI F AP N"
Victory in biga right holding palm branch, control mark "A III" below
Rome mint
Crawford 383
1 commentsmauseus
RepCoin2SpainAuctionBlack.jpg
383/1 TI.CLAVD TI.F AP.N.12 viewsTi. Claudius Ti.f. Ap. N. AR Denarius Serrate. Rome mint. 79 BC. Obv: Bust of Diana right, bow and quiver onshoulder, SC before. Rev: Victory in biga right, carrying wreath and long palm, CXIII below, TI CLAVD TI F/AP N in two lines in exergue.
Syd 770; Claudia 5; Crawford 383/1
Paddy
DoggiePanoramaBlack.jpg
394/1a C. Postumius32 viewsC. Postumius. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 74 BC. Obv: Bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder. Rev: Hound running right, spear below, C POSTVMI and TA monogram in exergue.
Syd 785; Postumia 9; Crawford 394/1a.

Ex: Romadrome
Paddy
394-1b_-_Postumia.jpg
394/1b. Postumia - denarius (74 BC)21 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 74 BC)
O/ Bust of Diana right, draped, with bow and quiver over shoulder.
R/ Hound running right; spear below; C POSTVMI in exergue.
3.96g; 17mm
Crawford 394/1b (192 obverse dies/213 reverse dies, both varieties)
- ex Lockdales 145, lot 1414.

* Gaius Postumius At. or Ta. (Albinus Atilianus?):

This variant without the monogram in exergue is very rare; only three reverse dies seem to exist.

The moneyer belonged to the great patrician gens Postumia, but his family is much more difficult to ascertain. The patrician Postumii had few different branches and only one had survived by the 1st century: the Albini. There were also plebeian Postumii.

His obverse with Diana reproduces those of Aulus Postumius S.f. S.n. Albinus (RRC 335/9), and his probable son Postumius A.f. S.n. Albinus (RRC 372/1), thus implying that he was a member of the patrician family. However, the Albini never used the praenomen Gaius. It is nonetheless possible that our moneyer was adopted into the gens, as it occurred with Decimus Junius Brutus (RRC 450), adopted by an Aulus Albinus. The Postumii seem to have had difficulties producing male heirs; they indeed had 9 consulships between 186 and 99 BC, but very few magistrates bore that name in the 1st century. The disaster of the campaign against Jugurtha by the brothers Spurius and Aulus Postumius Albinus might have hit the gens hard; Aulus was also murdered during the Social War (Livy, Periochae, 75).

The monogram in exergue could therefore be deciphered as AT for the plebeian gens Atilia -- the possible family of Gaius Albinus before his adoption. Another moneyer, Lucius Atilius Nomentanus, likewise ligatured the first two letters of his name on his denarii in 141 (RRC 225/1). This theory would explain both the unusual praenomen for the gens and the monogram. His adoptive father could also be one of the two moneyer mentioned above.

Crawford links the moneyer with a Gnaeus Postumius who accused Lucius Licinius Murena, the consul elect for 62, of bribery in the famous Pro Murena by Cicero (56-58), who also says that Postumius was a (unsuccessful) candidate to the praetorship that year. The case was won by Cicero and no doubt that accusing a Consul of bribery did not help his career and the fate of the Albini, as they disappeared from history after this.
1 commentsJoss
RIC_548__Denario_Forrado_Julia_Domna.jpg
47-09 - JULIA DOMNA (194 - 217 D.C.)8 viewsAE Limes denario 19 mm 3.6 gr.
Esposa de Septimio Severo y madre de Geta y Caracalla.

Anv: "IVLIA AVGVSTA" - Busto sin diadema y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "DIANA LVCIFERA" - Diana estante de frente viendo a izq., portando gran antorcha con ambas manos..

Acuñada 196 D.C.
Ceca: Laodicea ad Mare (Siria)

Referencias: RIC IVa #638 P.178 (Nota pie de página 373A P.272, Pl.13 #16), BMCRE V #598 P.277 (Pl.42 #18), Sear RCV II # 6578 P.493, Cohen IV #33 P.108, RSC III #33 P.53, DVM #15 P.191, Salgado II/1 #4226.b Pag.116
mdelvalle
ClodiusPanorama.jpg
494/23 P Clodius19 viewsP Clodius. AR Denarius. 42 BC. Rev: Laureate head of Apollo right, lyre behind. Obv: Diana standing facing, with bow and quiver over shoulder, holding lighted torch in each hand, P CLODIVS right, MF on left.
Syd 1117; Claudia 15; Crawford 494/23.
Paddy
POSTUME-dianaeluciferae-sanscarquois-700px.jpg
4e Emission - 1er Phase - (266) - Trèves - DIANAE LVCIFERAE9 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
DIANAE LVCIFERAE
imitation de la variante sans carquois et sans couronne
PYL
postume-dianaeluciferae.jpg
4e Emission - 1er Phase - (266) - Trèves - DIANAE LVCIFERAE8 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
DIANAE LVCIFERAE
variante avec carquois et avec couronne
EG 52
CUNETIO 2430
RIC 299
ELMER 396
AGK 11
de Witte 27
Cohen 33
PYL
postume-dinaeluciferae_6.JPG
4e Emission - 1er Phase - (266) - Trèves - DIANAE LVCIFERAE10 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
DIANAE LVCIFERAE
variante avec carquois et avec couronne
EG 52
CUNETIO 2430
RIC 299
ELMER 396
AGK 11
de Witte 27
Cohen 33
PYL
postume-dianaelucifere.JPG
4e Emission - 1er Phase - (266) - Trèves - DIANAE LVCIFERAE14 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
DIANAE LVCIFERAE
variante avec une biche à ses pieds
EG 56
CUNETIO 2431
RIC 299
ELMER 397
AGK 12
de Witte 28
Cohen 34
PYL
postume-dianaluciferae_-_sans_carquois_chignon_couronne.JPG
4e Emission - 1er Phase - (266) - Trèves - DIANAE LVCIFERAE9 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
DIANAE LVCIFERAE
variante sans carquois et sans couronne
EG 55
CUNETIO 2430
RIC 299
ELMER 396
AGK 11
de Witte 27
Cohen 33
PYL
lumiere_rasante.JPG
4e Emission - 1er Phase - (266) - Trèves - DIANAE LVCIFERE11 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
DIANAE LVCIFERE
variante Lucifere au lieu de luciferae
EG 56
CUNETIO 2431
RIC 299
ELMER 397
AGK 12
de Witte 28
Cohen 34
PYL
Postume_-_Dianae_Lucifere.jpg
4e Emission - 1er Phase - (266) - Trèves - DIANAE LVCIFERE9 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
DIANAE LVCIFERE
variante Lucifere au lieu de luciferae
EG 56
CUNETIO 2431
RIC 299
ELMER 397
AGK 12
de Witte 28
Cohen 34
PYL
postume-dianaereduci.jpg
4e Emission - 1er Phase - (266) - Trèves - DIANAE REDVCI29 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
DIANAE REDVCI
EG 58
CUNETIO 2429
RIC 300
ELMER 398
AGK 13
de Witte 29
Cohen 35
1 commentsPYL
Diadumenian-AE28-Nicop.jpg
63. Diadumenian.31 viewsAE 28, 217 - 218 AD, Nicopolis ad Istrum.
Obverse: M OΠEΛ ΔIAΔOΥMENIANOC K / bust of Diadumenian.
Reverse: ΥΠ CTA ΛONΓINOΥ NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠΡOC ICTΡΩ /Artemis standing, holding bow and drawing arrow from quiver; dog at her feet.
14.28 gm, 28 mm.

The inscription on the reverse indicates that Statilius Longinus was magistrate in Nicopolis when this coin was issued.
The reverse type is interesting: Artemis (Diana) is the deity of the hunt. In this role she is equipped with a bow and arrows, and is often accompanied by a hound dog.
1 commentsCallimachus
239Hadrian__RIC631_.jpg
631 Hadrian Sestertius, Roma 125-28 AD Diana33 viewsReference.
RIC 631b; C 316.

Obv. HADRIANVS - AVGVSTVS
laureate bust r., drapery on l. shoulder

Rev. COS III
Diana standing right, holding arrow and Bow; in field, S - C

22,55 gr
32 mm
6h
okidoki
Diana.jpg
74 BC* C POSTVMIVS67 viewsDraped bust of Diana right, wearing hair tied into knot; bow and quiver over shoulder

Hunting dog running right, spear below
C. POSTVMI / TA in exergue

Rome 74 BC

3.15g

Sear 330
1 commentsJay GT4
471Hadrian_RIC777.jpg
777 Hadrian Sestertius Roma 134-38 AD Diana standing26 viewsReference.
RIC 777d; C. 1364; BMC 1546.

Obv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P
Laureate head right

Rev. S-C in feild
Diana, draped, standing, left, holding arrow in right hand and in left holding bow

26.12 gr
31 mm
okidoki
Tranquillina-AE23-Marcian.jpg
80. Tranquillina.14 viewsAE 23, Marcianopolis, Moesia.
Obverse: TPANKVΛΛEINA CEB/ Diademed bust of Tranquillina.
Reverse: MAPKIANOPOΛEITΩN / Artemis standing; drawing arrow from quiver and holding bow; hound at her feet. Γ at left.
6.33 gm., 23 mm.

The reverse type is interesting: Artemis (Diana) is the deity of the hunt. In this role she is equipped with a bow and arrows, and is often accompanied by a hound dog.
The Γ in the left field of the reverse is actually a unit of value: 3 assarion.
Callimachus
domitian AE19~0.jpg
81-96 AD - DOMITIAN AE19 Byzantion - struck 81-96 AD47 viewsobv: DOMITIANOY KAICAPOC (laureate head left)
rev: [BYZ]ANTIWN (crescent moon and star)
ref: Moushmov3274
mint: Byzantion (Thrace)
3.16gms, 19mm
Very rare

The crescent and star is one of the oldest symbol, it appears on petroglyphs and steles of the first civilization in Sumer. This symbol was adopted by the Greeks and was associated with many of their gods. Nevertheless, Byzantium was the first governing state to use the crescent moon as its national symbol. According to some reports, they chose it in honor of the goddess Diana.
berserker
Antoniniano Galieno RIC 181.jpg
82-04 - GALIENO (253 - 268 D.C.)31 viewsBillon Antoniniano 19 x 17 mm 2.3 gr.

Anv: "GALLIENVS AVG" - Cabeza radiada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "DIANAE CONS AVG" - Antílope/Gasela caminando hacia la derecha. "XI" en exergo.
Este tipo fué acuñado en 267/268 D.C. para conmemorar votos a Diana invocando su protección contra la revuelta de Aureolo.

Acuñada 267 - 268 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias:
Göbl #747b - RIC Vol.V Parte I #181 Pag.144 - Sear RCTV (1988) #2952 - Cohen Vol.V #162 Pag.363/4 - DVM #49-6 Pag.245 - RSC Vol.IV #162 Pag.68
mdelvalle
Antoniniano_Galieno_RIC_179.jpg
82-07 - GALIENO (253 - 268 D.C.)66 viewsBillon Antoniniano 19 x 21 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "GALLIENVS AVG" - Cabeza radiada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "DIAN[AE CO]NS AVG" – Ciervo caminando hacia la derecha. "X" en exergo.
Este tipo fué acuñado en 267/268 D.C. para conmemorar votos a Diana invocando su protección contra la revuelta de Aureolo.

Acuñada 267 - 268 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias:
RIC Vol.V Parte I #179 Pag.146 - Sear RCTV (1988) #2951 - Cohen Vol.V #157 Pag.362 - DVM #49/3 Pag.245 - RSC Vol.IV #157 Pag.67 - Cunieto #1400 (50 ex) - Göbl 745b (69 ex)
mdelvalle
Göbl_745b_Antoniniano_Galieno.jpg
82-07 - GALIENO (253 - 268 D.C.)14 viewsAE Antoniniano 19 x 21 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "GALLIENVS AVG" - Cabeza radiada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "DIAN[AE CO]NS AVG" – Ciervo caminando hacia la derecha. "X" en exergo.
Este tipo fué acuñado en 267/268 D.C. para conmemorar votos a Diana invocando su protección contra la revuelta de Aureolo.

Acuñada 267 - 268 D.C.
Ceca: 10mo. Taller de Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte I #179 Pag.146 - Sear RCTV III #10201 Pag.289 - Sear RCTV (1988) #2951 - Cohen Vol.V #157 Pag.362 - DVM #49/3 Pag.245 - RSC Vol.IV #157 Pag.67 - Cunieto #1400 (50 ex) - Göbl 745b (69 ex) - Hunter #130
mdelvalle
Göbl_744b_Antoniniano_Galieno.jpg
82-07a - GALIENO (253 - 268 D.C.)13 viewsAE Antoniniano 19 x 21 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "GALLIENVS AVG" - Cabeza radiada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[DIANA[E CONS A[VG]" – Ciervo caminando hacia la izquierda. "??" en exergo.
Este tipo fué acuñado en 267/268 D.C. para conmemorar votos a Diana invocando su protección contra la revuelta de Aureolo.

Acuñada 267 - 268 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte I #179 Pag.146 - Sear RCTV III #10201 Pag.289 - Sear RCTV (1988) #2951 - Cohen Vol.V #158 Pag.362 - DVM #49/3 var. Pag.245 - RSC Vol.IV #158 Pag.67 - Göbl 744b - Hunter #130
mdelvalle
Göbl_747b_Antoniniano_Galieno.jpg
82-09 - GALIENO (253 - 268 D.C.)11 viewsAE Antoniniano 19 x 17 mm 2.3 gr.

Anv: "GALLIENVS AVG" - Cabeza radiada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "DIANAE CONS AVG" - Antílope/Gasela caminando hacia la derecha. "XI" en exergo.
Este tipo fué acuñado en 267/268 D.C. para conmemorar votos a Diana invocando su protección contra la revuelta de Aureolo.

Acuñada 267 - 268 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: Göbl #747b - RIC Vol.V Parte I #181 Pag.144 - Sear RCTV III #10200 Pag.Sear RCTV (1988) #2952 - Cohen Vol.V #162 Pag.363/4 - DVM #49/6 Pag.245 - RSC Vol.IV #162 Pag.68 - Hunter #135
mdelvalle
Antoniniano_Galieno_RIC_609.jpg
82-19 - GALIENO (253 - 268 D.C.)57 viewsBillon Antoniniano 20 x 22 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "GALLIENVS AVG" - Busto radiado y vistiendo coraza, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "LVNA LVCIF" – Diana/Luna de pié a derecha con media luna sobre la cabeza, portando una larga antorcha oblicua con ambas manos. ”PXV” en exergo (Potestas XV = año 267 D.C.).

Acuñada: 267 D.C.
Ceca: Antioquía (Göbl) – Asia (RIC)
Rareza: C

Referencias:
RIC Vol.V Parte I #609 Pag.185 - Cohen Vol.V #599 Pag.397 (2f) - DVM #158 Pag.247 - RSC Vol.IV #599 Pag.82 - Göbl 1665k
mdelvalle
Göbl_1665k_Antoniniano_Galieno.jpg
82-28 - GALIENO (253 - 268 D.C.)17 viewsBillon Antoniniano 20 x 22 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "GALLIENVS AVG" - Busto radiado y vistiendo coraza, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "LVNA LVCIF" – Diana/Luna de pié a derecha con media luna sobre la cabeza, portando una larga antorcha oblicua con ambas manos. ”PXV” en exergo (Potestas XV = año 267 D.C.).

Acuñada: 267 D.C.
Ceca: Antioquía (Göbl) – Asia (RIC)
Rareza: C

Referencias:
RIC Vol.V Parte I #609 Pag.185 - Cohen Vol.V #599 Pag.397 (2f) - Sear RCTV III #10284 Pag.295 - DVM #158 Pag.247 - RSC Vol.IV #599 Pag.82 - Göbl 1665k - Hunter #200
mdelvalle
Gallienus_32.jpg
A34 viewsGallienus Antoninianus

Attribution: RIC 207k
Date: AD 267-268
Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG; radiate bust r.
Reverse: IOVICONS AVG; goat stg. l.; stigma in exergue
Size: 17 mm
Weight: 2.5 grams

Gallienus’ coinage is perhaps best know by the issuance of his Zoo series. Each coin type depicts a mythical or real animal on the reverse as a dedication to a specific Roman deity: Diana (doe, stag, antelope/gazelle), Apollo (centaur, gryphon), Sol (Pegasus/winged horse, bull), Jupiter (goat), Liber Pater (panther/tigress), Neptune (capricorn, hippocamp), Juno (doe/elk/capreolus), Mercury (hippocamp/criocamp), Hercules (lion, boar).

“The vast majority of Zoo coins were produced at the mint of Rome, with a few rare examples coming from Siscia. Each officina produced a different coin within the series, with some producing a second, less common type also. Occasionally you'll find an animal with the "wrong" officina mark. These are fascinating, and the rarity leads us to believe that they represented mistakes, perhaps when a die engraver was transferred from one workshop to another. He gets the right animal, but the wrong officina. Or maybe one workshop was falling behind, so another was temporarily enlisted to help catch up on the quota?” – from Jim’s page on Coins of Gallienus' Zoo at http://www.ruark.org/coins/Zoo/#ZooLinks
Noah
Postumia1a_img.jpg
A Postumius AF SN Albinus, Denarius Serratus76 viewsObv:- Bust of Diana right, draped, with bow and quiver over shoulder; above bucranium
Rev:- A POST A F [S N ALBIN], Rock on which stands a lighted altar; to the left a bull stands right, on the right a figure stands left
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 81
Reference:– Crawford RRC 372/1; Sydenham 745; Postumia 7.

Weight 3.93g

Corrosion on right hand side of reverse obliterating part of legend.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
A_Postumius_Albinus~0.jpg
A. Postumius A.f. S.n. Albinus - AR serratus denarius9 views²Sardinia
¹Rome
¹²81 BC
draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder, bucranium above
togate figure standing left before flaming altar, holding sprinkler over sacrificial bull, all on stone platform
A·POST_·A·F__S·N·(AL)BIN
¹Crawford 372/1, SRCV I 296, Sydenham 745, RSC I Postumia 7
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,7g
ex Gitbud and Naumann

According story described by Livy: in Sabina a cattle of admirable size and beauty was born. Animal was sacrificed and his skull (bucranium) was placed in temple of Diana where it commemorate this wonder. The event was considered to be a prophetic sign that town whose citizen sacrifice the animal will rule. Before battle at Regillius Lake Roman citizen (Postumius' ancestor) took the cattle and sacrificed it in the temple of Diana on Aventine.
Johny SYSEL
A_Postumius.png
A. Postumius A.f. Sp.n. Albinus17 viewsRoman Republic AR serrate denarius 3.91 g, 20 mm
A. Postumius A.f. Sp.n. Albinus
Rome mint, 81 BC
Draped bust of Diana right, with bow and quiver over shoulder; bucranium above / Priest and bull with lighted altar between them
Rob D
postumiatoro~0.jpg
A. POSTUMIUS A.f. Sp.n. ALBINUS.131 viewsAR denarius. 81 BC. 3,92grs. Draped bust of Diana right, wearing single drop earring, hair drawn back and collected into knot, quiver and bow, terminating in stag’s head, over shoulder; bucranium above / Togate figure standing left on rock, holding aspergillum in right hand over head of ox, standing right, lighted altar between them. A • POST • A • F to left, S • N • ALBIN to right.
Crawford 372/1. RSC Postumia 7.
benito
postumiatoro~1.jpg
A. POSTUMIUS A.f. Sp.n. ALBINUS.161 viewsAR denarius. 81 BC. 3,92grs. Draped bust of Diana right, wearing single drop earring, hair drawn back and collected into knot, quiver and bow, terminating in stag’s head, over shoulder; bucranium above / Togate figure standing left on rock, holding aspergillum in right hand over head of ox, standing right, lighted altar between them. A • POST • A • F to left, S • N • ALBIN to right.
Crawford 372/1. RSC Postumia 7.

benito
L__Postumia_Albinus~0.JPG
A. Postumius A.f. Sp.n. – Postumia-763 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC A. Postumius A.f. Sp.n. Albinus. 81 BC. AR Serrate Denarius (19mm, 3.38 g, 11h). Rome mint. Draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder; bucranium above / Togate figure standing left on rock, holding aspergillum over head of ox, standing right; lighted altar between them. Crawford 372/1; Sydenham 745; SRCV 296; Postumia 7. From the Richard Weigel Collection1 commentsBud Stewart
ZBLITRA1D+R.jpg
a.ANONYMOUS AE Quarter-Litra 241-222 BC73 views
D/ Helmeted hd. of Diana r.
R/ Dog walking r.; in ex. ROMA

Syd. 22
Rugser
R670_Faustina_II_fac.jpg
AE Dupondius, RIC 3, p.194, 1405 (a) - Faustina II, Diana20 viewsFaustina II
Dupondius or As, AD 145-161
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right
Rev.: S - C, Diana standing left with bow and arrow.
AE, 12.4g, 26mm
Ref.: RIC 1405 (a) [C]
This coin was found in 2006 close to the Fleischstraße in Trier, Germany. The find was presented to the Landesmuseum (State Museum).

for the same type, with different hairstyle, click here
3 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_22.jpg
AE Dupondius, RIC 3, p.194, 1405a - Faustina II, Diana 29 viewsFaustina II
Dupondius, Rome mint, AD 154-156
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right, head bare, hair waived and coiled on back of head
Rev.: S-C, Diana standing facing, head left, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on grounded bow, S - C flanking across below center field
AE, 11.83g, 26.0mm
Ref.: RIC III 1405a
Ex Forvm Ancient Coins Shop

for the same type, with different hairstyle, click here
shanxi
Faustina_II_2.jpg
AE Sestertius, RIC 3, p.192, 1383 - Faustina II, Diana38 viewsFaustina II
Sestertius, AD 145-161
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA AVG PII F, draped bust right
Rev.: S-C, Diana standing left, holding arrow and resting on bow.
Ref.: RIC 1383
shanxi
046B.jpg
Aemilianus AR Antoninianus90 viewsRIC IVc 2b var., C 25 var. (Unlisted), Eauze hoard
2.71 g, 22 mm
IMP AEMILIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right
DIANE VICTRICI, Diana standing left, holding arrow and bow.
Extremely Rare
Note from Richard Beale (Roma Numismatics):
RIC only lists coins with DIANAE VICTRI, though it does mention a coin with "DIANE (sic) VICTRI" in Berlin. I suspect that the Berlin coin is actually the same type/dies as [this one] but without the reverse's final two letters showing.
Three known including this one: One in the Eauze Hoard, one in an Italian collection (FORVM member 'aemilianus') and this one.
4 commentsMark Z2
RRPostumiusMed~0.jpg
ANIMALS/PINK FLOYD, Track 2, Dogs.47 viewsRoman Republic
moneyer L. Caesius, 74 BC, Rome.
AR denarius, 18.74 mm, 3.6 gm
Obv: bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder
Rev: hound running right, spear below; C. POSTVMI, TA in exergue
Ref: Crawford 394/1a

Composite picture of the collection:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-104363

Interactive presentation:
http://prezi.com/q7mw1k1zur65/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share


2 commentsTIF
Anonymous_Denarius.png
Anonymous 13 viewsAnonymous
AR Denarius 3.4g
Helmeted head of Roma r./ Diana in biga, ROMA in ex.
RSC 5
Ex. Brian Bucklin
Rob D
Anonymous_Feather_Cr__163_Luna.JPG
Anonymous Feather Cr 163 Luna57 viewsCrawford 163 Feather (179-170BC)
Denarius
Ob: helmeted head of Roma right; border of dots
Rev: Luna in biga right (over figure’s head crescent moon), with horses prancing; below feather; in exergue ROMA. Line border

BMCRR I 394

Sydenham 325 Diana

The crescent moon is more visible in hand than this scan. In addition, this coin has pretty iridescent highlights that are much more prominent in hand.
Petrus Elmsley
antoninus_pius_02.jpg
Antoninus Pius AR Denarius68 viewsObv: CAES AEL ANTONINVS AVG - Bare head right.
Rev: PONT MAX TR POT COS - Diana standing right, holding arrow and bow.
Cat #: RIC 1b
Notes: Scarce, with only two examples in Reka Devnia hoard.
oa
apius02_-_caesar.jpg
Antoninus Pius denarius26 viewsRIC 447a[Hadrian] (3,45g, 19mm).
Mint of Rome, 26.02.138 - 09.07.138 AD.

One in first types.
Pure specimen.

CAESAR / DIANA
neander
Apameia_-_Artemis.jpg
Apameia, Phrygia 133-48 B.C.14 viewsApameia, Phrygia, c. 133 - 48 B.C. Apameia mint, Ae 18~20.6mm. 7.97g. Obv: Laureate head of Zeus right. Rev: AΠAME AΡTEMIΔ BABA, cultus-statue of Artemis Anaitis standing facing, wearing long chiton, kalathos and veil, a taenia or support hanging from each extended hand; BMC Phrygia p. 77, 48
Artemis Anaïtis was a fusion of the Persian goddess Anahita and the Greek Artemis. Tacitus (Annals 62) refers to the syncretic deity simply as the “Persian Diana”, who had a temple in Lydia “dedicated in the reign of Cyrus” (presumably Cyrus the Great).
ddwau
FAUSTJR-40.jpg
Artemis (Diana) as the huntress526 viewsThrace, Augusta Trajana. Æ 24mm, 8.9 g.
Obv: FAVCTEINA CEBACTH, draped bust right.
Rev: AVGOVCTHC TRAIANHC, Artemis standing right, holding bow, drawing arrow from quiver, hound at her side.
Similar to SGI 1729; BMC 3.177, 1.

Artemis is the twin sister of Apollo. As the huntress, she holds a bow with arrows, accompanied by a hound.
EmpressCollector
Diana_of_Ephesus_-_Claudius_AR_Tetradrachm.jpg
Artemis, (Diana of Ephesus), in her Temple139 viewsTI. CLAVD CAES AVG. Claudius bare head, facing left. / DIAN-EPHE Cult statue of Diana (Artemis) of Ephesus inside a tetra style temple, set on three tiered base; pediment decorated by figures flanking three windows.
RIC I 118; RPC I 2222; BMCRE 229; RSC 30; Sear Millennium 1839. Ephesus ca. 41-42 AD.
(25 mm, 11.14 g, 6h)

The statue of Artemis (Diana) at Ephesus was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Depicted on this coin, which was minted shortly after Claudius’ accession to the throne, there remains no trace of the statue, or the temple that housed it, other than some recently stacked column remnants to mark the location. Pliny The Elder described the temple as 115 meters in length, 55 meters in width, made almost entirely of marble; consisting of 127 Ionic style columns 18 meters in height. The original temple, which stood on the site from about 550 BC, was destroyed by arson in 356 BC. It was rebuilt around 330 BC in the form depicted on the coin, only to be destroyed by the Goths in 262 AD. Again rebuilt it was destroyed for the final time by Christians in 401 AD. The columns and marble of the temple were used to construct other buildings. Some of the columns found their way into the church of Hagia Sophia in Constantinople (Istanbul).

The site of the temple was rediscovered in 1869 by an expedition sponsored by the British Museum, but little remains to be seen today. A Christian inscription found at Ephesus reads Destroying the delusive image of the demon Artemis, Demeas has erected this symbol of Truth, the God that drives away idols, and the Cross of priests, deathless and victorious sign of Christ. This Christian zeal explains why so little remains of the site despite its repute in the ancient pre-Christian world.

This coin is rare with a few dozen examples known. In contrast to most examples, which show a four tiered temple base, the reverse of this coin shows a three-tiered temple base. The rectangles on the pediment of the temple are frequently identified as tables, or altars. However, it is more likely that these are windows in the pediment to facilitate lighting of the statue in the interior of the temple. The Ionic style of the columns, as described by Pliny, is clearly visible in the reverse image.
1 commentsLloyd T
Bactria,_Diodotos_I_Tetradrachm_.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Diodotos I, ca. 255/250-240 BC, AR Tetradrachm 27 viewsDiademed head of the Diodotos I right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ANTIOXOY (of King Antiochos). Zeus striding left, hurling thunderbolt in right hand, aegis over extended left arm; eagle standing in lower inner left, monogram in left field above eagle.

SC 628 (b); Holt A2 (Holt A2 example 2 = this coin); Bopearachchi 2E; Mitchiner 64c; Kritt, Dynastic Transitions Type A2 (Plate 1, page 19); HGC 9, 243. Mint “A”- Ai Khanoum ca. 255-250 BC.

(29 mm, 16.92 g, 6h).
Eukratides Ancient Numismatics: ex- William K. Raymond Collection; ex- Kovacs (1997)

The Kingdom of Baktria was created from the Seleukid province of Bactro-Sogdiana when the satrap Diodotos I began to act independently of the Seleukid king, Antiochos II around 256 BC. The first step towards independence came with the issue of coinage depicting Diodotos I, rather than the Seleukid king, Antiochos II. On their reverse the coins bear the image of a striding Zeus, rather than the Seleukid patron god Apollo. Yet the coinage maintains the legend ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ANTIOXOY indicating nominal servitude to the Seleukid king. This legend remained unchanged despite the accession to the throne of Seleukos III in 246 BC. In effect, this denies any allegiance to the latter king, while at the same time attesting to the legitimacy of Diodotos’ claim to the throne via his initial appointment under Antiochos II. Following the death of Diodotos I around 240 BC his son, Diodotos II, adopted the title of king, altering the legend of the coinage to that of ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔIOΔITOY, an unequivocal statement of independence.
1 commentsn.igma
C_Hosidius_Cf_Geta.jpg
C HOSIDIUS CF GETA AR Denarius, Gens Hosidia, Cr407/2; Hosidia 142 views OBV: GETA before, III VIR behind, diademed & draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver on shoulder
REV: C HOSIDI C F, wild boar of Calydon right, pierced by spear and attacked by dog
3.6g, 17mm

Struck at Rome, 64 BC
Legatus
AR 51 D.jpg
C Hosidius Cf Geta Denarius36 viewsC Hosidius Cf Geta Denarius. 68 BC. GETA before, III VIR behind, diademed & draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver on shoulder / C HOSIDI C F, wild boar of Calydon right, pierced by spear and attacked by dog.Tanit
hostid.jpg
C Hosidius CF Geta Denarius 68bc139 viewsSilver denarius, SRCV I 346, RSC I Hosidia 1, Crawford 407/2, VF, Rome mint, 68 B.C.; obverse III VIR GETA, diademed head of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder; reverse wild boar right, pierced by spear and attacked by hound, C HOSIDI C F in ex;6 commentsAdrian S
Hosidius_Geta~0.jpg
C. Hosidius C. f. Geta - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²65 BC
¹68 BC
diademed and draped bust of Diana, bow and quiver over shoulder
III VIR / GETA
attacked boar right, spear in shoulder, hound below
C HOSIDI C F
¹Crawford 407/2; Sydenham 903; Kestner 3317; BMCRR I Rome 3389; RSC I Hosidia 1, SRCV I 346
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,6g
ex Marc Walter

"Oineus, king of Kalydon in Aitolia, once had feasted the gods at an harvest festival but forgotten to butcher an animal for Artemis. The goddess was enraged and sent a big boar who wasted the fertile fields of the king. Oineus called for help and from all parts of Greece the heroes came to help him. There were the Curetes from Pleuron, the brothers of Althaia, the wife of Oineus. There were the Dioscurs Kastor and Polydeikes and their Messenian cousins Idas and Lynkeus. Theseus came from Athens, Iphikles, half-brother of Herakles, came from Thebens, Iason, Admetos, Peirithos, Peleus and Eurytion came from Thessalia, Telamon from Salamis, Amphiaraos from Argos, Ankaios and Atalante from Arcadia and much more. Herakles was prevented by his labours. On top of the heroes stood Meleagros, the son of Oineus and Althaia.
The hunt for the Calydonean boar ended very disastrous. Many heroes lost their lifes. Ankaios was the first killed by the boar. Peleus accidentally hit his father-in-law Eurytion with his spear. A second hunter too was killed by the boar.
The big catastrophe happened at the 6th day of the hunt. On this day Atalanta hit the boar with her arrow and Meleagros gave him the deathblow. Then he awarded head and skin of the boar to Atalante. But his uncles, brother of his mother Althaia, didn't tolerate that. They insisted on the rights of their clan. A dispute occured, they snatched the trophies from Atalante and then a fight began in which Meleagros slew his uncles. When Meleagros was born the fates predicted that he will live only as long as the log in the oven. Althaia pulled it out of the fire and hid it in a secret place. When she heard of the death of her brothers she enraged, got the log and threw it in the fire. When it was burnt Meleagros break down dead when he was dissecting the boar." - Jochen's Coins of mythological interest
Johny SYSEL
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C. Hosidius C. f. Geta, Crawford 407/1132 viewsC. Hosidius C. f. Geta, gens Hosidia
AR - denarius serratus, 3.79g
Rome 68 BC
obv. Bust of Diana, diademed, r., bow and quiver about shoulder, GETA behind, III.VIR
before
rev. The Calydonean boar stg. r., transfixed by spear, attacked by dog
C.HOSIDI C.F. in ex.
Crawford 407/1; Sydenham 904; Hosidia 2
rarer than the non-serrated type, VF

For more informations see the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
2 commentsJochen
IMG_9294.JPG
C. Hosidius C.f. Geta12 views
C. Hosidius C.f. Geta. 64 BC. AR Denarius. Rome mint. Diademed and draped bust of Diana right, with bow and quiver over shoulder: GETA downards to right, III VIR downards to left / Calydonian Boar standing right, pierced by spear and harried by hound below; C • HOSIDIC • F. Crawford 407/2; Sydenham 903; Hosidia 1.
1 commentsecoli
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C. Postumis, Denarius22 viewsRRC 394/1a
74 b.c.

The moneyer C. Postumius is identified as being named in Ciceros 'pro Murena' as prosecutor of Murena and candidate for praetorship in 62.
Hound and spear on the back belong to the Diana on the obverse. And the Diana again is copied from other Postumius issues of the past.
(Crawford)

Ex Busso Peus auct 388/289 no 905
1 commentsNorbert
00786.jpg
C. Postumius (RSC Postumia 9, Coin #786)11 viewsRSC Postumia 9, AR Denarius, Rome, 74 BC
OBV: Draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver at her shoulder.
REV: C POSTVMI, Hound running right, spear below.
SIZE: 18.6mm, 3.68g
MaynardGee
1443_C_Postumius.jpg
C. Postumius - AR denarius3 viewsRome
²73 BC
¹74 BC
draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder
hound bounding right, hunting spear below
C·POSTVMI / (TA)
¹Crawford 394/1a, RSC I Postumia 9, Sydenham 785, SRCV I 330
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Jesus Vico
Johny SYSEL
C__Postumius.jpg
C. Postumius - Postumia-972 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC C. Postumius 74 BC. AR denarius.(17mm, 3.98g). Rome mint. Bust of Diana right, draped, with bow and quiver over shoulder / C POSTVMI. Hound running right; below, spear. Crawford 394/1a, RSC I Postumia 9, Sydenham 785, RCV 3301 commentsBud Stewart
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C. Postumius 73 BC.62 viewsObverse- Bust of Diana right, bow and quiver on shoulder.
Reverse- Hound running right, spear below.
Crawford 394/1a; Sydenham 785; Postumia 9.
19mm, 3.90 gm.
b70
00www.jpg
C.POSTUMIUS43 viewsAR denarius. 74 BC. 3.52 gr. Bust of Diana huntress right,bow and quiver on shoulder. / Hound running right,hunting spear below. C. POSTUMI/TA (in monogram) below. Toned. Craw 394/1a . RSC Postumia 9
Ex Baldwin.
2 commentsbenito
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C.POSTUMIUS 33 viewsAR denarius. 74 BC. 3.52 gr. Bust of Diana huntress right,bow and quiver on shoulder. / Hound running right,hunting spear below. C. POSTUMI/TA (in monogram) below. Toned. Craw 394/1a . RSC Postumia 9
benito
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Caius Postumius Denarius - Running Hound (Syd 785a)31 viewsAR Denarius
Rome, 74 BC
3.90g

Obv: Draped bust of Diana (R), bow and quiver over shoulder.

Rev: Hound running (R), spear below, C·POSTVMI

Sydenham 785a Crawford 394/1b.

Rarer variant without T-A monogram below name of moneyer.

Double die-match with BMC Charles A. Hersh denarius.

ex. Elvira Clain Stefanelli (1914-2001) collection, curator of the National Numismatics Collection at the Smithsonian
1 commentsKained but Able
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Caracalla RIC IV, 284320 viewsCaracalla AD 198 - 217
AR - Denar, 3.13g, 19mm
Rome AD 217
obv. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
laureate head r.
rev. PM TRP XX COS IIII PP
Diana (or Luna?) with crescent on head and scarf flying
behind her, standing in bull-biga, driving l.
RIC IV, 284; C.396
Scarce; good EF
added to www.wildwinds.com
5 commentsJochen
coins16.JPG
Cilicia, Tarsus; Salonina14 viewsOn the rev., one can make out a gamma to the r. of Diana's shoulders (SNG calls her Demeter), and another gamma to the r. of her knees, meaning "presiding over three provinces, holder of three neocorates". Tarsus only acquired her third neocorate under Valerian; for Herennia Etruscilla, the second letter would have been a B=2 instead. So the gamma confirms the attribution to Salonina.ecoli
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Claudia 19 viewsP Clodius Denarius. 42 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, lyre behind / Diana standing facing, with bow and quiver over shoulder, holding lighted torch in each hand; P CLODIVS right, M F on left. Syd 1117, Cr494/23. Britanikus
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Claudius Gothicus108 viewsClaudius II --AE Antoninianus. R: Diana R, stag at feet. Cohen 67. 2 commentsfeatherz
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Claudius II Gothicus, 268-270 AD 4 viewsÆ antoninianus, 20mm, 3.6g, 6h; Milan mint.
Obv.: IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: DIANA LVCIF, Diana standing right, holding torch with both hands // P
Reference: RIC Va 144, p. 222
John Anthony
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CN Plamcivs AR Denarius, Cr 432/1, Diana20 viewsOBV: Head of Diana Planciana right, wearing petasus, earring, and necklace
REV: Cretan goat standing right; bow and quiver behind
3.6g, 18mm

Minted at Rome, 55BC
1 commentsLegatus
CN_PLANCIVS.jpg
CN Plamcivs Fourree Denarius, Cr 432/1, Diana25 viewsOBV: Head of Diana Planciana right, wearing petasus, earring, and necklace
REV: Cretan goat standing right; bow and quiver behind
2.67g
Ex CNG
Minted at Rome, 55BC
Legatus
Plancia_1a_img.jpg
Cn. Plancius, denarius18 viewsObv:– Head of Diana Planciana right, wearing petasus.
Rev:– Cretan goat right; bow and quiver behind
Minted in Rome B.C. 55.
Reference(s) – RSC Plancia 1. RRC 432/1. Syd 933

Weight 4.05g. 18.80mm.
maridvnvm
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Cn. Plancius, Denarius12 viewsRRC 432/1
55 b.c.

The obverse seems to symbolize Macedonia, the reverse to allude to hunting in Crete; both where places in which Cn. Plancius has spent some time in the course of his career (Crawford)

Cn. Plancius stammte aus einer Ritterfamilie und war der Sohn eines angesehenen Steuerpächters....
Wiederum wurde Plancius gewählt, mit ihm A. Plotins, während Q. Pedius und Inventius dnrchfielen. Letzterer erzielte die geringste Stimmenzahl (§ 17 p. 482,22). Er tat, was in solchen Fällen oft geschah: er verklagte seinen siegreichen Rivalen wegen ambitus;....die Verteidigung führten Cicero und Hortensius. (W. Kroll, Ciceros Rede für Plancius, Rheinisches Museum, 86 (1937))
--
ex Rauch Auktion 86, Lot 512, 2010-05-12-14

Described as:
Cn. Plancius
(D) Denarius (3,91g), Roma 55 v.Chr. Av.: CN PLANCIVS / AED CVR S C, Kopf der Diana Planciana (oder der Macedonia?) mit Kausia n.r. Rv.: Kretische Ziege n.r., dahinter Bogen und Köcher. -- Kleiner Kratzer im Av. Cr 432/1, Albert 1360. Attraktive Tönung.
s.sch.-vzgl.
Norbert
Commodus.jpg
Commodus - Hercluea and Africa52 viewsObverse: L AEL AVREL COMM AVG P FEL - Laureate head Commodus right
Reverse: PROVIDENTIAE AVG - Hercules standing left, foot on prow, resting club on a tree trunk behind and holding thunderbolt while clasping hands with Africa, who stands right, wearing elephant skin and holding sistrum; lion at her feet
Mint : Rome
Date : AD 191-192
Reference : RIC III, p. 396, 259a Rare; Cohen 643
Grade : aVF
Weight : 3.04g
Denom : Denarius
Metal : Silver
Acquired: 03/04/04

Comments : Issued c.192 A.D., to mark the establishment of a fleet of ships to bring North African grain to Rome which he renamed the Commodiana Herculea, and Commodus' foresight (PROVIDENTIAE AVG) in doing so. The ship's prow makes reference to the role of Rome's overseas provinces, in feeding the capital.
Bolayi
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Commodus, 177 - 193 AD28 viewsObv: L AEL AVREL (COMM) AVG P FEL, laureate head of Commodus facing right.

Rev: PROVIDENTIAE AVG, Commodus dressed as Hercules, standing front, head left, naked, foot on prow, resting a club on a tree-trunk, clasping hands over corn-ears with Africa, who stands before him facing right, she wears an elephant's skin headdress and holds a sistrum, lion at her feet.

Note: Refers to the foresight of the emperor in reorganizing the North African grain fleet that was renamed Commodiana Herculea.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 192 AD

2.6 grams, 18 mm, 180°

RIC III 259a, RSC 643, S5687, VM 90
1 commentsSPQR Coins
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Commodus, RIC 560, Sestertius of AD 190 (Ploughing)42 viewsÆ Sestertius (16,57g, Ø 30mm, 7h). Rome mint. Struck AD 190.
Ob.: M COMMOD ANT P FE-LIX AVG BRIT P P, laureate head right
Rev.: COL LAN COM PM TR P XV IMP VIII (around) COS VI (in ex.) S C, Commodus, veiled, as priest, ploughing right with two oxen.

RIC 560; BMC 643; Cohen 39(60fr.); Sear (RCV) 5737

This is a very rare type, found occasionally as Æ-As, but extremely rare as a sestertius. It probably refers to the refounding of Lanuvium, the birthplace of Commodus and the place where he displayed his skills as Hercules by killing lions in the arena.

There has been speculation about the meaning of the first part of the reverse legend COLLANCOM. The traditional expansion of this legend is based on Eckhel (1796), reading the legend as COLonia Lucia ANtoniana COMmodiana, in order to try to relate it to the refounding of Rome. This was followed by Cohen and many other references. The British Museum and RIC expand it slightly differently: "The depiction of the ritual ploughing of the furrow marking out a new foundation refers to Commodus' refounding of Rome as COLonia Lucia ANnia COMmodiana."

Curtis Clay in Forum's discussion board, points to a powerful objection of this interpretation: "Since Commodus still calls himself Marcus on the obverse and was not to switch his praenomen back to Lucius until 191, a year later, why, on the reverse, does he name Rome Lucia and not Marcia?

Chantraine in 1971, following a suggestion of Renier in 1872, proposed what seems to be the solution to the problem: the legend is to be expanded COLonia LANuvina COMmodiana and commemorates Commodus' elevation of his birthplace Lanuvium, which had been a municipium, to the rank of colony.

Commodus did refound Rome too, and this deed is commemorated on very rare mediallions, sestertii, and dupondii struck late in 192, just before his assassination on 31 december. These coins have the same rev. type of emperor plowing, but the legend HERCuli ROMano CONDITORI P M TR P XVIII COS VII P P, 'To the Roman Hercules, the Founder'."

ex cgb.fr (2014).
1 commentsCharles S
COMMAS03.jpg
Commodus, RIC 570, As of AD 190 (emperor ploughing)16 viewsÆ As (8,48g, Ø24mm, 6h). Rome, AD 190.
Obv.: M COMM ANT P FELIX AVG [BRIT P P], laureate head right.
Rev.: COL LAN [COM P M TR P XV IMP VIII] around, COS VI / SC in ex., Commodus, veiled and togate, as priest, ploughing right with yoke of two oxen.
RIC 570 (R2); Cohen 40 (20 fr.); RCV 5856
Ex Naville Numismatics Live Auction 16, July 2015

Issued to mark the elevation of Commodus' birthplace Lanuvium from municipium to the rank of colony: COLonia LANuvina COMmodiana.
Charles S
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Commodus, RIC 570, As of AD 190 (refounding Lanuvium)25 viewsÆ As (11,21g, Ø 27mmmm, 6h). Rome, AD 190.
Obv.: M COMM ANT P FELIX AVG BRIT P P, laureate head right.
Rev.: COL LAN COM P M TR P XV IMP VIII around COS VI ex. SC field, Commodus, veiled and togate, as priest, ploughing right with yoke of two oxen..
RIC 570 [R2]; BMCRE 659; Cohen 40 (20 fr.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values) 5856.
Expanding the reverse legend to COLonia LANuvina COMmodiana, this issue commemorates Commodus' elevation of his birthplace Lanuvium from municipium to the rank of colony.
Ex José A. Herrero, Subasta Num. Mayo 15.
Charles S
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Commodus, RIC 641, Sestertius of AD 192 (Providentiae)37 viewsÆ Sestertius (26.15g, Ø30mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 192.
Obv.: L·AEL·AVREL·CO-MM·AVG·P·FEL, laureate head right.
Rev.: P M TR P X IMP VII COS IIII (around) S C (in ex.), Commodus as Hercules, naked, standing left, foot on prow, holding club left resting on tree trunk or rock(s), receiving corn-ears from Africa, standing right, togate, wearing elephant-skin head-dress, holding sistrum (brass rattle, an Egyptian musical instrument) in left, lion at her feet.

RIC 641 (R); Cohen 644 (15fr.); BMC 718; Sear 5796

During the last year of his reign, the megalomania of Commodus reached insane levels. He renamed many things of importance after himself including the twelve months year, even the city Rome, the citizens of Rome, the Senate and so on. This issue marks the renaming of the African grain fleet to "Commodiana Herculea"

ex cgb.fr (2014); ex Alessandra Brunetti (London, 2010); ex coll. Prof. M. Caselli.
2 commentsCharles S
665aa212comb.jpg
Cr 335/9 AR Denarius A. Albinus Sp. f. 8 viewsRome, c. 96 BCE
o: Diademed and draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver on shoulder; below, ROMA
r: Three horsemen galloping left; before, fallen warrior; in exergue, A. ALBINVS S.F.
[This example has AL ligate.]
3.87 gm 18.50 mm
The odd items on the reverse above left of the riders are likely standards, but the left-most one looks almost like a modius! There are a few possible interpretations of the reverse, none of which are particularly stronger than the others, and all relating to the Postumia gens' tendency to get killed in battles important to Rome. Crawford associates the types of three moneyers for the same year.
PMah
Postumia_7_denarius.jpg
Cr 372/1 - Postumia 7 Denarius32 viewsA. Postumius Albinus
Denarius serratus, 81 BC
Draped bust of Diana r., with bow and quiver over shoulder; above head, bucranium. / A·POST·A·F· – S·N·ALBIN Togate figure r. standing l. on rock, holding aspergillum over bull; between them, lighted altar.
Babelon Postumia 7. Sydenham 745. Crawford 372/1.


Ex John Quincy Adams Collection, 6th President of the United States, and His Descendants, ex Massachusetts Historical Society Collection, ex Stack’s Sale, 5-6 March 1971, Lot # 626
Bought by Christian Blom, then sold to Smithsonian Institution underwater archaeologist Mendel Peterson, then to D.C. coin dealer Gene Brandenburg, then to me.
1 commentsSosius
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Cr 383/1 AR Denarius Ti. Claudius Ti. f. Ap. n. Nero7 views Rome, 79 BCE
o: Draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver on shoulder; before chin, SC
r: Victory in prancing biga right, holding palm-branch and reins in left hand and wreath in right; below horses, A. XXII. In exergue, TI. CLAVD. TI. F/AP. N. [ligate AV]
3.95 gms 19.00 mm
This series uses one-die control numerals, slightly fewer with the "A" prefix as in this example than without the prefix. Although this example has a rather worn obverse, the reverse is somewhat sharper, with crisp leaves on the palm frond, and is well-centered for the type.

The "S.C." tells us that this issue is perhaps a supplemental issue, although the specific reason is not immediately apparent. Ti. Claudius Ti. f. Ap. n. Nero was likely the great-grandfather of Emperor Claudius, grandfather of Emperor Tiberius, and so up the chain of Claudii, and may have been the fellow who opposed Cicero's immediate execution of the Catalinarian conspirators on the somewhat reasonable grounds that perhaps the facts should be uncovered first. My un-posted gallery of my Julio-Claudian collection will eventually include some coins associated with these ancestors as well.
PMah
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Cr 383/1 AR Denarius Ti. Claudius Ti. f. Ap. n. Nero 13 views79 BCE
o: Draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver on shoulder; before chin, SC
r: Victory in prancing biga right, palm-branch and reins in left hand and wreath in right; below horses, LXI. In exergue, TI. CLAVD. TI. F/AP. N.
Cr. 383/1 (g. 4.20 mm. 18.50) -- relatively heavy for type
PMah
639hb158comb.png
Cr 383/1 AR Denarius Ti. Claudius Ti.f.Ap.n.Nero12 viewso: Bust of Diana r., bow and quiver over shoulder, S C before
r: Victory in biga r., CXXXXV below; TI CLAVD TI F / AP N in ex
This type is one of the issues that have a large number of control numbers on both obverse and reverse dies, and per Crawford, “each control-mark has only one die.” Thus, each of them was struck from only a single reverse die. These types are quite useful for numismatic statistical analysis.
This particular coin I find to be enjoyable because Diana's quiver clearly has a cover on it. In modern times, archery quivers are open-topped sort of things, mostly for carrying the arrows from the garage to the back-yard range. In ancient times, and all times when arrows were weapons or tools, it was extremely important to keep the "fletches"/feathers/vanes protected, and to keep the shaft dry and point protected.
PMah
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Cr 407/2 AR Denarius C. Hosidius C.f. Geta9 views64 BCE
o: Diademed abd draped bust of Diana right with bow and quiver at shoulder, GETA before, III VIR behind
r: Calydonian Boar standing right, wounded by spear and attacked by dog, C HOSIDI [C F] in ex
Crawford 407/2; Hosidia 1.
3.52g. (6h)
A beautiful coin depicting a very narrow aspect of the Calydonian Boar myth. Oddly, the hero of the story is a strong woman, which must have been well known to the Romans, and the losers are a bunch of chest-thumping pseudo-Alpha-males.
Interesting to speculate what lesson the Romans drew from the story or the limited focus of this coin.
PMah
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Cr 494/23 AR Denarius P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus 15 viewsRome, 42 BCE
o: Laureate head of Apollo right; lyre behind
r: Diana standing facing, head right, with bow and quiver over shoulder, holding lighted torch in each hand; P•CLODIVS downwards to right, M•F• downwards to left.
Crawford 494/23; Claudia 15.
(3.81g, 17mm, 3h)
Note: Lyre is NOT a die symbol
PMah
Republik_16.jpg
Cr. 2222/1, Republic, 143 BC, Anonymous24 viewsAnonymous
AR Denarius, 143BC, Rome
Obv.: Head of Roma right with winged helmet, X behind
Rev.: Diana in biga of stags right holding torch, crescent below, ROMA in exergue
Ag, 17.9x19.5mm, 4.21g
Ref.: Crawford 222/1, Sydenham 438
shanxi
Republik_2.jpg
Cr. 394/1a, Republic, 74BC, C. POSTUMIUS39 viewsC. POSTUMIUS
Denarius, 74 BC, Rome
Obv.: Bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder.
Rev.: Hound running right, spear below, C. POSTVMI/TA ligate
Ag, 3.77g, 18.2mm
Ref.: Crawford 394/1a, Sydenham 785.
1 commentsshanxi
Republik_08.jpg
Cr. 394/1a, Republic, 74BC, C. POSTUMIUS 43 viewsC. POSTUMIUS
Denarius, 74 BC, Rome
Obv.: Bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder.
Rev.: Hound running right, spear below, C. POSTVMI/TA ligate
Ag, 3.99g, 18.5mm
Ref.: Crawford 394/1a, Sydenham 785.
1 commentsshanxi
Republik_18.jpg
Cr. 494/23, Republic, 42 BC, P. Clodius M. f. Turrinus 33 viewsP. Clodius M. f. Turrinus
AR Denarius, 42 BC, Rome
Obv.: Laureate bust of Apollo right; lyre behind
Rev.: P•CLODIVS right; M•F• left, Diana standing facing, with bow and quiver over shoulder, holding lighted torch in each hand;
AR, 3,78 g, 20 mm.
Ref.: Sydenham 1117, Crawford 494/23, Babelon Clodia 14
Old collection label
Ex Lanz Numismatik
1 commentsshanxi
Republic_R692b_fac.jpg
Cr. 494/23, Republic, 42 BC, P. Clodius M. f. Turrinus6 viewsP. Clodius M. f. Turrinus
AR Denarius, 42 BC, Rome
Obv.: Laureate bust of Apollo right; lyre behind
Rev.: P•CLODIVS right; M•F• left, Diana standing facing, with bow and quiver over shoulder, holding lighted torch in each hand;
AR, 3.92g
Ref.: Sydenham 1117, Crawford 494/23, Babelon Clodia 14
Ex Collection Reusing/Schürer
Ex Manfred Olding
shanxi
Crispina-RIC666.jpg
Crispina - Sestertius - RIC 66613 viewsObv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA. Bust, draped, r., hair waved, rolled in front and knotted in bun on back of head
Rev: DIANA LVCIFERA S C. Diana standing r., holding torch in both hands.
Size: 30 mm
Weight: 23 g
Date: 180-183 AD
Ref: RIC III 666 (Commodus), BMC 411
Rarity: S
vs1969
00decimia2~0.jpg
DECIMIUS FLAVUS22 viewsAE denarius. 150 BC. 4.00 grs. Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind. / Diana in biga right. FLAVS below horses. In exergue ROMA.
Craw 207/1. RSC Decimia 1.
benito
00decimia2.jpg
DECIMIUS FLAVUS.17 viewsAE denarius. 150 BC. 4.00 grs. Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind. / Diana in biga right. FLAVS below horses. In exergue ROMA.
Craw 207/1. RSC Decimia 1.
benito
Faustina_II_9.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.268, 674 - Faustina II, Diana Lucifera58 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome, ca. AD 161
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair bun tied with pearls
Rev.: DIANA LVCIF, Diana standing left, holding long lighted torch in both hands.
Ag, 3.20g, 17.4mm
Ref.: Strack 520b, BMCRE 87, Cohen 85, RIC 674, CRE 174 [S]
Ex Pecunem Gitbud&Naumann 21 auction, Lot 636
shanxi
Faustina_II_53.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.268, 674 - Faustina II, Diana Lucifera37 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome, ca. AD 161
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair bun without pearls
Rev.: DIANA LVCIF, Diana standing left, holding long lighted torch in both hands.
Ag, 3.41g, 17mm
Ref.: Strack 520b, BMCRE 87, Cohen 85, RIC 674, CRE 174 [S]
2 commentsshanxi
domna_lucifera.jpg
Denarius; IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG / DIANA LVCIFERA, RIC 373a34 viewsJulia Domna Denarius. Struck under Caracalla, 211-217 A.D. 2,3 g, 19 mm. IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right / DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, holding long torch with both hands. RIC 373A [Caracalla], RSC 32, BMC 1, Sear RCV (2002) 7100.Podiceps
RI 048j img~0.jpg
Diana175 viewsAnontinus Pius Denarius (As Caesar under Hadrian)
Obv: IMP T AEL CAES ANTONINVS, Bare head right
Rev: TRIB POT COS, Diana standing right, holding bow & arrow
Minted in Rome. A.D. 138
Reference:– BMC 1006. Cohen 1058. RIC 447a [hadrian]
maridvnvm
GG-TiClaudDiana56__5~1.jpg
Diana137 viewsAR Denarius, Rome mint, 79 BC
Obv: Diademed and draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder. S.C. before. Border of dots
Rev: Victory in biga right, holding palm branch and reins in left hand, and laurel wreath in right hand. Control-mark A.IIII above exergue. TI.CLAVD.TI.F/ APN in exergue. Border of dots.
Weight: 3.88g
Crawford 383/1 Sear RCV I 310 RSC Claudia 6

Diana, the sister of Apollo, was regarded as the moon-goddess, but she was also the protectress of the young and the goddess of the chase. It is in this latter guise that she is depicted here with her attributes of bow and quiver depicting her as a huntress.
nemesis
JulDomDenDiana.jpg
Diana8 viewsJulia Domna
Denarius

Draped bust, right, IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG
Diana standing left, holding torch, DIANA LVCIFERA

RIC 548
Blindado
HadrianAsDiana.jpg
Diana11 viewsHadrian
As

Laureate head right, right, HADRIANVUS AVG COS III PP
Diana standing facing, head left, holding arrow & bow, SC

RIC 825
Blindado
FAUSTJR-26~0.jpg
Diana (Artemis) as the moon goddess364 viewsFaustina Junior -- Died 175/6. Wife of Marcus Aurelius. Augusta, AD 147-175/6.
Orichalcum sestertius (30 mm), issued posthumously, Rome mint, AD 176-180.
Obv: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, Bare-headed and draped bust right.
Rev: SIDERIBVS RECEPTA S C, Diva Faustina, as Diana Lucifera, draped, wearing crescent on shoulders behind neck, standing r., holding lighted torch in both hands.
RIC-1715; BMC-1584; Cohen-215.

Diana in her lunar aspect here holds a torch and is shown with a crescent moon on her shoulders. SIDERIBVS RECEPTA = "received by the stars". Diana Lucifera lit the way for the dead to journey to their new home among the heavens, appropriate for a posthumous issue.
EmpressCollector
R662_Postumus_Diana.jpg
Diana - Antoninian - AD 260-269 (Postumus)16 viewsAR-Antoninian
Rev.: DIANAE LVCIFERAE Diana walking right, holding a long-handled torch in both hands; quiver on her back.
Ag, 3.66g, 20mm


for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
Claudius_II_R693_artemis.jpg
Diana - Antoninian - AD 268-270 (Claudius II)12 viewsAR-Antoninian
Rev.: DIANAE - VICTR Diana standing r. holding bow and drawing arrow from quiver, before her stag standing r. and looking back at her, H = officina 8 in exergue.
Ag, 21mm, 4.24g

for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
Republik_16_artemis.jpg
Diana - Denar - 143 BC (Republic)4 viewsAR Denarius, 143 BC, Rome
Rev.: Diana in biga of stags right holding torch, crescent below, ROMA in exergue
Ag, 17.9x19.5mm, 4.21g

for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
Republic_R692b_artemis.jpg
Diana - Denar - 42 BC (Republic)3 viewsAR Denarius, 42 BC, Rome
Rev.: P•CLODIVS right; M•F• left, Diana standing facing, with bow and quiver over shoulder, holding lighted torch in each hand
AR, 3.92g

for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
Republik_2_artemis.jpg
Diana - Denar - 74 BC (Republic)1 viewsAR Denarius, 74 BC, Rome
Obv.: Bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder.
Ag, 3.77g, 18.2mm

for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
Faustina_II_53_Diana.jpg
Diana - Denar - AD 161 (Faustina II)9 viewsAR-Denar (Faustina II obverse)
Rev.: DIANA LVCIF, Diana standing left, holding long lighted torch in both hands.
Ag, 3.41g, 17mm

for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
Julia_Domna_R687_artemis.jpg
Diana - Denar - AD 211-217 (Julia Domna)16 viewsAR-Denar, Rome Mint (Julia Domna obverse)
Rev.: DIANA LVCIFERA (light bringing Diana), Diana Lucifera standing facing, head left, holding flaming long torch transverse left with both hands
Ag, 3.175g, 18.7mm, 0°

for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
Gordianus_III_16_artemis.jpg
Diana - Denar - AD 241 (Gordianus III)2 viewsAR-Denar
Rev.: DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing right, holding long torch.
Ag, 2.77g, 18.9mm

for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
00postumdog.jpg
DIANA and LELAPS.249 viewsAR denarius. 74 BC. 3.52 gr. Bust of Diana huntress right,bow and quiver on shoulder. / Hound running right,hunting spear below. C. POSTUMI/TA (in monogram) below. Toned. Craw 394/1a . RSC Postumia 9
Myth of Lelaps and the fox.
Procris was a mortal woman, a great favorite of the Goddess Diana, the goddess of hunting. Diana (also famous for her hunting hounds) made a gift of a dog to Procris. Lelaps was the swiftest of dogs and could outrun any rival. Diana also gave a JAVELIN that would never miss its target to Procris.
Procris fell in love and married a beautiful youth by the name of Cephalus. Cephalus was also a great hunter, and so Procris gave the presents of the hound and javelin to her husband.
It came to pass that some angry deity had sent a ravenous fox to plague the country, snatching his prey from under the farmers very noses. All the hunters turned out in great numbers and strength to kill the fox, but their efforts failed. None had a hound that could run this supernatural fox to ground.
At last the people came to Cephalus and begged him to set Lelaps, the famous gift hound from Diana, after the fox.
Lelaps was loosed and darted away faster than the eye could follow. It was said that if the men had not seen his footprints in the sand they would have thought he had taken flight. Cephalus and the hunters stood on a hill and watched the pursuit.
The fox tried every trick, every sly, cunning art he knew to evade the hound. He ran in a circle and turned on his track, he doubled back, he leapt over water and trotted across fallen logs, but no trick he knew would fool swift and clever Lelaps. The hound came on relentless, breathing on the foxes heels and snapping at his brushy tail, missing by only a hair!
Cephalus threw the magic javelin when suddenly both dog and fox stopped, frozen in mid-motion. The heavenly powers that had given both hound and fox their powers were not willing that either should conquer - or lose. In that very moment, they turned to Stone .ZEUS cast them into the stars as the constellations Canis Major (Lelaps) and Canis Minor (the Teumessian fox).[


1 commentsbenito
Diana_Victory_1a.jpg
Diana and Victory * Roman Republican, Serrate AR Den., 79 BC.136 views
Diana with Bow and Quiver | Victory in Biga * Republican, Serrate AR Den., 79 BC.

Obv: Diana, diademed and draped bust facing right, hair pulled up and bound behind, bow and quiver over her shoulder; S.C. before.
Rev: Victory driving a charging biga to the right, holding reins and palm-branch in left hand and wreath in her right, control mark A . XI below.

Exergue: Off flan. [ TI. CLAVD TI. F. APN ].

Mint: Rome
Struck: 79 BC.

Size: 18.50 mm. (Flan circ. at largest).
Weight: 3.9 gms.
Die axis: 190°

Condition: Exceptional. Bright, clear, radiant luster. Both sides well struck though slightly off-center and with a very slight bend near the rim (ca. 190° obverse). Excellent relief and details on both sides.

Refs:
Sear, 310.
Claudia 6.
Crawford 383/1
Sydenham, 770a
BMCRR, Rome 3103
Kestner, 3233 var. (control numeral)
*
5 commentsTiathena
DIANA_LVCIFERA.jpg
DIANA LVCIFERA26 viewsobv: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG laurate, draped and cuirassed bust of gordian right seen from behind

Rev: DIANA LVCIFERA DIana standing right holding lighted torch

RIC 127
C 69

refered R by RIC but seems more likely C
1 commentsleseullunique
Gordian_DIANA_LVCIFERA_cw.jpg
DIANA LVCIFERA27 viewsGordianus III. denariusTibsi
Gallienus DIANAE CONS AVG RIC 181.jpg
DIANAE CONS AVG RIC V/1 18160 viewsAnt, 20x22mm, 3.51g.

Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, Radiate head R.

Reverse: DIANAE CONS AVG, antelope walking L.

XII in exe.

Rome RIC V/1 181, Common.

RIC
Robert_Brenchley
0141-510np_noir.jpg
Diva Faustina II, Sestertius69 viewsPosthumous issue, Rome mint, after AD 176
DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right
SIDERIBVS RECEPTA, Diana standing right, holding a torch, SC in field
19.76 gr
Ref : Cohen # 215, RCV # 5233 v
Potator II
coin_3_quart.jpg
DN VALENS PF AVG / GLORIA ROMANORVM AE3/4 follis (364-378 A.D.) 19 viewsDN VALEN-S PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / GLORIA RO-MANORVM, Emperor walking right, head left, (probably) holding labarum, dragging captive behind him. V(?) in left field, star (or point) over Δ in right field. Mintmark worn off.

AE3/4, 17mm, 1.96g, die axis 12 (medal alignment), material: bronze/copper-based alloy

DN = Dominus Noster = Our Lord, P F AVG = Pius Felix Augustus = the pius (dutiful) and fortunate (happy) emperor. GLORIA ROMANORVM = Glory of the Romans. The labarum (Greek: λάβαρον) was a vexillum (military standard) that displayed the "Chi-Rho" symbol ☧, a christogram formed from the first two Greek letters of the word "Christ" (Greek: ΧΡΙΣΤΟΣ, or Χριστός) — Chi (χ) and Rho (ρ). It was first used by the Roman emperor Constantine the Great.

GLORIA ROMANORVM with the captive was a very popular reverse design for Valens' coins, minted at many mints all over the empire. But star or dot over Δ in right field is characteristic only of one mint, Thessalonica. Examples include various types of RIC IX Thessalonica 26b (star over Δ) and 31 (dot over Δ). These types are dated 367-375 or 375-378 A.D., with some letter in the left field usually indicating later, 375-378 issue. Mintmark for these types is always TES, sometimes with dot before or after.

Flavius Iulius Valens. Born in 328 in Cibalae (in present-day Croatia) into an Illyrian family. His older brother Valentinian was later to become Valenitinian I the Great, another emperor.

His father Gratian (aka the Elder or Gratianus Funarius or Gratianus Major), a Roman soldier of common birth, rose through the ranks to become "protector domesticus" during the reign of Constantine the Great [A member of an elite guard unit/staff member with various important duties . After serving under the emperor for a certain duration, the Domestici would be able to become leaders themselves and potentially command their own regiment of legionnaires in the military], and later tribune and comes. He was forced to retire due to suspicion of embezzlement, but later recalled back to active duty to serve Constans. Again fell into disrespect and lost all estates when Constantius came to deal with Magnentius, because he was suspected to support him, but never lost influence with the army, which helped to promote careers of his sons.

Brothers grew up in various estates in Africa and Britain. While Valentinian had been distinguished in an active military career, Valens, though already 35 years old, had not participated in either the civil or military affairs of the empire previous to his selection as Augustus by his brother. In February 364, reigning Emperor Jovian, while hastening to Constantinople to secure his claim to the throne, died in his sleep during a stop at Dadastana, 100 miles east of Ankara. Valentinian, a tribunus scutariorum, who owed his advancement to the deceased, was elected by the legions to succeed Jovian. He was proclaimed Augustus on 26 February, 364. It was the general opinion that Valentinian needed help to handle the cumbersome administration, civil and military, of the large and unwieldy empire, and, on 28 March of the same year, at the express demand of the soldiers for a second Augustus, he selected his brother Valens as co-emperor in the palace of Hebdomon. Both emperors were briefly ill, delaying them in Constantinople, but as soon as they recovered, the two Augusti travelled together through Adrianople and Naissus to Mediana, where they divided their territories. Valentinian then went on to the West, where the Alemanic wars required his immediate attention.

Valens obtained the eastern half of the Empire Greece, Egypt, Syria and Anatolia as far east as Persia. He was back in his capital of Constantinople by December 364. Valens was utterly undistinguished and possessed no military ability: he betrayed his consciousness of inferiority by his nervous suspicion of plots and savage punishment of alleged traitors, but he was also a conscientious administrator, careful of the interests of the humble. He was an earnest Christian. Like the brothers Constantius II and Constans, Valens and Valentinian I held divergent theological views. Valens was an Arian and Valentinian I upheld the Nicene Creed. Valens was baptized by the Arian bishop of Constantinople before he set out on his first war against the Goths. Not long after Valens died the cause of Arianism in the Roman East was to come to an end. His death was considered a sign from God. His successor Theodosius I would favor the Nicene Creed, and suppress the Arian heresy. Valens, sometimes known as the Last True Roman (his co-emperor brother was dead in 375), was defeated and killed in the Battle of Adrianople against a confederated Gothic army on 9 August 378, which marked the beginning of the collapse of the decaying Western Roman Empire.
Yurii P
dog.jpg
DOG184 viewsAR denarius. 74 BC. 3.52 gr. Bust of Diana huntress right,bow and quiver on shoulder. / Hound running right,hunting spear below. C. POSTUMI/TA (in monogram) below. Toned. Craw 394/1a . RSC Postumia 91 commentsbenito
D623b.jpg
Domitian RIC-623b85 viewsÆ As, 10.13g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; S C in exergue; Domitian stg. l., sacrificing over altar; to l., flute player and lyre player stg. r.; in background, temple, wreath in pediment
RIC 623b (C2). BMC 434. BNC 471.
Acquired from Künker, January 2019. Ex Heinrich Pilartz Münzhandlung.

In October 88 AD Domitian held the Secular Games, a festival featuring theatrical performances and circus games accompanied by six various daytime and nighttime religious ceremonies. The games marked the transition from one era (saeculum) to another and were supposedly held once every 110 years, or the maximum span of a human lifetime, making them a 'once in a lifetime' event. Domitian conducted his games on the Augustan calculation, rejecting the formula for the Claudian games held in 47 AD. The festival was important enough to interrupt the normal striking of reverse types on the coinage and for the mint to produce a new unique issue commemorating the event both in precious metal and bronze. The precious metal designs tended to be symbolic while the bronze were more narrative in nature, focusing on the various religious sacrifices that were at the heart of the games.

The reverse on this as features a daytime victimless sacrifice of cakes to Apollo and Diana on the sixth and last day of the celebrations, held in front of an unidentified hexastyle temple somewhere on the Palatine. The stylised nature of the reverse's design makes it difficult to pinpoint the temple in question. The generic decorative wreath in the pediment offers no clues. Another variant of the type (RIC 623a) has an eagle in the pediment, perhaps an indication the engravers were not intending to depict a specific temple at all. The scene could stand alone and be an excellent representation for all the religious ceremonies of the games. The main message of the design is to show the Roman people that Domitian provided and responsibly held the Secular Games. The fact this type was struck in fairly large quantities hints it was an important piece of Domitianic propaganda.

Struck on a large flan in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton
Smirnova-400.jpg
Eastern Sogdiana, Ikhshids of Samarqand: Imitation of Gurak (710-738) AE Cash (Smirnova-400)27 viewsThere coins are classified differently between Smirnova and Akhunbabaev. Smirnova indicates that these are imitation coins of Gurak and hence read the inscription as "wr`kk MLK". However, Akhunbabaev attributed these coins to Divashtish, ruler of Penjikent. In this case, the inscription is read as "prykk MLK" which indicates Afrig Ikhshid. The tamgha is the same as Tukaspadak's and Tarkhun's and differing from the tamgha of Gurak.SpongeBob
Smirnova-1.jpg
Eastern Sogdiana, Samarqand: Anonymous (ca. 5th-6th Century CE) AE Unit (Smirnova-1)22 viewsObv: Mustachioed bust 3/4 facing, wearing long earrings; Wide border
Rev: Tamgha of Samarqand; Wide border
SpongeBob
Zeimal_pl31_10.jpg
Eastern Sogdiana, Samarqand: Anonymous Obol, 4th-5th Century (Zeimal pl. 31 #10)24 viewsObv: Diademed, bearded male head facing left
Rev: Stylized archer with bow facing right
SpongeBob
Zeimal_pl32_53.jpg
Eastern Sogdiana: Anonymous Obol, 4th-5th Century (Zeimal pl. 32 #53)26 viewsObv: Stylized bust facing left; Sogdian legend in front
Rev: Stylized archer with bow facing right
SpongeBob
Smirnova_359.jpg
Eastern Sogdiana: Gurak (710-738) AE Unit (Smirnova-359)25 viewsObv: Tamghas on both sides of the square hole
Rev: Sogdian legend Ishkhid Gurak (Urak) around the square hole
SpongeBob
EB0425_scaled.JPG
EB0425 Hadrian / Diana4 viewsHadrian, AE Sestertius, 136 AD.
Obv: HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right.
Rev: S-C, Diana standing facing, head left, holding arrow & bow.
References: RIC 777; Cohen 1364.
Diameter: 31.5mm, Weight: 23.2 grams.
EB
Faustina II -1.jpg
Faustina Jr Sestertius61 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA ; dr. bust r.
Rev: SIDERIBVS RECEPTA S C ; Diana Lucifera stg. r., holding a long torch.
Cohen 215
1 commentsTanit
FAVJSE20.jpg
Faustina Jr, RIC (A. Pius) 1383, sestertius of AD 155-15651 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.09g, Ø31mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 155-156.
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust of Faustina Minor, facing right.
Rev.: S C (in field), Diana standing left, holding arrow and resting bow on ground.
RIC 1383; BMCRE 2180; Cohen 206; Strack 1325; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali III-2) 112 (4 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4717.
ex Numis.be Eeckhout Joselito auction, May 2012
2 commentsCharles S
Faustina Jr-.jpg
Faustina Junior Sestertius27 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA ; dr. bust r.
Rev: SIDERIBVS RECEPTA SC ; Diana Lucifera stg. r., holding a long torch

C. 215
Tanit
0141-220.jpg
Faustina junior, Denarius 34 viewsRome mint, AD 161/175
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
DIANA LVCIF, Diana Lucifera standing left
Ref : RCV #5250
Potator II
00fcsulla.jpg
FAUSTUS CORNELIUS SULLA37 viewsAR denarius. 56 BC. 3,66 grs. Diademed and draped bust of Diana right. Crescent above,lituus behind. FAVSTVS before. / Sulla seated left,between King Bocchus of Mauretania ,who kneels right before him,presenting olive branch,and King Jugurtha of Numidia,who kneels left behind,hands bound. FELIX on right.
Craw 426/1. RSC Cornelia 59. Smyth VI/1.
1 commentsbenito
00fcsulla2.jpg
FAUSTUS CORNELIUS SULLA65 viewsAR denarius. 56 BC. 3,66 grs. Diademed and draped bust of Diana right. Crescent above,lituus behind. FAVSTVS before. / Sulla seated left,between King Bocchus of Mauretania ,who kneels right before him,presenting olive branch,and King Jugurtha of Numidia,who kneels left behind,hands bound. FELIX on right.
Craw 426/1. RSC Cornelia 59. Smyth VI/1.

1 commentsbenito
France_370_Nimes_Jardins_de_la_Fontaine.JPG
France, Nimes - Jardins de la Fontaine184 viewsDecorated with vases and statues, the Jardins de la Fontaine count as one of the major public gardens in Europe. They were laid out in the eighteenth century on the site of the ancient spring, an area that includes the Tour Magne and the Temple of Diana.vacationchick
France_368_Nimes_Jardins_de_la_Fontaine.JPG
France, Nimes - Jardins de la Fontaine176 viewsDecorated with vases and statues, the Jardins de la Fontaine count as one of the major public gardens in Europe. They were laid out in the eighteenth century on the site of the ancient spring, an area that includes the Tour Magne and the Temple of Diana.vacationchick
France_371_Nimes_Jardins_de_la_Fontaine.JPG
France, Nimes - Jardins de la Fontaine161 viewsDecorated with vases and statues, the Jardins de la Fontaine count as one of the major public gardens in Europe. They were laid out in the eighteenth century on the site of the ancient spring, an area that includes the Tour Magne and the Temple of Diana.vacationchick
purpk.jpg
Furius Purpurio, ca 169-158 BC19 viewsAR denarius, 18mm, 3.03g.
Obv.: Helmeted head of Roma to right.
Rev.: PVR beneath Diana (or Luna) in biga to right, murex shell above // ROMA
Reference: Crawford 187/1.
Notes: Ex - RBW, originally purchased from Peuss 322, 11/1/1983, in lot 69 for about $26.50. Ex - Goodman Collection, Ex - David Hendin, sold ACG 1/24/16.
1 commentsJohn Anthony
2-2014-10-027~0.JPG
Gallienius, Doe/Antelope29 viewsGallienius
Ae 18-22mm; 2.94g

GALLIENVS AVG
Radiate head right

DIANAE CONS AVG
Doe/Antelope? walking left

I am not sure if this is a Doe or Antelope- its hind end looks smaller than the Antelope and I don't see any trace of horns- but I also dont see any Doe's walking left with their head foreward, they are all looking back.
Robin Ayers
1diana_unita.jpg
Gallieno, antoniniano (R/DIANAE CONS AVG), 260-268 d.C.29 viewsGallieno (regnante da solo 260-268 d.C.), antoniniano. Zecca di Roma, III officina
AE, gr 1.80, 16 mm, B/BB
D/GALLIENVS AVG, testa radiata a dx
R/DIANAE CONS AVG, antilope andante a sin., Γ in ex.
RIC 181, Cohen 165.
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (4 maggio 2009, numero catalogo 66), ex Attila Horvath collection (Kiskunfelegyhaza, Ungheria, fino al 2009).
paolo
coins386.JPG
Gallienus16 viewsGallienus, c. 267-268 A.D., minted in rome
OBV: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right.
REV: DIANAE CONS AVG, stag walking left.
EX: X, mint of rome.
ecoli
009CGallienus.jpg
Gallienus17 viewsBillon Antoninianus
Roman Imperial - The Crisis

Gallienus

Milan mint, 260 - 268 A.D.
F.
20.0 mm / 1.804 g / 180°

Obverse: "GALLIENVS AVG", radiate bust right.
Reverse: "DIANA FELIX", Diana standing right, drawing arrow from quiver at shoulder, holding bow, hind/hound at foot.

RIC 473, RSC 173, Sear 10196.

MyID: 009C
TenthGen
ga180.jpg
Gallienus VI 179 Rome 260-268 CE21 viewsGallienus, AE Antoninianus. Rome mint, sole reign.
Obverse: GALLIENVS , radiate head right.
Reverse: DIANAE CONS AVG, Stag walking left.
Rome mint 17.2 mm., 2.6 g.
1 commentsNORMAN K
Gallienus_AE-Ant_GALLIENVS-AVG_DIANAE-CONS-AVG_Gamma_RIC-181var_C-_Rome_253-268-AD__Q-001_19-20mm_2,84g-s~0.jpg
Gallienus (253-268 AD.) AE-Antoninianus, ANTELOPE, DIANAE CONS AVG,174 viewsGallienus (253-268 AD.) AE-Antoninianus,
avers:- GALLIENVS-AVG, radiate head right.
revers:- DIANAE-CONS-AVG, antelope walking left, right legs forwards.
exergo: Gamma
diameter: 19-20mm
weight: 2,84g
mint: Rome
date:
ref: RIC-181var, Cunetio hoard 1344, Minster hoard 69, Appleshaw hoard 82,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
RIC_Gallienus_RIC_V_Rome_179.JPG
Gallienus (Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus) (253-268 A.D.)42 viewsSRCV 10201, RIC V S-179, Göbl.744b, Cohen 160, Van Meter 49/3

AE Antoninianus, 22 mm., 180°

Rome mint (per Göbl), 10th officina, struck during solo reign (260-268 A.D.) in 267-268 A.D.

Obv: GALLIENVS AVG, Radiate bust right.

Rev: DIANAE CONS AVG, Stag walking left, X in exergue.

Issued to commemorate Gallienus’s vows to Diana invoking her protection against the revolt of Aureolus.

RIC rarity C, Van Meter VB1
Stkp
RIC_Gallienus_Sear_10201_stag_l.jpg
Gallienus (Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus) (253-268 A.D.)15 viewsSRCV 10201, RIC V-S 179, Göbl 744b, Van Meter 49/3

BI Antoninianus, 2.60 g., 20.29 mm. max., 180°

Rome mint, tenth officina, struck during solo reign (260-268 A.D.), in 267-268 A.D.

Obv: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right.

Rev: DIANAE CONS AVG, stag standing left, X in exergue.

Issued to commemorate Gallienus’s vows to Diana invoking her protection against the revolt of Aureolus.

RIC rarity C, Van Meter VB1.
Stkp
RIC_Gallienus_RIC_V_S_656.JPG
Gallienus (Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus) (253-268 A.D.)27 viewsSRCV 10345, RIC V S-656 var. (reverse legend and bust type), Göbl 1626c, Alföldi, Weltkrise p. 159, Van Meter 251.

AR Antoninianus, 21 mm., 180°

Antioch mint, struck during solo reign (260-268 A.D.), in 264 or 265 A.D.

Obv: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust facing right.

Rev: SAECVLARHS AVG (Greek H [eta] instead of Latin E), stag standing right, palm branch in exergue.

The reverse legend means means “the Secular (Games) of the Emperor.” The Secular Games (Latin Ludi Saeculares) was a pagan celebration, involving sacrifices and theatrical performances, held for three days and nights to mark the end of a saeculum (supposedly the longest possible length of human life, considered to be either 100 or 110 years in length) and the beginning of the next. The only clearly attested celebrations under the Roman Republic took place in 249 B.C. and in the 140s B.C. The Games were revived in 17 B.C. by Augustus, who observed the traditional 110-year cycle. Claudius, however, introduced an alternative cycle for the games in 47 A.D. on the 800th anniversary of Rome's foundation, based on a century instead of a 110-year cycle, and from that point onward there were essentially two sets of games. Domitian followed Augustus in 88 A.D. using the traditional 110-year cycle, albeit with his games being six years ahead of schedule. Antoninus Pius followed the Claudian “century cycle” in 147/8 A.D. (though without his using the term saecular). Septimius Severus restored the 110-year cycle of Augustus in 204 A.D. Philip the Arab, whose Games of 247/8 marked the millennium of Rome, followed the Claudian cycle.

Alföldi, followed by Göbl, thinks this type proves that Gallienus intended to perform Saecular Games in 264 A.D. The repetition of Saecular games only sixteen years after Philip's games fits with the strong desire at the time to depict every emperor as the restorer of good times and the founder of a new Golden Age.

The stag refers to Diana as patroness of the Saecular Games and divine protectress of Gallienus. The palm branch symbol used with the type is also appropriate for anniversary celebrations.
1 commentsStkp
RIC_Gallienus_RIC_V-1_(S),_Rome_181_var.JPG
Gallienus (Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus) (253-268 A.D.)26 viewsSRCV 10200, RIC V S-181 var (officina letter), Göbl 716b, Van Meter 49/7

AE Antoninianus, 20 mm., 0°

Rome mint, struck during solo reign (260-268 A.D.), in 267-268 A.D.

Obv: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate [head] right.

Rev: DIANAE CONS AVG, antelope walking left, Γ in exergue.

Issued in 267-268 A.D. to commemorate vows to Diana invoking her protection against the revolt of Aurreolus.
.
RIC rarity C, Van Meter VB1.
Stkp
RIC_Gallienus_RIC-V-1_(S)_Rome_177_doe.jpg
Gallienus (Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus) (253-268 A.D.)21 viewsSRCV 10199, RIC V S-177, Göbl 728b, CT 1361, Van Meter 49/1

BI Antoninianus, 2.51 g., 20.75 mm. max., 0°

Rome mint, fifth officina, tenth emission, struck during solo reign (260-268 A.D.), in 267-268 A.D.

Obv: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right.

Rev: DIANAE CONS AVG, doe walking right, looking left. E in exergue.

Issued in 267-268 A.D. to commemorate vows to Diana invoking her protection against the revolt of Aureolus. As goddess of the hunt, Diana is often portrayed as a huntress accompanied by a deer.

RIC rarity C, Van Meter VB1.
Stkp
RIC_Gallienus_RIC-V-1_(S)_181_Rome_antelope.jpg
Gallienus (Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus) (253-268 A.D.)14 viewsSRCV 10200, RIC V S-181, Göbl 750b, Van Meter 49/7.

BI Antoninianus, 2.42 g., 20.50 mm. max., 180°

Rome mint, twelfth officina, struck during solo reign (260-268 A.D.), in 267-268 A.D.

Obv: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right.

Rev: DIANAE CONS AVG, antelope/gazelle standing left. XII in exergue.

Issued in 267-268 A.D. to commemorate vows to Diana invoking her protection against the revolt of Aureolus.

RIC rarity C, Van Meter VB1.
Stkp
RIC_Gallienus_RIC_V_S_207_goat_right.jpg
Gallienus (Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus) (253-268 A.D.)9 viewsSRCV 10236, RIC V S-207, Göbl 731b, Van Meter 100

BI Antoninianus, 3.22 g., 19.26 mm. max., 0°

Rome mint, sixth officina, tenth emision, struck during solo reign (260-268 A.D.), in 267-268 A.D.

Obv: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right.

Rev: IOVI CONS AVG, goat standing right, ς (stigma) in exergue.

Issued in 267-268 A.D. to commemorate vows to Diana invoking his protection against the revolt of Aureolus.

RIC rarity C, Van Meter VB1.
Stkp
RIC_Gallienus_RIC-V_S_luc.jpg
Gallienus (Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus) (253-268 A.D.)10 viewsSRCV 10284, RIC V-S 609, Göbl 1665i, Van Meter 158.

BI Antoninianus, 3.12 g., 19.73 mm. max., 180°

Antioch mint, struck during solo reign (260-268 A.D.), 267 A.D.

Obv: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate draped and cuirassed bust right.

Rev: LVNA LVC[IF], Diana walking right, crescent on head, carrying transverse torch. P XV in exergue.

The reverse legend abbreviates LVNA LVCIFERA = Luna the light-giver. The exergual legend is an abbreviation for TR P = Tribunicia Potestas = Tribunician Powers.

RIC rarity C, Van Meter VB1.
Stkp
RIC_Gallienus_SRCV_10200_dianae_cons_antelope_right.jpg
Gallienus (Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus) (253-268 A.D.)41 viewsSRCV 10200, RIC V S-181, Göbl 747b, Van Meter 49/6.

BI Antoninianus, 3.25 g., 21.41 mm. max., 180°

Rome mint, eleventh officina, struck during solo reign (260-268 A.D.), in 267-268 A.D.

Obv: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right.

Rev: DIANAE CONS AVG, antelope/gazelle walking right. XI in exergue.

Issued in 267-268 A.D. to commemorate vows to Diana invoking her protection against the revolt of Aureolus.

RIC rarity C, Van Meter VB1.
3 commentsStkp
00252.jpg
Gallienus (RIC 176, Coin #252)12 viewsRIC 176 (C), AE Antoninianus, Rome, 267-268 AD.
Obv: IMP GALLIENVS AVG Radiate head right.
Rev: DIANAE CONS AVG (globe) Doe walking right, head left.
Size: 20.9mm 2.77gm
MaynardGee
582_Gallienus_Luna_Lucifera.jpg
Gallienus - AE antoninianus6 viewsAntioch
265 AD
radiate head left
GALLIENVS AVG
Diana with moon crescent on her head holding torch
LVNA LVCIFERA
RIC 646; Göbl 1664e
3,63g
Johny SYSEL
414_Gallienus_antelope.jpg
Gallienus - AE antoninianus7 viewsRome
267 - IX 268 AD
10th emission
radiate head right
GALLIENVS AVG
antelope walking left
DIANAE CONS AVG
Γ
Göbl MIR 716b(2), RIC V S181, RSC IV 165, SRCV III 10200
2,67g
ex Jiří Militký
Johny SYSEL
ID0129_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Antelope Left58 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVS[AV]G, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- [DIANA]ECONSAVG, Antelope left, less common type depicting the antelope half from behind with both rear legs visible.
Exergue:- Gamma
RIC cf.181 GOBL 716b(2) CUNETIO 1345 CMR 7a3(E)

There are 5 coins of this type in the Cunetio Hoard
1 commentsnogoodnicksleft
ID117_MERGED.jpg
Gallienus - Antelope Left52 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Antelope left (head looking up)
Exergue:- Gamma
RIC cf.181 GOBL 716b(1) CUNETIO 1344 CMR 7a3(C)

This variation of the Antelope where the head is looking up isn't depicted in the drawing types for the Antelope in Figure 9 in Appendix 5 of the Cunetio. Although it is not so uncommon as I have seen about 3 or 4 examples coming up for sale in the last couple of years, and there is one example is shown in Gobl but with a different obverse (716u). Judging from the differences recorded between the other example types in Figure 9 in the Cunetio (for example Tigress items 5 & 6, Doe item 20 & 21 or 23 & 240) one would assume that the authors would have also recorded the head being raised on the Antelope had such an example been present. Therefore the logical conclusion is that this variation is unlikely to have been present in the Cunetio Hoard.
1 commentsnogoodnicksleft
0160_Merged2.jpg
Gallienus - Antelope Left27 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVS[AVG], Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- [DIANAE]CONSAVG, Antelope left
Exergue:- ?

I can't quite make out the Officina in the Exergue, it seems more likely to be Gamma, but the horns on this Antelope point it more to the type GOBL 723b which is from the Delta Officina


nogoodnicksleft
164_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Antelope Left27 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Antelope left
Exergue:- Gamma
RIC 181 GOBL 716b(1) CUNETIO 1344 CMR 7a3(B)
nogoodnicksleft
0162_MERGED2.jpg
Gallienus - Antelope Left23 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- [DIANAE]CONSAVG, Antelope left
Exergue:- Gamma over XII

A very interesting example showing 2 different officina marks in the exergue, and possibly being over struck on a reverse from a 3rd officina. The incuse (impression line from bust) can be clearly seen on the reverse.

This coin was discussed in the following thread
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=100717.0
nogoodnicksleft
ID0209_Merged_Antelope_L.jpg
Gallienus - Antelope Left16 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Antelope left
Exergue:- Gamma
RIC 181 GOBL 716b(1) CUNETIO 1344 CMR 7a3(B)

A coin from the Normanby hoard, discovered in 1983 in Normanby, North Lincolnshire

Provenance : Purchased from Art Ancient Ltd and formerly in the collection of W.Katz.
nogoodnicksleft
ID0224_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Antelope Left19 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right curaissed bust with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANA[E]CONSAVG, Antelope left
Exergue:- Retrograde Gamma
RIC cf.181 GOBL 716u var CUNETIO 1344 var CMR 7i3(D) var

There is no record of a retrograde gamma antelope in Gobl or in Cunetio/Venera hoards. The curaissed bust is also rare for the Antelope types with only 3 examples recorded in Gobl and a rarity grade of R4 in CMR (Catalogue Des Monnaies Romaines)

The Catalogue des Monnaies Romaines goes into good details on the bust
nogoodnicksleft
ID0152_MERGED.jpg
Gallienus - Doe Left28 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Doe standing left, looking right
Exergue:- E
RIC 177 GOBL 727b CUNETIO 1365
nogoodnicksleft
ID0180_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Doe Left25 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONS[AVG], Doe standing left, looking right
Exergue:- E
RIC 177 GOBL 727b CUNETIO 1365

This is likely to be a rare variation of the left standing doe looking right, where the front legs are in the reversed position to the usual type. This is only example I've personally seen so far. The Left standing Doe is a good deal more uncommon than Right standing Doe the Cunetio lists 37 verses 228, GOBL records 38 verses 227, while La Verena 16 against 128 .

As a note of caution when comparing the figures quoted in the Gobl with those of Cunetio / Verena or other hoards. Some of the examples pictures in Gobl are referenced as coming from these hoards, therefore it is probable that some of these coins were also likely to have been included in his survey figures. Since the total numbers in Gobl clearly don't included all the coins from Cunetio & Verena or other hoards, this "double bubble" comparison could potentially skew the figures (probably making rarer coins seem less rare). That said Gobl's figures are not so far away in terms of percentages from either the Cunetio or Verena hoards & this may well have been a deliberate undertaking by the author.
nogoodnicksleft
ID0185_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Doe Right18 viewsObverse:- [...][GALLIENVS]AVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANA[ECONSAVG], Doe walking right, looking left, rear seen from behind
Exergue:- E
RIC 176/7 GOBL 728b/z CUNETIO 1360

Second example where the rear is seen from behind. This is one of those coins where it is impossible to say if the obverse legend is an IMPGALLIENVS or just GALLIENVS fortunately 3 coins in the Cunetio Hoard seem to be same hence the singular Cunetio Reference.
nogoodnicksleft
0161_MERGED2.jpg
Gallienus - Doe Right33 viewsObverse:- IMPGALLIENVSA[VG], Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECO[N]S[AV]G, Doe walking right, looking left
Exergue:- E
RIC 176 GOBL 728z CUNETIO 1357
nogoodnicksleft
0074_MERGED2.jpg
Gallienus - Doe Right30 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Doe walking right, looking left
Exergue:- E
RIC 177 GOBL 728b CUNETIO 1361
nogoodnicksleft
ID0154_MERGED.jpg
Gallienus - Doe Right26 viewsObverse:- IMPGALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Doe walking right, looking left
Exergue:- E
RIC 176 GOBL 728z CUNETIO 1357
nogoodnicksleft
0167_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Doe Right25 viewsObverse:- [I]MPGALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAV[G], Doe standing right, looking left
Exergue:- E
RIC 176 GOBL 728z CUNETIO 1357

At first glance you will might think this is another standard right standing doe looking left. However the front legs are the wrong way round to most other examples, the fore leg on this example being behind the far side leg (rather than to the front). This variation is not shown in types in the Cunetio in figure 9 Appendix 5. Nor does there seem to be any distinction made in Gobl between the two variations. Differences of a similar nature are show in the doe type and other types so one would assume that this variation was not found in the Cunetio Hoard nor in any of the reference sources for Gobl. Possible making it rare or at least uncommon. During my research I found 2 other examples.
nogoodnicksleft
0174_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Doe Right20 viewsObverse:- [GALLIENV]SA[VG], Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONS[AVG], Doe standing right, looking left
Exergue:- e off flan
RIC 177 GOBL 728b CUNETIO 1361

In bad condition, but this is one of the other doe coins that I previously mentioned which has the forelegs reversed to the normal type.

nogoodnicksleft
ID0187_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Doe Right20 viewsObverse:- IMPGALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- [DIANA]ECONSAVG, Doe walking right, looking left rear seen from behind
Exergue:- E
RIC 176 GOBL 728z CUNETIO 1357

The first (and better) of two coins where the doe's rear is seen from behind. Accordingly there was only one single example of this variation in the Cunetio hoard.
nogoodnicksleft
0163_Merged1.jpg
Gallienus - Gazelle XI Left35 viewsObverse:- GAL[LIENVS]AVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAE[CONSAVG], Gazelle left, rear seen from behind
Exergue:- XI
RIC 181 GOBL 746b CUNETIO 1403

nogoodnicksleft
ID0186_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Gazelle XI Left22 viewsObverse:- [GA]LLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAE[CONSAVG], Gazelle left, rear seen from behind
Exergue:- XI
RIC 181 GOBL 746b CUNETIO 1403

nogoodnicksleft
ID0181_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Gazelle XI Right17 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Gazelle Right
Exergue:- XI
RIC 181 GOBL 747b CUNETIO 1401

Generally with the Gazelle XI facing right coins the near side front leg is forward of the far side leg, however this coin has the front legs the other way around. This is another variation that isn't detailed in Appendix 5 figure 9 of the Cunetio.
nogoodnicksleft
ID0151_MERGED.jpg
Gallienus - Gazelle XI Right38 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Gazelle Right
Exergue:- XI
RIC 181 GOBL 747b CUNETIO 1401

Let me draw your attention to the mustache which seems particularly well preserved on this coin.
nogoodnicksleft
ID0189_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Gazelle XI Right24 viewsObverse:- G[ALLIENV]SAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Gazelle Right
Exergue:- IX
RIC 181 GOBL ???? CUNETIO ????

Rare/unlisted example with IX for the officina mark in the exergue. So far I've not found any other examples although there is a left facing IX gazelle listed in the Venera hoard (LV79)
nogoodnicksleft
ID0076_ANTELOPE_MERGED.jpg
Gallienus - Gazelle XII Left55 viewsObverse:- GALLIEN[VSA]VG, Head right cuirassed bust with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Gazelle left
Exergue:- XII
RIC 181 GOBL 750u CUNETIO 1410
nogoodnicksleft
ID0156_MERGED.jpg
Gallienus - Gazelle XII Left31 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECO[N]SAVG, Gazelle left
Exergue:- XII
RIC 181 GOBL 750b CUNETIO 1408

At first glance this coin seems to have an XI in the exergue, however according to the Cunetio one of the subtle differences between the coins of the XI & XII officina are the rear legs, those from XI are seen from behind, whilst those from XII are not. On closer inspection and only in right light you can just make out a raised area which corresponds to the missing I (see small picture in the middle). Whether this was done deliberately or not is not for me to make judgements but it does at least keep the coin in line with the Cunetio statement about the rear legs. The only other coin I came across which maybe refute this statement for the XI Gazelle can be found in the coin project (http://www.coinproject.com/coin_detail.php?coin=218931).
nogoodnicksleft
0171_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Gazelle XII Left14 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAV[G], Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAE[CONSAV]G, Gazelle Left
Exergue:- IIX
RIC ???? GOBL ???? CUNETIO ????

An interesting piece with a Officina mint mark error. The style of the gazelle could make it possibly a contemporary imitation. The X is a particularly interesting shape looking more like a cross rather than X, maybe simply an unintentional coincidence or perhaps we could tentatively speculate that it was deliberate act by an early Christian die maker?. Different dies to the ZF57 example in Gobl, and to the coin in Helveticas collection (referenced in Gallienus RIC list).
nogoodnicksleft
0135_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Gazelle XII Left14 viewsObverse:- IMPGALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECO[N]SAVG, Gazelle left
Exergue:- XII
RIC 181 GOBL 750z CUNETIO ----
nogoodnicksleft
ID0194_GAZELLEXII_L.jpg
Gallienus - Gazelle XII Left24 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right Paludamentrest (portion of clock) on both shoulders with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Gazelle left
Exergue:- XII
RIC 181 GOBL 750e CUNETIO ????

This coin looks like it is a die match for the coin example listed (incorrectly) as 746e in Gobl
nogoodnicksleft
0170_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Gazelle XII Right20 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Gazelle Right
Exergue:- XII
RIC 181 GOBL 751b CUNETIO 1415
nogoodnicksleft
0155_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Gazelle XII Right 29 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown, draped and cuirassed
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Gazelle Right
Exergue:- XII (off flan)
RIC ??? GOBL ???? CUNETIO ????

I've listed this one as a Gazelle from the XII officina. The rear legs are wrong according to the Cunetio for the Gazelle XI types. Plus the front legs seem to be wrong for the Antelope Gamma types. The shape of the horns seem more in keeping with the Gazelle XII Type rather than both of the other types. The right facing Gazelle XII types seems to be more common than the right facing Antelope types.

The bust seems to be the type listed in Göbl as "Paludamentum über Cüraß" (Paludamentum is a roman cloak/cape, über = over & Cüraß = Cuirass which is a piece of armour which covers the torso) this is abbreviated as PCh in the tables. In table 20 which is where the animal series for Rome can be found, there is only listed a PCh2 bust type, the 2 digit relating to the ties/ribbons which would be hanging freely. This coin however seems to have one tie draped over the shoulder like the standard right facing busts which is indicated by the 1 digit (B1 for example for the standard right facing bust). This would make the bust type a PCh1 of which there are few examples in Göbl (for example table 7 38r) but none recorded in table 20 for the animal series.
nogoodnicksleft
0175_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Gazelle XII Right20 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Gazelle Right seen from behind
Exergue:- XII
RIC ??? GOBL ???? CUNETIO ????

Rare example of a right facing Gazelle XII but seen from behind, which fly's in the face of the Cunetio statement about XI Gazelles only being seen from behind & XII Gazelles not.

Provenance :- Purchased from Harlan J Berk formally a lunalucifera.com coin
nogoodnicksleft
ID0111_MERGED.jpg
Gallienus - Stag Left47 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Stag left
Exergue:- X

RIC 179 GOBL 744b CUNETIO 1397:1
1 commentsnogoodnicksleft
ID0195_Merged_Stag_L.jpg
Gallienus - Stag Left28 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Stag left (head facing upwards)
Exergue:- X
RIC 179 GOBL 744b CUNETIO 1397:2
nogoodnicksleft
ID0216_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Stag Left24 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Stag left
Exergue:- X
RIC 179 GOBL 744b CUNETIO 1398

A rarer variation of the stag half seen from behind.
nogoodnicksleft
ID0082_STAG_MERGED.jpg
Gallienus - Stag Right42 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Stag right
Exergue:- X
nogoodnicksleft
ID0138_MERGED.jpg
Gallienus - Stag Right27 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Stag right
Exergue:- X or XI

Normally the officini for the stag is a X however in the exergue there is looks to be traces of a possible I (although this may just be a defect on the flan itself). The style of the antlers seems a bit odd compared to the usual types.
nogoodnicksleft
gallienus_RIC181(sole_reign).jpg
GALLIENUS AE antoninianus - 267-268 AD (sole reign)32 viewsobv: GALLIENVS AVG (radiate head right)
rev: DIANAE CONS AVG (antelope walking right), XI in ex.
ref: RIC Vi 181, RSC 162
mint: Rome
2.93gms, 20mm
berserker
gallienus_RIC179K.jpg
GALLIENUS AE antoninianus - 267-268 AD (sole reign)33 viewsobv: GALLIENVS AVG (radiate head right)
rev: DIANAE CONS AVG (antelope walking left), XII in ex.
ref: RIC Vi 179K, RSC 160
mint: Rome
3.41gms, 22mm

It seems this animal has three corn.
berserker
gallienus_RIC177.jpg
GALLIENUS AE antoninianus - 267-268 AD (sole reign)38 viewsobv: GALLIENVS AVG (radiate head right)
rev: DIANAE CONS AVG (doe walking right, looking backwards), Epsilon (Greek e) in ex.
ref: RIC Vi 177, RSC 154
mint: Rome
3.17gms, 20mm
1 commentsberserker
gallienus_RIC179.jpg
GALLIENUS AE antoninianus - 267-268 AD (sole reign)27 viewsobv: GALLIENVS AVG (radiate head right)
rev: DIANAE CONS AVG (Stag walking right, [X in ex])
ref: RIC Vi 179, Cohen 160
mint: Rome (or Mediolanum?)
2.66gms, 16mm

Gallienus produced an entire series of Antoniniani invoking the protection of various gods and goddesses against the revolt of Aureolus in 268. When Gallienus was murdered in 4 March 268, Claudius II paid off the soldiers, and probably coins was struck at Mediolanum. This hypothese is prove by this coin where the bust looks nothing like Gallienus, but much like Claudius II, whose coins were very commonly imitated by unofficial or "barbaric" mints.
berserker
gallienus_RIC179~0.jpg
GALLIENUS AE antoninianus - 267-268 AD (sole reign)39 viewsobv: GALLIENVS AVG (radiate head right)
rev: DIANAE CONS AVG (stag walking left), X in ex.
ref: RIC Vi 179, Cohen 160
mint: Rome
1.98gms, 19mm
1 commentsberserker
Gallienus_Antelope_Right~0.JPG
Gallienus Antelope Right20 viewsGallienus Antoninianus, 21.42mm, 2.6g,
OBV: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate bust right
REV: DIANAE CONS AVG, Antelope walking right
RIC 181, RSC 162, SEAR (88) 2952
Romanorvm
AAECb_small.png
Gallienus Antoninianus7 viewsGallienus; joint reign with Valerian 253-260 AD; sole reign 260-268 AD

Rome. 260-268 AD.

19mm., 2.36g.

IMP GALLIENVS AVG: Head of Gallienus, radiate, right

DIANAE CONS AVG: Doe, walking right, looking backward

References: RIC V Gallienus 176

AAEC
RL
AAIGb.png
Gallienus Antoninianus8 viewsGallienus; joint reign with Valerian 253-260 AD; sole reign 260-268 AD

Asia, 267 AD

20mm., 3.39g.

GALLIENVS AVG. Bust of Gallienus, radiate, cuirassed, right

LVNA LVCIF. Diana, draped, walking right, holding torch. Mintmark: P[X]V

References: RIC V Gallienus 609

AAIG
RL
IMG_1027.JPG
Gallienus Antoninianus Luna Lucifera28 viewsBi Antoninianus
Gallienus , 253-268CE
Diameter: 21mm, Weight: 3.60 grams, Die axis: 12h

Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG
Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust to right

Reverse: LVNA LVCIFERA
Diana as luna, crescent atop head, advancing to right. Holds lit torch in both hands, drapery billows behind.

Mint: Asian mint, probably Antioch

Notes:
- Struck during sole reign of Gallienus, 260 -268 CE.
-The Roman goddess Luna, the equivalent of the Greek Selene, came to be associated in Rome with Diana. The reverse can be translated as 'Diana bringer of light'.
-The goddess Luna had her own temple on the Aventine Hill, but it was destroyed by the great fire of Rome circa 64 CE during Emperor Nero's reign.

Ex Civitas Galleries 2016, ex Tom Cederlind
Pharsalos
Gallienus18_opt.jpg
GALLIENUS Antoninianus, RIC 179, Stag21 viewsOBV: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate bust right
REV: DIANAE CONS AVG, Stag walking left


Struck at Rome, 267-28 AD
1 commentsLegatus
Gallienus16_opt.jpg
GALLIENUS Antoninianus, RIC 181, Antelope20 viewsOBV: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right
REV: DIANAE CONS AVG, antelope walking left


Minted at Rome, 267-8 AD
Legatus
gallienus_RIC473K.jpg
GALLIENUS AR antoninianus - 264-265 AD (sole reign)32 viewsobv: GALLIENVS AVG (radiate head right)
rev: DIANA FELIX (Diana advancing right, holding bow and drawing arrow, at her feet deer leaping right)
ref: RIC Vi 473K (C), Cohen 173
mint: Mediolanum, billon
2.6 gms, 19 mm
Rare in this condition

Cohen and RIC describes the animal as a hound, but this example clearly shows the short tail and long horns of a deer. Only at the DIANA FELIX sestertius (without S-C) describes a deer.
berserker
Gallienus21.jpg
GALLIENUS Billon Antoninianus RIC VI 609, Luna25 viewsOBVERSE: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate cuirassed bust right
REVERSE: LVNA LVCIF, Diana walking right holding torch in both hands, PXV in ex.
3.8g, 20mm

Struck at Antioch, 260-268 AD
1 commentsLegatus
coins1 205~0.jpg
gallienus DIANAE CONS AVG464 viewsgallienus, 267-268 A.D., mint of rome..
OBV: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right.
REV: DIANAE CONS AVG, stag walking left. X in exergue.

this coin is historically important because it is believed that this coin was minted to commemorate vows to goddess diana and invoke her protection of gallienus against the revolt of aureolus... theres a whole series of these asking all kinds of different gods/goddesses for help. when i get more of these " zoo" coins ill post them here!

submitted by ancientcoins
2 commentsancientcoins
Gallienus_DIANAECONSAVG.jpg
Gallienus DIANAECONSAVG11 viewsObverse:
Head right with radiate crown
GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
IMP: IMPERATOR - Emperor
GALLIENVS: Gallienus
AVG: AUGUSTUS

Reverse:
Doe walking right, looking left
DIANAECONSAVG: Dianae Conservatrix Augusti

Domination: Bronze AE 3, size 19 mm
Exergue: E (Regnal Year "E"=5 or 569/70)
RIC 177 GOBL 728b CUNETIO 1361

Comments:
DIANAE CONS. AVG. Dianae Conservatrix Augusti. A stag. -- This legend and type, with variations, frequently appears on coins of Gallienus, whose father Valerianus was ingularly attached to the worship of Diana the Preserver, insomuch that he dedicated a temple to her honor at Rome, called Aedes Valeranae.
John S
Gallienvs FELICITAS SAECVLI.jpg
Gallienus FELICITAS SAECVLI37 viewsGallienus, 253 - 24 March 268 A.D.

Radiate draped bust right

Obverse: IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS AVG: Imperator Ceasar Publius Licinius Gallienvs Augustus

Imp: Imperator, Supreme army commander
C: Ceasar
P: Publius
LIC: Licinivs
Gallienus: Gallienus
AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
Felicitas Saecvli: The happiness of the 100th year

Felicitas: The happiness
Saecvli: 100th year

Diana advancing right holding long torch in both hands.

Domination: Billon Antoninianus, size 20 mm

Mint: Antiochia, 2nd emission, 1st officina ; 255 CE. RIC 212 ; C 51
John S
galienus_ric779.png
Gallienus RIC 17910 viewsGallienus AR Antoninianus.
Rome mint,
GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right /
DIANAE CONS AVG, Stag walking left, officina mark I below.
xokleng
gallienus_luna_lucif_com.JPG
Gallienus RIC V-1 (S), Asian Mint 60929 viewsAE 20 mm 3.5 grams
OBV :: GALLIENVS AVG Radiate and cuirassed bust right
REV :: LVNA LVCIF . Diana with crescent headress walking right holding torch. chalmy flowing to left
EX :: PXV (Antioch )
RIC V-1 (S), Asian Mint 609
RIC rated Common
Purchased 08/2008
Johnny
gallienus_deer_left.JPG
gallienus RIC V-1, Rome 17959 viewsAE 19 MM 3.7 GRAMS 253-268 AD
obv :: GALLIENVS AVG. Radiate head right
REV :: DIANAE CONS AVG. Stag walking left
EX :: X
RIC V-1, Rome 179
Purchased 08/2008


Johnny
gallienus_goat_left.JPG
Gallienus RIC V-1, Rome 18156 views21 mm 3.5 grams
OBV :: GALLIENVS AVG. Radiate, cuirassed bust right
REV :: DIANAE CONS AVG. Antelope walking left
EX :: XII
RIC V-1, Rome 181
Purchased 08/2008


Johnny
gallienus_zoo_ant_left.JPG
gallienus RIC V-1, Rome 18146 viewsAE 22 mm 4.4 grams
OBV :: GALLIENVS AVG, Radiate head right
REV :: DIANAE CONS AVG, Antelope walking left
EX :: XII
RIC V-1, Rome 181
RIC rated C
purchased 04/2010
Johnny
gallienus_diana.JPG
Gallienus Zoo20 viewsGallienus Ae. antoninianus

Gallienus (AD 253-268), Ae. antoninianus, rad. bust r., rev., DIANAE CONS AVG, Stag walking r., hd. turned
James b4
GALLIEN-13.jpg
Gallienus, RIC 18016 viewsObv: GALLIENVS AVG
radiate head right
Rev: DIANAE CONS AVG
antelope walking right
r in ex.
20mm 2.9gm
OWL365
GallDianae.JPG
Gallienus, AE Antoninianus24 viewsGALLIENVS AVG
Bust radiate, right
DIANAE CONS AVG
Antelope right
Ex. XI
RIC 181, C 162
Rome
whitetd49
Clipboard6~4.jpg
Gallienus, AE antoninianus. Rome. Sole reign.16 viewsObv: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate, draped bust right.
Rev: DIANAE CONS AVG, gazelle or antelope walking left. XII.
ancientone
0440-302_red.jpg
Gallienus, Antoninianus - 001249 viewsGALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right
DIANAE CONS AVG, doe walking right looking back, E at exergue
3.3 gr
Cohen # 154, RCV # 10199
Potator II
4629_4630.jpg
Gallienus, Antoninianus, DIANAE CONS AVG8 viewsAE Antoninianus
Gallienus
Augustus: 253 - 268AD
Issued: 260 - 268AD
21.0mm 3.46gr
O: IMP GALLIENVS AVG; Radiate head, right.
R: DIANAE CONS AVG; Antelope advancing left.
Exergue: XII
Rome Mint
RIC 179, left, XII; Cohen 160; Goebl 0744b; Sear 10201.
Aorta: 430: B40, O10, R75, T11, M5.
lucernae 281311505852
4/22/14 3/6/17
Nicholas Z
4621_4622.jpg
Gallienus, Antoninianus, DIANAE CONS AVG7 viewsAE Antoninianus
Gallienus
Augustus: 253 - 268AD
Issued: 267 - 268AD
14.0 x 13.0mm
O: GALLIENVS AVG; Radiate head, right.
R: DIANAE CONS AVG; Antelope walking left.
Exergue: X
RIC 179, X, left; Cohen 160; Goebl 0744b; Sear 10201.
Aorta: 435: B40, O10, R75, T43, M5.
michaelp9686 151438497252
12/18/14 3/7/17
Nicholas Z
4611_4612.jpg
Gallienus, Antoninianus, DIANAE CONS AVG10 viewsAE Antoninianus
Gallienus
Augustus: 253 - 268AD
Issued: 260 - 268AD
20.5 x 19.0mm
O: GALLIENVS AVG; Radiate head, right.
R: DIANAE CONS AVG; Antelope standing right.
Exergue: XII
Rome Mint
RIC 181, radiate; RSC 165; Goebl 750b; Sear 10200.
Aorta: 432: B40, O10, R75, T12, M5.
Holding History Coins #A74
4/10/14 3/7/17
Nicholas Z
4613_4614.jpg
Gallienus, Antoninianus, DIANAE CONS AVG7 viewsAE Antoninianus
Gallienus
Augustus: 253 - 268AD
Issued: 264 - 268AD
O: GALLIENVS AVG; Radiate head, right.
R: DIANAE CONS AVG; Deer standing left, looking right.
Exergue: ε
Rome Mint
RIC 177; RSC 154; Sear 10199.
Aorta: 434: B40, O10, R75, T43, M5.
Holding History Coins #i153
4/10/15 3/7/17
Nicholas Z
collage2~8.jpg
Gallienus, Doe33 viewsGALLIENVS AVG
radiate head right

DIANAE CONS AVG
Antelople walking right

XI
arizonarobin
gal176.jpg
Gallienus, RIC 176 Rome10 viewsGallienus, AE antoninianus
Obverse: IMP GALLIENVS radiate, bust right.
Reverse: DIANAE CONS AVG, doe running right and looking backwards.
Rome mint, 17 mm., 1.9 g.
NORMAN K
GALLIEN-14-ROMAN.jpg
Gallienus, RIC V(1)-181.K Rome13 viewsBillon Antoninianus
Rome mint, 267-268 A.D.
19mm, 3.21g
RIC V(1)-181, RSCv.4-165, RCVv.3-10200

Obverse:
GALLIENVS AVG
Radiate head right.

Reverse:
DIANAE CONS AVG
Γ in exergue
Antelope walking left.
rubadub
GALLIEN-16-ROMAN.jpg
Gallienus, RIC V(1)-181.K Rome8 viewsBillon Anoninianus
Rome Mint, 267-268 A.D.
19mm, 1.82g
RIC V(1)-181, RSCv.4-162, RCV.v3-10200

Obverse:
GALLIENVS AVG
Radiate head right

Reverse:
DIANAE CONS AVG
XI in exergue
Antelope walking right.
rubadub
GALLIEN-15-ROMAN~0.jpg
Gallienus, RIC V(1)-181.K Rome15 viewsBillon Anoninianus
Rome Mint, 267-268 A.D.
21mm, 2.77g
RIC V(1)-181, RSCv.4-162, RCVv.3-10200

Obverse:
GALLIENVS AVG
Radiate head right

Reverse:
DIANAE CONS AVG
XI in exergue
Antelope walking right.
rubadub
GALLIEN-17-ROMAN.jpg
Gallienus, RIC V(1)-181.K Rome14 viewsBillon Antoninianus
Rome mint, 267-268 A.D.
20mm, 2.79g
RIC V(1)-181, RSCv.4-165, RCV.v3-10200

Obverse:
GALLIENVS AVG
Radiate head right

Reverse:
DIANAE CONS AVG
XII in exergue
Antelope walking left.
rubadub
Gallieno_R_DIANAE_CONS_AVG.jpg
Gallienus, Roma mint, R/ DIANAE CONS AVG (Braithwell hoard)35 viewsGALLIENO (253-268 d.C.),antoniniano, zecca di Roma
AE, gr. 3.11, mm 18, B (F+)
D/ GALL(IENVS AVG), busto radiato a dx
R/ DIANAE CONS AVG, animale incerto
Braithwell Report #61 (3 esemplari nell'hoard)
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (21 novembre 2008, numero catalogo 38), ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, Londra-New York, 2007), ex CNG (Londra, 2007); ex Braithwell hoard (Braithwell, South Yorkshire Uk, 2002);
paolo
A6E26775-0D2B-48C5-89EA-F76306F7E0F0.jpeg
Gallienus, Stag16 viewsGALLIENVS AVG,
radiate head right

DIANAE CONS AVG,
Stag walking left

officina mark X below

Cohen 160; Goebl 0744b; Sear 10201
Robin Ayers
felicitas.jpg
Gallienus/Diana Antoninianus.91 viewsGallienus Billon Antoninianus. Viminacium mint, 253-254 AD. IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS AVG, radiate draped bust right / FELICITAS SAECVLI, Diana advancing right holding long torch in both hands. RSC 206a. Ric v-1 291 Moesia/Viminacium. Joint reign of Gallienus with valerian. Rarity:S,253-254. Wonderful desert patina.6 commentstiberiusjulius
ID0076_ANTILOPE_MERGED.jpg
Gazelle - Gallienus214 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right cuirassed bust with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONSAVG, Gazelle left
Exergue:- XII
nogoodnicksleft
1diana_accoleia.jpg
Gens Accoleia, denario (43 a.C.)18 viewsP. Accoleius Lariscolus, denario, 43 a.C., Roma
AR, 4.01 gr, 19mm, qBB
D/ P ACCOLEIVS LARISCOLVS; busto drappeggiato di Diana Nemorensis a destra.
R/ Triplice statua di culto di Diana Nemorensis (Diana, Hecate e Selene); dietro un boschetto di cipressi.
Crawford 486/1
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo (Roma, dal 6 febbraio 2018, numero catalogo 389), ex Giovanni Dorigo Numismatica (Venezia, Italia), ex collezione Alessandro Vanni, Tinia numismatica (Follonica, Grosseto, fino al gennaio 2018)
1 commentspaolo
1pletoria__unito.jpg
Gens Plaetoria, denarius (67 a.C.)21 viewsConiata da M. Plaetorius M.f. Cestianus nel 67 a.C., Roma
AR, 3.96 gr, 19 mm, qSpl
D/ CESTIANVS - S C; busto con attributi di Iside, Minerva, Apollo, Diana e Vittoria, con elmo crestato e faretra e arco sulle spalle; davanti, una cornucopia.
R/ M PLAETORIVS M F AED CVR; aquila su saetta.
Crawford 409/1
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo (Roma, Italia, dal 3 novembre 2018, numero catalogo 397), ex collezione Vanni, Tinia numismatica (Follonica, Italia fino al 3 novembre 2018)
1 commentspaolo
1nuova.jpg
Gens Postumia, denarius (81 a.C.) 12 viewsConiato da A. Postumius A.f. Sp.n. Albinus nell'81 a.C., a Roma
AR, 3.37 gr, 19 mm.
D/ Busto di Diana con arco e faretra; in alto, un bucranio.
R/ A POST A F S N ALBIN (legato); una figura togata, un altare acceso e un toro; tutta la scena è posta su di una base di pietre.
Crawford 372/1
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo (Roma, Italia, dal 4 giugno 2017, numero catalogo 282), ex collezione Alessandro Vanni, Tinia numismatica (Follonica, Italia fino al maggio 2017)
paolo
Plancia_1.JPG
Gnaeus Plancius14 viewsObv: CN. PLANCIVS AED CVR SC, Head of Macedonia (sometimes identified as Diana) facing right.

Rev: Goat standing right, quiver and bow behind.

Silver Denarius, Rome Mint, 55 BC

4.2 grams, 18.7 mm, 180°

RSC Plancia 1, S396
Matt Inglima
Gnaeus_Plancius.jpg
Gnaeus Plancius - AR denarius5 viewsRome
²54 BC
¹55 BC
head of Macedonia or Diana Planciana right wearing causia
CN·PLANCIVS / AED·CVR·S·C
agrimi standing right, bow and quiver left
¹Crawford 432/1, SRCV I 396, Sydenham 932, RSC I Plancia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,1g
ex Aureo & Calicó

The agrimi is the wild goat of Crete. This moneyer used symbols of Macedonia and Crete on his coinage because these were places where he had spent some time during his career. If the obverse depicts Diana Planciana than it commemorates temple of Diana Planciana with statue which was paid by moneyer in 55 BC. The temple stood between Quirinal and Viminal.
Johny SYSEL
geor1.jpg
Gordian III 238-244 denarius16 viewsOb. IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG Laureate and draped bust left
Rev. DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing right, holding long torch
Ref. RIC127

Diana was the goddess of hunting and wildlife. When depicted as Diana Lucifera with a torch (as here) she represents the "lightbringer"

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
GordianAnt1.jpg
Gordian III Antoninianus54 viewsIMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG
Radiate and Cuiirassed bust right

ORIENS AVG
Sol standing front head left, raised hand holding globe

Antioch mint
242-244 AD

RIC 213
Sear 8626

ex-Indalo Colecciones

Sold Forum Auctions 2016
Jay GT4
gordianIII_RIC127.jpg
GORDIAN III AR denarius - 240 AD12 viewsobv: IMP.GORDIANVS.PIVS.FEL.AVG (laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right)
rev: DIANA.LVCIFERA (Diana standing right, holding long transverse torch)
ref: RIC 127, RSC 69
mint: Rome (7th Issue, 1st Officina)
3.14gms, 21mm
Rare

This was a special issue of six struck marking the marriage of Gordian III to Sabinia Tranquillina in the summer of 240.
berserker
GordianIIIDiana.jpg
Gordian III denarius91 viewsIMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG
laureate bust right

DIANA LVCIFERA
Diana standing right holding lighted torch in both hands

Rome
241-2 AD

Rare?

Sear 8673, RIC 127, RSC 69

Special issue for marriage of Gordian III and Sabinia Tranquillina

SOLD! Forum Auction January 2017
2 commentsJay GT4
Gordian_III_RIC_127_den.JPG
Gordian III, 238 - 244 AD31 viewsObv: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian III facing right.

Rev: DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana Lucifera standing right, holding a flaming torch.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 241 - 242 AD

2.6 grams, 22.3 mm, 180°

RIC IViii 127, RSC 69, S8673, VM 67
2 commentsSPQR Coins
0300-204.jpg
Gordian III, Denarius 90 viewsRome mint, AD 240
IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate and draped bust right
DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing right, holding lighted torch in hands
3,08 gr
Ref : RSC # 69, RCV # 8673
5 commentsPotator II
Sogdiana,_Imitative_Antiochos_I__AR_drachm_.jpg
Greek, Sogdiana, Imitative Antiochos I Soter, 281-261 BC, AR Drachm 106 viewsLaureate head of Antiochos right.
Retrograde legend ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ANT[I]OXOY curving from left to below and before a bridled horned horse head right, circled Δ to far right.
SC 461-462 (var. – controls); HGC 9, 136 (var. - controls) (R3).
Sogidana, uncertain mint, mid-third century BC.
A unique and unrecorded variant of SC 461-462.
(17 mm, 2.86 g, 6h)
ex- William K. Raymond Collection

The crude style, the retrograde semi-circular legend, the disposition of the mint control and the low weight of this coin are indicative of a Sogdian imitation of the Antiochos I drachm type that was issued by the mint at Ai Khanoum in Baktria during the period 281-261 BC. Unlike the imitative coin the official issue was struck on the Attic weight standard of 4.3 grams. The style of this coin and the full replication of the Ai Khanoum mint control place it early in the Sogdian imitative series, possibly contemporaneous with the lifetime Antiochos I issue that it imitates. Marcanda/Samarkand and Bukhara are likely candidates for the origin of this coin.
Lloyd T
00hadrian.jpg
HADRIAN41 viewsAR denarius. 124-128 AD. 3,29 grs. Laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS. / Diana standing half front
head right,holding arrow and bow. COS III.
RIC II 147. RSC 315a.
CNG. EA 80. Lot 155.
benito
00hadriandiana.jpg
HADRIAN39 viewsAR denarius. 124-128 AD. 3,29 grs. Laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS. / Diana standing half front
head right,holding arrow and bow. COS III.
RIC II 147. RSC 315a.
CNG. EA 80. Lot 155.

benito
Hadrian~0.jpg
Hadrian 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.5 viewsHadrian 117 – 138 A.D. Sestertius 125-128 A.D. Æ 31.1~33.5mm. 28.14g. Obv: HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, Laureate head r. draped far shoulder. Rev: COS III, S - C, Diana standing r. holding arrow and bow. Cohen 316. BMC 1281. RIC 631b. Sear(2000 Ed.) #3583.ddwau
Hadrien D.jpg
Hadrian Sestertius27 viewsAE Sestertius.
Obv: HADRIANVS AVG COS III PP ; dr. and laur. bust r.
Rev: SC ; Diana stg. l. holding arrow and bow.
Tanit
Hadr_Sest_2.jpg
Hadrian Sestertius24 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: HADRIANVS AVG COS III PP; dr. and laur. bust r.
Rev: S C; Diana stg. l., holding arrow and bow.

C.1364
Tanit
Hadrian_Sestertius_Diana.jpg
Hadrian Sestertius Diana65 viewsObv.
HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Laureate head right

Rev.
COS III
SC
Diana facing, with bow
ancientdave
Hadrse30-2.jpg
Hadrian, RIC 631b, Sestertius of AD 125-128 (Diana) 27 viewsÆ Sestertius (27.4g, Ø33mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 125-128.
Obv.: HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right, drapery on left shoulder.
Rev.: COS III (around) S C (low across field), Diana (=Artemis) standing right holding bow and arrow.
RIC 631b; BMCRE 1281Cohen 316; Strack 600; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-2) 177 (35 spec.).
1 commentsCharles S
HADRSE10-2.jpg
Hadrian, RIC 631b, Sestertius of AD 125-128 (Diana) 18 viewsÆ Sestertius (22.8g, Ø33mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 125-128.
Obv.: HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right, drapery on left shoulder.
Rev.: COS III (around) S C (field), Diana standing right holding bow and arrow.
RIC 631b; BMCRE 1281Cohen 316; Strack 600; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-2) 177 (35 spec.).
Charles S
Hadriensestertius.jpg
Hardiran Sestertius113 viewsHADRIANVS AVG COS III P P
Laur head of Hadrian right

SC
Diana standing left holding Bow and Arrow

Scarce

Rome 136 AD
29.43g

Sear 3645

Ex-Arcade Coins

SOLD to Calgary Coin June 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
Medaillen_Artemis_01_Henri_II_fac.jpg
Henri II of France, Artemis5 viewsHenri II
Obv.: + HENRICVS. II. GALLIAR - REX CHRISTIANISS. PP, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Henry II facing right.
Rev.: .NOMEN. AD *ASTRA. 1552, Diana walking left front, arrow in right hand, bow in left hand, building and tree in background.
From the collection of Baron Auguste Gaspard Louis Desnoyers (1779-1857)
Possibly an old restrike
Ref.: Mazerolle, Medailleurs francais. No. 112, Appel (HENRICVS II) 3
shanxi
medaillen_artemis_07_fac.jpg
Hörnlein, Artemis13 viewsBronze Medal 1930
by Friedrich Wilhelm Hörnlein, (1873 – 1945)
Obv: Artemis/Diana with bow and quiver, roe behind, signed Hörnlein
Rev: EHRENMÜNZE v. HUBERUS SCHIESSKINO, G. ROEDER, DRESDEB, MOSENSTR, Filmstrip with fox head, iPA LEIPZIG 1930
340 pieces made
Ref.: Arnold 245
shanxi
Gallienus-Antoninian-ANTIOCHIA-LVNALVCIF-GÖBL_1665i.jpg
II - GALLIENUS -a- Antoninian - ANTIOCHIA - GOEBL 1665i9 viewsAv) GALLIENVS AVG
Radiated and draped bust righ

Rv) LVNA LVCIF
Exergue.: PXV
Diana walking right, holding torch

Weightt: 4,1g; Ø: 22mm; References: GOEBL: 1665i; RIC V/I/609
ANTOCIA mint; struck: 267 A.D.
sulcipius
Gallienus-Antoninian-MEDIOLANUM-GOEBL_920h.jpg
II - GALLIENUS -b- Antoninian - MEDIOLANUM - GOEBL 0920h12 viewsAv) IMP GALLIENVS AVG
Radiated head left

Rv) DIANA FELIX
Diana in hunting pose right, at her feet dog

Weight: 3,39g; Ø: 22mm; Reference: GOEBL 920h
sulcipius
Gallienus-Antoninian-ROMA-DIANAECONS-GOEBL0728b.jpg
II - GALLIENUS -d- Antoninian - ROMA - GOEBL 0728b7 viewsA) IMP GALLIENVS AVG
Radiated bust right

R) DIANAE CONS AVG
Exergue: Є
Doe standing right, head turned left over shoulder

Weight: 2,4g; Ø: 20mm; References: GÖBL: 0728b, RIC V/I/178
sulcipius
Gallienus-Antoninian-ROMA-Hirschlinks-GOEBL744b.jpg
II - GALLIENUS -d- Antoninian - ROMA - GOEBL0744b26 viewsAv) GALLIENVS AVG
Radiated bust right

Rv) DIANAE CONS AVG
Exergue: X
Stag left

Weight: 4,1g; Ø: 19mm; References: RIC V/I/179k; GOEBL/0744b
sulcipius
lg2_quart_sm.jpg
IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG / P M S COL VIM / Ӕ30 (239-240 AD)18 viewsIMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right / P M S CO - L VIM, personification of Moesia standing facing, head left, arms outstretched over a lion (right) and a bull (left). AN • I • in exergue.

Ӕ, 29-30+mm, 16.75g, die axis 1h (slightly turned medal alignment), material: looks like red copper.

IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG = Imperator Caesar Marcus Antonius Gordianus Augustus, P M S COL VIM = Provinciae Moesiae Superioris Colonia Viminacium = Colony of Viminacium, in the province of Upper Moesia, AN•I• = the first year. 238 AD was the infamous "year of the 6 emperors", so 239-240 was the first sole ruling year of Gordian III. The bull is the symbol of Legio VII Claudia, based in the capital of Moesia Superior, Viminacium itself, and the lion is the symbol of Legio IV Flavia Felix based in another city of Moesia Superior, Singidunum (modern Belgrade). Due to size this is most probably a sestertius, but large dupondius is another possibility, since it is clearly made of red copper and sestertii were typically made of expensive "gold-like" orichalcum, a kind of brass (but in this time of civil strife they could have used a cheaper replacement). Literature fails to clearly identify the denomination of this type.

A straightforward ID due to size and clear legends, this is AMNG 71; Martin 1.01.1 minted in Viminacium, Moesia Superior (Kostolac, Serbia).

Gordian III was Roman Emperor from 238 AD to 244 AD. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. Antonia Gordiana was the daughter of Emperor Gordian I and younger sister of Emperor Gordian II. Very little is known of his early life before his acclamation. Gordian had assumed the name of his maternal grandfather in 238 AD.

In 235, following the murder of Emperor Alexander Severus, Maximinus Thrax was acclaimed Emperor. In the following years, there was a growing opposition against Maximinus in the Roman senate and amongst the majority of the population of Rome. In 238 (to become infamous as "the year of six emperors") a rebellion broke out in the Africa Province, where Gordian's grandfather and uncle, Gordian I and II, were proclaimed joint emperors. This revolt was suppressed within a month by Cappellianus, governor of Numidia and a loyal supporter of Maximinus Thrax. The elder Gordians died, but public opinion cherished their memory as peace-loving and literate men, victims of Maximinus' oppression.

Meanwhile, Maximinus was on the verge of marching on Rome and the Senate elected Pupienus and Balbinus as joint emperors. These senators were not popular and the population of Rome was still shocked by the elder Gordians' fate, so the Senate decided to take the teenage Gordian, rename him Marcus Antonius Gordianus like his grandfather, and raise him to the rank of Caesar and imperial heir. Pupienus and Balbinus defeated Maximinus, mainly due to the defection of several legions, particularly the II Parthica, who assassinated Maximinus. However, their joint reign was doomed from the start with popular riots, military discontent and an enormous fire that consumed Rome in June 238. On July 29, Pupienus and Balbinus were killed by the Praetorian Guard and Gordian proclaimed sole emperor.

Due to Gordian's age, the imperial government was surrendered to the aristocratic families, who controlled the affairs of Rome through the Senate. In 240, Sabinianus revolted in the African province, but the situation was quickly brought under control. In 241, Gordian was married to Furia Sabinia Tranquillina, daughter of the newly appointed praetorian prefect, Timesitheus. As chief of the Praetorian Guard and father in law of the Emperor, Timesitheus quickly became the de facto ruler of the Roman Empire.

In the 3rd century, the Roman frontiers weakened against the Germanic tribes across the Rhine and Danube, and the Sassanid Empire across the Euphrates increased its own attacks. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243). The campaign was a success and Gordian, who had joined the army, was planning an invasion of the enemy's territory, when his father-in-law died in unclear circumstances. Without Timesitheus, the campaign, and the Emperor's security, were at risk.

Gaius Julius Priscus and, later on, his own brother Marcus Julius Philippus, also known as Philip the Arab, stepped in at this moment as the new Praetorian Prefects and the campaign proceeded. Around February 244, the Persians fought back fiercely to halt the Roman advance to Ctesiphon. Persian sources claim that a battle occurred (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. Roman sources do not mention this battle and suggest that Gordian died far away from Misiche, at Zaitha (Qalat es Salihiyah) in northern Mesopotamia. Modern scholarship does not unanimously accept this course of the events. One view holds that Gordian died at Zaitha, murdered by his frustrated army, while the role of Philip is unknown. Other scholars have concluded that Gordian died in battle against the Sassanids.
Philip transferred the body of the deceased emperor to Rome and arranged for his deification. Gordian's youth and good nature, along with the deaths of his grandfather and uncle and his own tragic fate at the hands of the enemy, earned him the lasting esteem of the Romans.
Yurii P
Moeda_indiana0_39_gm_.png
INDIA, MARATHAS of THANJAVUR: Anonymous Gold fanam, c. 1678-180012 viewsObv: Dagger, whose hilt has been made to look like a sun and moon
Rev:Two rows of pellets within a heart-shaped border, derived from the Vira Raya design, crescent above.
Date c. 1678-1800
Weight 0.38 gm.
Diameter 8 mm.
Die axis 9 o'clock
Reference MNI 1312
_34
Antonivs Protti
MOedaIndiana0_36_gm_.png
INDIA, MARATHAS of THANJAVUR: Anonymous Gold fanam, c. 1678-1800. 17 views Dagger, whose hilt has been made to look like a sun and moon
Reverse Two rows of pellets within a heart-shaped border, derived from the Vira Raya design, crescent above.
Date c. 1678-1800
Weight 0.38 gm.
Diameter 8 mm.
_34
Die axis 9 o'clock
Reference MNI 1312
Antonivs Protti
IMG_1301.JPG
Italy, Rome, Capitoline Museums, Diana177 viewsCapitoline museumsJohny SYSEL
Italy- Rome- The Arch of Constantine The Great.jpg
Italy- Rome- The Arch of Constantine The Great71 viewsArch of Constantine
The Arch of Constantine is a triumphal arch in Rome, situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected to commemorate Constantine's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge on October 28, 312 AD. Dedicated in 315 AD, it is the latest of the extant triumphal arches in Rome, from which it differs by the extensive re-use of parts of earlier buildings.

General Description
The arch is 21 m high, 25.7 m wide and 7.4 m deep. It has three archways, the central one being 11.5 m high and 6.5 m wide, the lateral archways 7.4 m by 3.4 m each. The lower part of the monument is built of marble blocks, the top (called attic) is brickwork revetted with marble. A staircase formed in the thickness of the arch is entered from a door at some height from the ground, in the end towards the Palatine Hill. The general design with a main part structured by detached columns and an attic with the main inscription above is modelled after the example of the Arch of Septimius Severus on the Forum Romanum. It has been suggested that the lower part of the arch is re-used from an older monument, probably from the times of the emperor Hadrian (Conforto et al., 2001; for a defence of the view that the whole arch was constructed in the 4th century, see Pensabene & Panella). The arch spans the Via Triumphalis, the way taken by the emperors when they entered the city in triumph. This route started at the Campus Martius, led through the Circus Maximus and around the Palatine Hill; immediately after the Arch of Constantine, the procession would turn left and march along the Via Sacra to the Forum Romanum and on to the Capitoline Hill, passing both the Arches of Titus and Septimius Severus. During the Middle Ages, the Arch of Constantine was incorporated into one of the family strongholds of ancient Rome. Works of restoration were first carried out in the 18th century; the last excavations have taken place in the late 1990s, just before the Great Jubilee of 2000.

Decoration
The decoration of the arch heavily uses parts of older monuments, which are given a new meaning in the context of the Constantinian building. As it celebrates the victory of Constantine, the new "historic" friezes illustrating his campaign in Italy convey the central meaning: the praise of the emperor, both in battle and in his civilian duties. The other imagery supports this purpose: decoration taken from the "golden times" of the Empire under Trajan, Hadrian and Marcus Aurelius places Constantine next to these "good emperors", and the content of the pieces evokes images of the victorious and pious ruler. Another explanation given for the re-use is the short time between the start of construction (late 312 at the earliest) and the dedication (summer 315), so the architects used existing artwork to make up for the lack of time to create new one. As yet another possible reason, it has often been suggested that the Romans of the 4th century lacked the artistic skill to produce acceptable artwork and therefore plundered the ancient buildings to adorn their contemporary monuments. This interpretation has become less prominent in more recent times, as the art of Late Antiquity has been appreciated in its own right. It is, of course, possible that a combination of two or all three of those explanations are correct, as they are not mutually exclusive.

Attic
Above the middle archway, the main inscription (see below) takes the most prominent place of the attic. It is identical on both sides of the arch. Flanking the inscription on both sides, there are pairs of relief panels above the minor archways, 8 in total. They were taken from an unknown monument erected in honour of Marcus Aurelius, and show (north side, left to right) the emperor's return to Rome after the campaign (adventus), the emperor leaving the city and saluted by a personification of the Via Flaminia, the emperor distributing money among the people (largitio), the emperor interrogating a German prisoner, (south side, left to right) a captured enemy chieftain led before the emperor, a similar scene with other prisoners, the emperor speaking to the troops (adlocutio), and the emperor sacrificing pig, sheep and bull. Together with three panels now in the Capitoline Museum, the reliefs were probably taken from a triumphal monument commemorating Marcus Aurelius' war against the Sarmatians from 169 - 175, which ended with his triumphant return in 176. On the largitio panel, the figure of Marcus Aurelius' son Commodus has been eradicated after the latter's damnatio memoriae. On top of each of the columns stand marble statues of Dacian prisoners from the times of Trajan, probably taken from the Forum of Trajan. From the same time date the two large (3 m high) panels decorating the attic on the small sides of the arch, showing scenes from the emperor's Dacian Wars. Together with the two reliefs on the inside of the central archway, they came from a large frieze celebrating the Dacian victory. The original place of this frieze was either the Forum of Trajan, as well, or the barracks of the emperor's horse guard on the Caelius.

Main Section
The general layout of the main facade is identical on both sides of the arch. It is divided by four columns of Corinthian order made of Numidian yellow marble (giallo antico), one of which has been transferred into the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano and was replaced by a white marble column. The columns stand on bases showing victory figures on front, and captured barbarians and Roman soldiers on the sides. The spandrels of the main archway are decorated with reliefs depicting victory figures with trophies, those of the smaller archways show river gods. Column bases and spandrel reliefs are from the times of Constantine. Above each lateral archway are pairs of round reliefs dated to the times of emperor Hadrian. They display scenes of hunting and sacrificing: (north side, left to right) hunt of a boar, sacrifice to Apollo, hunt of a lion, sacrifice to Hercules, (south side, left to right) departure for the hunt, sacrifice to Silvanus, hunt of a bear, sacrifice to Diana. The head of the emperor (originally Hadrian) has been reworked in all medaillons: on the north side, into Constantine in the hunting scenes and into Licinius or Constantius I in the sacrifice scenes; on the south side, vice versa. The reliefs, c. 2 m in diameter, were framed in porphyry; this framing is only extant on the right side of the northern facade. Similar medaillons, this time of Constantinian origin, are placed on the small sides of the arch; on the eastern side, showing the Sun rising, and on the western side, the Moon, both on chariots. The main piece from the time of Constantine is the "historical" relief frieze running around the monument under the round panels, one strip above each lateral archway and at the small sides of the arch. These reliefs depict scenes from the Italian campaign of Constantine against Maxentius which was the reason for the construction of the monument. The frieze starts at the western side with the "Departure from Milan". It continues on the southern, "outward" looking face, with the siege of a city, probably Verona, which was of great importance to the war in Northern Italy; also on that face, the Battle of Milvian Bridge with Constantine's army victorious and the enemy drowning in the river Tiber. On the eastern side, Constantine and his army enter Rome; the artist here has avoided to use the imagery of the triumph, as Constantine probably did not want to be shown triumphant over the Eternal City. On the northern face, looking "towards" the city, two strips with the emperor's actions after taking possession of Rome: Constantine speaking to the citizens on the Forum Romanum, and distributing money to the people.

Inner Sides of the Archways
In the central archway, there is one of the large panels of Trajan's Dacian War on either wall. Inside the lateral archways, eight portraits busts (two on each wall), destroyed to such an extent that it is not possible to identify them any more.

Inscriptions
The main inscription reads:

IMP · CAES · FL · CONSTANTINO · MAXIMO · P · F · AVGUSTO · S · P · Q · R · QVOD · INSTINCTV · DIVINITATIS · MENTIS · MAGNITVDINE · CVM · EXERCITV · SVO · TAM · DE · TYRANNO · QVAM · DE · OMNI · EIVS · FACTIONE · VNO · TEMPORE · IVSTIS · REM-PUBLICAM · VLTVS · EST · ARMIS · ARCVM · TRIVMPHIS · INSIGNEM · DICAVIT

Which means in English:

To the Emperor Caesar Flavius Constantinus, the greatest, pious, and blessed Augustus: because he, inspired by the divine, and by the greatness of his mind, has delivered the state from the tyrant and all of his followers at the same time, with his army and just force of arms, the Senate and People of Rome have dedicated this arch, decorated with triumphs.

The words instinctu divinitatis ("inspired by the divine") have been much commented. They are usually read as sign of Constantine's shifting religious affiliation: The Christian tradition, most notably Lactantius and Eusebius of Caesarea, relate the story of a vision of the Christian god to Constantine during the campaign, and that he was victorious in the sign of the cross at the Milvian Bridge. The official documents (esp. coins) still prominently display the Sun God until 324 AD, while Constantine started to support the Christian church from 312 on. In this situation, the vague wording of the inscription can be seen as the attempt to please all possible readers, being deliberately ambiguous, and acceptable to both pagans and Christians. As was customary, the vanquished enemy is not mentioned by name, but only referred to as "the tyrant", drawing on the notion of the rightful killing of a tyrannical ruler; together with the image of the "just war", it serves as justification of Constantine's civil war against his co-emperor Maxentius.

Two short inscriptions on the inside of the central archway transport a similar message: Constantine came not as conqueror, but freed Rome from occupation:

LIBERATORI VRBIS (liberator of the city) - FUNDATORI QVIETIS (founder of peace)

Over each of the small archways, inscriptions read:

VOTIS X - VOTIS XX SIC X - SIC XX

They give a hint on the date of the arch: "Solemn vows for the 10th anniversary - for the 20th anniversary" and "as for the 10th, so for the 20th anniversary". Both refer to Constantine's decennalia, i.e. the 10th anniversary of his reign (counted from 306), which he celebrated in Rome in the summer of 315 AD. It can be assumed that the arch honouring his victory was inaugurated during his stay in the city.




John Schou
00domnalucifera.jpg
JULIA DOMNA18 viewsAR denarius. 214 AD. Draped bust right. IVLIA FELIX AVG. / Diana standing left,holding flaming torch with both hands. DIANA LVCIFERA.
RSC 32. s 7100.
benito
00domnalucifera~0.jpg
JULIA DOMNA34 viewsAR denarius. 214 AD. Draped bust right. IVLIA FELIX AVG. / Diana standing left,holding flaming torch with both hands. DIANA LVCIFERA.
RSC 32. s 7100.
benito
Domna_Ceres.JPG
Julia Domna129 viewsJULIA DOMNA, wife of Septimius Severus, 193-217
Sestertius, late 195-early 196. AE 18.89 g. IVLIA - AVGVSTA Draped bust r., the hair in a large bun on the back of the head. Rev. CE-RES / S - C Ceres, wearing long dress and veil, standing facing, head turned l., holding long torch with her l. hand, ears in her lowered r. hand over burning round altar. RIC 848

CERES is a comparatively common type on sestertii, so must fall before the drastic cutback in the production of sestertii early in 198, and indeed even before the preliminary cutback of sestertius production in mid-196.

Its date is beyond question late 195-early 196, since CERES is the type that appeared on Julia's New Year's issue of large bronze medallions and asses for 1 January 196. In the course of 196, after defeating Albinus on 19 Feb. 196 (not 197 as all the books say), Septimius cancelled the annual New Year's issues of medallions and asses, so that none at all were issued for 1 Jan. 197 or 198.

The misdating of Julia's CERES type to 198 that appears in various resources is due to P.V. Hill, whose work on the Severan coinage is largely mere guesswork and therefore often grossly mistaken. It is a shame that Hill's largely erroneous dates have now been taken over as fact and so given wide currency by David Sear in his new Roman Coins and Their Values!

I was able to establish the true chronology of the coinage of 193-8 in my Oxford thesis of 1972, which Hill couldn't of course consult for his first edition of 1964, and didn't consult for his second edition of 1977, though the Coin Room at the BM has a copy.

This CERES sestertius is no. 1761 in my die catalogue, obv. 453, rev. 661, other specimens in BM 764, Glasgow, Paris, and Naples.

Obv. die 453 is interesting, because it was used first with the CERES rev. die 661, like this coin; then with all five recorded MATRI CASTRORVM dies, this type coming from this obv. die only on sestertii; and finally with an early rev. die of the next normal type, HILARITAS.

HILARITAS of 196 was the last comparatively common sestertius rev. type of Julia's early coinage; then came the preliminary cutback, and the next three types, DIANA LVCIFERA, IVNO REGINA, and VESTAE SANCTAE, were considerably scarcer. Thereafter came the drastic cutback early in 198. (Curtis Clay)
3 commentsAuer
Julia Domna2 - Augusta Trajana.jpg
Julia Domna - Augusta Trajana - Artemis78 viewsAE23, 9.39 g, 23 mm, 12 h, 193-217 AD

Obverse: IOYΛIA ΔOMNA CE
Draped bust right

Reverse:AVΓOYCTHC TPAIANHC
Artemis (Diana) running right, holding bow and reaching for arrow in quiver; dog running at her feet

Augusta Trajana mint (Thrace Provincial issue)

SGI 1729
4 commentsdrjbca
J9.jpg
Julia Domna - Diana Lucifera131 viewsDenarius 196
O/ IULIA - AUGUSTA Draped bust right
R/ DIANA - LU-CIFERA Diana, crescent on shoulder, standing half-left, holding long torch in both hands
C 27 - RIC S638
Mint: Laodicea
1 commentsseptimus
009EJuliaDomna.jpg
Julia Domna - Fourree8 viewsFourree Denarius
Roman Imperial - The Principate

Julia Domna

Uncertain mint, ~200 A.D
Base metal core beneath silver surface, encrustations remain
19.5 mm / 2.814 g / 180°

Obverse: "IVLIA AVGVSTA", draped bust right.
Reverse: "DIANA LVCIFERA", Diana standing left, holding torch.

RIC 548, RSC 27.

MyID: 009E
TenthGen
image~3.jpg
Julia Domna 194-217 ad23 viewsAr denarius, wife of Septimius Severus, (obv) IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right
(Rev) DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, lit torch in both hands. Rome mint, struck 211-217 ad
Caesarincarnate
image~4.jpg
Julia Domna 194-217 ad22 viewsAr denarius, wife of Septimius Severus, (obv) IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right
(Rev) DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, lit torch in both hands. Rome mint, struck 211-217 ad
Caesarincarnate
julia_domna_01.jpg
Julia Domna AE of Markianopolis28 viewsObv: IOVLIA AVGOVCTA - Draped bust right
Rev: MAPKIANOPOLITWN - Diana advancing right, drawing arrow from quiver on her back, holding bow, hound at feet.
Mint: Markianopolis
Ref: ?
Notes: Rare.
1 commentsoa
Julia Domna 12 D.jpg
Julia Domna Antoninianus34 viewsAR Antoninianus.
Obv.: IVLA PIA FELIX AVG ; dr. bust r. ; Rev.: DIANA LVCIFERA ; Diana stg. l., holdng a torche.
Ric.638 Cohen.27

Tanit
Julia_Domna_2b.jpg
Julia Domna denarius38 viewsDIANA LVCIFERA
wife of Septimius Severus
1 commentsTibsi
juliaden.JPG
Julia Domna Denarius37 viewsOBV: IVLIA AVGVSTA; Draped bust rt. REV: DIANA LVCIFERA; Diana standing left holding long torch with both hands.
RIC 548 (Ref: Wildwinds)

One of the many faces of Julia Domna. The portrait probably bears no resemblance to her at all but perhaps to the coin engraver's girlfriend fitted out with a million-dollar Imperial hairdo. The Romans were coming down to earth about themselves in the3rd century and their coin portraits show this very well. Not a great coin numismatically but a charming picture. Note the stray curl just above the eye brow.



daverino
Julia_Domna_Denarius_Diana_Lucifera.jpg
Julia Domna Denarius Diana Lucifera32 viewsObv.
JVLIA PIA FELIX AVG

Rev.
DIANA LVCIFERA
Diana standing left, holding long torch with both hands


1 commentsancientdave
Julia_Domna3_opt.jpg
JULIA DOMNA Fouree Denarius RIC 373A [Caracalla], Diana24 viewsOBV: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right
REV: DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, holding long torch with both hands
3,1 g; 18,3 mm

Minted at Rome under Caracalla, 211-17 AD
Legatus
Julia_Domna_RIC_373A_neu.jpg
Julia Domna RIC 373a50 viewsDenarius (3,07 g / 19 mm)
obv.IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG
draped bust right
rev.DIANA LVCIFERA
Diana standing left, holding long torch with both hands
Rome mint AD 214
RIC IVi, 373
1 commentsHolger G
iulia_domna_RIC373.jpg
Julia Domna RIC IV, 37364 viewsJulia Domna, died 217(?), wife of Septimius Severus
AR - denar, 2.67g, 19mm
struck in Rome AD 211-217
obv. IVLIA PIA - FELIX AVG
Bust of Julia, head bare, draped, r. Hair elaborately waved in 5 vertical waves,
varying numbers of horizontal ridges, fastened in bun at back and queue
below it.
rev. DIANA - LVCIFERA
Diana, draped, standing front, holding long lighted torch, pointing slightly
upward to l., in both hands
RIC IV/1, (Caracalla) 373; C.32; BMC 2; RCV 6578
about EF
3 commentsJochen
julia.jpg
Julia Domna, denarius16 viewsRome Mint
IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG
Draped bust right.
DIANA LVCIFERA
Diana standing left, holding torch with both hands.
3,20gr
Ref: 373a
byzancia
0181-219.jpg
Julia Domna, Denarius89 viewsRome mint, AD 214
IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right
DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana Lucifera standing left holding long torch in hands
3.32 gr, 18 mm
Ref : RCV # 7100, RSC # 32, RIC IV-1 # 375a
Ex Auctiones.ch
3 commentsPotator II
5015_(1)_5017_(1).jpg
Julia Domna, Denarius, DIANA LVCIFERA9 viewsAR Denarius
Julia Domna
Born ca. 170AD - Died 217AD
Augusta: 193 - 217AD
Issued (under Caracalla): 211 - 217AD
20.0 x 18.5mm 3.25gr
O: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG; Draped bust, right.
R: DIANA LVCIFERA: Diana standing left, holding torch with both hands.
Rome Mint
RIC 373a (Caracalla); Sear 7100; RSC 32; Cohen 32.
Aorta: 197: B6, O6, R25, T29, M4.
Naville Numismatics, Auction 33, Lot 486.
7/16/17 7/28/17
Nicholas Z
2-2014-11-14_coinsnov20145.JPG
Julia Domna, Diana26 viewsAr denarius; 17mm; 3.62g

IVLIA-AVGVSTA
draped bust right

DIANA-LVCIFERA
Diana standing left, holding torch, crescent behind shoulders

RIC 548; RSC 27; Sear 1835
Robin Ayers
julia_domna_den_DIANA_LVCIFERA.jpg
Julia Domna, LVCIFERA23 viewsJulia Domna Augusta Silver denarius. Silver denarius, RIC IV 548, VF, Rome mint, 2.867g, 18.0mm, 0o, 196 - 211 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bus right; reverse DIANA LVCIFERA (light bringing Diana), Diana standing left crescent over shoulders, holding transverse flaming torch in both hands. Lucifer means lightbringer, from the Latin lux "light" and ferre "to bear or bring." The word Lucifer is found in only one place in the Bible -- Isaiah 14:12 -- but only in the King James and related versions: "How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! The King James Version is based on the Vulgate, the Latin translation of Jerome. Jerome translated the Hebrew helel (bright or brilliant one) as "lucifer," which was a reasonable Latin equivalent. And yet it is this lucifer, the bright one or lightbearer, that came to be understood by so many as the name for Satan, Lord of Darkness. -- Sunrise magazine, October/November 1996. ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
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Julia Domna, RIC 37327 viewsIVLIA PIA FELIX AVG
Draped bust right
DIANA LVCIFERA
Diana standing left, holding long torch with both hands
AR denarius, 19mm 3.06g
1 commentsnovacystis
julia_domna_379(a).jpg
Julia Domna, RIC IV 379(a)65 viewsJulia Domna, AD 193-217
AR - antoninianus, 4.67g, 22.88mm
Rome, AD 211-217, struck under Caracalla
obv. IVLIA PIA - FELIX AVG
Bust, draped, wearing stephane, r., on crescent
rev. LVNA LVCIFERA
Luna/Diana, in long garment, crescent on head, driving in a biga drawn by horses l., holding
reins in r. hand and sceptre in l. hand; above her the billowing garment.
RIC IV/1, Caracalla 379(a); C.106 (Diana?)
EF

Mythologically Diana is not known as biga driver like Sol. It seems to be the counterpart to Severus who
is depicted as Sol.
4 commentsJochen
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Julia Domna, wife of Septimius Severus, mother of Caracalla and Geta17 viewsObv: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust of Julia Domna facing right.

Rev: DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana Lucifera standing left holding a long torch in both hands.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 214 AD

3.7 grams, 18.1 mm, 180°

RIC IVi Caracalla 373A, RSC 32, S7100
1 commentsSPQR Coins
Julia_Domna_Diana_Lucifera.jpg
Julia Domna- Diana Lucifera Laodicea Mint RIC 638137 viewsObv: IVLIA AVGVSTA
Julia Domna draped, right
Rev: DIANA LVCIFERA
Diana holding torch with crescent at her shoulders.

Laodicea Mint, AD 196
RIC 638. BMCRE 277, 598. RSC 27a. RCV 6578
This coin displays the trademark loop of fabric on Domna's neck, marking it as the product of the mint at Laodicea ad Mare (modern Latakia, Syria). It is a fine example of the Eastern style of the Laodicea mint.
2 commentsC. Caesar Germ.
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Julia Domna. AR Denarius. AD 211-217.12 viewsRome mint, (3.44g, 20mm, 1h). IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right / DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, holding torch in both hands. RIC 373A (Caracalla); C. 32; RSC 32; BMCRE 1 (Severus).

Near Extremely Fine; attractive toning.

Fritz Rudolf Künker GmbH & Co. KG, September 2010.

Ruslan K
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L. Hostilius Saserna – Hostilia-426 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC L. Hostilius Saserna denarius c. 48 BC. Head of Gallia right, hair long and dishevelled, Gaulish trempet behind. / L HOSTILIVS SASERNA Diana of Ephesus facing with stag and spear. Crawford 448/1; SRCV 419; Hostilia 4; Syd 953Bud Stewart
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L. Hostilius Saserna, Crawford 448/334 viewsRoman Republic, L. Hostilius Saserna, gens Hostilia
AR - Denarius, 3.38g, 18.7mm, 35°
Rome, 48 BC
obv. Bare head of Pallor, with dishavelled hair, falling down, behind a wind instrument
rev. Cult statue of Diana Ephesus, stg. frontal, laureate, long hair falling down over her
shoulders, long floating garment, resting with raised l, hand on spear and holding with r.
hand stag, stg. l., at antlers
in l. field SASERNA in a curve upward, r. L.HOSTILIVS downward
ref.: Crawford 448/3; Sydenham 953; Hostilia 4; Sear Imperators 19; BMCRR Rome 3996;
SRCV I, 419; Kestner 3541
scarce, well centered, toned, some flat areas
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

The rev. of this coin refers to the conquest of Massilia (Marseille) by Julius Caesar 1 year before at the begin of his war against Pompeius after a siege and a naval battle. Artemis Ephesia was particularly worshipped in Massilia, an ancient Greek foundation, and had its own temple.

The obv. is disputed. Today you often can read that the depicted portraits of the Hostilius coins represent Gallia and Vercingetorix. But that the Romans put on the obv. of their coins the portrait of their enemies would be very unusual. I went into the matter and actually these designations came into vogue not before the end of the 19th century, and of cause in France, when the French national sentiment was at its height. And naturally coins with the name of Vercingetorix are selling much better than without, especially today in the time of Asterix.
2 commentsJochen
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L.HOSTILIUS SASERNA43 viewsAR denarius. 48 BC. 4,12 grs. Head of Gallia right; carnyx behind / Diana of Ephesus standing facing with stag in right hand, spear in left; L • HOSTILIVS to right, [SASERNA] to left.
Crawford 448/3. RSC Hostilia 4.
1 commentsbenito
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L.HOSTILIUS SASERNA22 viewsAR denarius. 48 BC. 4,12 grs. Head of Gallia right; carnyx behind / Diana of Ephesus standing facing with stag in right hand, spear in left; L • HOSTILIVS to right, [SASERNA] to left.
Crawford 448/3. RSC Hostilia 4.

benito
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Lincoln Heritage Trail, 196912 viewsObv: LINCOLN HERITAGE TRAIL, beardless head of Abraham Lincoln facing right.

Rev: KENTUCKY * INDIANA * ILLINOIS 1969, a depiction of Lincoln riding the legal circuit in the Midwest, a log cabin with split-rail fence in background.
Matt Inglima
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Lincoln Heritage Trail, 197014 viewsObv: LINCOLN HERITAGE TRAIL - 1970, bust of Lincoln facing right.

Rev: HISTORY'S HIGHWAY, a map of Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky showing the path of the Lincoln Heritage Trail through each state.

Mint: Medallic Art Company

Silver, Diameter: 38.65 mm
Matt Inglima
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Lincoln Heritage Trail, 197012 viewsObv: LINCOLN HERITAGE TRAIL - 1970, bust of Lincoln facing right.

Rev: HISTORY'S HIGHWAY, a map of Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky showing the path of the Lincoln Heritage Trail through each state.

Designer: C. Calverly, Mint: Medallic Art Company

Bronze, Diameter: 63 mm
Matt Inglima
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Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)91 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right.
R: DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left holding torch with both hands.
Rome
17.5mm
3.4g
RIC 762 RSC 14

Scarce
8 commentsMat
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Luna Lucifera119 viewsAR Antoninianus, Rome mint, struck in A.D.215 (under Caracalla)
Obv: IVLIA PIA - FELIX AVG Diademed, draped bust right, crescent behind shoulders
Rev: LVNA LVCIFERA Luna, crescent on her head, driving biga pulled by horses left, drapery billowing in a semi-circle behind her head.
Weight: 5.12g

RIC.C.379a Sear RCV II 7096

ex F Sternberg Auction, Zurich, November 1975, Lot 153

Luna, the moon-goddess, is depicted only rarely on Roman coins, and is usually equated with Diana Lucifera (the Light Bringer). She is only named on coins of Julia Domna, Gallienus and Salonina. Luna is depicted in a biga pulled by two horses only on coins of Julia Domna, as in this example. However, a very similar depiction is shown on another coin of Caracalla, where the biga is pulled by bulls that have a definite attribution to Diana Lucifera. Otherwise Luna Lucifera is depicted with a crescent on her head standing holding a long torch.
nemesis
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Luna/Diana270 viewsCaracalla AD 198 - 217
AR - Denar, 3.13g, 19mm
Rome AD 217
obv. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
laureate head r.
rev. PM TRP XX COS IIII PP
Luna/Diana with crescent on head and scarf flying
behind her, standing in bull-biga, driving l.
RIC IV, 284; C.396
Scarce; good EF

LUNA, goddess of the moon. Her usual attribute is a crescent worn at top of her head. She first appears early 2nd century BC on Bigati. Equated with DIANA and sometimes impossible to make any clear distinction between these two. The bull is connected to DIANA by a myth, in which sacrificing a big bull would bring great power to the city of the person who sacrificed him. Thus Rome was given the imperium! Diana was the patron of the Biga racing driver too!
2 commentsJochen
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Lydia, Nacrasa. Time of Hadrian or later. RPC II 938. Possibly one of two known. 20 viewsLydia, Nacrasa. Pseudo-autonomous issue, time of Hadrian (AD 117–138) or later. Æ 19mm, 4.99 g, 1h. Struck under the magistrate Markos.
Obverse: ΙЄΡΑ CΥ – Ν – ΚΛΗΤΟC, draped bust of the Senate right; countermarked with capricorn right.
Reverse: [ΕΠΙ CΤΡ ΜΑΡΚΟΥ] ΝΑΚΡΑCЄΙΤ, Artemis Ephesia standing facing, wearing polos and veil, extending hands supported by fillets between two stags, with crescent in left field and star in right.
References: RPC II 938 (= Imhoof, LS 6); Howgego 307 (for c/m).
Ex Gitbud & Naumann (eBay), 8-9-2014.
Mark Fox
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M. Plaetorius Cestianus, Crawford 409/148 viewsRoman Republic, M. Plaetorius Cestianus, gens Plaetoria
AR - denarius, 18.52mm, 3.86g
Rome, 67 BC
obv. Bust of a winged goddess, r., wearing crested helmet, lotus-blossom and grain-ears on forehead, bow and quiver over r. shoulder, cornucopiae under chin
behind CESTIANVS, before S.C
rev. in ex. M PLAE, then TORIVS F AED CVR
Eagle with spread wings stg. r. on thunderbolt, head turned l.
Crawford 409/1, Sydenham 809; BMCRR 3596; Plaetoria 4
VF, toned
Pedigree:
ex. M&M AG Auktion 38, Basel 6./7.12.1968, coll. August Voirol, Lot 181
Plaetorius Cestianus was a friend of Cicero.

The goddess on the obv. often is called Vacuna in error. But actually she is an unknown goddess with the attributes of Isis, Ceres, Minerva, Diana and Victoria.
For more information please look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'.
Jochen
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M. Plaetorius M.F. Cestianus AED CVR , Denar12 viewsRRC 409/1
67 b.c.

The avers ist showing a bust with the combined attributes of Apollo (Hair, Laurel), Minerva (Helmet), Diana (Bow) Victory (winged) and Fortuna (Cornucopia).
According to M Harlan the whole coin can also be read as a reference to Fortuna Primigenia as seen in her temple on the Quirinal.

For the moneyer Crawford refers to Cicero (ad Att v,20, 8); Mommsen names him as the prosecutor of Fonteius, also refering to Cicero (pro Font.)

Ex HD Rauch Auct 27, lot ?, 2010
Norbert
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M. Plaetorius M.f. Cestianus – Plaetoria-443 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC M. Plaetorius M.f. Cestianus AR Denarius 67 BC (18.96 mm 3.45 grams) SESTIANVS - S C, Helmeted draped bust right, with attributes of Isis, Minerva, Apollo, Diana, and Victory, cornucopia below chin / M.PLAETORIVS.M.F.AED - CVR, Eagle standing right on thunderbolt, head left, wings spread. Ex Madroosi collection. Crawford 409/1, Plaetoria 4, Syd 809, RCV 349Bud Stewart
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Macedonian Tetradrachm72 viewsMacedonia Prima Merida (First Region), Roman Dependent Republic, c. 168 - 149 B.C.

Macedonian silver tetradrachm, Amphipolis mint, 158 - 149 BC, 16.338g, 31.1mm, die axis 0o,
Prokopov Macedonia 469: II.A. O. 93 - R. 365 var; AMNG III, p. 57, 176 ff. var; SNG Cop 1314-5 var (same); BMC Macedonia p. 8, 8 var
OBV: Macedonian shield (the whole obverse represents a shield) with bust of Artemis Tauropolos
(Diana to the Romans) at the center facing right, bow and quiver at her shoulder
REV: ΜΑΚΕ∆ΟΝΩΝ ΠΡΩΤΗΣ (First Macedonia Province), legend above and below club,
Α/ΣΗΡ monogram above, ΤΚΡ and ΤΜΕ monograms below, all within oak wreath closed by thunderbolt left

Rare with slight apparently unpublished variation in the monogram above

EX: Forvm Ancient Coins
4 commentsRomanorvm
diana.jpg
Macrinus & Diadumenianus/ Artemis & dog12 viewsMacrinus & Diadumenianus, Moesia, Marcianopolis, 27 mm (5 assaria)
Obv: AV K OPPEL CEVH MAKREINOS K M OPPE ANTWN DIADOVMEN, Laureate head of M. facing bare head of D.
Rev: V P AGIPPA NIKO POLITWP // E. Hunting Artemis and dog.
Podiceps
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Marcus Aurelius, Denarius, COS III4 viewsAR Denarius
Marcus Aurelius
Caesar: 140 - 161AD
Augustus: 161 - 180AD
Issued: December, 170 - December, 171AD
19.5 x 18.5mm
O: M ANTONINVS AVG TR P XXV; Laureate head, right.
R: COS III; Diana standing front, head left, holding arrow and bow.
Rome Mint
Aorta: B11, O47, R26, T102.
RSC 232; RIC 1306; BMC, p. 460.
edgars2010 272343467044
8/16/16 1/21/17
Nicholas Z
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Marcus Opelius Diadumenian (as Caesar), 217 - 218 AD25 viewsObv: K M OΠΠEΛ ANTΩNI ΔIAΔOYMAIAN[OC], bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust of Diadumenian facing right.

Rev: YΠ AГPΠΠA NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPO-C ICTPΩ, Artemis running right, holding a bow and drawing an arrow from a quiver, a hound at her side.

Legate: Marcus Claudius Agrippa

Æ 28, Nikopolis, Moesia Inferior, c. 217 - 218 AD

15.5 grams, 28.02 mm, 180°

Varbanov I 3669 (variety, bust type)
SPQR Coins
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Marcus Plaetorius M.f. Cestianus44 viewsObv: Helmeted and draped bust of a composite deity (referenced as Vacuna) facing right, wearing a wreath of laurel, corn, poppy and lotus, bow and quiver over her shoulder, cornucopia below chin, CESTIANVS behind, SC before.

Rev: M PLAETORIVS MF AED [CVR], eagle standing on thunderbolt, head turned left.

Note: Vacuna was an ancient Sabine goddess, identified by ancient Roman sources and later scholars with numerous other goddesses, including Ceres, Diana, Minerva, Victory, Bellona and Venus. She was mainly worshipped at a sanctuary in Horace's villa (now in the commune of Licenza), in sacred woods at Reate and at Rome.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 67 BC

4.1 grams, 18 mm, 180°

RSC Plaetoria 4, S349
2 commentsSPQR Coins
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Meleager and Atalanta and the Hunt of the Calydonian Boar, c. 1618-19; Peter Paul Rubens296 viewsMeleager and Atalanta and the Hunt of the Calydonian Boar, c. 1618-19

Peter Paul Rubens
Flemish, 1577-1640
Oil on panel
18-3/4 x 29-1/8 in. (47.6 x 74 cm)
Norton Simon Art Foundation, Gift of Mr. Norton Simon
M.1975.21.P
© 2002 Norton Simon Art Foundation

The subject is derived from Homer's Iliad, but it is widely believed that Ruben's composition is drawn from Ovid's narrative in the Metamorphoses. The goddess Diana has taken insult over the Calydonian king's failure to pay her tribute during the harvest festival. To avenge herself, she sends a ferocious boar to ravage the land. The king's son Meleager, accompanied by the bravest warriors, seeks to destroy the creature. Atalanta, the beautiful virgin huntress, joins the hunt and is the first to wound the boar with her arrow, much to the chagrin of her male competitors.

This infamous boar has been depicted on, notably, a beautiful reverse of a coin of the ROMAN REPUBLIC: C. Hosidius C.f. Geta. Diana / Calydonian boar.

Cleisthenes
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Milan, DIANA FELIX12 viewsGöbl:1146icos
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Milan, Diana felix 25 viewsMilanicos
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Milan, Diana Felix23 viewsicos
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Modern depictions of Artemis/Diana, 1552, France12 viewsHenri II, France

Rev.: .NOMEN. AD *ASTRA. 1552, Diana walking left front, arrow in right hand, bow in left hand, building and tree in background.


for obverse, reverse and details click here
shanxi
Rechenpfennig_2_artemis.jpg
Modern depictions of Artemis/Diana, 1586-1635, Nuremberg11 viewsNuremberg, Counter Token/Jeton

by Hans Krauwinckel, Nuremberg, AD 1586-1635
Obv.: APOLLO DIANA /in ex. H . K . - Apollo with harp to left. Diana with dog, spear, arrow and quiver to right.

for obverse, reverse and details click here
shanxi
rechenpfenning_diana.jpg
Modern depictions of Artemis/Diana, 1791, Nuremberg15 viewsNuremberg, Counter Token

Rev.: RECH PFENN / LAUER , Artemis/Diana walking with her dog (poodle ?) on the dog leash, trees and bushes to the right
AE, 1.53g, 21mm

for obverse, reverse and details click here
shanxi
medaillen_artemis_07_artemis.jpg
Modern depictions of Artemis/Diana, 1930, Germany18 viewsBronze Medal 1930
by Friedrich Wilhelm Hörnlein, (1873 – 1945)
Obv: Artemis/Diana with bow and quiver, roe behind, signed Hörnlein

for obverse, reverse and details click here
shanxi
medaillen_artemis_06_artemis.jpg
Modern depictions of Artemis/Diana, 1931, France7 viewsMedal by Pierre-Alexandre Morlon (original design 1931)

Obv: UNION FEDERALE DES SOCIETES DE TIR AUX ARMES DE CHASSE, Artemis/Diana Standing right, holding bow, dog behind, signed MORLON


for obverse, reverse and details click here

shanxi
Medaillen_Artemis_03_artemis.jpg
Modern depictions of Artemis/Diana, 1932, France9 viewsMedal by André Pierre Schwab

Obv: Artemis advancing right, holding bow, dog behind, signed SCHWAB

for obverse, reverse and details click here

shanxi
Medaille_Artemis_04_artemis.jpg
Modern depictions of Artemis/Diana, 1940, France14 viewsBronze Medal ca. 1940
by François André Clémencin (1878-1950)
Obv: Artemis running left, holding bow, dog behind

for obverse, reverse and details click here
shanxi
Medaillen_Artemis_09_artemis.jpg
Modern depictions of Artemis/Diana, 1963, France19 viewsBronze Medal ca. 1963-1965
by Raymond Delamarre (1890–1986)

Obv: ARTEMIΣ, Artemis running left, stag behind, squirrel underneath

for obverse, reverse and details click here
shanxi
nikopolis_macrinus_HrJ(2011)8_23_43_3cf.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 23. Macrinus, HrHJ (2018) 8.23.43.04 (plate coin)36 viewsMacrinus, AD 217-218
AE 28, 11.12g, 27.87mm, 195°
struck under governor Marcus Claudius Agrippa
obv. AVT K OPPEL C - EVH MA[KRINOC]
Bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. VP AGRIP[PA NIKOP]OLITWN PROC I / CTRW
Nude youth (mountain-god Haimos), slight drapery over r. shoulder and knees, wearing boots, std. r.(!)
on rocks, looking back, l. hand on head, r. arm with spear resting on tree behind
in r. field AIMOC
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1700, pl. III, 24 (1 ex., Bassarabescu)
b) not in Varbanov (engl.):
cf.#3390: different obv. legend, spear not mentioned, pic of rev. from Pick, pic of obv. called #3407 in
error
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.23.43.4 (plate coin)
unique (R10), about VF
pedigree:
ex dianacoins, Ebay, 2009
ex coll. Steve Cady, Tantalus Coins, #34158, 2012

The pic in Hristova/Jekov (2011) was taken from Varbanov, Varbanov's pic was taken from Moushmov, Moushmov's pick was taken from Pick! Therefore the copies are so bad and the spear has disappeared!

One of the rarest types of Nikopolis at all. This type was listed and depicted in AMNG I/1. Nicolae Bassarabescu, a Romanian collector, was in AD 1890 the director of the journal "Poporul" in Bukaresti. But the coin vanished in the course of time. It is now the first time that this type appears in the public after more than 100 years. Enjoy!
1 commentsJochen
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Morlon, Artemis7 viewsMedal by Pierre-Alexandre Morlon
1878-1951
(Morlon created also the french circulating coins)

Obv: UNION FEDERALE DES SOCIETES DE TIR AUX ARMES DE CHASSE, Artemis/Diana Standing right, holding bow, dog behind, signed MORLON
Rev: CHAMPIONAT DE FRANCE
BALL-TRAP “OLYMPIQUE”
1951, 2E Prix,
ILE DE FRANCE
(original design 1931)
shanxi
IMAG0057mod.jpg
Morocco, Volubilis mosaic55 viewsBath of DianaFranz-Josef M
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Nerva Denarius - Diana the Huntress (RIC 11)151 viewsAR Denarius
Rome Oct - Dec 96 AD
3.28g

Obv: Laureate bust of Nerva (R).
IMP NERVA CAES AVG PONT MAX TR P

Rev: Diana advancing right, head facing,
drawing arrow from quiver & holding bow, hound running behind.
COS II DESIGN III P P

RIC 11, RSC 40.
Coin on Wildwinds.
CNG 84, Lot 1011, 5th May 2010
Helios Auction 4, Lot 346, 14th Oct 2009
H.D. Rauch, Auktion 75, Lot 403, 6th May 2005 (Not this coin - mistakenly attributed by Helios)
CNG 58, Lot 1177, 19th Sept 2001
ex. Aloysius Lynn Collection (A. Lynn)
The rarest Nerva denarius.
No examples in Reka Devnia hoard.

This type was minted between October and December in the year 96 AD. This can be ascertained from the reverse legend that states Nerva is Consul for the 2nd time but has already been designated a third term in office, which would commence in the New Year. The symbolism of the reverse itself has been questioned – perhaps Nerva had held some venationes (beast hunts) early in his reign to endear himself to the people?
5 commentsKained but Able
Rechenpfennig_2_fac.jpg
Nuremberg, 1586-1635, Counter Token, Diana Apollo, Meleagros Atlante11 viewsCounter Token/Jeton
by Hans Krauwinckel, Nuremberg, AD 1586-1635
Obv.: APOLLO DIANA /in ex. H . K . - Apollo with harp to left. Diana with dog, spear, arrow and quiver to right.
Rev.: MELIAGER - Meleagros, left, giving Atlante, to the right, head of a killed boar.
AE, 4.63g, 27mm
Ref.: Stalzer Pl. 35, 307.
shanxi
rechenpfenning_fac.jpg
Nuremberg, 1791, Counter Token, Louis XVI, Diana13 viewsCounter Token
by (Ernst Ludwig Sigmund ?) Lauer, Nuremberg, AD 1791
Obv.: LVD: XVI DG - FR. ET. NAV R , bust of Louis XVI facing right.
Rev.: RECH PFENN / LAUER , Artemis/Diana walking with her dog on the dog leash, trees and bushes to the right
AE, 1.53g, 21mm
Ref.: Hennin Nr. 274. Pl. 26 - 31, 1791
1 commentsshanxi
0191-a00.jpg
Overview of Plautilla's Coinage by Potator II85 viewsThere are five main types of portrait for Plautilla’s denarii at the Rome mint :

A - With a draped bust right, hair coiled in horizontal ridges and fastened in bun in high position. Her facial expression is juvenile
B - Hair being coiled in vertical ridges, with bun in low position. Plautilla looks here more like a young beautiful woman
C - The third bust shows a thinner face of Plautilla with hair in vertical ridges and no bun but braids covering her neck
D - The fourth type has a similar appearance with the former, but the vertical ridges disappear, hair being plastered down, still showing the right ear
E - Plautilla appears with mid long hair plastered down and covering her ears

In the mean time there are seven different reverses :

1 - CONCORDIAE AETERNAE
2 - PROPAGO IMPERI
3 - CONCORDIA AVGG
4 - CONCORDIA FELIX
5 - PIETAS AVGG
6 - VENVS VICTRIX
7 – DIANA LVCIFERA

Not every combination exists, but some of the above reverses can be shared by several obverse portraits. Noticeable also is an evolution of the obverse legend, being PLAVTILLAE AVGVSTAE (a) in 202, and becoming PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA (b) soon after.

Taken with permission from the gallery of Potator II:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/index.php?cat=11724
LordBest
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P CLODIUS MF TURRINUS ROMAN REPUBLIC; GENS CLAUDIUS AR Denarius13 viewsOBVERSE: Laureate head of Apollo right, lyre behind
REVERSE: Diana standing facing, with bow and quiver over shoulder, holding lighted torch in each hand; P CLODIVS right, M F on left
Rome 42BC
3.8g, 20mm
Cr494/23, Claudia 15
Legatus
P_CLODIUS_MF_TURRINUS_3.jpg
P CLODIUS MF TURRINUS ROMAN REPUBLIC; GENS CLAUDIUS AR Denarius 4 viewsOBVERSE: Laureate head of Apollo right, lyre behind
REVERSE: Diana standing facing, with bow and quiver over shoulder, holding lighted torch in each hand; P CLODIVS right, M F on left
Rome 42BC
3.02g, 19mm
Cr494/23, Claudia 15
Legatus
accoleia2.jpg
P. ACCOLEIUS LARISCOLUS37 viewsAR denarius. 43 BC. 3,92 grs. Draped bust of Diana Nemorensis right. P. ACCOLEIUS LARISCULUS / Triple cult statue of Diana Nemorensis. The Nymphae Querquetulanae ( Diana, Hecate, Selene) facing, supporting on their hands and shoulders a beam, above which are five cypress trees. The figure on the left holds a poppy in her right hand; the nymph on the right holds a lily in her left.
Crawford 486/1. RSC Accoleia 1.
1 commentsbenito
accoleia2~0.jpg
P. ACCOLEIUS LARISCOLUS22 viewsAR denarius. 43 BC. 3,92 grs. Draped bust of Diana Nemorensis right. P. ACCOLEIVS LARISC0LVS / Triple cult statue of Diana Nemorensis. The Nymphae Querquetulanae ( Diana, Hecate, Selene) facing, supporting on their hands and shoulders a beam, above which are five cypress trees. The figure on the left holds a poppy in her right hand; the nymph on the right holds a lily in her left.
Crawford 486/1. RSC Accoleia 1.
benito
accoleius_Cr486.1.jpg
P. Accoleius Lariscolus, Crawford 486/161 viewsAR - Denarius, 3.90gm, 19.7mm.
Rome, 43 BC
obv. P. ACCOLEIVS - LARISCOLVS
Archaisized bust of Diana Nemorensis, draped, r.
rev. Triple cult statue of Diana Nemorensis (Diana, Hecate, Selene) facing,
supporting on their hands and shoulders a bar; behind them a grove of five
cypresses; the figure on the left (Diana) holds a bow in her outer hand, the
figure on the right (Selene) a poppy.
Crawford 486/1; Sydenham 1148; Accoleia 1
gVF, light toning, with a reasonably unobtrusive banker's mark.

Regarding the hairstyle of the obv. portrait this coin is from a later period of this issue (A. Alföldi). The family of the mint-master is originated from Aricia at the Lake Nemi where stood the grove and the temple of Diana Nemorensis. Here too votiv-inscriptions of the Accoleii have been found. Octavian's mother was from Aricia. Perhaps Octavian himself has influenced the selection of this coin-motive.

For more informations please look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'
1 commentsJochen
0112-B.jpg
P. Accoleius Lariscolus, Denarius18 viewsP. Accoleius Lariscolus, Denarius

RRC 486/1
43 bc

Av: Draped bust of Diana Nemorensis r.; behind, P ACCOLEIVS; before, LARISCOLVS
Rv. Triple cult statue of Diana Nemorensis; behind, cypress grove

Ex Bertolami Fine arts, Auction 24, Numismatics, London, 23.06.2016, #567
Norbert
clodius2.jpg
P. Clodius137 viewsP. Clodius --AR Denarius. Apollo, Lyre behind. / Diana lucifera, two torches. Crawford 494/23; HCRI 184; Sydenham 1117; Claudia 154 commentsfeatherz
p_clodius.jpg
P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus55 viewsSilver denarius, Rome, 42 BC
Laureate head of Apollo right, lyre behind
Diana Lucifera standing facing, holding two long torches,
bow and quiver on shoulder, P. CLODIVS to right, M.F to left.
Crawford 494/23. Sydenham 1117.
Sergius Silus
_1ClodiusDenarius.JPG
P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus100 views42 BC
AR Denarius (18mm, 3.86g)
O: Laureate head of Apollo right; lyre behind.
R: Diana Lucifera standing facing, holding two long torches, bow and quiver on her shoulder; M.F - CLODIVS flanking.
RSC Claudia 15; Crawford 424-23; Sydenham 1117; CRI 184; RSC Claudia 15; BMC 4290
ex Sayles & Lavender

TO APOLLO AND DIANA
Virgins, sing the Virgin Huntress;
Youths, the youthful Phoebus sing;
Sing Latona, she who bore them
Dearest to the eternal King:
Sing the heavenly maid who roves
Joyous, through the mountain groves;
She who winding waters loves;
Let her haunts her praises ring!

Sing the vale of Peneus’ river;
Sing the Delian deity;
The shoulder glorious with its quiver’
And the lyre of Mercury.
From our country, at our prayer -
Famine, plague, and tearful war
These, benign, shall drive afar
To Persia’s plains or Britain’s sea.
~ Horace (Odes 1,21)
2 commentsEnodia
P_CLODIUS_MF_TURRINUS_2.jpg
P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus (42 B.C)27 viewsO: Laureate head of Apollo right; lyre to left.
R: Diana Lucifera standing right, bow and quiver over her shoulder, holding torch with each hand; P • CLODIVS downard to right, M • F • downward to left.
Rome Mint
4.0g
20mm 
Cr494/23, Claudia 15
1 commentsMat
00759.jpg
P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus (RSC I Claudia 15, Coin #759)6 viewsRSC I Claudia 15, AR Denarius, Rome, 42 BC
OBV: Laureate head of Apollo right, lyre behind.
REV: M•F• / P•CLODIVS; Diana Lucifera (the light bringer) standing right holding two long lit torches.
SIZE: 19.2mm, 3.10g
MaynardGee
P_Clodius.jpg
P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus - AR denarius6 viewsRome
42 BC
laureate head of Apollo right, lyre behind
Diana Lucifera standing half right holding torch in each hand
P·CLODIVS / M·F
SRCV I 492, RSC I Claudia 15, Sydenham 1117, Crawford 494/21, BMCRR 4287
3,8g
ex Naumann
Johny SYSEL
P_Clodius_M_f__Turrinus.jpg
P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus - Claudia-15133 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC P Clodius Denarius. 42 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, lyre behind / Diana standing facing, with bow and quiver over shoulder, holding lighted torch in each hand; P CLODIVS right, M F on left. Sydenham 1117, Crawford 494/23, RCV 4923 commentsBud Stewart
clodius_denarius.jpg
P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus 42b.c. Denarius31 viewsLaureate head of Apollo right, Lyre behind. Reverse. Diana Lucifera standing facing holding two long torches, bow and quiver on her shoulder, P. CLODIVS on right, M.F on left.Philoromaos
0113.jpg
P. Clodius M.f., Denarius16 viewsP. Clodius M.f., Denarius

RRC 494/23
42 bc

Av: Laureate head of Apollo r.; behind, lyre,
Rv: Diana standing r., with bow and quiver over shoulder, holding two lighted torches; on r.,

P CLODIVS; on l., M F.

The crawford number 494 covers 46 very different coins of 3 different moneyers from 42 bc.

Ex Bertolami Fine arts, Auction 24, Numismatics, London, 23.06.2016, #569
Norbert
083.JPG
Petra - Treasury12 viewsThe most photographed site in Petra. Here is mine. Called the Treasury (al-Khazneh) due to a wrong guess in the 19th century this is in fact the most magnificent tomb in Petra. It dates to the 1st c AD. Despite the efforts of Indiana Jones, Tin Tin and Sinbad the sailor (and modern archaeologists) no one knows whose tomb it is.otlichnik
unk_prov.jpg
Philip I, Thrace, Deultum43 viewsPhilip I, Thrace, Deultum
AE21
Ob: IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rv: COL F L PAC DEVLT - Diana (Artemis) advancing right, drawing arrow from quiver, holding bow in left hand.
Ref: Jurukova 433; SNG Bulgaria, vol 1, 1601-1607
Scotvs Capitis
caratripolis.jpg
Phoenicia, Tripolis. Caracalla. Zeus Hagios / Helios / Diana27 viewsCaracalla AE 21 mm of Tripolis, Phoenicia. MAP AV ANTWNEINOC C, laureate, draped bust right / TRIPOLITWN, tetrastyle temple; in the center intercolumnation the flaming altar of Zeus Hagios; Helios in the left and Diana holding torch in the right. SNG Copenhagen 288v ancientone
GRK_Phrygia_Apameia.JPG
Phrygia, Apameia.12 viewsSear 5121 var., SNG Copenhagen 183; SNG von Aulock 347, BMC Phrygia p. 80, 69.

AE 20 mm, circa 100-50 B.C.

Obv: Laureate head of Zeus facing right.

Rev: Cult statue of Artemis Anaïtis facing; AΠAME to right, HPAKΛΕI and EΓΛΟ (Herakles and Eglo, magistrates), to left.

Artemis Anaïtis was a fusion of the Persian goddess Anahita and the Greek Artemis. Tacitus (Annals 62) refers to the syncretic deity simply as the “Persian Diana”, who had a temple in Lydia “dedicated in the reign in of Cyrus” (presumably Cyrus the Great).
Stkp
plated_denar.jpg
plated Republican denarius, P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus29 viewsP. Clodius M.f. Turrinus, 42 BC
18mm, 2.87g
obv: laureate head of Apollo right, hair in knot, falling in two locks; lyre behind
rev: Diana Lucifera, wearing long drapery, standing facing, head right, holding lighted long torch in each hand, bow and quiver on her shoulder; P • CLODIVS • to right, M • F • to left
areich
rome_14.jpg
Plautilla Denarius - Rome - Diana Lucifera - No.1422 viewsPlautilla
Denarius
205 A.D.
Rome
Av.: PLAVTILLA - AVGVSTA / draped bust right (Hill: Lii)
Rev.: DIANA - LVCIFERA / Diana standing left, bow on back, holding torch with both hand
3,55 Gr., 12 h die axis
RIC 366, Coh. 13, Hill 702

The last and rarest denarii issue for Plautilla in early 205, before she was exiled.
nummis durensis
0191-7070.jpg
Plautilla, Denarius - bE7128 viewsRome mint, AD 205
PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair waved & drawn down on neck
DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, holding torch in both hands.
3.3 gr
Ref : RIC IV # 366, Cohen # 13, RCV #7070
See G&M auction # 170/2507, same dies
Ex. arizonarobin collection
4 commentsPotator II
plautilladiana.jpg
Plautilla, Diana66 viewsPlautilla
Ar Denarius Rome

PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA,
draped bust right, hair waved & drawn down on neck

DIANA LVCIFERA,
Diana standing left, holding torch in both hands.

RIC 366
5 commentsarizonarobin
POSTUME-dianaeluciferae-sanscarquois-700px~0.jpg
Postume9 viewsDIANAE LVCIFERAE
2,44g
19-18mm
PYL
RR_006_postumia.jpg
Postumia, 81 B.C.45 viewsSilver denarius. Bust of Diana right; bow & quiver over shoulder. / A POST A F S N ALBIN, Togate figure before lit altar; ox right about to be sacrificed. jimmynmu
postumius_3.jpg
POSTUMIUS48 views74 BC
AR Denarius 18 mm, 3.90 g
O: (no legend) Draped bust of Diana right, wearing hair tied into knot; bow and quiver over shoulder
R: Hound running right; spear below, right C POSTVMI / A in exe.
Rome, Postumia 9; Crawford 394/1a; Sydenham 785.
(ex Beast Coins)
2 commentslaney
Postumus DIANAE LVCIFERAE RIC 299.jpg
Postumus DIANAE LVCIFERAE RIC V/2 29964 viewsAnt, 20mm, 4.11g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: DIANAE LVCIFERAE, Diana walking R with torch and quiver.

Trier, Officina B, Issue 4.

RIC v/2 299, Common.
2 commentsRobert_Brenchley
roman56~0.jpg
Quintillus AE Antoninianus33 views270 AD. Milan mint.
Obv.: IMP C M AVR CL QVINTILLVS AVG - Radiate and draped bust right.
Rev.: DIANA LVCIF - Diana standing right, holding long transverse torch. P in ex..
RIC 16 cor. (Obv. legend, P in ex. missing, listed under Rome); Cohen 20.
1 commentsMinos
RIC 373A Julia Domna.jpg
RIC 373A Julia Domna Denarius Diana.64 viewsRome mint, 211-217. Under Caracalla.
Draped bust right IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG
Rev. Diana standing left holding torch DIANA LVCIFERA
RIC 373A, RSC 32
1 commentsLordBest
Julia_Domna_R687_fac.jpg
RIC 4a, p.272, 373a - Julia Domna, DIANA LVCIFERA17 viewsJulia Domna
AR-Denar, Rome Mint, AD 211-217
Obv.: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, bun at the back, looped plait from ear around back of neck
Rev.: DIANA LVCIFERA (light bringing Diana), Diana Lucifera standing facing, head left, holding flaming long torch transverse left with both hands
Ag, 3.175g, 18.7mm, 0°
Ref.: RIC IV 373a; RSC III 32; BMCRE V p. 430, C1
Ex Numismatik Naumann
Ex FORVM ANCIENT COINS
shanxi
Gordianus_III_16.jpg
RIC 4c, p.028, 127 - Gordianus III, Diana Lucifera22 viewsGordianus III
Denar, Rome
Obv.: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing right, holding long torch.
AR, 2.77g, 18.9mm
Ref.: RIC 127
1 commentsshanxi
Claudius_II_R693_fac~0.jpg
RIC 5a, p.228, 205 - Claudius II Gothicus, Diana11 viewsClaudius II Gothicus
AR-Antoninian, 268-270 AD, Antioch
Obv.: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG Bust radiate, draped, cuirassed right
Rev.: DIANAE - VICTR Diana standing r. holding bow and drawing arrow from quiver, before her stag standing r. and looking back at her, H = officina 8 in exergue.
Ag, 21mm, 4.24g, 12h
Ref.. RIC 205
Ex London Ancient Coins
shanxi
R662_Postumus_fac.jpg
RIC 5B, p.361, 299 - Postumus, Diana18 viewsPostumus
AR-Antoninian
Obv.: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus to right.
Rev.: DIANAE LVCIFERAE Diana walking right, holding a long-handled torch in both hands; quiver on her back.
Ag, 3.66g, 20mm
Ref.. RIC 299, Cunetio 2430
Ex Roma Numismatics 2009
Ex moremoth 2019
1 commentsshanxi
Trajan_RIC_696.jpg
RIC 69616 viewsSemis, undated
Obv: IMP CAES TRAIAN AVG GERM
Bust of Minerva, helmeted r.
Rev: S C
Diana walking r., drawing arrow from quiver on her shoulder.
2.83g, 18mm
klausklage
GIII-Ric127(r).jpg
Ric-127 - Gordian III DIANA LVCIFERA44 viewsIMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG - Laureate and draped bust right
DIANA LVCIFERA - Diana, the moon-goddess, sister of Apollo, standing right, holding long, lighted torch

RIC-127(r) Cohen-69 Sear-2470
jimwho523
GORDIAN_III_AR_DENARIUS_SALUS.jpg
Roman Empire , Emperor Gordian III. AD 238-244. AR Denarius97 viewsGordian III. AD 238-244. AR Denarius (20 mm, 2.92 g, 1 h) . Rome mint, 4th officina. 7th emission, struck AD 240.

Obverse : Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right .
Reverse : Salus standing right, feeding serpent from patera.

References: RIC IV 129a; RSC 325.
Superb extremely fine .

Salus was a Roman goddess. She was the goddess of health and the daughter of Asclepius God of Medicine .
Hygieia for Ancient Greeks.

New Owner : Miss. Arianna Parrillo.

EX ; The Sam Mansourati Collection./ NO. RI 2032

Marcus Antonius Gordianus (January 20, 225 – February 11, 244), known in English as Gordian III, was a Roman Emperor from 238 to 244. Marcus Antonius Gordianus' mother was the daughter of Gordian I and the sister of Gordian II. This made him the grandson and nephew of the two Gordian emperors. His younger sister was called Gordiana. Gordian had assumed the name of his maternal grandfather in 238.
It was the public hostility towards the successors of the Gordian emperors which brought the thirteen year old boy to the attention of the Roman senate. Not only was he a Gordian and hence to the ordinary Roman people's liking, but so too was his family very rich. Rich enough to finance a bonus payment to the people.So Gordian III became Caesar (junior emperor) alongside the two new Augusti Balbinus and Pupienus. But only a few months after this, Balbinus and Pupienus was murdered by the praetorian guard.This left Gordian III accede to the throne as emperor.
In 241 Gordian married Furia Sabinia Tranquillina, the daughter of Timesitheus. Gordian joined Timesitheus who was campaigning against the Persians. When Timesitheus died of an illness, he was replaced by Philip the Arab who was to become emperor when Gordian III died in 244. How Gordian died is not known, although Philip blamed it on an illness and it is thought that Philip engineered a mutiny. Gordian III was deified after his death. Gordian ruled from 238-244.

Gordian III is considered one of the most powerful men in the world.
1 commentsSam
GALLIENUS_ANTEOPE_GAMMA_RIC_318.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - Gallienus17 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - Gallienus (253-268 AD), AE antoninianus, Rome mint, sole reign. Obv.: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right. Rev.: DIANAE CONS AVG, Antelope walking left. Antelope's rear legs are viewed from the front, i.e. right leg forwards.Mintmark: Gamma. NOTE: Detector-Find from Portugal. References: Goebl 716; Cunetio hoard 1344; Minster hoard 69; Bassaleg Hoard 175; Appleshaw hoard 82; Lavilledieu hoard 61-63; RIC V-1, Rome 181 var (officina letter).dpaul7
deictator denarius.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - REPUBLIC - P CLODIVS31 viewsRoman Republic Denarius - Apollo & Diana - Rome, Imperatorial Period 42 BC - Octavian, Antony, Lepidus, Dictators, Silver Denarius Obv: no legend - Apollo head right with lyre behind head Rev: M-F (on left) P CLODIVS (on right) - Diana Lucifera standing right holding long torch in each hand. Rome mint 42 BC = M. Crawford, Vol. I, p. 506, 494/23, Vol. II, Pl. LIX, 17; D. Sear I, p. 163, 492, 3.28 g.
This coin refers to the Sabine origin of the moneyer's family, worship of Diana was introduced into Rome by the Sabines.
dpaul7
Commodus AMNG2699 obv and rev.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Commodus. Moushmov 185346 viewsCommodus
AE 4 Assaria
Tomis, Moesia Inferior. 175-192 A.D.
25.9mm. 8.94g.
Die Aligment: 210 degrees
Obv: AVT KAI Λ AVP KOMOΔOC - Laureate and draped bust right.
Rev: MHTPOΠ ΠONTOY TTOMEΩC - Artemis (Diana the Huntress) advancing right, holding bow, drawing arrow from quiver on her back.
Δ in right field.
Ref: Moushmov 1853. AMNG 2699.
Notes: By engravers error the "T" of Tomis is written twice. Thank you to Clay Curtis for attributing this coin.
seraphic
Gordian_III.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Gordian III AE22 of Deultum, Thrace.23 viewsGordian III AE22 of Deultum, Thrace.
circa 238 - 244 AD

IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate ciurassed bust right /
COL FL PAC DEVLT, Diana shooting arrow Right

Moushmov 3763
In Bad condition :(
George
moneta 571.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Macrinus, Nikopolis, AE2636 viewsobv: Laureate and draped bust right
rev: Diana (Artemis), the huntress, with bow and arrow, hound at her feet.
Struck 217-218 A.D. at Nikopolis ad Istrum
Jericho
moneta 594.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Septimius Severus, Augusta Trajana, AE1835 viewsobv: Laureate bust right
rev: Diana (Artemis), the huntress, with bow and arrow
Struck 193-211 A.D. at Augusta Trajana
Moushmov 3000
Note: Reverse legend in retrograde
Jericho
009.jpg
Roman Empire, Augustus & Julia, Daughter of Augustus.36 viewsJulia, daughter of Augustus.
AR Denarius, Roma mint, 13 BC.
Obv. AVGVSTVS, Bare head of Augustus right, lituus behind.
Rev. C MARIVS TRO III VIR, draped bust of Julia, as Diana, right with quiver at shoulder.
RIC 403 (I, 72); RSC 1 (I, 160).
3,82g, 17mm.
Provenance: H.D.Rauch Auktionshaus, Auction 84, lot 336.
apyatygin
Faustina-fil_AE-Dup_FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL_S-C_RIC-1405b-A-Pius-_C-207_Rome_145-146-AD_Q-001_axis-5h_27mm_13,86g-s.jpg
Roman Empire, Faustina II (Filia) (128-175 A.D.), AE-Dupondius, RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!,398 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), AE-Dupondius, RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!,
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head, band of pearls and necklace.
revers: No legend - Diana standing left, holding arrow and resting hand on bow, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 27mm, weight: 13,86g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 145-146 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1405b (Antoninus Pius), p-194, C-207,209,
Q-001
6 commentsquadrans
GallienusCor.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Gallienus Ant.- Stag16 viewsAntoninianus 18.9x19.5 mm
Obv. GALLIENVS AVG
Head right, radiate
Rev. DIANAE CONS ___
Stag standing right on line
Exergue. X
gparch
GallienusBor.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Gallienus Ant.- Stag21 viewsAntoninianus 18.5x20 mm
267-268 AD
Obv. GALLIENVS AVG
Head right, radiate
Rev. DIANAE CONS AVG
Stag standing right, on line
Exergue. X
gparch
Gallienus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Gallienus Antoninianus24 viewsIMP GALLIENVS AVG radiate head right / DIANAE CONS AVG
doe walking right, looking backwards; Epsilon in ex. RIC 177 Sear 10199
Mike C
coins1 205.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Gallienus DIANAE CONS AVG95 viewsGallienus, c. 267-268 A.D., Rome.
OBV: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right.
REV: DIANAE CONS AVG, stag walking left.
EX: X, Rome.

This coin was minted to get the goddess Diana to help Gallienus with the revolt the of Aureolus.
1 commentsancientcoins
Photo_2006_9_26_23_14_55_edited.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Gallienus LUNA LVCIF49 viewsGallienus, 260-268 A.D., Antioch.
OBV: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust right.
REV: LVNA LVCIF, Diana walking right, holding torch in both hands, PXV in exergue.
1 commentsancientcoins
moneta 622.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Gallienus, Antoninianus41 viewsobv: GALLIENVS AVG. Radiate head right
rev: DIANAE CONS AVG. Antelope walking left.
exergue: X
Struck 267-268 A.D. at unknown mint
Note: Commemorates vows to Diana invoking her protection against the revolt of Aureolus.
Jericho
bpS1O5Gallienus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Gallienus, Antoninianus44 viewsObv: GALLIENVS AVG
Radiate head right.
Rev: DIANAE CONS AVG
Stag walking right.
Antoninianus, 3.6 gm, 20.6 mm, Rome RIC 179
History (As sole Augustus, 266-268, Part II): In the East, the rampages of Shapur I were largey repelled and kept in check by the Palmyran King, Odaenathus who was rewarded with titles including "Ruler of the Romans" and "Governor of the East". In 266 he extended his influence by advancing into Dacia to check another of the Gothic invasions. An extremely important and powerful ally of Rome who never contended for Imperial power, he was murdered in 267 in a domestic quarrel and succeeded by his wife, Queen Zenobia. Gallienus was in almost continuous defense of Gothic intrusions over the Danube in 266-267. In 268, however, the Goths joined by the Heruli staged a massive invasion through the Balkans and into Greece. Leaving Aureolus at Milan to deflect any incursion by Postumus into the homeland, Gallienus won a great victory at Naissus. At this point, Aureolus staged his second rebellion by defecting to Postumus and shortly after declaring himself Emperor. This forced Gallienus to immediately return to Italy to face the expected invasion. He quickly managed a victory over Aureolus at Pontirolo and then laid siege to him at Milan. Before he could bring this to its expected conclusion, Gallienus was betrayed by his military staff who murdered the emperor in front of his own tent after luring away his guards.
Massanutten
moneta 564.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Gallienus, Rome - RIC V (Part I) 1736 viewsGallienus Antoninianus
obv: GALLIENVS AVG. Radiate bust right
rev: DIANAE CONS AVG. Doe walking right, looking back.
exeruge: epsilon
Struck 267-268 A.D. at Rome
RIC V (Part I) 17
Note: Commemorates vows to Diana invoking her protection against the revolt of Aureolus.


Jericho
Gordian III.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Gordian III, Denarius63 viewsGordian III 238-244 A.D.

Obv: IMP GORDIANVS PIUS FEL AVG
Rev: DIANA LVCIFERA
RIC 127
1 commentsBarry
Julia_Dommna_-_Diana_Lucifera_-_.JPG
Roman Empire, Julia Dommna66 viewsJulia Domna AR-Denar Rom Diana

Kaiserin: Julia Domna, gest. 217 n.C.

Nominal: AR-Denar.

Stadt: Rom.

Vs.: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG Drapierte Büste der Kaiserin nach rechts.

Rs.: DIANA LVCIFERA Diana steht nach links, hält brennende Fackel.

Erhaltung: gutes sehr schön.

Maße: 2,57g, 19mm. Kamp: 50.69.

Verkäufer:dionysos_numismatik,Hamburg.
3 commentsM. V. Celerinus
RIC_IV-I_373A_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_PIA_FELIX_AVG,_DIANA_LVCIFERA,_Roma,_RSC-32,_BMC-1,_Sear-7100,_211-217-AD,_Q-002,_7h,_18,5-19,0mm,_3,57g-s.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 373A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Denar, DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, #2155 views050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 373A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Denar, DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, #2
avers: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, Draped bust right
revers: DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, holding the long torch with both hands.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 18,5-19,0mm, weight: 3,57g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 211-217 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-373A (Caracalla), p-, RSC-32, (Caracalla), BMC-1, Sear-7100,
Q-002
2 commentsquadrans
JDomna.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, JULIA DOMNA (194 - 217 D.C.)22 viewsAR Denario Ø:17mm p:3,04gr.

Anv: "IVLIA AVGVSTA" - Con la cabeza cubierta y el busto derecho descubierto.
Rev: "DIANA LVCIFERA" - Diana de pie(izq.), sosteniendo la antorcha a la izquierda con las dos manos, la media luna en el hombro

Acuñada: 196 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Grado de rareza: S

Referencias: RIC IVi, 548D (s) scarce, page 167 - Cohen 27 - SEAR RCV II (2002), #6578v, page 493
peter2
rs5500bb1186.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Julia Domna- Diana Lucifera Laodicea Mint RIC 638122 viewsROMAN EMPIRE, Julia Domna- Diana Lucifera Laodicea Mint RIC 638
Obv: IVLIA AVGVSTA
Julia Domna draped, right
Rev: DIANA LVCIFERA
Diana holding torch with crescent at her shoulders.

Laodicea Mint
RIC 638. BMCRE 277, 598. RSC 27a. RCV 6578

3 commentsdougsmit
Lucilla_Faustina_Mule.jpg
Roman Empire, Mule (Lucilla obverse, Faustina Jr. reverse) - As - not in RIC75 viewsObv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust r.
Rev: LAETITIA S C, Laetitia standing r., holding scepter and wreath.
Size: 26 mm
Weight: 10,01 g
Mint: Rome
Ref: RIC: -, Cohen: -, possible mule sources: obverse e.g. RIC 1770 (Marcus Aurelius - Lucilla), reverse: RIC 1657 (Marcus Aurelius - Faustina Jr.)
Provenance: Roma Numismatics, Sep. 2010
Wildwinds reference (this coin): http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/ric/lucilla/RIC_1770cf.txt

Wildwinds citation (from the text accompanying Roma numismatics sale):
"Lucilla, AE As. 9.97g; 26mm. 164-166 AD. Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right. Rev: unclear legend, Venus standing right, holding apple and sceptre, S-C across fields. cf. RIC 1770; Cohen 80. This is the only Lucilla coin in RIC which has a deity standing right holding a sceptre (there is a Diana holding a torch with both hands). The legend seems to contain ..IT or AT.. and ends in A, but there are no coins in RIC which have such a legend. This coin is almost identical to one sold by Noble Coins Australia with the same description, though that one was a dupondius)"

Note by Johny SYSEL: "It could be mule combining Lucilla obverse with Faustna II reverse. But definitely there is Laetitia on reverse not Venus."

Note by Curtis Clay: "I think Johny S is right: a mule with a LAETITIA reverse die meant for Faustina II. Rome mint mules are rare. This one might help to establish the chronology of Lucilla's and Faustina's respective coinages."
vs1969
0191-bE7.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, PLAUTILLA Denarius RIC 36655 viewsRome mint, AD 205
PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair waved & drawn down on neck
DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, holding torch in both hands.
3.3 gr
Ref : RIC IV # 366, Cohen # 13, RCV #7070
See G&M auction # 170/2507, same dies
Ex. arizonarobin collection
Potator II
po-02G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - DIANAE LVCIFERE14 views22mm - 3.16g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
DIANAE LVCIFERE
AGK - ; EG 57
gascogne
bot17.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Quintillus, AE Antoninianus59 views270 AD. Milan mint.
Obv.: IMP C M AVR CL QVINTILLVS AVG - Radiate and draped bust right.
Rev.: DIANA LVCIF - Diana standing right, holding long transverse torch. P in ex..
RIC 16 cor. (Obv. legend, P in ex. missing, listed under Rome); Cohen 20.
1 commentsMinos
TitusRaven~0.jpg
Roman Empire, Titus Denarius RIC 131112 viewsTitus AR Denarius Rome Mint, 80 AD
O: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
R: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Tripod, with fillets streaming out l. and r., on which are ravens r. and l., and in the center, dolphin over wreath: ('exuviae' of Apollo, for 'pulvinar' of Apollo and Diana (?)).
- RIC 131 (R), BMC 82, RSC 323a

Reka Devnia hoard, recording only 3 specimens with ravens and the dolphin and 24 specimens of the regular type with only the dolphin. The dolphin, ravens, laurel and tripod are all symbols of Apollo. His most famous attribute is the tripod, the symbol of his prophetic powers. It was in the guise of a dolphin that Apollo brought priests from Crete to Delphi, explaining Apollo's cult title "Delphinios" and the name of the town. He dedicated a bronze tripod to the sanctuary and bestowed divine powers on one of the priestesses, and she became known as the "Pythia." It was she who inhaled the hallucinating vapors from the fissure in the temple floor, while she sat on a tripod chewing laurel leaves. After she mumbled her answer, a male priest would translate it for the supplicant.
4 commentsNemonater
Ephesus,_Claudius_AR_Tetradrachm.jpg
Roman Ephesus37 viewsIonia, Ephesus, Claudius, 41-54, AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm

TI. CLAVD CAES AVG. Claudius bare head, facing left.
DIAN-EPHE Cult statue of Diana (Artemis) of Ephesus inside a tetra style temple, set on three tiered base; pediment decorated by figures flanking three windows.

RIC I 118; RPC I 2222; BMCRE 229; RSC 30; Sear Millennium 1839. Ephesus ca. 41-42 AD.

(25 mm, 11.14 g, 6h).

The Temple of Artemis (Diana) at Ephesus was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Depicted on this coin, which was minted shortly after Claudius’ accession to the throne, there remains no trace of the temple other than some recently stacked column remnants to mark the location. Pliny The Elder described the temple as 115 meters in length, 55 meters in width, made almost entirely of marble; consisting of 127 Ionic style columns 18 meters in height. The original temple, which stood on the site from about 550 BC, was destroyed by arson in 356 BC. It was rebuilt at the direction of Alexander III the Great around 330 BC, in the form depicted on the coin, only to be destroyed by the Goths in 262 AD. Again rebuilt, it was destroyed for the final time by Christians in 401 AD. The marble of the temple was used to construct other buildings. Some of the columns found their way into the church of Hagia Sophia in Constantinople (Istanbul).

The site of the temple was rediscovered in 1869 by an expedition sponsored by the British Museum, but little remains to be seen today. A Christian inscription found at Ephesus reads Destroying the delusive image of the demon Artemis, Demeas has erected this symbol of Truth, the God that drives away idols, and the Cross of priests, deathless and victorious sign of Christ. This Christian zeal explains why so little remains of the site despite its repute in the ancient pre-Christian world.

This coin is rare with a few dozen examples known. In contrast to most examples, which show a four-tiered temple base, the reverse of this coin shows a three-tiered temple base, the same as that found on the Parthenon. The rectangles visible on the pediment of the temple are frequently identified as depictions of tables, or altars attended by flanking figures. However, architectural reconstructions of the temple show these rectangles as windows permitting light into the temple interior, a fact supported by the presence of pediment window frame moldings amongst the remains of other temples from the period in Asia Minor. The Ionic style of the temple’s columns, as described by Pliny, is clearly visible in the reverse image.
4 commentsn.igma
z49832.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, P. Clodius, AR Denarius - Crawford 494/23 - Sear Plate Coin!8 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Publius Clodius M. f. Turrinus, 41 BCE.
AR Denarius (4.01g; 20mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Laureate head of Apollo, facing right; lyre behind.

Reverse: Diana facing with head right, holding a torch in each hand; M.F – P.CLODIVS in fields.

References: Crawford 494/23; Sear, HCRI 184 (this coin illustrated); BMCRR 4290-1; Sydenham 1117.

Provenance: Ex The Mayflower Collection [Heritage Auction (30 April 2012), Lot 26089]; ex J. Schulman Auction 262 (14 May 1975), Lot 1249.

Nothing certain is known of this moneyer besides his coins. The Clodii were an old patrician family of Sabine origin that also had plebeian branches. It is impossible to know whether this moneyer was of the patrician or plebeian side of the family, though his use of the spelling Clodius suggests he was plebeian. Some researchers have suggested (others disagree) that he was the Clodius sent into Macedonia by Caesar in 48 BCE, who fought on the side of Antonius in the Perusine War, and who was put to death by order of Octavian in 40 BCE.
Carausius
Screenshot_2019-08-13_18_45_28.png
Roman Imperial, Antoninus Pius as Caesar, AR Denarius.12 viewsRome 138 A.D. 3.18g - 17.8mm, Axis 4h.

Obv: IMP T AEL CAES HADRI ANTONINVS - Bare head right.

Rev: AVG PIVS P M TR P COS DES II - Diana standing right with arrow and bow.

RIC III 7; RSC 68.
Christian Scarlioli
Screenshot_2018-12-23_10_54_27.png
Roman Imperial, Faustina II, Augusta, AE As.13 viewsRome 139-141 A.D. 11.05g - 25.1mm, Axis 11.

Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA AVG PII FIL - Draped bust right.

Rev: S-C - Diana standing left holding arrow and resting hand on bow.

RIC III 1405b (Antoninus Pius); Cohen 211.
Christian Scarlioli
40117422_221049338758768_6031789028972429312_n.jpg
Roman Imperial, Hadrian AE As., (134-138 AD)11 viewsRoman Imperial, Hadrian AE As., (134-138 AD)

HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, Laureate head right.

S-C, Diana standing left, holding bow and arrows.

Cohen 1365, RIC 825
Gil-galad
rjb_2017_09_03.jpg
Roman intaglio21 viewsA Roman citrine intaglio of Diana/Artemis standing left holding bow and withdrawing arrow from quiver.1 commentsmauseus
RR_C_POSTUMIUS_74_BC_.jpg
Roman Republic / C. POSTUMIUS AR Denarius 74 BC.45 viewsObverse ; Bust of Diana draped right, bow and quiver on shoulder.

Reverse ; Hound running right, hunting spear below, C.POSTVMI / TA in exergue.

18.3 MM AND 3.53 GR , Ch gVF (Choice Good Very Fine )
Ref; Syd 785 Sear 330 Craw 394/1

*The hound was a constant companion of Diana in her capacity as the huntress.
** Moneyer: C. Postumius ( Caius Postumius )
*** From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ;
A moneyer is a private individual who is officially permitted to mint money. Usually the rights to coin money are bestowed as a concession by a state or government. Moneyers have a long tradition, dating back at least to ancient Greece. They became most prominent in the Roman Republic, continuing into the empire.

EX ; The Sam Mansourati Collection./ NO. RR 563
Given as a souvenir to a very dear friend Ms. Christy McCarthy. / On 10/13/2016.
Sam
C__POSTUMIUS.jpg
Roman Republic / C. POSTUMIUS Denarius 60 viewsObverse : Bust of Diana draped right, bow and quiver on shoulder
Reverse : Hound running right, hunting spear below, C.POSTVMI / TA or AT in exergue
Struck 74 BC , Max Diameter 18.2 MM , Weight 3.73 Gr .
references ; Syd 785 , Sear 330 , Craw 394/1.

The hound was a constant companion of Diana in her capacity as the huntress.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection. / NO. RR 249.
1 commentsSam
Roman_Republic_AR_C_POSTVMUS.jpg
Roman Republic / C. POSTUMIUS Denarius.67 viewsObverse : Bust of Diana draped right, bow and quiver on shoulder.
Reverse : Hound running right, hunting spear below, C.POSTVMI
TA or AT in exergue
Moneyer : Caius Postumius. Struck 74 BC , Max Diameter 17mm , 4.03 Gr.
EF , well centered and struck and attractive dark toning.
References ; Syd 785.

The hound was a constant companion of Diana in her capacity as the huntress.

The Sam Mansourati Collection.
8 commentsSam
C_POSTUMIUS.jpg
Roman Republic / Caius Postumius Denarius. 74 BC. 47 viewsObverse : Bust of Diana right, bow & quiver over shoulder. (Profile of huntress Diana)
Reverse : Hound running right full speed, C POSTVMI and AT Monogram in ex.

3.94g , 19mm . Ch XF.


Ref: RRC 394/1

Jovan Lee Delavega Ancient Coins Collection.
Jovan D
hostid~0.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, C Hosidius CF Geta Denarius 68 bc142 viewsC Hosidius CF Geta Denarius 68 bc - Diana / Wild Boar attacked by hound1 commentsAdrian S
bpPI1F1Postumius.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, C Postumius, Denarius, 74 BC86 viewsObv: Anepigraphic
Draped bust of Diana, right. Bow and quiver over shoulder.
Rev: C POSTUMI TA (or AT)
Hound running right. Spear below. Legend in exergue.
3.6 gm, 17.4 mm, Mint: Rome, S 330, RSC 9.
Comment: Gens Postumia. Interesting that D. Sear did not know whether the A and T ligate on reverse is TA or AT although little of the historical record is left of this moneyer. Otherwise I love the pony tail on Diana, goddess of the hunt.
Massanutten
RRPostumiusMed.jpg
Roman Republic, C. Postumius denarius45 views74 BC, Rome
18.74 mm, 3.6 gm
Obv: bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder
Rev: hound running right, spear below; C. POSTVMI, TA in exergue
Ref: Crawford 394/1a

Diana doesn't look very happy.

4 commentsTIF
1680723l.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, C. Postumius, AR Denarius - Crawford 394/1a17 viewsRome, The Republic.
C. Postumius, 74-73 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.95g; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: Draped bust of Diana facing right, with bow and quiver over shoulder.

Rev: Hound running to right; spear below; C. POSTVMI and AT or TA (ligate) in exergue.

References: Crawford 394/1a; Sydenham 785; BMCRR 3238; Postumia 9.

Provenance: Ex Student and Mentor Collection [NAC 83 (20 May 2015) Lot 347]; ex Frank Sternberg Auction VII (24-5 Nov 1977), Lot 390.

They moneyer may have been the Caius Postumius that prosecuted Lucius Licinius Murena for election fraud in 63 BCE. It is uncertain what the ligate letters AT (or TA) denote on the reverse, and there is another variety of this issue without the monogram. Diana is a popular deity on coinage produced by the Postumia gens, and the hound and spear on the reverse are also attributes of Diana, the huntress. Diana appears so frequently on Postumian coins because on the eve of the battle of Lake Regillus (c. 496 BCE), during a sacrifice to Diana, the augurs foretold the domination of Rome over Latium. A. Postumius Albinus led the troops at this decisive battle. Thus, the gens subsequently claimed responsibility for fulfilling the prophecy of Diana.

Crawford dated this issue to 74 BCE, but Hersh and Walker in Mesagne down-dated the issue to 73 BCE. Michael Harlan suggests an even later date of 71 BCE.
1 commentsCarausius
Clodius_Turrinus_Fourré.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Clodius Turrinus Fourre148 viewsObv: Anepigraphic, Head of Apollo facing right;
Rev: Diana Lucifera bearing two torches, standing facing, bow and quiver on her shoulder, P. CLODIVS to right, M.F. to left.
Denarius subaeratus, (3,01 g, 18 mm)

Reproducing RRC 494/23, RSC Claudia 15 of ca. 42 B.C.The original coin would have been struck under the second triumvirate, possibly the year Cassius and Brutus were defeated at Second Philippi.
Syltorian
Screenshot_2019-03-21_09_28_07.png
Roman Republic, Gens: Postumia, C. Postumius, AR Denarius. 8 viewsRome 73 B.C. 3.61g - 18.5mm, Axis 3h.

Obv: Bust of Diana right, with bow and quiver on shoulder. Bankers mark on the throat of Diana.

Rev: C●POSTVMI / TA - Hound running right, spear below, C● POSTVMI TA (Ligate) in exergue.

Postumia 9; Sydenham 785.
Christian Scarlioli
42BC_Clodius.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, P.Clodius M.f. Turrinus. AR denarius. Rome, 42 BC.36 viewsObv. Laureate head of Apollo right, lyre behind. Bankers mark behind head.
Rev. Diana Lucifera with bow and quiver over shoulder holding lighted torch in each hand. P CLODIVS MF
Ref. Albert 1583, Crawford 494/23, Sear 492.
Coin: Diana Lucifera is the bearer of light, also called Hekate, carries the torch symbolizing spiritual resurrection and illumination. The Greeks knew her as Artemis, the twin sister of Apollo, and daughter of Zeus and Leto. She was born under Mount Cynthus in Delos and hence was also called Cynthia and Delia. She was the goddess of hunting, carried a bow and quiver like her brother, and was especially fond of music and dance. Diana was never conquered by love, and submitted to no man, hence she was the goddess of a "chaste" moon and, except for her family, tolerated only female companions. Her priestesses were all chaste and this festival was celebrated with daily music and dance until the kalends of June.
19mm.
Bohemond
Rome_Postumi~0.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Postumia. C. Postumius, 74 BC, AR Denarius 272 viewsHead of Diana right, bow and quiver on shoulder. / Hound running right, hunting spear below; C POSTUMI in exergue with TA monogram below.
Sear (Millennium) 330; Seaby, Postumia 9 (Vol 1, p 83).
Spink & Son Ltd (London)
2 commentsLloyd T
43BC_AccoleiusLariscolus.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Publius Accoleius Lariscolus. AR denarius, Rome, 43 BC36 viewsObv. Diana Nemorensis to right. Behind P ACCOLEIVS, in front LARISCOLVS.
Rev. Triple cult statue of Diana Nemorensis ( consisting of Diana, Hekate and Selena ) standing facing, supporting beam on which there are five trees.
Coin: Sear maintains that this coin commemorates the town of Aricia, the place of origin of the moneyer's family. Diana Nemoerensis was the chief deity of Aricia, and the ruins of her temple there are still visible today. Octavian's mother, Atia, was born in the town.
Ref. Albert 1542, Crawford 486/1, Sear 484.
3.41 gr, 18mm.
Bohemond
GG-TiClaudDiana56__5.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Ti Claudius Ti.f. Ap. n. Nero29 viewsAR Denarius, Rome mint, 79 BC
Obv: Diademed and draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder. S.C. before. Border of dots
Rev: Victory in biga right, holding palm branch and reins in left hand, and laurel wreath in right hand. Control-mark A.IIII above exergue. TI.CLAVD.TI.F/ APN in exergue. Border of dots.
Weight: 3.88g
Crawford 383/1 Sear RCV I 310 RSC Claudia 6
ex F Sternberg Auction VII, Zurich, November 1977, Lot 378
nemesis
GG-TiClaudDiana56__5~0.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Ti Claudius Ti.f. Ap. n. Nero136 viewsAR Denarius, Rome mint, 79 BC
Obv: Diademed and draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder. S.C. before. Border of dots
Rev: Victory in biga right, holding palm branch and reins in left hand, and laurel wreath in right hand. Control-mark A.IIII above exergue. TI.CLAVD.TI.F/ APN in exergue. Border of dots.
Weight: 3.88g
Crawford 383/1 | Sear RCV I 310 | RSC Claudia 6
ex F Sternberg Auction VII, Zurich, November 1977, Lot 378
3 commentsnemesis
1710183.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Ti. Claudius Ti.f. Ap.n. Nero, AR Denarius50 viewsTi. Claudius Ti.f. Ap.n. Nero. 79 BC. AR Serrate Denarius (18mm, 4.07 g). Diademed and draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver on shoulder / Victory driving biga right, holding wreath and palm; A•^XVIII below.
Crawford 383/1; Sydenham 770; Claudia 5.
Good VF, toned.
FabiusMaximus
2199.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Ti. Claudius Ti.f. Ap.n. Nero, AR Denarius30 viewsTi. Claudius Ti.f. Ap.n. Nero. 79 BC. AR Serrate Denarius (18mm, 4.07 g). Diademed and draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver on shoulder / Victory driving biga right, holding wreath and palm; A•^XXVI below.
Crawford 383/1; Sydenham 770; Claudia 5.
Good VF, toned.
FabiusMaximus
AR_-_Nero-3~0.jpg
Roman Republic, TI. Claudius TI.F. AP.N. Nero, AR Denarius Serratus61 views79 BC
3.86 grams
Obv.: Diad. and dr. bust of Diana r., bow and quiver over shoulder, S.C. before.
Rev.: Victory in a briga r. holding palm, TI CLAVD TI F/AP N, Control No. XXXXII
Sear #310 | RSC Claudia 5.
Richard M10
411607.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Tiberius Claudius Nero, AR Serrate Denarius24 viewsRome. The Republic.
Ti. Claudius Ti.f. Ap.n. Nero, 79 BCE.
AR Serrate Denarius (4.13g; 19mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Draped bust of Diana facing right, with bow and quiver over shoulder; S.C, before.

Reverse: Victory driving biga galloping right; A.LXXXVIII below; TI CLAVD TI F AP N, in exergue.

References: Crawford 383/1; Sydenham 770a; BMCRR ;Claudia 5.

Provenance: Ex CNG Classical Numismatic Review (Fall 2015), Lot 411607; CNG Inventory 735603 (August 2003); Numismatica Ars Classica N (26 June 2003), lot 1540; Eton College Collection [Sotheby’s (1 December 1976), lot 195].

The moneyer is Tiberius Claudius Nero, son of Tiberius ("TI F") and grandson of Appius ("AP N"). He served under Pompey in the war against the pirates in 67 BCE, and was the grandfather of the Roman emperor Tiberius. There are two series of control marks for the reverse: one, marked from I to CLXV; the second marked with letter A and I to CLXXXII. Each reverse control mark has only one die. The letters S.C on the obverse mean that this coin was struck by special Senatorial decree, as opposed to routine coinage which was still authorized by the Senate but not specially marked. The reason for the special decree is not certain in this case. The obverse of the coin may refer to the introduction of the worship of Diana by the Sabines from whom the Claudii originated, though Crawford disputes this reading. The reverse may refer to the Second Punic War victories of C. Claudius Nero.

This example comes from the Eton College Collection, which was auctioned by Sotheby’s in 1976. Eton College initiated its ancient coin collection by acquiring a large group of British Museum duplicates in the 1870s, and Eton added to this collection in the ensuing years. By the mid-1970s, the ancient coin market was white-hot, and Eton decided to cash-out the lion’s share of its collection, keeping a representative core for study purposes.
2 commentsCarausius
Claudius_Turrinus_Fourré.jpg
RRC 494/23 (Clodius Turrinus) Subaeratus92 viewsObv: Anepigraphic, Head of Apollo facing right;
Rev: Diana Lucifera bearing two torches, standing facing, bow and quiver on her shoulder, P. CLODIVS to right, M.F. to left.
Denarius subaeratus, (3,01 g, 18 mm)

Reproducing RRC 494/23, RSC Claudia 15 of ca. 42 B.C.The original coin would have been struck under the second triumvirate, possibly the year Cassius and Brutus were defeated at Second Philippi.
Syltorian
RRC383-1.jpg
RRC383/1 (Ti. Claudius Ti. f. Ap. N.)50 viewsObv. Diademed and draped bust of Diana right, stag-shaped bow and quiver over shoulder, S.C. before;
Rev. Victory in biga right, holding palm and wreath, control numeral XXXX below, TI CLAVD TI. F. AP.N. (VD and AP in monogram) in exergue;
19 mm; 3,80 gr.
Rome, 79 B.C.
Refs: RRC383/1, Sear 310, RSC Claudia 5

[Research in progress]
2 commentsSyltorian
IMGP0349aParthCMcombo.jpg
Sakastan, late 1st cent. BC - early 1st cent. AD, unknown ruler over Phraates IV30 viewsAR dr., 3,55gr, 19,25mm
Sellw. 91.12, Shore 472, Senior 1991 D;
mint: Margiane or Sogdiana, axis: 12h; Sakastan, AR dr., late 1. cent. BC - early 1. cent. AD, AR dr., 3,55gr, 19,25mm;
obv.: bare-headed bust of Phraates IV, left, (Sellw.52.19); diadem, knot, and 2 broad ribbons joined at the end; med.-long hair in 5 waves, mustache, short pointed beard; royal wart; in upper right field eagle carrying wreath or diadem; on left shoulder oval countermark w/Eukratides style helmeted bust, right, surrounded by beads; host coin has BB 12 - 18h;
rev.: archer,right, on throne, w/bow and monogr. Π; 5 lines of corrupted ‘Greek’ legend visible;

ex: CNG Auction 398, #370.

1 commentsSchatz
Medaillen_Artemis_03_fac.jpg
Schwab, Artemis/Diana10 viewsMedal by André Pierre Schwab (1883 Nancy – 1969)
Obv: Artemis advancing right, holding bow, dog behind, signed SCHWAB
Rev: EVIAN, EXPOSITION CANINE INTERNATIONALE, 1932, laurel wreath
Silver Plated Bronze, 41mm, 30g
Ref.: Eng. 4387
shanxi
IMG_1359.JPG
Skythians in Sogdiana, AR Obol, 1st century AD31 viewsUncertain Tribe
Skythians in Sogdiana
AR Obol
1st century AD
Stylized bust left
Archer standing right
Senior A8.7
Ardatirion
IMGP0166CentAcombo.jpg
Sogdiana (Samarkand), Unknown Ruler, 4.-5. cent. AD34 viewsAR scyphate obol,, 0,35gr., 10,05mm;
MACW 348; some green deposits;
obv.: bare-headed, left, 1 circle and 4 curved vertical lines for top hair and 3 vertical lines for neck hair, beardless; necklace (?); remnants of possible legend at bottom;
rev.: headless and footless, heavily stylized archer facing, holding bow and arrow in right hand, dressed in tunic w/belt;

ex: R. Thun, FL.
Schatz
IMGP0164CentAcombo.jpg
Sogdiana (Samarkand), Unknown Ruler, 4.-5. cent. AD37 viewsAR scyphate obol, 0,36gr., 9,94mm;
MACW 346;
obv. : bare headed, left, w/5 lines for top hair and 3 lines for neck hair, mustache; nose and forehead one curved line; large dot behind head in upper right field; line at bottom for necklace (?);
rev.: headless and footless archer, facing, w/tunic and belt, holding bow w/arrow (?) in left hand, right arm resting on belt;

ex: R. Thun, FL.
Schatz
IMGP0168CntrAcombo.jpg
Sogdiana (Samarkand), Unknown Ruler, 4.-5. cent. AD27 viewsAR scyphate obol, 0,32gr. , 9,5mm;
MACW 350;
obv.: bare-headed, left, w/4 lines for top hair, 3 lines for neck hair; necklace (?) ;
rev.: headless and footless, heavily stylized archer, facing, w/bow and arrow in left hand, wearing tunic w/belt; large dot in left field, ∫ below;

ex: R. Thun, FL.
Schatz
IMGP0105Dahcombo.jpg
Sogdiana (Samarkand), Unknown Ruler, 4.-5. cent. AD33 viewsAR scyphate obol, 0,36gr., 9,72mm;
MACW 350var.;
obv.: bare-headed, left; retrograde 6 and 5 crescent shaped lines for hair, beardless; in bottom and left field possibly traces of inscription;
rev.: headless, heavily stylized archer, facing, w/bow and arrow in left hand, right arm resting on tunic belt, short sword on left side (?);

ex: Xinjiang Coins (Silk Road).
Schatz
IMGP0107Dahcombo.jpg
Sogdiana (Samarkand), Unknown Ruler, 4.-5. cent. AD28 viewsAR scyphate obol, 0,5gr., 10,9mm;
MACW 350, Rtveladze 36;
obv.: bare-headed, left, cicular line and 5 crescent shaped lines for top hair, 4 vertical lines for neck hair, beardless; necklace(?);
rev.: archer, left, facing, w/bow in left hand, short sword on left side(?), wearing tunic w/belt;

ex: Dmitry Markov Coins.
Schatz
1388_Dahae2.jpg
Sogdiana - AR Obol4 viewsSamarkand
3rd-5th century AD
head left
archer right holding bow and arrow
Mitch., Central Asia, 16; Mitch. Indo-Greek, 662; Mitch., ATC, 1562
Johny SYSEL
Smirnova-1379.jpg
Sogdiana, Bukhara: Kai Yuan Tong Bao imitation (ca. 7th century)35 viewsSpongeBob
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Sogdiana, Bukhara: Turco-Hephthalite lords of Bukhara in the name of the Abbasid caliph al-Amin (809-813) BI Drachm (Album-96, MACW-1396)36 viewsObv: Bukharan-style bust facing right with Arabic legend around, commencing at 5 o'clock
Rev: Fire altar; bust of Ahura Mazda in flames right on altar. Stylized attendants to either side.
SpongeBob
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Sogdiana, Bukhara: Turco-Hephthalite lords of Bukhara in the name of the Abbasid caliph al-Mahdhi (775-785) BI Drachm (Album-94, MACW-1395)34 viewsObv: Bust in the style of the Sasanian king Varhran V facing right. Sogdian legend Pwy'r ywB k'y 'King-Emperor of Bukhara' to right; Arabic legend 'al-Mahdi' behind head.
Rev: Fire altar; bust of Ahura Mazda in flames right on altar. Stylized attendants to either side.
SpongeBob
Sogdiana_Chach_01.jpg
Sogdiana, Chach: Unknown Ruler (3rd-5th c.) AE Unit (Shagalov & Kuznetsov-1)44 viewsObv: Portrait of a ruler in profile facing left surrounded by a linear rim. The ruler has an almond shaped eyes, a large nose, sloping forehead, pointed chin with a forked beard, and small mustache. Hair is flowing down to his shoulders and individual strands of curly hair is intercepted by a tiara, which ends tied behind his head with two loops back down to his head. The top of the tiara has a crescent-shaped pommel attached. On the neck of the ruler is a jewlery with a round medallion in the middle.
Rev: Tamgra surrounded by Sogdian legend - c'c'n n'pn'c wnwn xw b - Chach people ruler - King Vanvan.
SpongeBob
Smirnova-657.jpg
Sogdiana, Ikhshids of Samarqand: Urk Wartramuka (675-696) AE Cash (Smirnova-657)48 viewsObv: Tamghas around central square hole
Rev: Sogdian legend around central square hole
SpongeBob
Samitan.jpg
Sogdiana, Principality of Samitan: Nanaiabiat Samidanian (ca. 700-800 AD) AE Cash (Fedorov: pl. 24, 1-6)30 viewsObv: Sogdian legend around square hole, which can be translated as 'Nanaiabiat Samidanian', Samidan being the town's name, Nanaiabiat the ruler.
Rev: Tamgha each side of square hole. The identical tamghas are in the form of a semi-circle on a pedestal; small annulet in semi-circle.

Reference

Fedorov, M., & Kuznetsov, A. (2010). A Hoard of Early Medieval Sogdian Bronze Coins from the Ming Tepe Hillfort. The Numismatic Chronicle, 170, 446-451.
SpongeBob
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Sogdiana, Semirech'e: Proto-Qarakhanid (10th c.) AE Cash (Kamyshev-49)48 viewsObv: Legend in Kufic Arabic - Mulk-Aram-Yinal-Chig
Rev: Blank
SpongeBob
Sogdiana_Semirechie_Kamyshev_27.jpg
Sogdiana, Semirechie: Tugesh Kaganate (800-850AD) AE Cash? (Kamyshev #27)31 viewsObv: Sogdian legend around square hole
Rev. Scarce type of tamgha with elongated connection from square hole corner to tamgha
SpongeBob
Sogdiana_Turgesh_Kamyshev_21.jpg
Sogdiana, Turgesh Kaqanate: Wahshutawa (8th c.) AE Cash (Kamyshev-21)26 viewsObv: Sogdian legend xwt' w'xswt'wy pny (coin of the king Vahshutava)
Rev: Tamgha, "P" & Yuan
SpongeBob
Smirnova-1427A.jpg
Sogdiana, Ustrushana: Satachari II (ca. 7th century) AE cash (Smirnova-1427)18 viewsObv: elephant facing left
Rev: tamgha
SpongeBob
Smirnova_519.jpg
Sogdiana: King Turghar (740-760) AE Cash (Smirnova-519 Type II)38 viewsObv: Sogdian legend, ishkhid turghar, around central square hole
Rev: Tamghas around central square hold, with crescent at top
SpongeBob
sol-gorsium.jpg
SOL statue from Gorsium (Pannonia Inferior) - 3rd century AD137 viewsGorsium is the greatest open-air archeological park in the Carpathian basin. The city was established in place of a military settlement by the Emperor Trajan. Gorsium lay at one of the most important road intersections in the province, and it was the center of emperor worship in Pannonia and the seat of the provincial assembly. Delegates from all over the province gathered here once every year to offer sacrifices to their gods for the glory of the reigning emperor, and to attend the assembly meetings. Septimius Severus visited the city in AD 202, and rebuilt the Temple of Augustus, what was destroyed by Markomanns in AD 178.
The city was full of pagan shrines, reliefs and monuments. According to the artifacts, the inhabitants of the city worshipped Aeneas, Amor, Icarus, Achilles, Jupiter, Silvanus, Minerva, Liber, Attis, Hercules, Venus, Luna, Juno, Mars, Victoria, Diana, Mithra and others.
This SOL statue was found in the central free-well together with broken coins and other things. 42mm high.
3 commentsberserker
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Struck A.D.267. GALLIENUS. AE ANTONINIANUS of Antioch7 viewsObverse: GALLIENVS AVG. Radiate and cuirassed bust of Gallienus facing right.
Reverse: LVNA LVCIF. Diana as Luna advancing right holding long torch in both hands; in exergue, PXV.
(PXV = Tribunician year = A.D.267)
Diameter: 21mm | Weight: 3.3gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC V i : 609
SCARCE
*Alex
Faustina_imitation.jpg
Struck Imitation of Faustina I denarius16 viewsFaustina Jr.
PB denarius
c. 161-180 AD
Draped bust r.
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Diana Lucifera standing l., holding long torch
DIANA LVCIF
Cf. RIC III 674

Iron or copper inclusion on reverse.
Ardatirion
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SWEDEN - Karl XII25 viewsSWEDEN - Karl XII (1697-1718) Cu Daler, 1718. Subject: Sun God. Obv: Sun god with rays around circle, PHOEBVS above, date below Rev: Value in circle within wreath. Reference: KM #359, Hobsen 215.
Goertz daler-Swedish emergency money of 1718, approx 24mm across. From Sweden was struck in the financial hardship that hit Sweden after the war with Russia. These copper coins were used by the government to replace the much larger silver daler in use before the war. They are called Goertz dalers after Baron Georg Heinrich von Goertz, the finance minister at the time. This is one of a series of several coins, this one displaying Phoebus (son of Zeus and Leto and twin brother of Artemis Diana - Roman name for the god Apollo).
dpaul7
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T. Claudius Nero T.f. Ap. N., Crawford 383/1258 viewsT. Claudius Nero T.f. Ap. N., gens Claudia
AR - Denarius Serratus, 3.81g
Rome 79 BC
obv. Bust of Diana, draped, bow and quiver over r. shoulder, r.
S.C before
rev. Victory stg. in biga, galloping r., holding wreath in raised r. hand, and palm and reins in l. hand.
beneath LXIII
in ex. TI.CLAVD.TI. / AP.N. (VD and AP ligate)
Crawford 383/1; Sydenham 770; Claudia 6
VF
2 commentsJochen
1TAVOLETTA.jpg
Tavoletta letteraria sumera o accadiana (2800-1800 a.C.)48 viewsAsia mesopotamica, periodo sumero o accadiano (circa 2800-1800 a.C.)
Tavoletta letteraria scritta orizzontalmente da uno studente scriba in antico babilonese letterario. Ricomposta da frammenti. Origine incerta
Argilla, 89,8 gr, 65x50 mm
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (30 dicembre 2007, numero catalogo A); ex David A.J. Liebert collection (The Time Machine co, Flushing, NY Usa, 2007); ex collezione privata (Usa, prima del 2007).

NOTA STORICA: Accadiani o Accadi, abitanti del paese di Accad. Popolazioni di probabile origine semitica affini ai Sumeri, insediati in Mesopotamia e nelle regioni ad essa vicine, entro confini che non ci sono noti e che dovettero sensibilmente variare nel corso dei secoli. Furono distinti, in origine, dai Sumeri, poi ad essi legati dalle comuni vicende politiche, come ci testimoniano le più antiche iscrizioni che attribuiscono ai re mesopotamici il titolo di "Re dei Sumeri e degli Accadiani".

1 commentspaolo
carac46~0.jpg
Temple of Diana73 viewsCaracalla --AE32, Augusta Trajana. R: Temple of Diana, tree on each side. cf. SNG Evelpedis 1037 3 commentsfeatherz
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TEMPLE, CARACALLA, (Temple of Diana)333 viewsCaracalla --AE32, Augusta Trajana. R: Temple of Diana, tree on each side. cf. SNG Evelpedis 1037 3 commentsfeatherz
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TEMPLE, CLAUDIUS, (Temple of Artemis at Ephesus) 221 viewsIonia, Ephesus, Claudius, AD 41-54, AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm
TI. CLAVD CAES AVG. Claudius bare head, facing left. / DIAN-EPHE Cult statue of Diana (Artemis) of Ephesus inside a tetra style temple, set on three tiered base; pediment decorated by figures flanking three windows.
RIC I 118; RPC I 2222; BMCRE 229; RSC 30; Sear Millennium 1839. Ephesus ca. 41-42 AD.
(25 mm, 11.14 g, 6h)
5 commentsLloyd T
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Terre Haute, Indiana: Commercial Exchange Bank $1 Aug. 3, 1858 (Wolka#797-1)4 viewsSpongeBob
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Terre Haute, Indiana: Commercial Exchange Bank $1 Aug. 3, 1858 (Wolka#797-1)6 viewsSpongeBob
Indiana_Wolka#797-3_Front.jpg
Terre Haute, Indiana: Commercial Exchange Bank $2 Aug. 3, 1858 (Wolka#797-3)5 viewsPayable at the Keokuk Exchange Bank of Keokuk, IA, this $2 was an issue of this enigmatic Terre Haute institution that was printed by W.L. OrmsbySpongeBob
Indiana_Wolka#797-3_Rear.jpg
Terre Haute, Indiana: Commercial Exchange Bank $2 Aug. 3, 1858 (Wolka#797-3)4 viewsPayable at the Keokuk Exchange Bank of Keokuk, IA, this $2 was an issue of this enigmatic Terre Haute institution that was printed by W.L. OrmsbySpongeBob
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Thrace, Plotinopolis, Marcus Arellius40 viewsPlotinopolis, Thrace

Diana/Demeter with torch and bow.
ecoli
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Ti CLAUDIUS Ti F Ap NERO; GENS CLAUDIA AR Serrate Denarius11 viewsOBVERSE: Bust of Diana r., draped, bow & quiver over shoulder, SC before
REVERSE: TI·CLAVD·TI·F / AP·N, Victory driving galloping biga right, holding wreath, reins, and palm frond; CXXVIIII below
Struck at Rome 79 BC
3.91g, 18.3mm
Cr 383/1; Syd 770; RSC Claudia 5
ex. J. Montgomery Collection
Legatus
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Ti Claudius Ti.f.Ap.n.Nero Denarius 79bc52 viewsSilver denarius serratus, SRCV 310, Crawford 383/1, Sydenham 770a, RSC Claudia 6, VF, Rome mint, 79 B.C.; obverse diademed and draped bust of Diana, bow and quiver over shoulder, S·C before; reverse Victory in a biga right, raising wreath in right, palm and reigns in left, A·XVII? (control number) below, TI·CLAVD·TI·F / AP N (VD and AP in monogram) in ex; Nice dark toning


The S C on the obverse stands for Senatus Consulto. This issue was authorized by Senate decree, most likely to pay for the extensive military operations during the dictator ship of Sulla. The obverse refers to the Sabine origin of the Claudius Gens. The control numbers run all the way to CLXX.
Adrian S
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Ti. Claudius Nero (79 B.C.)28 viewsAR Serrate Denarius
O: Diademed and draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver on shoulder, S•C before.
R: I CLAVD TI F AP N, Victory driving biga right, holding wreath, reins, and palm; A•LXXXVIIII below.
Rome Mint
3.7g
18mm
Crawford 383/1; Sydenham 770; Claudia 5

Ti. Claudius Nero was the grandfather of the emperor Tiberius. The true meaning of the obverse is not known, though it may be an allusion to the Claudians' Sabine origins.
1 commentsMat
Ti__Claudius_Nero.jpg
Ti. Claudius Ti. f. Ap.n. Nero - AR serratus denarius5 views²Sardinia
¹Rome
²78 BC
¹79 BC
diademed draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder
S·C
Victory in biga right, holding wreath, reins and palm branch
LXIII
TI·CLA(VD)·TI·F / (AP)·N
¹Crawford 383/1, SRCV I 310, Sydenham 770a, RSC I Claudia 6
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g

This issue was authorized by Senate decree (Senatus Consulto), most likely to pay for the extensive military operations during the dictator ship of Sulla. The obverse refers to the Sabine origin of the Claudius Gens.
Johny SYSEL
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TI. Claudius TI.F. AP.N. Nero, AR Denarius Serratus12 views79 BC
3.86 grams
Obv.: Diad. and dr. bust of Diana r., bow and quiver over shoulder, S.C. before.
Rev.: Victory in a briga r. holding palm, TI CLAVD TI F/AP N, Control No. XXXXII
Sear #310
Purchased from eBay
NGC Ch MS Strike: 5/5: Surface 5/5

This is a coin that almost did not end up in my collection. I came across this coin about 2 or 3 days before its auction was going to end on eBay. At that time it had not received a bid and had a starting price of $99.99 + $4 S&H. As far as I was concerned this coin was worth more than its asking price so why no bids? I have bad eyes due to diabetes so I studied the heck out of the two photos to see if could find the problems that kept bidders away from this coin. I just could not see the problem(s). I have heard evaluators on the Antique Road Show start with “••• were there any dealers at this auction when you purchased this?” The response would be yes. That would be followed up by “did any of them bid on this item?” The answer would be no. This would be followed by “didn’t this cause you to wonder why they did not bid?” Followed by silence. I had this same conversation a couple of times with a good friend of my who owns a coin shop in Rockville, MD when I brought him in a great find I made at a local auction only to be told I had a counterfeit. For the remaining days I kept coming back to see if this coin had received a bid. Then the final hour then the final minute. I entered a bid with 5 seconds to go and won. When the coin showed up I went over it with the strongest glass I have and found nothing. That was followed by the long wait to get it back from NGC to see if I was right or wrong.
Richard M10
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Ti. Claudius Ti.f. Ap.n. Nero, Denarius 19 viewsTi. Claudius Ti.f. Ap.n. Nero. 79 BC. AR Serrate Denarius (3.97 gm).

RRC 383/1
79 b.c.
Bust of Diana right, bow and quiver on shoulder / Victory in biga right, carrying wreath and long palm; A.LXXXII below.

Gekauft 30.01.2004 bei Barry P Murphy /
Norbert
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Tiberius Claudius Nero – Claudia-615 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC Tiberius Claudius Nero serrate denarius. c79 BC, SC Bust of Diana right, bown and quiver before. / Victory in biga right, CXXXVIII below, TI CLAVD TI F AP N in exergue. Claudia 6; Cr383/1; Syd 770; RCV 310Bud Stewart
TitusRaven.jpg
Titus / Tripod, Ravens, Dolphin RIC 13197 viewsTitus AR Denarius Rome Mint, 80 AD
O: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
R: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Tripod, with fillets streaming out l. and r., on which are ravens r. and l., and in the center, dolphin over wreath: ('exuviae' of Apollo, for 'pulvinar' of Apollo and Diana (?)).
- RIC 131 (R), BMC 82, RSC 323a

Reka Devnia hoard, recording only 3 specimens with ravens and the dolphin and 24 specimens of the regular type with only the dolphin. The dolphin, ravens, laurel and tripod are all symbols of Apollo. His most famous attribute is the tripod, the symbol of his prophetic powers. It was in the guise of a dolphin that Apollo brought priests from Crete to Delphi, explaining Apollo's cult title "Delphinios" and the name of the town. He dedicated a bronze tripod to the sanctuary and bestowed divine powers on one of the priestesses, and she became known as the "Pythia." It was she who inhaled the hallucinating vapors from the fissure in the temple floor, while she sat on a tripod chewing laurel leaves. After she mumbled her answer, a male priest would translate it for the supplicant.
4 commentsNemonater
titus semi-circular throne.jpg
Titus RIC-122122 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Rome Mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, semicircular frame with three crescents
RIC 122 (C2). BMC 58 var. RSC 313. BNC 48.
Acquired from Beast Coins, July 2006.

Another in a series of pulvinaria types Titus issued in commemoration of the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD . The BMCRE attributes this reverse to Apollo and Diana, also, the BMCRE description puts the number of crescent-like objects on the frame as three, the above reverse has five. There is quite a variety of differences with the throne reverses for both Titus and Domitan, a lot of them are variants.

A fairly typical denarius of Titus, well toned with a solid portrait. I already owned this reverse type with the triangular frame, but liked this coin enough to add it to the collection.
1 commentsVespasian70
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Titus RIC-124c (1)169 viewsAR Denarius, 3.60g
Rome Mint 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, triangular frame with nine palmettes
RIC 124c (C2). BMC 62. RSC 313a. BNC 50.
Acquired from Old Roman Coins, December 2003.

A reverse, which according to the BMCRE, may commemorate the pulvinar of Apollo and Diana (and possibly Ceres) for the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD. This issue was interrupted by the fire in Rome later in the same year and was continued again by Domitian upon the mints reopening in 81.

A denarius that looks quite spectacular in hand, despite the brightness.
3 commentsVespasian70
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Titus RIC-128120 viewsAR Denarius, 3.31g
Rome Mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Tripod with fillets; above, dolphin
RIC-128 (C2). BMC 78. RSC 27a. BNC 67.
Acquired from York Coins, January 2005.

A reverse that commemorates the pulvinar of Apollo and Diana (?) for the opening of the Colosseum. There is a more elaborate variation of this reverse with ravens on either side of the tripod.

A nice well centred denarius.
1 commentsVespasian70
TrajanDrachmArtemis.jpg
Trajan Provincial50 viewsTrajan 98-117 AD. AR Drachm. Caesareia in Cappadocia. Dated Cos. 6 (AD 112-117) (3.13g; 19.16mm) Obv: AVTOKR KAIS NER TRAIANO ARISTO SEB GERM DAK, Laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind. Rev: DEMARCH EX VPATO S, Female bust left, Artemis (Diana), in chiton holding spear in right hand and patera in left.
Metcalf 70b; Sydenham 198

Ex: Ecin, V-coins
2 commentsPaddy
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USA - CIVIL WAR TOKEN23 viewsUSA - CIVIL WAR TOKEN - AE; Tradesman token. Obv.: Liberty head with 13 stars; date 1863 below. Rev.: No./20/TOY STORE/No. 20. - SMITH & TAYLOR WASHINGTON ST. INDIANAPOLIS. Reference: 460S-1a.dpaul7
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Valerian Antoninianus, 254-255 AD. Diana43 viewsObv: IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped bust right.
Rev: FELICITAS SAECVLI. Diana advancing right, holding torch with two hands.
ancientone
coins125.JPG
Valerian I14 viewsDiana

In Roman mythology, Diana was the virgin goddess of the hunt, the equivalent of the Greek goddess Artemis. Born with her twin brother Apollo on the island of Delos, Diana was the daughter of Jupiter and Latona.

Diana was the perpetually virginal huntress goddess, associated with wild animals and woodlands. She also later became a moon goddess, supplanting Luna, and was an emblem of chastity. Oak groves were especially sacred to her. She was praised for her strength, athletic grace, beauty and hunting skill. She made up a trinity with two other Roman deities: Egeria the water nymph, her servant and assistant midwife; and Virbius, the woodland god.

Diana was worshipped in a temple on the Aventine Hill and at the city of Ephesus, where the Temple of Artemis stood. Being placed on the Aventine, and thus outside the pomerium, meant that Diana's cult essentially remained a 'foreign' one, like that of Bacchus; she was never officially 'transferred' to Rome as Juno was after the sack of Veii. It seems that her cult originated in Aricia, where her priest, the Rex Nemorensis remained. Diana was regarded with great reverence by lower-class citizens and slaves; slaves could receive asylum in her temples. She was worshipped at a festival on August 13, when King Servius Tullius, himself born a slave, dedicated her shrine on the Aventine.

Diana is usually depicted with a deer. This is because Diana was the patroness of hunting. It is also a reference to the myth of Acteon (or Actaeon), a prince who saw her bathing naked. Diana transformed Acteon into a deer and sent his own hunting dogs to kill him.

IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS AVG Radiate draped cuirassed bust right
FELICITAS SAECVLI Diana, with crescent on head, walking right, drapery flying, carrying long traverse torch.

RIC 291 (Thanks!)
ecoli
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VI - Gallienus Antoninianus - G - Stag12 viewsGallienus (260 - 268 AD)
AR/BI Antoninianus

obv: GALLIENUS AUG - Radiate bust right.
rev: DIANAE CONS AUG - Stag walking left. 'X' in exergue.
-
*This coin has an AMAZING gold colored toning to it, that I have found very hard to capture on camera.... I will keep trying but I don't think I can quite show it the way it really looks... it is beautiful, the toning~!

Weight: 2.0 Grams
Size: 21 mm
rexesq
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VI - Gallienus Antoninianus - G - Stag w/ 25 cent piece15 viewsGallienus (260 - 268 AD)
AR/BI Antoninianus

obv: GALLIENUS AUG - Radiate bust right.
rev: DIANAE CONS AUG - Stag walking left. 'X' in exergue.

Weight: 2.0 Grams
Size: 21 mm
-
*This coin has an AMAZING gold colored toning to it, that I have found very hard to capture on camera.... I will keep trying but I don't think I can quite show it the way it really looks... it is beautiful, the toning~!

~Coin shown next to US Quarter Dollar (25 Cents) for size comparison.~
rexesq
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Western Sogdiana: King Asbar (3rd - 6th Century AD) AE Drachm33 viewsObv: Portrait of ruler facing right
Rev: Bukharan tamgha arranged as a firealtar, sogdian legend on both sides: " xwβ ´sbr"
SpongeBob
gallienus_stag.jpg
Zoo: Stag left, X in ex43 viewsGALLIENUS A.D. 253-268 Æ Antoninianus. Rome 267-8 A.D. Rev. DIANAE (CONS AVG), Stag walking left, X in exergue. 2.8gm 18mm Sear RCV III 10201. RSC 1581 commentsPodiceps
Valerian1RIC232.jpg
[1112a] Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.70 viewsSilver antoninianus, RIC 232, RSC 10, VF, worn die reverse, Mediolanum mint, 3.909g, 22.2mm, 180o, 257 A.D.; Obverse: IMP VALERIANVS P AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: AETERNITATI AVGG, Sol standing left, raising right, globe in left; nice portrait, good silver for the reign. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian (A.D. 253-260) and Gallienus (A.D. 253-268)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University


P. Licinius Valerianus, or Valerian, was unusual for his time period in that he was an emperor who came from an old Roman senatorial family. He was likely born shortly before 200 A.D., but little is known of his early life. Valerian married Egnatia Mariniana and had two sons, Gallienus and Valerian Junior. Gallienus was born around 218. Valerian makes his first appearance in the sources in 238 A.D. as an ex-consul and princeps senatus negotiating with (more likely than serving on) the embassy sent to Rome by Gordian I's African legions to secure senatorial approval of Gordian's rebellion against and replacement of Maximinus Thrax as emperor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae probably report accurately that Trajan Decius, on the recommendation of the Senate, offered Valerian the censorship in 251. Although the senatus consultum cited and the specific office are of doubtful authenticity, the high reputation Valerian possessed in the Senate and his association with the government under Decius probably are truthful aspects of the story. In 253 Valerian was apparently commanding in Raetia and Noricum when Trebonianus Gallus sent him to bring legions from Gaul and Germany to Italy for the struggle with the forces of Aemilianus. After Gallus' troops killed him and his son and joined Aemilianus, Valerian's men proclaimed their general emperor and their arrival in Italy caused Aemilianus' soldiers to desert and kill their commander and join Valerian's forces in acclaiming Valerian as emperor.

The Senate presumably was pleased to ratify the position of Valerian, one of their own, as emperor and they also accepted his son and colleague, P. Licinius Egnatius Gallienus, as Augustus, rather than just as Caesar. Valerian apparently realized the necessity of sharing power equally with his son and of dividing their efforts geographically, with Gallienus responsible for the West and Valerian himself concentrating on the East. The biographies of Valerian and Gallienus in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae, attributed to Trebellius Pollio, are not especially helpful in putting together an account of their joint reign. The life of Valerian is fragmentary and that of Gallienus projects an extremely biased negative interpretation of his career.

Gallienus in the early years of the joint reign concentrated, with some success, on protecting Gaul and the Rhine frontier by driving back Germanic tribes and fortifying cities such as Cologne and Trier. In a move which would characterize later diplomacy with Germans, Gallienus concluded an alliance with one of their chieftains, presumably to assist the Romans in protecting the empire from other Germanic tribes. The invasions increased in number around 257-258 as the Franks entered Gaul and Spain, destroying Tarraco (Tarragona), and the Alamanni invaded Italy. Gallienus defeated the Alamanni at Milan, but soon was faced with the revolts in Pannonia and Moesia led first by his general there, Ingenuus, and then by Regalianus, commander in Illyricum. Gallienus put down these rebellions by 260 and secured stability in the region by concluding an alliance with the Marcomannic king, whose daughter Pipa the emperor apparently accepted as his concubine although he was still married to Cornelia Salonina.

In the East, Valerian had succeeded by A.D. 257 in rescuing Antioch in Syria from Persian control, at least temporarily, but was soon faced with a major invasion of the Goths in Asia Minor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae biography of Aurelian has Valerian appear to speak in the Baths at Byzantium to publicly commend Aurelian for his success in driving back the Goths and reward him with the consulship and even with adoption as imperial successor. However, it is not clear that Valerian even reached Byzantium because he sent Felix to that city while he remained to protect the eastern section of Asia Minor and then returned to Antioch to guard it against renewed Persian attacks. It was at this point, around 259, that Valerian moved to defend Edessa and his troops lost significant numbers to the plague. Valerian tried to negotiate a peace with the Persian king, Sapor, but was captured by treachery and taken into captivity. The ultimate humiliation of a Roman emperor by a foreign leader was enacted through Sapor's use of Valerian as a human stepping-stool to assist the Persian king in mounting his horse and Valerian's body was later skinned to produce a lasting trophy of Roman submission.

Eusebius discusses the policy of Valerian toward the Christians and says that, after initially treating them most positively, Valerian was persuaded by Macrianus to lead another persecution against them. Valerian in fact after his brutal imprisonment and death in Persia would serve as a negative moral exemplum for some Latin Christian writers who gleefully pointed out that those who oppose the true God receive their just desserts.

Eusebius also credits Gallienus with reversing his father's policy and establishing peace with the Church, citing imperial edicts which established freedom of worship and even restored some lost property. Paul Keresztes claims that Gallienus in fact established a peace with Christians that lasted for forty-three years, from A.D. 260 until 303, and gave the community a kind of legal status which they had previously lacked.

Andreas Alföldi details a growing separation between Gallienus and his father which goes well beyond the geographical one which had developed out of military necessity. In addition to the strikingly different policies, just described, which they pursued toward the Christians, Gallienus began to make his military independence clear through changes in coin inscriptions and by 258 he had created his central cavalry unit and stationed it at Milan. This independent force, which was under the command of a man of equestrian rank and soon stood on a level at least equal to that of the Praetorian Guard, would play a significant role in Gallienus' upcoming battles and, of course, was a foretoken of a new trend for military organization in the future. Alföldi cites as evidence of the increasing separation between the joint emperors the statement that Gallienus did not even seek his father's return from captivity, which Lactantius of course interpreted as part of Valerian's divine punishment, but one wonders what indeed Gallienus might have done and his "indifference" may have been instead his attempt to reassert confidence in his armies and not dwell on the depressing and humiliating servitude and ultimate death of Valerian. Another reform which Alföldi discusses as part of Gallienus' independent stand is his exclusion of the senatorial class from major military commands. H.M.D. Parker credits Gallienus with beginning to separate the civil and military functions of Rome's provincial governors, thus making senatorial governors purely civil administrators and starting to replace them even in this reduced role by equestrians. The disappearance in this period of the S.C. stamp of senatorial authority on bronze coins was probably also seen as an attack on the prestige of the order, although the debasement of the silver coinage had by this time practically reached the point where the "silver" coins were themselves essentially bronze and the change may have been more for economic than for political reasons. Gallienus' exclusion of senators from military command further broke down class distinctions because sons of centurions were by this time regularly given equestrian rank and the move further accelerated the alienation of Rome as center of the Empire. In addition, the bitterness of the senatorial class over Gallienus' policy most likely explains the hatred of Latin writers toward this particular emperor.

Although Gallienus' military innovations may have made his forces more effective, he still had to face numerous challenges to his authority.In addition to systemic invasions and revolts, the plague wreaked havoc in Rome and Italy and probably in several provinces as well. It must have seemed that every commander he entrusted to solve a problem later used that authority to create another threat. When Gallienus was involved in putting down the revolt of Ingenuus in Pannonia, he put Postumus in charge of the armies guarding the Rhine and Gaul. There is some doubt about which of Gallienus' sons, Cornelius Valerianus or P. Cornelius Licinius Saloninus, was left in Cologne under the care of the Praetorian Prefect Silvanus and perhaps also Postumus. In any case, when Postumus revolted and proclaimed his independent Gallic Empire, Silvanus and one of the emperor's sons were killed. Gallienus probably restricted Postumus' expansion, but he never gained the personal revenge that, according to one source, drove him to challenge Postumus to single combat. While Gallienus was thus engaged, and after Valerian's capture by the Persians, Macrianus had his soldiers proclaim his sons, Macrianus and Quietus, emperors in Syria, Asia Minor, and Egypt. Gallienus sent Aureolus to defeat Macrianus and one son in the area of Illyria and Thrace; Odenathus of Palmyra defeated the other son and restored stability in Syria and, with Gallienus' approval, followed that up with a victory over the Persians. After Odenathus' assassination ca. 267, his wife Zenobia continued to rule the independent Palmyrene section of the Empire.

In A.D. 262 Gallienus concluded his tenth year in office by celebrating in Rome his Decennalia with a spectacular procession involving senators, equestrians, gladiators, soldiers, representatives of foreign peoples, and many other groups. This festival included feasts, games, entertainment, and spectacle which probably reminded Romans of the millennial Secular Games celebrations of Philip I and likely were intended to secure popular support at home for Gallienus. Over the next five years little is known about specific activities of the emperor and he presumably spent more time in Rome and less along the frontiers.

Gallienus and Salonina as rulers patronized a cultural movement which collectively is known as the Gallienic Renaissance. The imperial patrons are most directly connected with the philosophical aspects of this movement because Porphyry testifies to their friendship for the Neoplatonic philosopher Plotinus. Porphyry goes on to say that Plotinus asked Gallienus to rebuild an abandoned former city of philosophers in Campania, rename it Platonopolis, and govern it as a kind of Platonic Republic, but that the jealousy and spite of others at court scuttled the plan. In addition to Neoplatonic philosophy, according to Gervase Matthew, the Gallienic Renaissance included the "upward glance" and other stylistic changes in imperial sculpture and religious beliefs that were characterized by "an overwhelming sense of the transcendent and immutable." Matthew points out both the return to artistic models of Augustus, Hadrian, and even Severus Alexander and also "a new Romantic tension" which breaks with the past and points toward a new and very different world. The Hellenic character of much of the Gallienic Renaissance is also stressed in the emperor's trip to Athens where he, likely in imitation of Hadrian, became eponymous archon and received initiation into the Eleusinian cult of Demeter.
Late in his reign, Gallienus issued a series of coins in Rome which honored nine deities as Conservator Augusti or protector of the emperor by pairing his portrait with reverses picturing an animal or animals symbolic of each deity. Included in this group of celestial guardians are Apollo, Diana, Hercules, Jupiter, Juno, Liber Pater, Mercury, Neptune, and Sol. For example, Apollo's coin-types portray a centaur, a gryphon, or Pegasus; Hercules is represented by either the lion or the boar. It appears that Gallienus was issuing the "animal series" coins both to secure, through some religious festival, the aid of Rome's protective gods against continuing invasions, revolts, and plague and to entertain the Roman populace with pageantry and circus games, thus to divert their attention away from the same problems and maintain the security of the regime in power.

In A.D. 268, Gallienus saw his third son, Marinianus, become consul, but in the spring another Gothic invasion brought the emperor back to Greece. He defeated the invaders at Naissus in Moesia , but was deterred from pursuing them further by a revolt of the commander of his elite cavalry, Aureolus. He besieged this last rebel emperor in Milan, but a plot involving his Praetorian Prefect and two future emperors, Claudius and Aurelian, all three men Illyrians popular with many of the soldiers, lured Gallienus away from the city on a false pretext and assassinated him.The emperor's brother Valerian and young son Marinianus were also murdered. In spite of the bitter resentment which many of the senators must have felt toward the dead emperor and his reform policies, Claudius II, perhaps only to legitimize his own reign, persuaded the Senate to deify Gallienus.

Copyright Richard D. Weigel, 2007. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian I was proclaimed emperor after the death of Trajan Decius. He successfully repulsed many barbarian incursions but the standard of living declined and would never recover. In 260 A.D., after four years of war during which Roman forces suffered great losses in battle and to plague, he arranged for peace talks. He set off with a small group to discuss terms with the Sassinian emperor Sapor and was never seen again. The date of his death is unknown, but in Rome it was rumored that he had been murdered and that Sapor was using his stuffed body as a footstool. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
GalllienusRIC163.jpg
[1113a] Gallienus, August 253 - 24 March 268 A.D.72 viewsBronze antoninianus, RIC 163, RSC 72, choice EF, Rome mint, 3.716g, 21.6mm, 180o, 268 A.D.; Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; Reverse: APOLLINI CONS AVG, centaur walking right drawing bow, Z in exergue; struck on a full and round flan, rare this nice. Commemorates vows to Apollo invoking his protection against the revolt of Aureolus. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian (A.D. 253-260) and Gallienus (A.D. 253-268)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University


P. Licinius Valerianus, or Valerian, was unusual for his time period in that he was an emperor who came from an old Roman senatorial family. He was likely born shortly before 200 A.D., but little is known of his early life. Valerian married Egnatia Mariniana and had two sons, Gallienus and Valerian Junior. Gallienus was born around 218. Valerian makes his first appearance in the sources in 238 A.D. as an ex-consul and princeps senatus negotiating with (more likely than serving on) the embassy sent to Rome by Gordian I's African legions to secure senatorial approval of Gordian's rebellion against and replacement of Maximinus Thrax as emperor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae probably report accurately that Trajan Decius, on the recommendation of the Senate, offered Valerian the censorship in 251. Although the senatus consultum cited and the specific office are of doubtful authenticity, the high reputation Valerian possessed in the Senate and his association with the government under Decius probably are truthful aspects of the story. In 253 Valerian was apparently commanding in Raetia and Noricum when Trebonianus Gallus sent him to bring legions from Gaul and Germany to Italy for the struggle with the forces of Aemilianus. After Gallus' troops killed him and his son and joined Aemilianus, Valerian's men proclaimed their general emperor and their arrival in Italy caused Aemilianus' soldiers to desert and kill their commander and join Valerian's forces in acclaiming Valerian as emperor.

The Senate presumably was pleased to ratify the position of Valerian, one of their own, as emperor and they also accepted his son and colleague, P. Licinius Egnatius Gallienus, as Augustus, rather than just as Caesar. Valerian apparently realized the necessity of sharing power equally with his son and of dividing their efforts geographically, with Gallienus responsible for the West and Valerian himself concentrating on the East. The biographies of Valerian and Gallienus in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae, attributed to Trebellius Pollio, are not especially helpful in putting together an account of their joint reign. The life of Valerian is fragmentary and that of Gallienus projects an extremely biased negative interpretation of his career.

Gallienus in the early years of the joint reign concentrated, with some success, on protecting Gaul and the Rhine frontier by driving back Germanic tribes and fortifying cities such as Cologne and Trier. In a move which would characterize later diplomacy with Germans, Gallienus concluded an alliance with one of their chieftains, presumably to assist the Romans in protecting the empire from other Germanic tribes. The invasions increased in number around 257-258 as the Franks entered Gaul and Spain, destroying Tarraco (Tarragona), and the Alamanni invaded Italy. Gallienus defeated the Alamanni at Milan, but soon was faced with the revolts in Pannonia and Moesia led first by his general there, Ingenuus, and then by Regalianus, commander in Illyricum. Gallienus put down these rebellions by 260 and secured stability in the region by concluding an alliance with the Marcomannic king, whose daughter Pipa the emperor apparently accepted as his concubine although he was still married to Cornelia Salonina.

In the East, Valerian had succeeded by A.D. 257 in rescuing Antioch in Syria from Persian control, at least temporarily, but was soon faced with a major invasion of the Goths in Asia Minor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae biography of Aurelian has Valerian appear to speak in the Baths at Byzantium to publicly commend Aurelian for his success in driving back the Goths and reward him with the consulship and even with adoption as imperial successor. However, it is not clear that Valerian even reached Byzantium because he sent Felix to that city while he remained to protect the eastern section of Asia Minor and then returned to Antioch to guard it against renewed Persian attacks. It was at this point, around 259, that Valerian moved to defend Edessa and his troops lost significant numbers to the plague. Valerian tried to negotiate a peace with the Persian king, Sapor, but was captured by treachery and taken into captivity. The ultimate humiliation of a Roman emperor by a foreign leader was enacted through Sapor's use of Valerian as a human stepping-stool to assist the Persian king in mounting his horse and Valerian's body was later skinned to produce a lasting trophy of Roman submission.

Eusebius discusses the policy of Valerian toward the Christians and says that, after initially treating them most positively, Valerian was persuaded by Macrianus to lead another persecution against them. Valerian in fact after his brutal imprisonment and death in Persia would serve as a negative moral exemplum for some Latin Christian writers who gleefully pointed out that those who oppose the true God receive their just desserts.

Eusebius also credits Gallienus with reversing his father's policy and establishing peace with the Church, citing imperial edicts which established freedom of worship and even restored some lost property. Paul Keresztes claims that Gallienus in fact established a peace with Christians that lasted for forty-three years, from A.D. 260 until 303, and gave the community a kind of legal status which they had previously lacked.

Andreas Alföldi details a growing separation between Gallienus and his father which goes well beyond the geographical one which had developed out of military necessity. In addition to the strikingly different policies, just described, which they pursued toward the Christians, Gallienus began to make his military independence clear through changes in coin inscriptions and by 258 he had created his central cavalry unit and stationed it at Milan. This independent force, which was under the command of a man of equestrian rank and soon stood on a level at least equal to that of the Praetorian Guard, would play a significant role in Gallienus' upcoming battles and, of course, was a foretoken of a new trend for military organization in the future. Alföldi cites as evidence of the increasing separation between the joint emperors the statement that Gallienus did not even seek his father's return from captivity, which Lactantius of course interpreted as part of Valerian's divine punishment, but one wonders what indeed Gallienus might have done and his "indifference" may have been instead his attempt to reassert confidence in his armies and not dwell on the depressing and humiliating servitude and ultimate death of Valerian. Another reform which Alföldi discusses as part of Gallienus' independent stand is his exclusion of the senatorial class from major military commands. H.M.D. Parker credits Gallienus with beginning to separate the civil and military functions of Rome's provincial governors, thus making senatorial governors purely civil administrators and starting to replace them even in this reduced role by equestrians. The disappearance in this period of the S.C. stamp of senatorial authority on bronze coins was probably also seen as an attack on the prestige of the order, although the debasement of the silver coinage had by this time practically reached the point where the "silver" coins were themselves essentially bronze and the change may have been more for economic than for political reasons. Gallienus' exclusion of senators from military command further broke down class distinctions because sons of centurions were by this time regularly given equestrian rank and the move further accelerated the alienation of Rome as center of the Empire. In addition, the bitterness of the senatorial class over Gallienus' policy most likely explains the hatred of Latin writers toward this particular emperor.

Although Gallienus' military innovations may have made his forces more effective, he still had to face numerous challenges to his authority.In addition to systemic invasions and revolts, the plague wreaked havoc in Rome and Italy and probably in several provinces as well. It must have seemed that every commander he entrusted to solve a problem later used that authority to create another threat. When Gallienus was involved in putting down the revolt of Ingenuus in Pannonia, he put Postumus in charge of the armies guarding the Rhine and Gaul. There is some doubt about which of Gallienus' sons, Cornelius Valerianus or P. Cornelius Licinius Saloninus, was left in Cologne under the care of the Praetorian Prefect Silvanus and perhaps also Postumus. In any case, when Postumus revolted and proclaimed his independent Gallic Empire, Silvanus and one of the emperor's sons were killed. Gallienus probably restricted Postumus' expansion, but he never gained the personal revenge that, according to one source, drove him to challenge Postumus to single combat. While Gallienus was thus engaged, and after Valerian's capture by the Persians, Macrianus had his soldiers proclaim his sons, Macrianus and Quietus, emperors in Syria, Asia Minor, and Egypt. Gallienus sent Aureolus to defeat Macrianus and one son in the area of Illyria and Thrace; Odenathus of Palmyra defeated the other son and restored stability in Syria and, with Gallienus' approval, followed that up with a victory over the Persians. After Odenathus' assassination ca. 267, his wife Zenobia continued to rule the independent Palmyrene section of the Empire.

In A.D. 262 Gallienus concluded his tenth year in office by celebrating in Rome his Decennalia with a spectacular procession involving senators, equestrians, gladiators, soldiers, representatives of foreign peoples, and many other groups. This festival included feasts, games, entertainment, and spectacle which probably reminded Romans of the millennial Secular Games celebrations of Philip I and likely were intended to secure popular support at home for Gallienus. Over the next five years little is known about specific activities of the emperor and he presumably spent more time in Rome and less along the frontiers.

Gallienus and Salonina as rulers patronized a cultural movement which collectively is known as the Gallienic Renaissance. The imperial patrons are most directly connected with the philosophical aspects of this movement because Porphyry testifies to their friendship for the Neoplatonic philosopher Plotinus. Porphyry goes on to say that Plotinus asked Gallienus to rebuild an abandoned former city of philosophers in Campania, rename it Platonopolis, and govern it as a kind of Platonic Republic, but that the jealousy and spite of others at court scuttled the plan. In addition to Neoplatonic philosophy, according to Gervase Matthew, the Gallienic Renaissance included the "upward glance" and other stylistic changes in imperial sculpture and religious beliefs that were characterized by "an overwhelming sense of the transcendent and immutable." Matthew points out both the return to artistic models of Augustus, Hadrian, and even Severus Alexander and also "a new Romantic tension" which breaks with the past and points toward a new and very different world. The Hellenic character of much of the Gallienic Renaissance is also stressed in the emperor's trip to Athens where he, likely in imitation of Hadrian, became eponymous archon and received initiation into the Eleusinian cult of Demeter.

Late in his reign, Gallienus issued a series of coins in Rome which honored nine deities as Conservator Augusti or protector of the emperor by pairing his portrait with reverses picturing an animal or animals symbolic of each deity. Included in this group of celestial guardians are Apollo, Diana, Hercules, Jupiter, Juno, Liber Pater, Mercury, Neptune, and Sol. For example, Apollo's coin-types portray a centaur, a gryphon, or Pegasus; Hercules is represented by either the lion or the boar. It appears that Gallienus was issuing the "animal series" coins both to secure, through some religious festival, the aid of Rome's protective gods against continuing invasions, revolts, and plague and to entertain the Roman populace with pageantry and circus games, thus to divert their attention away from the same problems and maintain the security of the regime in power.

In A.D. 268, Gallienus saw his third son, Marinianus, become consul, but in the spring another Gothic invasion brought the emperor back to Greece. He defeated the invaders at Naissus in Moesia , but was deterred from pursuing them further by a revolt of the commander of his elite cavalry, Aureolus. He besieged this last rebel emperor in Milan, but a plot involving his Praetorian Prefect and two future emperors, Claudius and Aurelian, all three men Illyrians popular with many of the soldiers, lured Gallienus away from the city on a false pretext and assassinated him.The emperor's brother Valerian and young son Marinianus were also murdered. In spite of the bitter resentment which many of the senators must have felt toward the dead emperor and his reform policies, Claudius II, perhaps only to legitimize his own reign, persuaded the Senate to deify Gallienus.

Copyright (C) 1998, Richard D. Weigel. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/gallval.htm. Used by permission.


Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus was born in about AD 213. This means that he was about 40 years old when his father Valerian, in AD 253, was hailed emperor by his troops in Raetia. Gallienus was made Caesar immediately by his father. But within a month, when Valerian got to Rome, Gallienus received the rank of Augustus.

Compared to other Roman emperors of the age, Gallienus was an exception, as far as he was not a soldier-emperor. He was rather a thoughtful, intellectual ruler, possessing sophisticated Greek tastes. However, this made him deeply unpopular with the gritty Danubian generals, who very much understood it as their right to choose a leader among their own ranks to rule the empire.

If the Danubian military elite didn't like Gallienus, then he certainly soon proved that he was a capable military leader. Between AD 254 to AD 256 he campaigned along the Danube, securing this troubled frontier against the barbarians. In AD 256 he then moved west to fight the Germans along the Rhine.

Then by autumn AD 260 the message of Valerian's capture by the Persians reached Gallienus. If Gallienus had always been unpopular among the military leaders, then now with his father gone and Roman authority crumbling, rebellion was in the air.

On a night in September, AD 268, at the siege of Mediolanum (Milan), an alarm was suddenly raised in the camp of the emperor. In the brief moment of confusion, Gallienus was struck down in the dark as he emerged from his tent.

During his reign, Gallienus began numerous reforms and military campaigns to defend the empire, as much from usurpers as from barbarians. In doing so, he perhaps saved the empire from oblivion. At the same time he presided over perhaps the last flowering of classical Roman culture, patronizing poets, artists and philosophers.

As a last gesture of disrespect to this, most unfortunate of emperors, the Romans should lay Gallienus to rest not in one of the great mausoleums in Rome, but in a tomb nine miles south of the capital, along the Via Appia.

Ironically, he was deified by the senate at the request of Claudius II Gothicus, one of the men who must be held accountable for the assassination of Gallienus.
See: http://www.roman-empire.net/decline/gallienus.html


Gallienus was the son of Valerian I and was named Caesar at his father's accession to the throne in 253 A.D. Upon his father's capture by the Parthians he assumed the rank of Augustus and began numerous reforms and military campaigns to defend the empire, as much from usurpers as from barbarians. At the same time he presided over perhaps the last flowering of classical Roman culture, patronizing poets, artists and philosophers. Gallienus was assassinated while besieging Milan. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
CIIGRICV197unlistedvar.jpg
[1114a] Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.58 viewsSilvered antoninianus, RIC V 197 var (pellet in exergue), aEF, 3.880g, 21.1mm, 0o, Antioch mint, 268 - 270 A.D.; Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing left, scales in right, cornucopia in left, • in exergue; full silvering, bold strike, excellent centering and eastern style, rare this nice; rare variety. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Claudius II Gothicus (268-270)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University

M. Aurelius Claudius, known to history as Claudius Gothicus or Claudius II, was born in either Dalmatia or Illyria on May 10, probably in A.D. 213 or 214. Although the most substantive source on Claudius is the biography in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae (SHA), this account is riddled with fabrications and slanted with fawning praise for this particular emperor, who in the fourth century was viewed as an ancestor of Constantine's father and thus of the ruling imperial family. This biography, attributed to one Trebellius Pollio, must be read with extreme caution and supplemented with information from other sources, including Aurelius Victor, the Epitome de Caesaribus, Eutropius, Orosius, Zonaras, and Zosimus, as well as coins and inscriptions.

The SHA account describes Claudius as being tall, with fiery eyes, and so strong that he could knock out the teeth of man or beast with one punch. It also says that Trajan Decius rewarded him after Claudius demonstrated his strength while wrestling another soldier in the Campus Martius. The SHA author suggests that Claudius may have been descended from the Trojan King Ilus and even from Dardanus, son of Zeus and ancestor of the Trojan royal family, but these suggestions are very likely fabricated to further ennoble Claudius and his putative descendants, the family of Constantine. The SHA biography also includes false letters attributed to the emperors Trajan Decius, Valerian, and Gallienus, all attesting to their high opinions of Claudius. Reference is made in these letters to Claudius' service as tribune in an otherwise unattested legion V Martialis and also as general in command of Illyria, but these positions may also be fictitious. One can assume that Claudius had served for some time in the army, at least under Gallienus and perhaps also under several earlier emperors.

There is some evidence that Claudius was wounded in Gallienus' campaign to put down the revolt of Ingenuus and that he later served with Aureolus under Gallienus in the war with Postumus. By 268, when Gallienus took his troops into Italy to put down Aureolus' revolt, Claudius had emerged as heir-apparent to Gallienus and may also have been involved in the plot to assassinate the emperor. Aurelius Victor says that when Gallienus was killed by his own troops besieging Aureolus in Milan, Claudius as tribune was commanding the soldiers stationed at Ticinum, some twenty miles to the south, and that prior to dying Gallienus designated Claudius as his heir. Victor goes on to claim that after succeeding to the purple Claudius forced the Senate to deify Gallienus. The SHA account states that the soldiers mutinied after Gallienus' death and had to be quieted with a donative of twenty aurei each before settling down and accepting their new emperor. Once in power, Claudius quickly dealt with Aureolus, who surrendered and was killed almost immediately. The new emperor also demanded clemency for the supporters of Gallienus.

The story of Gallienus' deathbed selection of his successor is doubtful at best and is very likely an attempt to deflect blame for the assassination plot from Claudius. The suggestion that the new emperor pressured the Senate to deify Gallienus is more difficult to assess. It is true that securing divine status for one's predecessor is generally seen as a pious act (e.g. Antoninus Pius requesting deification of Hadrian) that reflects positively on the initiator and the story, recorded only in Aurelius Victor, could just be a fabrication used to build up Claudius' moral reputation. What is difficult to penetrate is the biased condemnation of Gallienus that particularly dominates the Latin sources. They make it hard to see why anyone would want to deify Gallienus and so the story seems out of place. However, deification of a predecessor could also be interpreted as the expected thing to do and the act could have fostered legitimacy of the new emperor and gained support from those who were still loyal to Gallienus so it may well have taken place.

The first major challenge facing the new emperor was that of the Alemanni, who had invaded Raetia and Italy. After an early defeat, Claudius replaced some irresponsible officers and soldiers, designated Aurelian as cavalry commander, and led the army to a decisive victory over the Alemanni. This victory earned Claudius the title of Germanicus Maximus and several of his coin-types appear to refer to victory over the Germans.

In 269 Claudius served as consul with Paternus. This year would also feature his major campaign against the Goths. There are indications that Spain separated itself from the Gallo-Roman Empire of Postumus and Tetricus and recognized Claudius, at least nominally, as emperor. In addition, rebellion within Gaul itself demonstrated the weakening of this independent state, although Claudius avoided engagement at Augustodunum and chose only to send a small force to protect Narbonese Gaul. While Claudius concentrated on protecting Roman territory against the Alemanni and Goths, Zenobia extended her Palmyrene Empire by taking Antioch, parts of Asia Minor, and most of Egypt. Although Eusebius and Sulpicius Severus portray the period between the reign of Valerian and that of Diocletian as a peaceful pause in the persecution of Christians, the Acts of the Martyrs does list some individuals allegedly martyred during Claudius II's reign.

The coins issued by Claudius II provide some limited insight into his reign. In addition to the standard "personified virtues" coins that are common with most emperors of the second and third centuries, Claudius struck coin-types proclaiming the security of the Empire (SECVRITAS PERPETVA and PAX AETERNA), the fidelity of the army (FIDES MILITVM), and military victories over the Germans and Goths (VICTORIA GERMAN and VICTORIAE GOTHIC). In addition, Claudius Gothicus' mints struck some other interesting and unusual coin-types. For example, Claudius is one of very few emperors who issued coins portraying the god Vulcan. These must have been limited issues because they are struck only by the Antioch mint and are very rare. The type shows Vulcan standing, with his special tools, the hammer and tongs, and features the unique inscription REGI ARTIS. A variant type with a similar image has been described as carrying another unique coin inscription, DEO CABIRO, and interpreted as depicting one of Vulcan's sons, the Cabiri, with the same tools. However, the existence of this variant type is doubtful. Although the reason for honoring Vulcan (and his sons?) with these coins is unclear, there may be a connection to the fact that the Cabiri were patron gods of Thessalonica who had protected that city against an attack by the Goths. Although a connection between Claudius Gothicus and the Cabiri as defenders against Gothic attacks is relatively attractive, it is weakened somewhat by the fact that Valerian and Gallienus had also issued coins with Vulcan in a temple so there may be some other reason for his reappearance on coins in this period.

Claudius II issued an unusual and scarce series of coins that features a pair of deities, who are presumably conservatores Augusti, on each reverse. The AETER AVG type depicts Apollo and Diana, who, as gods of the sun and moon, are associated with the concept of aeternitas. A type featuring Serapis and Isis is combined with a CONSER AVG inscription and one of Hercules and Minerva with one of CONSERVATORES AVG. Apollo and Diana are depicted with a SALVS AVG inscription, Aesculapius and Salus with one of SPES PVBLIC, and Vulcan and Minerva with VIRT AVG. The general message is that these deities will protect the future of the empire and the emperor.

Other unusual coin-types include MARS VLTOR, the god Augustus had honored with a temple for securing revenge for Caesar's assassination. This deity had appeared on Roman coins in the reigns of Galba and Severus Alexander. Claudius II also minted coins with rarely-seen NEPTVN AVG [see this reverse type in my collection] and SOL AVG types. The latter coin indicates some early interest in the god who would become so dominant a few years later on the coins of Aurelian, yet Claudius also used the INVICTVS AVG inscription that Gallienus had paired with an image of Sol with one of Hercules. ROMAE AETERNAE coin-types were fairly common in the mid-third century, but Claudius II issued an unusual variant type on an aureus that showed the goddess in her temple and echoed the SAECVLVM NOVVM images associated with Philip I. In addition, Claudius introduced a IOVI VICTORI reverse combined with the image normally paired with a IOVI STATORI inscription and a IOVI FVLGERAT reverse inscription, both of which had not been used by any of his predecessors. Andreas Alföldi suggested that Claudius' GENIVS SENATVS type signified improvement of the relationship between emperor and Senate following the senatorial hostility toward Gallienus.

Claudius Gothicus also produced coin-types with reverses of goddesses customarily found paired on coins with images of the Roman empresses. The deities portrayed include Ceres, Diana, Diana Lucifera, and Diana Victrix, Minerva, Venus, and the goddess naturally associated with the image of an empress, Juno Regina. One might suggest that Claudius issued these images because he had no empress with which to pair them, but an examination of other emperors' reigns during this period reveals that those emperors who did not issue coins bearing the empress' image also did not strike these particular goddess types. Although Ceres and Venus images are sometimes paired with an emperor's portrait, Diana Lucifera is rarely found on emperors' coins and Claudius II is the only emperor paired on coins with Juno Regina. In addition, Claudius was the first emperor to issue imperial coins that featured an isolated image of the exotic Egyptian goddess, Isis Faria.

Claudius II's short reign was vulnerable to internal as well as external attack. There may have been a revolt in 269-270 led by a Censorinus, although the date and even the existence of this usurper remain in doubt. The SHA includes him as the last of the "thirty tyrants" and lists a whole series of offices for him, including two consulships, but no other record exists to confirm such service. The SHA account states that he was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers, but soon afterwards killed by them because of his enforcement of strict discipline. His tomb is listed as being in Bologna, which may provide some idea of the location for the revolt. Henry Cohen dates the revolt to the beginning of the year 270, perhaps on the basis of a reference in the Epitome de Caesaribus, but suggests that coins attributed to Censorinus in earlier works may not exist.

The Gothic challenge in 269 proved to be the greatest that Claudius II would face. The Goths assembled a large invading force, reportedly amounting to 320,000 men transported on a fleet of at least 2,000 ships, and first attacked coastal cities along the Black Sea in Moesia. After passing into the Aegean the Goths besieged Thessalonica. At this point, in 269, Claudius left Rome to stop the invasion. The Goths then sent the larger segment of their troops on land toward the Danube, while the fleet took the remaining group to continue the naval attack on Aegean coastal cities. Claudius sent Aurelian's cavalry to Macedonia to protect Illyria from attack, while he commanded the forces blocking the route to the Danube. In the area of Doberus and Pelagonia, the Goths lost 3,000 men to Aurelian's cavalry. At Naissus in Moesia, Claudius' force succeeded in killing some 50,000 Goths. There were follow-up operations on both land and sea, but the Gothic War had essentially been won. Staving off the attacks of the Goths was a major contribution to the survival of the Roman Empire. It was a significant step leading to the subsequent success of Aurelian and the resurrection of the Empire under Diocletian and Constantine. When the Goths eventually succeeded in taking parts of the western Empire in the fifth century, their disruption to the course of civilization was likely much less violent than it would have been had they succeeded in the third century.

In addition to bad weather, a lack of supplies, and hunger, plague was a major factor in the defeat of the Goths. Many of the Gothic prisoners were either impressed into Roman military service or settled on farms as coloni. Claudius received the title Gothicus in recognition of his triumph over the Goths. At some point he had also been given the title Parthicus, but the unlikelihood of any conflict with the Parthians in his short reign makes this difficult to explain. Perhaps Damerau was correct in his suggestion that a Parthian unit may have been involved in one of the battles with the Palmyrenes, although on this front there were few achievements to claim. In any case, Claudius' victory over the Goths was short-lived. The emperor himself caught the plague and died at Sirmium early in 270. He was 56 years old. Claudius' brother, Quintillus, became emperor briefly before losing out to Aurelian. Claudius also had another brother, Crispus, and the SHA traces the link to Constantius through Crispus' daughter Claudia.

The Roman Senate showed its respect for Claudius Gothicus by setting up a gold portrait-shield in the Curia and by approving his deification. He was also honored with a golden statue in front of the great temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and a silver statue set on a column on the Rostra.

In many ways, Claudius II received more adulation and honor in his Nachleben than he had during his lifetime. In the fourth century, attempts to link Constantine's family to Claudius resulted in the phrases of adoration and outright fabrication that dominate the SHA life and most of our other sources. Constantine even issued commemorative coins honoring Claudius. These carried inscriptions such as: DIVO CLAVDIO OPT[IMO] IMP[ERATORI], MEMORIAE AETERNAE, and REQVIES OPT[IMORVM] ME[RITORVM]. A tradition grew that changed the story of Claudius' death in some sources. In this version, Claudius, instead of dying from the plague, had actually performed a devotion, in response to an oracle found in the Sibylline Books, and sacrificed his life so that Rome could win the Gothic War. One of the most surprising things about the SHA account is that it ignores this more dramatic tradition and has Claudius simply dying from the plague.

One must, of course, reject the excessive claims of the SHA to the effect that Claudius II was "destined to rule for the good of the human race" and would, had he lived longer, "…by his strength, his counsel, and his foresight have restored to us the Scipios, the Camilli, and all those men of old." However, Claudius Gothicus was clearly a good emperor who made a significant contribution to protecting and restoring the Empire. In the third century there aren't too many emperors who merit such an assessment.

Copyright (C) 2001, Richard D. Weigel. Used by permission.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/claudgot.htm


Claudius II Gothicus was born in Illyricum around 215 A.D. Under Valerian and Gallienus he was recognized as a superb general. After the murder of Gallienus, Claudius Gothicus was proclaimed emperor and preceded to crush the Alemani tribe who had invaded Roman territory. Soon after an enormous horde of Goths poured into the empire. Against all advice, Claudius confronted the barbarians at Naissus in Upper Moesia. He fought a brilliant battle and annihilated them. Unfortunately for the empire, he died of plague after a reign of only two years (Joseph Sermarini, FORVM;
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=741&pos=0#Recovery%20of%20the%20Empire%20Coins).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
CIIGRICV214.jpg
[1114b] Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.53 viewsBronze antoninianus, RIC V 214, VF, 2.930g, 20.3mm, 180o, Antioch mint; Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate bust right; Reverse: NEPTVN AVG, Neptune standing left, dolphin in right, trident in left hand, • in exergue; excellent centering. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Claudius II Gothicus (268-270)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University

M. Aurelius Claudius, known to history as Claudius Gothicus or Claudius II, was born in either Dalmatia or Illyria on May 10, probably in A.D. 213 or 214. Although the most substantive source on Claudius is the biography in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae (SHA), this account is riddled with fabrications and slanted with fawning praise for this particular emperor, who in the fourth century was viewed as an ancestor of Constantine's father and thus of the ruling imperial family. This biography, attributed to one Trebellius Pollio, must be read with extreme caution and supplemented with information from other sources, including Aurelius Victor, the Epitome de Caesaribus, Eutropius, Orosius, Zonaras, and Zosimus, as well as coins and inscriptions.

The SHA account describes Claudius as being tall, with fiery eyes, and so strong that he could knock out the teeth of man or beast with one punch. It also says that Trajan Decius rewarded him after Claudius demonstrated his strength while wrestling another soldier in the Campus Martius. The SHA author suggests that Claudius may have been descended from the Trojan King Ilus and even from Dardanus, son of Zeus and ancestor of the Trojan royal family, but these suggestions are very likely fabricated to further ennoble Claudius and his putative descendants, the family of Constantine. The SHA biography also includes false letters attributed to the emperors Trajan Decius, Valerian, and Gallienus, all attesting to their high opinions of Claudius. Reference is made in these letters to Claudius' service as tribune in an otherwise unattested legion V Martialis and also as general in command of Illyria, but these positions may also be fictitious. One can assume that Claudius had served for some time in the army, at least under Gallienus and perhaps also under several earlier emperors.

There is some evidence that Claudius was wounded in Gallienus' campaign to put down the revolt of Ingenuus and that he later served with Aureolus under Gallienus in the war with Postumus. By 268, when Gallienus took his troops into Italy to put down Aureolus' revolt, Claudius had emerged as heir-apparent to Gallienus and may also have been involved in the plot to assassinate the emperor. Aurelius Victor says that when Gallienus was killed by his own troops besieging Aureolus in Milan, Claudius as tribune was commanding the soldiers stationed at Ticinum, some twenty miles to the south, and that prior to dying Gallienus designated Claudius as his heir. Victor goes on to claim that after succeeding to the purple Claudius forced the Senate to deify Gallienus. The SHA account states that the soldiers mutinied after Gallienus' death and had to be quieted with a donative of twenty aurei each before settling down and accepting their new emperor. Once in power, Claudius quickly dealt with Aureolus, who surrendered and was killed almost immediately. The new emperor also demanded clemency for the supporters of Gallienus.

The story of Gallienus' deathbed selection of his successor is doubtful at best and is very likely an attempt to deflect blame for the assassination plot from Claudius. The suggestion that the new emperor pressured the Se