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Search results - "Constantinople,"
Arcadius-Constantinople- RIC 60-4.JPG
37 viewsAE3, Constantinople mint, 395-401 AD
Obverse: DN ARCADIVS PF AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VIRTVS EXERCITI, Emperor standing facing in military uniform, being crowned from behind by Victory.
CONSB in exergue
RIC 60
17mm, 2.1gms.
Jerome Holderman
Julian-8.jpg
34 viewsJVLIAN II - AE3 - 361-363 AD. Constantinople mint
Obv.: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, diademed, helmeted, cuirassed bust left with sheild and spear
Rev.: VOT X MVLT XX, four lines in laurel wreath, (dot) CONSPB (branch) in ex.
Gs.: 3,3 mm. 20,6
RIC 167
Maxentius
coin409.jpg
83 viewsSear Byzantine Coins and their Values # sb1760
Romanus I. 920-944 AD. Æ Follis. Constantinople
mint. Crowned facing bust, holding sceptre and
globus cruciger / +RWMA /N EN QEW bA SILE
VS RW/MAIWN. Coin #409
cars100
coin410.jpg
31 viewsAnastasius, Constantinople mint, SB 29 DOC 26
Bust pearl diad.,draped and cuirassed. Rev. large
Epsilon with 2 dots, Gamma in field left. Coin #410
cars100
coin151.jpg
39 viewsConstantinople RIC 21a
Valentinian I AE3. DN VALENTINIANVS P F AVG,
pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
/ SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Victory advancing
left holding wreath & palm branch. CONSPD in ex.
Coin #151
cars100
ARCADIUS_(393-408_AD)_,_Æ_4_,_DESERT_PATINA!_CONSTANTINOPLE_MINT__13mm_1_29gr__USS2_80.jpg
24 viewsAntonivs Protti
sb360,29mm1491gpir.jpg
91 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG (or similar) Justin, on L., and Sophia, on r., seated facing on double throne, both nimbate; he holds gl. cr., she holds cruciform sceptre; rarely with cross between heads.
Reverse: Large M between ANNP and regnal year (G,I) yr 7, cross above, officina letter "deta" below, In ex. CON.
Date: 569/70 CE
Mint: constantinople
Sear 360 DO 22-43
29mm 14.91 gm
wileyc
Romanus_III,_Class_B_Follis,_Constantinople,_1028-1034_AD~0.JPG
44 viewsRomanus III, Class B Follis, Constantinople, 1028-1034 AD

IC to left, XC to right
Christ, bust facing, square in each limb of nimbus cross,
holding book of gospels
IS-XS / BAS-ILE / BAS-ILE
cross with dots at the ends, on three steps
SB 1823
11.8g / 27mm
Antonivs Protti
30599.jpg
35 viewsanonymous (attributed to Alexius I). Ca. 1081-1118. AE follis (25.96 mm, 5.26 g, 12 h). anonymous class J. Constantinople mint. Facing bust of Christ, cross behind his head with 5 pellets in each limb; wearing pallium and colobium; raising hand and holding book of Gospels; / IC - C / XC / Crosss with globule and two pellets at each extremity; beneath, large crescent; around, four globules, each surrounded by pellets. SBCV 1900. Overstruck on a class I anonymous follis SBCV 1889 1 commentsQuant.Geek
Sear-2429.jpg
12 viewsAndronicus II Palaeologus, with Michael IX. 1282-1328. Æ Assarion (19mm, 1.70 g, 6h). Class III. Constantinople mint. Struck 1295-1320. Winged seraph / Half-length facing figures of Andronicus and Michael, holding patriarchal cross between them. DOC 638-46; SB 2429. VF, green and brown patina.


From the Iconodule Collection.
Quant.Geek
Sear-1966.jpg
28 viewsManuel I Comnenus. 1143-1180. BI Aspron Trachy (30mm, 2.62 g, 6h). Constantinople mint. Struck 1167-1183(?). Christ Pantokrator enthroned facing; star to either side / Manuel standing facing, wearing loros, being crowned by the Theotokos (Virgin Mary) standing left. DOC 13d; SB 1966Quant.Geek
Randy.JPG
Falling horseman71 viewsAll 15 official mints.
Alexandria
Amiens
Antioch
Aquileia
Arles
Constantinople
Cyzicus
Heraclea
Lyons
Nicomedia
Rome
Sirmium
Siscia
Thessalonica
Trier
Barbaous Mint

Updated coins with a new background (thanks Jay!)
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
ju167.jpg
Julian II, AE3 Constantinople RIC 167, 361-363 CE 16 viewsObverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust right, holding spear forward and shield.
Reverse: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines across field within wreath.
Dot CONSPB (palm) in ex. RIC VIII 167. 18.5 mm, 3.4 g.
NORMAN K
Leo_RIC_X_704.jpg
91 Leo RIC X 7047 viewsLEO I
AE4, Constantinople Mint
457-474 AD

O: DN LEO, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right

R: Leo standing facing, head right, holding long cross in right and placing left hand on head of kneeling captive.

Mintmark CN. RIC X 704. Sear (2014) 21452. VF
Sosius
Zeno_Solidus.jpg
98 Zeno Solidus23 viewsZeno, First Reign
AV Solidus. Constantinople Mint

D N ZENO-PERP AVG, facing helmeted and cuirassed bust, holding shield, spear behind / VICTORI-A AVGGG and officina letter, Victory standing left, holding long cross, star in right field, CONOB in exergue.

RIC 910. Sear (2014) 21514. Broad flan. Holed, but otherwise VF.

Thanks to FORVM member Rick2 for his help identifying this coin!
Sosius
DSC_s363b.jpg
AE Pentanummium Justin II SB 36359 viewsObverse: Mongram 8
Reverse: Large E, Officina Letter "B" to r.
Date: 565-578 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear: 363, DO 60a-d
15mm 1.70gm
3 commentswileyc
arcadius53.jpg
Arcadius, AE2, RIC IX 53b Constantinople 383-395 CE & 395-408 CE23 viewsObverse: D N ARCADIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right, holding spear, crowned by hand of god above.
Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM, Emperor standing facing, head left, holding standard in left hand and resting right hand on shield, captive at feet to the left.
CONR* in ex. Constantinople mint 23.9 mm., 6.1 g.
NORMAN K
1224vot2.jpg
Constantius II, RIC VIII 69 Constantinople, 347-348 CE.14 viewsObverse: DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, rosette-diademed head, right.
Reverse: VOT XX MVLT XXX in four lines within wreath.
Mintmark: CONS Constantinople, 14 mm., 1.1 g.
NORMAN K
Honorius-Constantinople RIC 61.JPG
Honorius-Constantinople RIC 6132 viewsAE3, Constantinople mint, 395-401 AD
Obverse: DN HONORIVS PF AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VIRTVS EXERCITI, Emperor standing facing in military uniform, being crowned from behind by Victory.
CONSA in exergue
RIC 61
16mm, 2.7gms.
Jerome Holderman
20110425-205933-1sb2046.jpg
Latin trachy type C small module Sear 2046193 viewssmall module as SB 2023

Obverse:MP_OV barred in upper fields. Virgin nimbate, wearing tunic and maphorion, seated upon throne with back;holds beardless nimbate head of Christ on breast.
Reverse. Emperor seated on throne without back, collar-peice and paneled loros of simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum-headed scepter, and in l., anexikakia. Manus Dei in upper rt. field.
Mint:?Constantinople
Date 1204-
SB 2046, DOC LIII,32
15mm
wileyc
leowi.jpg
Leo VI the Wise (870 - 912 A.D.)60 viewsÆ Follis
O: + LEOn bASILVS ROm, bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown with cross and chlamys, holding akakia in left hand.
R: + LEOn/En ΘEO bA/SILEVS R/OMEOn, inscription in four lines.
Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint
8.58g
26mm
SBCV 1729
1 commentsMat
sb1964_clipped_18mm_165gjpg.jpg
Manuel I Komnenus clipped billion aspron trachy SB196416 viewsObverse: The Virgin enthroned facing, nimbate and wearing pallium and maphrium, she holds nimbate head of the infant Christ facing; to l. MP to r. Theta V.
Reverse: MANUHA AECIIOTHC or similar, Manuel stg. facing wearing crown, divitision and chlamys and holding labarum (one dots= on shaft) and globus surmounted by patriarchal cross.
Mint: Constantinople Third metropolitan coinage Variation B
Date: 1143-1180 CE
Sear 1964 DO 15.5-10
18mm 1.65 gm
wileyc
sear1966clipped.jpg
Manuel I Komnenus clipped billion aspron trachy SB196666 viewsObverse: IC-XC (bar above) in field, Christ bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and colobion, seated upon throne without back; holds gospels in left hand.
Reverse: MAN(monogram)HA AECIIOT or var, MP OV bar above in upper right field, Full-length figure of emperor, bearded on left, crowned by Virgin nimbate. Emperor wears stemma, divitision, collar-peice, and jewelled loros of simplified type; holds in right hand labarum-headed scepter, and in left globus cruciger. Virgin wears tunic and maphorion.
four main varieties:
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1167-1183?
Sear 1966 Var d, Fourth coinage; H 16.14,15; 17.1-4
rev: Jewel within circle on loros waist
16mm .89gm
As discussed in the Byzantine forumThese are the "neatly clipped" trachies.
During the reign of Manuel I the silver content of the trachy was dropped from c.6% to c.3%, but later types were sometimes issued with the higher silver content.
In Alexius III's time these high silver types were clipped down to half size, probably officially, presumably so as to match the lower silver content of the later issues.
Of course this would only have worked as long as the populace accepted the idea that the clipped coins were all high silver versions to start with. Once smarties started clipping ordinary coins these types would soon have have fallen out of favour and been withdrawn.

Ross G.


During the reign of Alexius III were reused coins of previous releases, clipping its border in a very regular mode and thus reducing to half their weight. Regularity of shearing and the fact that they were found to stock uniforms, suggesting that this clipping is a formal issuance of mint. Based on the stocks found in Constantinople , some of which consist only of clipped coins, it may safely be dated between 1195 and 1203.
Hendy and Grierson believe that this shearing was a consequence of the devaluation of trachy mixture during the reign of Isaac II and Alexius III. They reduced by half the already low silver content of this coin: shearing coins of previous emperors, still widely in circulation, made their trachy consistent with the intrinsic value of current emissions. Of course, this does not justify the clipping of coins already degraded of Isaac II and Alexius III. Therefore, reason for their declassification is not understood. I think that reason of Ross is right!
The structure of their dispersion in hoards indicates that, however, were made after the other emissions. Clipped trachys appear in small amounts along with regular trachy in hoards, represents a rarity. Were clipped trachys of Manuel I, Andronicus I, Isaac II and Alexius III, and perhaps of John II; those of Manuel are less scarce. In principle, we must believe that all trachys after Manuel I have been clipped, although many have not yet appeared.

Antvwala
wileyc
Manuel_I_SBCV_1975(Brockage).JPG
Manuel I, SBCV 197520 viewsFull Brockage
MANγHΛ ΔECΠOT
Facing bust wearing crown and loros, holding labarum and globus cruciger
Constantinople
AE tetarteron, 23mm, 4.85g
novacystis
sb1874_20mm175g.jpg
Michael VII, Ducus Miliaresion12 viewsObverse: EN TOVTW NIKATE MIXAHL S MARIA, cross crosslet on globus resting on
three steps, x at center of cross, pellet within crescent on shaft;
in field to left, facing bust of Michael, bearded, wearing crown and
jeweled chlamys; to right, facing bust of Maria, wearing crown and
loros; triple border
Reverse: MIXAHL KAI MARIA PICTOI RACILEIC PWMAIWN in
five lines; -+- above and below; triple border.
Mint:Constantinople
Date: 1071-1078 CE
SB 1874, DO 6
20mm, 1.75g (clipped)
wileyc
theo54c.jpg
Theodosius I, RIC IX 54c Constantinople24 viewsBronze AE2, 378-382 CE.
Obverse: D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: REPARATIO REIPVB, Emperor standing left raising up kneeling woman with turret with right hand & holding Victory on a globe.
CON in ex. Constantinople mint 24 mm, 3.7 g.
NORMAN K
Valens-7.JPG
Valens-752 viewsAE3, 364-378 AD, Constantinople mint
Obverse: DN VALENS PF AVG, Diademmed , draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Victory advancing left with wreath and palm.
CONSP(Gamma) exergue, RIC 21c
2.0gm , 17mm
Jerome Holderman
honorius-virtus-exerciti-cons.JPG
RIC.61? Honorius (AE3, Virtus Exerciti)18 viewsHonorius, western roman emperor (393-423)
Nummus AE3 : Virtus exerciti (395-401, Constantinople mint)

bronze, 18 mm diameter, 2,31 g, die axis: 12 h

A/ D N HONORI-VS P F AVG; pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
R/ VIRTVS-EXERCITI/CONSΓ in exergue; Emperor standing facing in military uniform, being crowned by Victory
Droger
HELENA_C.jpg
(0271) HELENA25 views(1st wife or consort of Constantiius I; mother of Constantine I)
d. 329 AD (POSTHUMOUS ISSUE STRUCK 337 - 340 AD)
AE
O: DIAD DR BUST R
R: PAX STANDING L HOLDING OLIVE BRANCH AND SCEPTER
CONSTANTINOPLE
laney
constantine_ii_gloria_scons.jpg
(0317) CONSTANTINE II (as Caesar)31 views317 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 340 AD (as Augustus)
AE 18.5 mm 2.21 g
O: [CONSTANTI]NVS IVN NOB C, Laureate cuirassed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers facing each other with two standards between them; pellet between standards; SCONS in exe.
Constantinople mint
laney
CONSTANTIIUS_II_10.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II58 views324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
337 - 361 AD
AE 18 mm 2.30 g
Obv: DN CONSTANTIVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen
horseman who is bare-headed, bearded, reaching backwards.
mintmark CONSIA
Constantinople
1 commentslaney
cssts_ii_ft_consa_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II27 views324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 17.5 mm max., 2.97 g
O: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG diademed draped cuirassed bust right
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO soldier advancing left and spearing a fallen horseman; Dot to left of soldier; CONSA in exe.
Constantinople mint
laney
csts_ii_ft_cons_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II16 views324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 15.6 mm, 2.28 g
O: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG diademed draped cuirassed bust right
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO soldier advancing left and spearing a fallen horseman; E in left field; CONSB in exe.
Constantinople mint
laney
costantius_consh.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II20 views324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
Struck 348 - 351 AD
AE Centenionalis 23 mm, 5.07 g
O: D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman, G left, CONSA* in exergue.
Constantinople Mint
laney
c_ii_ge_conssdotres.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II23 views324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 19 mm, 2.20 g
O: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C laureate draped cuirassed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS 2 soldiers on either side of 2 standards; CONSSdot in exe
Constantinople
RIC VII 75
laney
c_ii_ge_consi_caes_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II20 views324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 17 mm 1.93 g
O: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C bust right
R: 2 soldiers with 2 standards between; CONSIdot in exe.
Constantinople mint
laney
c_ii_ft_cri_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II15 views324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
22 mm; 4.53 g
O: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG diademed draped cuirassed bust right
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO soldier spearing fallen horseman; G to left of spear and dot to right of spear
Constantinople mint
laney
c_ii_f_t_consi_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II16 views324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 17 X 19 mm, 3.21 g
22 mm; 4.53 g
O: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG diademed draped cuirassed bust right
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO soldier spearing fallen horseman; CONSI in exe.
Constantinople mint
laney
csts_ii_phoenix_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II15 views324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 17.5 mm, 2.23 g
O: bust right
R: radiate phoenix on globe
Constantinople mint
laney
csts_ii_ge_cons_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II21 views324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 15.28 mm, 1.21 g
O: CONSTANTIVS P F AVG diademed head right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS two soldiers facing single standard,"o" on banners;
Constantinople mint
laney
csts_2_vot.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II15 views324 - 337 AD as Caesar
337 - 361 AD as Augustus
AE 16mm, 2.10 g
O: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG diademed head right
R: VOT XX dot MVLT XXX in 3 lines within wreath; CONSG star in exe.
Constantinople mint; RIC VIII 76 (Gamma) rated Scarce
laney
constans_hut_res.jpg
(0333) CONSTANS54 views333 - 337 (as Caesar)
337 - 350 AD (as Augustus)
struck ca. 348-350 AD.
AE2 Centenionalis 22.mm 4.02 g
O: DN CONSTANS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left, holding globe
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier advancing right, head left, holding spear pointed downwards between legs, leading small bare-headed figure from hut beneath a tree
CONSB in exe., Constantinople
1 commentslaney
constans_ge_consi_res.jpg
(0333) CONSTANS (as Caesar)17 views333 - 337 (as Caesar)
337 - 350 AD (as Augustus)
AE 16.5 mm, 1.31 g
O: VAL CONSTANS NOB CAES Bust left
R:; GLORIA EXERCITVS 2 soldiers facing, single standard between; CONSI in exe.
Constantinople mint
laney
csts_2_fel.jpg
(0337) CONSTANTIUS II18 views337 - 361 AD
AE 18 mm; 2.63 g
O: D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: FEL TEMP - REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman, pellet center; CONSB in exe
Constantinople mint
laney
theod_11_res.jpg
(0379) THEODOSIUS I29 views379 - 395 AD
AE 8 mm; 1.16 g
O: D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right;
R: SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory walking left, trophy in right over shoulder, dragging captive with left, christogram left, CONSA in ex
Constantinople mint;
laney
anastasius_3_7_26.jpg
(0491 ) ANASTASIUS63 views491 - 518 AD
STRUCK 498 - 518 (5th Officina)
AE FOLLIS 32 mm 15.64 g
O: D N ANASTA SIVS P P AVC, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
R: Large M (mark of value); star to left and right, cross above, below, CON IN EXE.
CONSTANTINOPLE
DOC 23i; MIBE 27; SB 19

laney
anastasius_2_7.jpg
(0491) ANASTASIUS58 views491 - 518 AD
AE FOLLIS 33 mm 17.24 g
O: DN ANASTASIVS PP AVG
BUST RIGHT
R: Large M Cross, above, star to each side "A" below, CON in exergue
CONSTANTINOPLE
laney
anastasiasn_1.jpg
(0491) ANASTASIUS I47 views491-518
Æ 40 Nummi – Follis 38 mm, 16.45 g
O: ANASTA SIVS P P AVC, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
R: Large M ; star to left and right, cross above, below
Constantinople
laney
justin_i_follis_con.jpg
(0518) JUSTIN I 18 views518 - 527 AD
ca. 520 AD
AE Follis, 30 mm; 10.89 g
O: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG; Bust right
R: M with stars on both sides, cross above, Gamma officina, CON in ex.
Constantinople mint; SB 62 var.
laney
BYZ_JUSTIN_I_5_NUMMI.jpg
(0518) JUSTIN I32 views518 - 527 AD
AE PENTANUMMIUM 13 mm 2.27 g
O: BUST R
R: LARGE CHI-RHO BETWEEN D AND E
CONSTANTINOPLE
laney
justin_i_follis.jpg
(0518) JUSTIN I39 views518 - 527 AD
30 mm 16.32 g
O: DN IVSTI-NVS PP AVG
DIAD DR CUIR BUST R
R: LARGE M, CROSS ABOVE AND TO RIGHT, STAR TO LEFT, M BELOW; CON IN EXE.
CONSTANTINOPLE
laney
justin_1.jpg
(0518) JUSTIN I17 views518 - 527 AD
AE pentanummium 12 mm, 1.77 g
O: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG bust r.
R: Large E, officina letter A to right
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 72 DO 18
laney
justinian_i.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I41 views527 - 565 AD
2nd OFFICINA, STRUCK 527 - 538 AD
AE FOLLIS 30 mm max. 17.89 g
O: D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVC, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, with star on shoulder
R: Large M ; star to left, cross above and to right, B below; CON. IN EXE
CONSTANTINOPLE
DOC 28b; MIBE 84; SB 158
laney
half_follis_4.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I41 views527-565 AD
Æ Half Follis 24 mm 7.30 g
O: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust r.
R: Large K; long cross at left;officina mark to right; stars above and below.
Constantinople
Sear 164
laney
half_follis_2_7.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I38 views527-565 AD
Æ Half Follis 20.5 mm 7.20 g
O: [DN IV]STINIANVS PP AVG. Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust r.
R: Large K; long cross at left;officina mark to right; stars above and below.
Constantinople
Sear 164
laney
half_follis_1_7.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I39 views527-565 AD
Æ Half Follis 26 mm 7.25 g
O: Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust r.
R: Large K; long cross at left;officina mark to right; stars above and below.
Constantinople
Sear 164
laney
justinian_k_blk.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I14 views527-565 AD
Æ Half Follis 24 mm 7.30 g
O: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust r.
R: Large K; long cross at left;officina mark to right; stars above and below.
Constantinople
Sear 164
laney
byz_one_bkk.jpg
(0602) PHOCAS14 views602-610.
Struck 603-610, 5th officina
Æ Half Follis 25 mm, 5.63 g
O: Crowned facing bust, wearing consular robes, holding mappa and cross
R: Large XX; star above; CONЄ
Constantinople mint DOC 37e; SB 644.
laney
heraclius_and_heraclius_constantine_(2).jpg
(0610) HERACLIUS35 views610 - 641 AD
AE FOLLIS 26 mm max. 4.98 g
O: standing figure of Heraclius left and Heraclius Constantine right cross between their heads
R: Large M, officina letter Γ beneath, cross over letter C above, CON in exe.
CONSTANTINOPLE



laney
LEO_VI.jpg
(0886) LEO VI (The Wise)36 views886 - 912 AD
AE FOLLIS 25 mm 6.69 g
O: + LЄOn ЬAS ILЄ[V]S ROm
BUST FACING, WITH SHORT BEARD, WEARING CROWN & CHALMYS
R +LЄOn/Єn ӨЄO ЬA/SILЄVS R/OmЄOn IN FOUR LINES ( Leo by the grace of God king of the Romans )
CONSTANTINOPLE
SBV 1729 - DO8
laney
john_ii_comnenus_b.jpg
(1118) JOHN II COMNENUS37 views1118-1143 AD
Billon Aspron Trachy. 30.5 mm max. 2.78 g
Constantinople Mint
O: Bust of Christ
R: Bust of John II facing, wearing loros and crown with pendilia, holding sceptre and globus cruciger
Sear 1944
laney
John_II_Comnenus.jpg
(1118) JOHN II COMNENUS37 views1118-1143 AD
Billon Aspron Trachy. 27 mm 4.97 g
Constantinople Mint
O: Bust of Christ
R: Bust of John II facing, wearing loros and crown with pendilia, holding sceptre and globus cruciger
Sear 1944
laney
Byz_Latin_rulers_of_Const.jpg
(1204) LATIN RULERS OF CONSTANTINOPLE48 views1204 - 1261 AD
Billon Aspron Trachy. 16 mm max., 0.55 g
O: BUST OF CHRIST FACING
R: ARCHANGEL MICHAEL STANDING FACING, HOLDING GLOBUS CRUCIGER
SEAR 2036
(STRUCK FOLLOWING THE LATIN CONQUEST OF CONSTAN5TINOPLE IN THE 4TH CRUSADE)


laney
andronicus_ii.jpg
(1282) ANDRONICUS II & MICHAEL IX17 viewsAndronicus II Palaeologus with Michael IX
1282 - 1328 AD
AE Assarion 21mm, 1.99 grams
O: Nimbate and facing bust of Archangel St. Michael holding scepter and globus cruciger.
R: Facing half length figure of Christ blessing the two emperors who kneel before him.
Constantinople mint; Sear2435 // DOC677-80
laney
027.JPG
(582-602) Maurice Tibere [Sear 494, Constant. ]12 viewsMaurice Tiberius 582-602 AD
Minted: Constantinople
Size: 30mm Weight: 11.53grams
Obverse: ....ER PP, AV Crowned and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield
Reverse: Large M between ANNO and regnal year 6; above, cross; beneath, Officina letter D, in ex CON
Ségusiaves
2Pdwc7jEspK64DozHPy5Q3RmZFg8a9.jpg
(610-641) Heraclius [Sear 811]11 viewsHeraclius 610-641 AD
AE Follis (4.71 gm ; 22 mm)
Constantinople Mint
Obv: No Legend. Heraclius (center)� in military dress with long beard and mustache, Heraclius Constantine, and Heraclonas, all standing facing.
Rev: Large M between ANNO and numeric regnal year,� B (officina 2)� below; CONE in exergue
Ségusiaves
Cons.jpg
(Deceased) Constantine I Magnus29 viewsFuneral issue of Constantine I (347-348 CE)
Veiled head of Constantine, right/Constantine standing right, wearing toga and veil. Legend: Veneranda Memoria.
Minted in Constantinople.
AE
Belisarius
Julian_II.jpg
*SOLD*85 viewsJulian II AE 1

Attribution: RIC VIII 164, Constantinople, scarce
Date: AD 361-363
Obverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust r.
Reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB dot, Apis bull stg. r., two stars above,
palm CONSPA palm in exergue (double struck)
Size: 28.9 mm
Weight: 8.7 grams
ex-Forvm
4 commentsNoah
001_Anastasius.JPG
001. Anastasius, 491-518. AE 40 Nummi.49 viewsObv. Bust of Anastasius
Rev. Large M, stars on either side, CON below.
Constantinople Mint.
1 commentsLordBest
Byzantine2.jpg
002 - Maurice Tiberius (582-602 AD), tremissis - Sear 48850 viewsObv: D N TIbERI PP AVG. diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: --NTORI -AVRI AVG, cross potent.
Minted in Constantinople (CONOB in exe).

Note the rev. inscription that seems to be misspelled, it should read VICTORI MAVRI AVG.
pierre_p77
002_Justin_I.JPG
002. Justin I, 518-527. AE 40 Nummi.47 viewsObv. Bust of Justin I.
Rev. Large M, stars on either side, CON below.
Constantinople Mint.
SB 62
1 commentsLordBest
coins155.JPG
003. Pop Romanvs Constantinople14 viewsConstantine the Great, Commemorative issue, (0.84g) POP
ROMANVS Laureate and draped bust of Roman people left, cornucopia
on shoulder. / Star and CONSS in wreath. These tiny coins are
associated with the founding of the new capital at
Constantinople. F
ecoli
p1.JPG
004. Constantius II Constantinople GLORIA EXERCITVS29 viewsRIC VII Constantinople 75 R2
ecoli
coin255~0.JPG
005. Constantius Gallus constantinople Fel Temp9 viewsUnlisted in RIC. Ric does not record any C. Gallus with field marks of B*ecoli
005_Tiberius_Constantine.JPG
005. Tiberius Constantine, 578-582. AE 40 Nummi.49 viewsObv. Bust of Tiberius Constantine
Rev. Large M, CON below ANNO II to sides
Constantinople Mint, 580.
SB 430.
LordBest
007_Phocas.JPG
007. Phocas, 602-610. AE 40 Nummi.47 viewsObv. Bust of Phocas.
Rev. XXXX ANNO II, CONE below
Constantinople Mint, 607.
LordBest
DSC07046_obv_03_DSC07051_rev_04.JPG
01 - Julian II - Silver Siliqua - Vows49 viewsRoman Empire
Emperor Julian II (355 - 363 AD, sole reign from 361 - 363 AD)
Silver Siliqua, Constantinople Mint, struck 361 - 363 AD.

obv: DN JULIANUS P F AUG - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VOTIS V MULTIS X within wreath, 'P CON' in exergue.

Size: 19 mm
Weight: 1.9 Grams
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4 commentsrexesq
DSC07044_obv_01_DSC07048__rev_01JPG.JPG
01 - Julian II - Silver Siliqua - Vows36 viewsRoman Empire
Emperor Julian II (355 - 363 AD, sole reign from 361 - 363 AD)
Silver Siliqua, Constantinople Mint, struck 361 - 363 AD.

obv: DN JULIANUS P F AUG - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VOTIS V MULTIS X within wreath, 'P CON' in exergue.

Size: 19 mm
Weight: 1.9 Grams
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2 commentsrexesq
Julian-II_AR-Siliqua_vows_1_9gr_03_rev-85%.JPG
01 - Julian II - Silver Siliqua - Vows - 00139 views Roman Empire, 4th century AD Silver Siliqua.
Emperor Julian II (355 - 363 AD, sole reign from 361 - 363 AD)
Silver Siliqua, struck 361 - 363 AD, Constantinople Mint, Prima Officinae.

obverse: " DN JULIANUS P F AUG " - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.

reverse: " VOTIS V MULTIS X " - within wreath, '' P CON '' in exergue (below), for Constantinople mint.

Size: 19 dia.
Weight: 1.9 Grams
----------------------------------------------
5 commentsrexesq
DSC07050_rev_03.JPG
01 - Julian II - Silver Siliqua - Vows - Reverse.14 viewsRoman Empire
Emperor Julian II (355 - 363 AD, sole reign from 361 - 363 AD)
Silver Siliqua, Constantinople Mint, struck 361 - 363 AD.

obv: DN JULIANUS P F AUG - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VOTIS V MULTIS X within wreath, 'P CON' in exergue.

Size: 19 mm
Weight: 1.9 Grams
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rexesq
DSC07049_rev_02.JPG
01 - Julian II - Silver Siliqua - Vows - Reverse.12 viewsRoman Empire
Emperor Julian II (355 - 363 AD, sole reign from 361 - 363 AD)
Silver Siliqua, Constantinople Mint, struck 361 - 363 AD.

obv: DN JULIANUS P F AUG - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VOTIS V MULTIS X within wreath, 'P CON' in exergue.

Size: 19 mm
Weight: 1.9 Grams
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rexesq
DSC07063_rev_09.JPG
01 - Julian II - Silver Siliqua - Vows - Reverse. BRIGHT.16 viewsRoman Empire
Emperor Julian II (355 - 363 AD, sole reign from 361 - 363 AD)
Silver Siliqua, Constantinople Mint, struck 361 - 363 AD.

obv: DN JULIANUS P F AUG - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VOTIS V MULTIS X within wreath, 'P CON' in exergue.

Size: 19 mm
Weight: 1.9 Grams
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-
Slightly off color photo; too much lighting.
-
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rexesq
Constans_hut2.jpg
010 - Constans (237-250 AD), AE 2 - RIC 9271 viewsObv: D N CONSTANS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left, globe in hand.
Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier draging barbarian from hut under tree.
Minted in Constantinople (CONSI* in exe, gamma in left upper field) 347-348 AD.
1 commentspierre_p77
LarryW1924.jpg
0345 Justin II, 565-57877 viewsAV solidus, 20.8mm, 4.4g, aVF
Struck at Constantinople
DN IVSTI-NVS PP AVC, helmeted and cuirassed bust of Justin facing, holding globe surmounted by Victory, and shield / VICTORI-A AVCCC H, angel standing facing, holding long staff and globus cruciger; star in right field, CONOB in exg
Sear 345
Private sale
Lawrence Woolslayer
FaustaCONSSalus.JPG
043. Fausta, wife of Constantine I. AE Follis, Constantinople mint.83 viewsAE Follis. Constantinople mint, late 326AD.

Obv.Bust of Fausta right FLAV MAX FAVSTA AVG

Rev. Fausta standing holding Constantine II and Constantius II SALVS REIPVBLICAE.

RIC VII 12; LRBC 976. gVF

A very rare and interesting coin. The mint at Constantinople was only in operation for a couple of months when Fausta was executed, coins of her and Crispus from this mint are very hard to come by.
1 commentsLordBest
LarryW1913.jpg
0488 Maurice Tiberius, 582-60219 viewsAV tremissis, 17.8mm, 1.49g, EF, flat strike, 180deg,
Constantinople mint, 583 - 602 A.D.
d N TIbE-RI P P AVC, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORI MAVRI AVS, cross; CONOB in exg
Sear 488; DO 14
Consigned to Forvm
Lawrence Woolslayer
AnasISear14.jpg
0491-0518 AD - Anastasius I - Sear 14 - Follis (small module)6 viewsEmperor: Anastasius I (r. 491-518 AD)
Date: ca. 498-507 AD
Condition: Fine
Denomination: Follis (small module)

Obverse: -
Bust right; diademed, draped and cuirassed.

Reverse: Large ""; Above, cross.
Exergue:

Constantinople mint
Sear 14
7.77g; 24.3mm; 195°
Pep
AnasISear19.jpg
0491-0518 AD - Anastasius I - Sear 19 - Follis (large module)5 viewsEmperor: Anastasius I (r. 491-518 AD)
Date: 498-518 AD
Condition: aFine
Denomination: Follis (large module)

Obverse: -
Bust right; diademed, draped and cuirassed.

Reverse: Large ""; Above, cross; To left and right, star; Beneath, .
Exergue:

Constantinople mint, fourth officina
Sear 19
16.27g; 33.3mm; 195°
Pep
JustISB69.jpg
0518-0527 AD - Justin I - Sear 69 - Half Follis32 viewsEmperor: Justin I (r. 518-527 AD)
Date: 518-527 AD
Condition: Fair
Denomination: Half Follis

Obverse: D N IVSTINVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, with cross rising from front of diadem.

Reverse: Large K; to left, long cross; to right, "B"; stars above and below.

Constantinople mint, second officina
Sear 69
7.99g; 24.4mm; 180°
Pep
JustISB75.jpg
0518-0527 AD - Justin I - Sear 75 - Pentanummium28 viewsEmperor: Justin I (r. 518-527 AD)
Date: 518-527 AD
Condition: aFine
Denomination: Pentanummium

Obverse: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG
Bust right; diademed, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: Large Chi-Rho
"E" in right field
"Δ" in left field

Constantinople mint, fourth officina
Sear 75; DOC 21d.2
1.72g; 13.8mm; 165°
Pep
JustnnSB159.jpg
0527-0565 AD - Justinian I - Sear 159 - Follis48 viewsEmperor: Justinian I (r. 527-565 AD)
Date: 527-565 AD
Condition: Fair
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Bust right; diademed, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: no legend
Large "M"; cross above, crosses to left and right; "E" below.
Exergue: CON (Constantinople mint, fifth officina)

Sear 159
15.64g; 33.26mm; 180°
Pep
024.JPG
06 Constantius Gallus137 viewsConstantius Gallus, AE3, DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, soldier standing left, knee raised, spearing fallen horseman.
Left field: dot S dot, Star.

ex: CONS[?] Constantinople 117
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_3373.jpg
06 Constantius Gallus54 viewsConstantius Gallus
A.D. 351- 354
19x21mm 3.9gm
DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES; bare-headed, draped & cuirassed bust right, Delta behind bust.
FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO; Soldier spearing fallen horseman, B in left field.
In ex. CONS[?]
RIC VIII Constantinople 113
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_3421.jpg
06 Constantius Gallus44 viewsConstantius Gallus
24 MM. 4.61 G
DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES
bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right
R-EPARATIO
beared?, Phrygian helmet, clutching
CONS epsilon / Γ left / · centre
Constantinople 107
Rare (rev. break)
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_4595.jpg
06 Constantius Gallus13 viewsConstantius Gallus
DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES
bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right
RE-PARATIO
no beard, Phrygian helmet, reaching (headwear not in RIC for this issue)
CONSH / · in centre
Constantinople 122
Randygeki(h2)
Project1~3.jpg
06 Constantius II76 viewsConstantius II AE3 of Constantinople. 351-355 AD. DN CONSTANTIVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP R-EPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman, who is unbearded, wearing a Phrygian helmet, clutching horse's neck. Stylized Epsilon resembling C< in left field. Mintmark CONSI (unpublished officina). RIC VIII Constantinople 115 var. 3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_3688.jpg
06 Constantius II29 viewsConstantius II

D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO
Soldier spearing horseman, no beard, Phrygian helmet, clutching
CONSA / ·S· left / *
Constantinople 116
ex DS
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_3690.jpg
06 Constantius II32 viewsConstantius II
D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG,
pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
FEL TEMP R-EPARATIO
no beard, brimmed helmet?, reaching
CONSH / · in center
Constantinople 121 var
Rare (rev break)
ex DS
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_3784.jpg
06 Constantius II28 viewsConstantius II
DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG
pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO
Soldier spearing horseman, no beard, Phrygian helmet, clutching
CONSA / Γ left /Dot center
Constantinople 106
ex thomas d walker
Some silvering (redish/copper toning)
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_4353.jpg
06 Constantius II30 viewsDN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, PDC/ FEL TEMP R-EPARATIO,bearded, bare-headed, reaching. CONSI

Constantinople
RIC 127.
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_4454.jpg
06 Constantius II13 views
D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO
bearded, hair in a topknot, reaching
CONS Delta Dot?
Constantinople 135?
Randygeki(h2)
LarryW1928.jpg
0620 Focus, 602-61024 viewsAV solidus, 22.8mm, 4.49g, EF
Struck 607-610 at Constantinople
DN FOCAS PERP AVG, draped and cuirassed bust facing, wearing crown and holding globus cruciger / VICTORIA [AVGU] I, Angel standing facing, holding staff surmounted with Rho and globus cruciger; CONOB in exg. Unusual double strike.
Sear 620; Hahn 9

Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW1921.jpg
0620v Focas, 602-61042 viewsGold solidus, 22.29mm, 4.48g, brilliant, Mint State
Struck c. 607-610 at Constantinople
d N FOCAS PERP AV, crowned, draped and cuirased bust facing, holding globus cruciger in raised right hand / VICTORIA AVGU E, angel standing facing, holding long staff surmounted by chi-rho monogram in right hand and orb surmounted by cross (globus cruciger) in left; CONOB in exg.
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
Ex: Glenn W. Woods; Leu Auction 75, Zurich, 25-27 October 1999, lot 1629
cf. Sear 620; DOC 10e 1-5; MIB 9; Wroth (BMC) 10; Tolstoi 8; Ratto 1181 - all with obverse legend ending AVG
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW1901.jpg
0621 Focas, 602-61049 viewsAV solidus, 21.1mm, 4.4g, Nice VF
Struck at Constantinople 609-610
dNN FOCAS PERP AVC, Draped and cuirassed bust facing, wearing crown and holding globus cruciger / VICTORIA AVGU I, Angel standing facing, holding staff surmounted with Rho and globus cruciger. CON OB in exg, N inner right field.
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Sear 621; DO 11c.3
Lawrence Woolslayer
constantiusgallus.jpg
062A. Constantius Gallus, 351-354AD. AE2.119 viewsAE2. Constantinople mint.

Obv. Bare head bust right, draped and cuirassed D N FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES.

Rev. Soldier spearing horseman left, down and holding neck of horse with one hand and reaching back with the other arm FEL TEMP R-EPARATIO. Exe: CONSS

RIC VIII, 120 (s) Scarce, page 458 - LRBC #2040/ 3.06 g
LordBest
LarryW1900.jpg
0633 Focas, 602-61048 viewsAV tremissis, 18.3mm, 1.49g, VF
Struck at Constantinople
oN FOCA - S PP AVC, Diademed, draped, cuirassed, and beardless bust of Focas facing right / VICTORI FOCAS AV[C], Cross potent on base, CON OB in exg. Broad flan and apparently an overstrike.
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Sear 633; DO 18 Γ
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW1907.jpg
0634 Focas, 602-61046 viewsAV tremissis, 16.3mm, 1.48g, VF
Struck at Constantinople
dN FOCAS PERP AVI, diademed, cuirassed, and beardless bust right wearing paludamentum / VICTORI FOCAS AVc, cross potent, CON OB in exg
Ex: Forvm Ancient Coins
Sear 634; DO 19.3
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW1919.jpg
0634 Focas, 602-61044 viewsGold tremissis, 18.18mm, 1.52g, EF
Struck c. 607-610 at Constantinople
dN FOCAS PER AVG, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORI FOCAS AVG, cross potent, CONOB beneath
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Sear 634; DO 19; MIB 27; Wroth/BMC 30-32; Ratto 1206; CBN 40-43
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW1918.jpg
0635 Focas, 602-61038 viewsGold half tremissis (1/6 solidus), 14.34mm, 0.72g, aEF
Struck c. 607-610 at Constantinople
dN FOCAS PER AV, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, beardless / VICTORI FOCAS AV, cross potent, CONOB beneath.
Extremely rare with three known specimens; the smallest gold denomination in the Byzantine series.
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
Ex: Glenn W. Woods; Frank Kovacs
Sear 635; cf. DOC 20; cf. MIB 29
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW1912.jpg
0640v Focas, 602-61032 viewsÆ follis, 25mm, 8.69g, F
Srtuck 607-608 at Constantinople
DM FOCAS PP AVG (or similar), crowned bust facing wearing consular
robes, holding mappa and cross / XXXX, ANNO (NN retrograde) above, stigma right, CON A
in exg.
Sear 640v, DO 30a v; MIB 69a
Lawrence Woolslayer
theodosius2~0.jpg
074. Theodosius II, 402-450AD. AV Solidus.514 viewsAV Solidus. Constantinople mint. Obv: DN THEODO-SIVS PF AVG - Three-quarters bust right, draped, cuirassed, holding spear over right shoulder and shield in left hand Rev: VOT XXX MVLT XXXXS - Constantinopolis seated left, holding cross on globe and scepter, her left foot sits on the prow of a galley and at rear of her throne, a shield sits; in right field, a 'star'. Exe: CONOB : AD 430-440, RIC X, 257 (s) Scarce, page 259/ 4.48 g. Choice FDC.
15 commentsLordBest
08-Helena-Con-34-49.jpg
08. Helena: Constantinople.25 viewsA 4, 337 - 341, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: FL IVL HELENAE AVG / Diademed bust of Helena.
Reverse: PAX PVBLICA / Pax standing, holding branch and sceptre.
Mint mark: CONSE
1.57 gm., 15.5 mm.
RIC 34/49; LRBC #1047 var.; Sear #17497/98.

This coin does not really fit the description of RIC #34 or RIC #49:
RIC #34 - terminal dot to reverse legend, Officina E.
RIC #49 - without terminal dot. Officina Θ.
This coin - without terminal dot. Officina E.
Callimachus
2860420.jpg
08. Maurice Tiberius23 viewsAV Solidus (21mm, 4.41 g, 7h). Constantinople mint, 7th officina. Struck 583-602 AD.

O: Helmeted, draped, and cuirassed facing bust, holding globus cruciger

R: Angel standing facing, holding long staff surmounted by staurogram and globus cruciger; Z//CONOB. DOC 5g; MIBE 6; SB 478. VF, small dig on reverse.

Ex CNG

1 commentsSosius
LarryW1915.jpg
0805 Heraclius, 610-64144 viewsÆ follis, 31mm, 11.56g, F
Struck 613-614 at Constantinople, officina Δ
DD NN HERACLIUS ET HERA CONST PP A, Heraclius, bearded at left, and Heraclius Constantine, at right, both standing facing wearing crown and chlamys and holding globus cruciger, cross between their heads / Large M between ANNO and numeric regnal year, cross above and officina below.
Overstrike: a follis of Phocas with a portion of the obverse legend still present at 10 o'clock on the obv.
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Sear 805; MIB 159
Lawrence Woolslayer
constantinople.jpg
0818 viewshill132
constantinople1.jpg
082 Constantine II19 viewsobv: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C laur. drp. cuir. bust l.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE CAESS campgate with two turrents star between, base at bottom
ex: B/CONS
hill132
constantinople1~0.jpg
082 Constantius II15 viewsobv: FL IVL CONSTANTINV NOB C laur. drp. cuir. bust l.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE CAESS campgate with two turrents star between, with base
ex: B/CONS
hill132
TheopSB1667.jpg
0829-0842 AD - Theophilus - Sear 1667 - Follis40 viewsEmperor: Theophilus (r. 829-842 AD)
Date: 829-842 AD
Condition: VF
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: ΘEOFIL' bASIL'
Three-quarter length figure facing, wearing loros and crown surmounted by tufa (which is ornamented with pellets); he holds labarum in right hand and globus cruciger in left hand.

Reverse: +ΘEO / FILE AV / OVSE SV/ ICAS in four lines.

Constantinople mint
Sear 1667
6.49g; 27.0mm; 195°
Pep
constantinople2.jpg
083 Constantine II15 viewsobv: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C laur. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE CAESS campgate with two turrents star above
ex: r/CONS
hill132
constantinople3.jpg
084 Constantine I 17 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINUS AVG laur. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG campgate with two turrents star above
ex: A.CONS
hill132
constantinople4.jpg
085 Constantine I15 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINUS AVG laur. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG campgate with two turrents star above
ex: A/CONS
hill132
09-Theodora-Con-50.jpg
09. Theodora: Constantinople.16 viewsAE 4, 337 - 340, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: FL MAX THEODORAE AVG / Diademed bust of Theodora.
Reverse: PIETAS ROMANA / Pietas standing, carrying infant.
Mint mark: CONSE
1.46 gm., 15 mm.
RIC #50; LRBC #1049; Sear #17506.
Callimachus
LarryW1922.jpg
0956 Contans II, AD 641-66850 viewsGold solidus, 19.44mm, 4.49g, nearly EF
Struck c. 651-654 at Constantinople
d N CONSTAN[TINU]S PP AV, crowned bust facing, with long beard and mustache, wearing chlamys and holding globus cruciger in right hand / VICTORIA AVGU I, cross potent on three steps; CO[NOB] beneath.
Areas of flatness in the striking
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Sear 956; DOC 19j; MIB 23; Wroth/BMC 36; Tolstoi 57; CBN 41
Lawrence Woolslayer
Thrace,_Byzantion,__AR_Siglos_340-320_BC~0.jpg
1. Thrace, Byzantion, 340-320 BC, AR Siglos38 viewsHeifer standing left above dolphin, VΠΥ above.
Incuse square of mill-sail pattern.

SNG BM Black Sea 21; SNG Copenhagen 476; Sear GCV 1579.

(17 mm, 5.36 g)
Classical Numismatic Group electronic Auction 146, 23 August 2006, 34.

Standing on the European side of the Bosporos, Byzantion with its twin city Kalchedon on the Asia Minor side of the Bosporos was the ancient gateway between the two continents, a role that continues to the present.

The symbolism of the bull and the heifer on the obverse of the coins of twin cities of Kalchedon (Asia Minor) and Byzantion (Europe) respectively is striking and points to a shared identity. They stood astride the southern entrance to the Bosporus. Both were 7th century BC foundations of Megara and jointly they controlled the vital grain trade from the Black Sea into the Mediterranean.

The grain ear upon which the bull of Kalchedon stands alludes to this fact. That of the dolphin beneath the Heifer of Byzantion is a reflection of the maritime orientation of the city and the bountiful pods of dolphins that even to this day frolic in swift flowing waters of the Bosporus beneath the old city walls of Constantinople which succeded Byzantion and was in turn succeded by Istanbul.
1 commentsn.igma
Focas_Solidus_sm.jpg
10. Phocas16 viewsPHOCAS
602-610 AD
AV Solidus (22mm, 4.49 g, 6h). Constantinople mint, 1st officina. Struck 604-607.
Crowned, draped, and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger / Angel standing facing, holding staff surmounted by staurogram and globus cruciger; A//CONOB. DOC 5a; MIBE 7; SB 618. EF.
Ex-CNG 10/2013
Sosius
1059-1067 Constantin IX S 1853.jpg
1059-1067 Constantin IX - follis from Constantinople54 views+EMMANOVHΛ , Christ standing facing, in field IC / XC
+ KωN T ΔK EVΔK AVΓO , Eudocia and Constantine IX standing facing holding labarum (Constantine IX and Eudocia are depicted like the icon of Constantine the Great and his mother Helena holding the True Cross).

Sear 1853
Ginolerhino
NiceIIISB1889.jpg
1078-1081 AD - Nicephorus III - Sear 1889 - Anonymous Follis39 viewsEmperor: Nicephorus III (r. 1078-1081 AD)
Date: 1078-1081 AD
Condition: Fair
Denomination: Anonymous Follis (Class I)

Obverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium and colobium, and raising right hand in benediction; in left hand, book of Gospels; to left, ; to right, ; normal border.

Reverse: Latin cross, with X at centre, and globule and two pellets at each extremity; in lower field, on either side, floral ornament; in upper field, on either side, crescent.

Constantinople mint
Sear 1889
3.35g; 25.6mm; 180°
Pep
ManISear1966.jpg
1143-1180 AD - Manuel I Comnenus - Sear 1966 - Billon Aspron Trachy26 viewsEmperor: Manuel I Comnenus (r. 1143-1180 AD)
Date: 1143-1180 AD
Condition: Fine/VF
Denomination: Billon Aspron Trachy

Obverse: -
Christ, bearded, seated facing on throne without back, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium and colobium; in left hand, book of Gospels.

Reverse: -
The Virgin, nimbate (on right) and Manuel (on left), both standing facing; the Virgin wears pallium and maphorium, and with Her right hand crowns the emperor, who wears divitision and loros, and holds labarum and globus cruciger; between their heads, ; to right, .

Constantinople mint
Sear 1966
4.49g; 31.3mm; 180°
Pep
ManISear1966_2.jpg
1143-1180 AD - Manuel I Comnenus - Sear 1966 - Billon Aspron Trachy - 2nd Example10 viewsEmperor: Manuel I Comnenus (r. 1143-1180 AD)
Date: 1143-1180 AD
Condition: Fine/VF
Denomination: Billon Aspron Trachy

Obverse: -
Christ, bearded, seated facing on throne without back, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium and colobium; in left hand, book of Gospels.

Reverse: -
The Virgin, nimbate (on right) and Manuel (on left), both standing facing; the Virgin wears pallium and maphorium, and with Her right hand crowns the emperor, who wears divitision and loros, and holds labarum and globus cruciger; between their heads, ; to right, .

Constantinople mint
Sear 1966
3.96g; 30.4mm; 180°
Pep
2860424.jpg
12. Heraclius with Heraclius Constantine19 viewsHeraclius, with Heraclius Constantine

AV Solidus (19mm, 4.51 g, 7h). Constantinople mint, 5th officina. Struck 616-circa 625.

O: Crowned facing busts of Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine; cross above

R: Cross potent set on three steps; Є//CONOB.


DOC 13d; MIB 11; SB 738. VF.

Ex CNG
1 commentsSosius
image~4.jpg
12. Heraclius with Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas41 viewsHeraclius, with Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas. 610-641.
AV Solidus (18mm, 4.34 g, 6h). Constantinople mint, 6th officina.
Dated IY 11 (AD 637/8).
Crowned figures of Heraclonas, Heraclius, and Heraclius Constantine standing facing, each holding globus cruciger / Cross potent set on three steps; monogram to left, IA monogram (date) to right; ς//CONOB.
DOC 39e; MIB 45; SB 764. EF, areas of weak strike.
Ex-CNG
1 commentsSosius
LarryW1801.jpg
120 Honorius, AD 393–423162 viewsGold solidus, 21.2mm, 4.43g, FDC
Struck c. 408-420 at Constantinople
D N HONORI—VS P F AVC, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over right shoulder and shield with horseman motif on left arm / CONCORDI—A AVCC Γ, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head right, right foot on ship's prow, holding scepter in right hand, Victory on globe in left. Star in left field, CON OB in exergue.
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
Ex: Forvm Ancient Coins
RIC X, 201; Cohen 3; DO 778v (off B)
1 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
LatinByzSB2021.jpg
1204-1261 AD - Latin Occupation of Constantinople - Sear 2021 - AE Trachy69 viewsLatin Occupation of Constantinople (1204-1261 AD)
Date: 1204-1261 AD
Condition: Mediocre
Denomination: AE Trachy

Obverse: unknown legend
Virgin Mary enthroned, holding an image of Christ's face on her chest.

Reverse: unknown legend
Generic "emperor" figure; in his upraised right hand a labarum, in his left an akakia.

Sear 2021
1.31g; 21.7mm; 180°
Pep
LatinByzSB2024.jpg
1204-1261 AD - Latin Occupation of Constantinople - Sear 2024 - AE Trachy60 viewsLatin Occupation of Constantinople (1204-1261 AD)
Date: 1204-1261 AD
Condition: Mediocre
Denomination: AE Trachy

Obverse: -
Bust of Christ.

Reverse: MANHCΛ ΔECΠOTHC
Emperor standing, holding sceptre cruciger.

Sear 2024
1.39g; 16.7mm; 180?°
Pep
LatinByzSB2038.jpg
1204-1261 AD - Latin Occupation of Constantinople - Sear 2038 - AE Trachy35 viewsLatin Occupation of Constantinople (1204-1261 AD)
Date: 1204-1261 AD
Condition: Mediocre/Fair
Denomination: AE Trachy

Obverse: unknown legend
Christ seated.

Reverse: unknown legend
Virgin Mary, orans.

Sear 2038
1.24g; 17.1mm; ?°
Pep
LatinByzSB2044.jpg
1204-1261 AD - Latin Occupation of Constantinople - Sear 2044 - AE Trachy47 viewsProbable: Latin Occupation of Constantinople (1204-1261 AD)
Date: 1204-1261 AD
Condition: Mediocre
Denomination: AE Trachy

Obverse: unknown legend
Virgin Mary enthroned.

Reverse: unknown legend
Emperor standing, holding labarum and akakia.

SB 2044
0.93g; 18.5mm; 180?°
Pep
LatinByzSB2045.jpg
1204-1261 AD - Latin Occupation of Constantinople - Sear 2045 - AE Trachy50 viewsLatin Occupation of Constantinople (1204-1261 AD)
Date: 1204-1261 AD
Condition: Mediocre
Denomination: AE Trachy

Obverse: unknown legend
Christ enthroned.

Reverse: unknown legend
Generic "emperor" figure; in his right hand a sword, in his left a globus cruciger.

Sear 2045
0.87g; 17.9mm; 180°
Pep
LatinByzSB2047.jpg
1204-1261 AD - Latin Occupation of Constantinople - Sear 2047 - AE Trachy58 viewsLatin Occupation of Constantinople (1204-1261 AD)
Date: 1204-1261 AD
Condition: Mediocre/Fair
Denomination: AE Trachy

Obverse: -
Christ seated.

Reverse: no legend
Half-length figure of emperor.

Sear 2047
1.12g; 19.4mm; 180°
Pep
122a.jpg
122a Constantinoplis. AE follis 2.8gm18 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINOPOLIS laur. helm. and mantled bust of Constantinople l., holding scepter
rev: Victory std. l. holding shield and scepter, foot on prow to l.
ex: SMANI
"city commemorative struck in honer of Constantinople. alluding to a recent navel battle over the Licinii, with Victory adv. from conquest."
hill132
122b.jpg
122b Constantinoplis. AE follis 2.5gm16 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINOPLIS laur. helm. and mantled bust of Constantinople l. holding scepter
rev: Victory std. l. holding shield and scepter, foot on prow to l.
ex: TR.P
"City commerative struck in honor of Constantinople, alluding to the recent navel battle over the Licinii with Victory adv. from a conquest"
hill132
LarryW1852.jpg
130 Theodosius II, AD 402-450104 viewsGold solidus, 20.8mm, 4.48g, FDC
Struck AD 408-419 at Constantinople
D N THEODO-SIVS P F AVC, helmeted and cuirassed facing bust holding spear and shield decorated with horseman / CONCORDI-A AVCC Θ, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head right, foot on prow, holding sceptre and Victory on globe, star left, CONOB in exergue
Ex: Forum Ancient Coins
RIC X, 202
1 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
LarryW1833.jpg
140 Marcian, AD 450-45764 viewsGold solidus, 20.8mm, 4.48g, brilliant, gEF
Struck at Constantinople
D N MARCIA-NVS P F AVG, diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, head slightly to right, holding spear and shield decorated with horseman spearing a fallen enemy / VICTORI-A AVCCC Z, Victory standing half left holding a long jeweled cross resting on ground, star in right field, CON OB in exergue
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
Ex: Forum Ancient Coins
DOC 481; RIC 510; Sear 4322v
Lawrence Woolslayer
St.Helena.jpg
1401a, St. Helena, Augusta 8 November 324 - 328 to 330 A.D., mother of Constantine the Great97 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC 148, VF, Alexandria mint, 3.243g, 19.4mm, 165o, 327 - 328 A.D. Obverse: FL HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed and mantled bust right wearing double necklace; Reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE, Securitas holding branch downward in right and lifting fold of robe in left, wreath left, I right, SMAL in exergue; rare.

The mother of Constantine the Great, born about the middle of the third century, possibly in Drepanum (later known as Helenopolis) on the Nicomedian Gulf; died about 330. She was of humble parentage; St. Ambrose, in his "Oratio de obitu Theodosii", referred to her as a stabularia, or inn-keeper. Nevertheless, she became the lawful wife of Constantius Chlorus. Her first and only son, Constantine, was born in Naissus in Upper Moesia, in the year 274. The statement made by English chroniclers of the Middle Ages, according to which Helena was supposed to have been the daughter of a British prince, is entirely without historical foundation. It may arise from the misinterpretation of a term used in the fourth chapter of the panegyric on Constantine's marriage with Fausta, that Constantine, oriendo (i. e., "by his beginnings," "from the outset") had honoured Britain, which was taken as an allusion to his birth, whereas the reference was really to the beginning of his reign.

On the death of Constantius Chlorus, in 308, Constantine, who succeeded him, summoned his mother to the imperial court, conferred on her the title of Augusta, ordered that all honour should be paid her as the mother of the sovereign, and had coins struck bearing her effigy. Her son's influence caused her to embrace Christianity after his victory over Maxentius. This is directly attested by Eusebius (Vita Constantini, III, xlvii): "She (his mother) became under his (Constantine's) influence such a devout servant of God, that one might believe her to have been from her very childhood a disciple of the Redeemer of mankind". It is also clear from the declaration of the contemporary historian of the Church that Helena, from the time of her conversion had an earnestly Christian life and by her influence and liberality favoured the wider spread of Christianity. Tradition links her name with the building of Christian churches in the cities of the West, where the imperial court resided, notably at Rome and Trier, and there is no reason for rejecting this tradition, for we know positively through Eusebius that Helena erected churches on the hallowed spots of Palestine. Despite her advanced age she undertook a journey to Palestine when Constantine, through his victory over Licinius, had become sole master of the Roman Empire, subsequently, therefore, to the year 324. It was in Palestine, as we learn from Eusebius (loc. cit., xlii), that she had resolved to bring to God, the King of kings, the homage and tribute of her devotion. She lavished on that land her bounties and good deeds, she "explored it with remarkable discernment", and "visited it with the care and solicitude of the emperor himself". Then, when she "had shown due veneration to the footsteps of the Saviour", she had two churches erected for the worship of God: one was raised in Bethlehem near the Grotto of the Nativity, the other on the Mount of the Ascension, near Jerusalem. She also embellished the sacred grotto with rich ornaments. This sojourn in Jerusalem proved the starting-point of the legend first recorded by Rufinus as to the discovery of the Cross of Christ.

Constantine I, in 327, improved Drepanum, his mother's native town, and decreed that it should be called Helenopolis, it is probable that the latter returned from Palestine to her son who was then residing in the Orient. Constantine was with her when she died, at the advanced age of eighty years or thereabouts (Eusebius, "Vita Const.", III, xlvi). This must have been about the year 330, for the last coins which are known to have been stamped with her name bore this date. Her body was brought to Constantinople and laid to rest in the imperial vault of the church of the Apostles. It is presumed that her remains were transferred in 849 to the Abbey of Hautvillers, in the French Archdiocese of Reims, as recorded by the monk Altmann in his "Translatio". She was revered as a saint, and the veneration spread, early in the ninth century, even to Western countries. Her feast falls on 18 August.

(See The Catholic Encyclopedia: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07202b.htm)

Cleisthenes
CtG AE3.jpg
1403a,1, Constantine I (the Great), 307-337 A.D.46 viewsConstantine I (the Great), 307-337 A.D. Bronze AE 3, RIC 16, C -, VF, 2.854g, 19.1mm, 180o, Constantinople mint, 327 A.D. Obverse: CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, rosette diademed head right; Reverse: GLORIA EXERCITVS, Soldier standing left, head right, resting left hand on shield and holding inverted spear in right, G in left field, CONS in exergue; very rare (R3).

The Emperor Constantine I was effectively the sole ruler of the Roman world between 324 and 337 A.D.; his reign was perhaps one of the most crucial of all the emperors in determining the future course of western civilization. By beginning the process of making Christianity the religious foundation of his realm, he set the religious course for the future of Europe which remains in place to this very day. Because he replaced Rome with Constantinople as the center of imperial power, he made it clear that the city of Rome was no longer the center of power and he also set the stage for the Middle Ages. His philosophical view of monarchy, largely spelled out in some of the works of Eusebius of Caesarea, became the foundation for the concept of the divine right of kings which prevailed in Europe.

Constantine was not a "Christian convert" in any traditional sense. He was not baptized until close to death, and while that was not an uncommon practice, the mention of Christ in his speeches and decrees is conspicuous by its absence. Eusebius, Church historian and Constantine biographer, is responsible for much of the valorization of Constantine as the Christian Emperor. The somnambulant "sign" in which Constantine was to become victor at the Milvian Bridge is, not so surprisingly, revealed to posterity long after the "fact." Throughout his reign, Constantine continues to portray himself on coins as a sun god (Freeman, Charles. Egypt, Greece and Rome: Civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean; Second Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. 582). Above all, Constantine was a pragmatist. It would be cynical to egregiously disavow his commitment to Christianity, but it would be equally wrong to think that he would allow Christianity to meddle in the governance of his empire. As he reputedly told a group of bishops, "You are bishops of those within the church, but I am perhaps a bishop appointed by God of those outside." Whatever the motives for his decision to support Christianity, Christianity benefitted from the arrangement. So, too, did Constantine. It was a match made in heaven.
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

For perhaps the best Constantine The Great site on the web, see Victor Clark's Constantine The Great Coins: http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/
1 commentsCleisthenes
Const1GlrEx.jpg
1403b, Constantine I (the Great), early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.37 viewsConstantine the Great, early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D., Bronze AE 3, RIC 137, VF, Constantinople mint, 1.476g, 16.4mm, 180o, 336 - 337 A.D. Obverse: CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, laurel and rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers, each holding spear and shield on ground, flanking standard, CONS[ ] in exergue. Ex FORVM.

The Emperor Constantine I was effectively the sole ruler of the Roman world between 324 and 337 A.D.; his reign was perhaps one of the most crucial of all the emperors in determining the future course of western civilization. By beginning the process of making Christianity the religious foundation of his realm, he set the religious course for the future of Europe which remains in place to this very day. Because he replaced Rome with Constantinople as the center of imperial power, he made it clear that the city of Rome was no longer the center of power and he also set the stage for the Middle Ages. His philosophical view of monarchy, largely spelled out in some of the works of Eusebius of Caesarea, became the foundation for the concept of the divine right of kings which prevailed in Europe.

Constantine was not a "Christian convert" in any traditional sense. He was not baptized until close to death, and while that was not an uncommon practice, the mention of Christ in his speeches and decrees is conspicuous by its absence. Eusebius, Church historian and Constantine biographer, is responsible for much of the valorization of Constantine as the Christian Emperor. The somnambulant "sign" in which Constantine was to become victor at the Milvian Bridge is, not so surprisingly, revealed to posterity long after the "fact." Throughout his reign, Constantine continues to portray himself on coins as a sun god (Freeman, Charles. Egypt, Greece and Rome: Civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean; Second Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. 582). Above all, Constantine was a pragmatist. It would be cynical to egregiously disavow his commitment to Christianity, but it would be equally wrong to think that he would allow Christianity to meddle in the governance of his empire. As he reputedly told a group of bishops, "You are bishops of those within the church, but I am perhaps a bishop appointed by God of those outside." Whatever the motives for his decision to support Christianity, Christianity benefitted from the arrangement. So, too, did Constantine. It was a match made in heaven.
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

For perhaps the best Constantine The Great site on the web, see Victor Clark's Constantine The Great Coins: http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/
Cleisthenes
CTGDafne.jpg
1403c, Constantine I (the Great), early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.49 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC VII 35, choice aEF, Constantinople mint, 3.336g, 20.0mm, 180o, 328 A.D.; Obverse: CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: CONSTANTINI-ANA DAFNE, Victory seated left on cippus, head right, palm frond in each hand, trophy and captive before, CONS in exergue, B left; scarce. Ex FORVM.

"The information about Constantine's campaign across [the Danube] is obscure and untrustworthy. The question, therefore, of what he achieved by this enterprise was, and is, subject to contradictory interpretations. On the one hand, the Panegyrists claimed that he had repeated the triumphs of Trajan. On the other, his own nephew, Julian the Apostate, spoke for many when he expressed the view that this second 'conquest' of Dacia was incomplete and extremely brief . . . monetary commemoration was accorded to the building, at about the same time [AD 328], of the river frontier fortress of Constantiniana Dafne (Spantov, near Oltenita) . . ." (Grant, Michael. The Emperor Constantine. London: Phoenix, 1998. 58-9).

The Emperor Constantine I was effectively the sole ruler of the Roman world between 324 and 337 A.D.; his reign was perhaps one of the most crucial of all the emperors in determining the future course of western civilization. By beginning the process of making Christianity the religious foundation of his realm, he set the religious course for the future of Europe which remains in place to this very day. Because he replaced Rome with Constantinople as the center of imperial power, he made it clear that the city of Rome was no longer the center of power and he also set the stage for the Middle Ages. His philosophical view of monarchy, largely spelled out in some of the works of Eusebius of Caesarea, became the foundation for the concept of the divine right of kings which prevailed in Europe.

Constantine was not a "Christian convert" in any traditional sense. He was not baptized until close to death, and while that was not an uncommon practice, the mention of Christ in his speeches and decrees is conspicuous by its absence. Eusebius, Church historian and Constantine biographer, is responsible for much of the valorization of Constantine as the Christian Emperor. The somnambulant "sign" in which Constantine was to become victor at the Milvian Bridge is, not so surprisingly, revealed to posterity long after the "fact." Throughout his reign, Constantine continues to portray himself on coins as a sun god (Freeman, Charles. Egypt, Greece and Rome: Civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean; Second Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. 582). Above all, Constantine was a pragmatist. It would be cynical to egregiously disavow his commitment to Christianity, but it would be equally wrong to think that he would allow Christianity to meddle in the governance of his empire. As he reputedly told a group of bishops, "You are bishops of those within the church, but I am perhaps a bishop appointed by God of those outside." Whatever the motives for his decision to support Christianity, Christianity benefitted from the arrangement. So, too, did Constantine. It was a match made in heaven.
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

For perhaps the best Constantine The Great site on the web, see Victor Clark's Constantine The Great Coins: http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/
1 commentsCleisthenes
CTGKyzAE3.jpg
1403d, Constantine I (the Great), early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D. (Cyzicus)37 viewsConstantine the Great, early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D. Bronze AE 3, RIC 199, gVF, corrosion, Cyzicus, 1.402g, 16.2mm, 0o, 336 - 337 A.D. Obverse: CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, laurel and rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS•, two soldiers, each holding spear and shield on ground, flanking standard, SMKA in exergue.

The Emperor Constantine I was effectively the sole ruler of the Roman world between 324 and 337 A.D.; his reign was perhaps one of the most crucial of all the emperors in determining the future course of western civilization. By beginning the process of making Christianity the religious foundation of his realm, he set the religious course for the future of Europe which remains in place to this very day. Because he replaced Rome with Constantinople as the center of imperial power, he made it clear that the city of Rome was no longer the center of power and he also set the stage for the Middle Ages. His philosophical view of monarchy, largely spelled out in some of the works of Eusebius of Caesarea, became the foundation for the concept of the divine right of kings which prevailed in Europe.

Constantine was not a "Christian convert" in any traditional sense. He was not baptized until close to death, and while that was not an uncommon practice, the mention of Christ in his speeches and decrees is conspicuous by its absence. Eusebius, Church historian and Constantine biographer, is responsible for much of the valorization of Constantine as the Christian Emperor. The somnambulant "sign" in which Constantine was to become victor at the Milvian Bridge is, not so surprisingly, revealed to posterity long after the "fact." Throughout his reign, Constantine continues to portray himself on coins as a sun god (Freeman, Charles. Egypt, Greece and Rome: Civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean; Second Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. 582). Above all, Constantine was a pragmatist. It would be cynical to egregiously disavow his commitment to Christianity, but it would be equally wrong to think that he would allow Christianity to meddle in the governance of his empire. As he reputedly told a group of bishops, "You are bishops of those within the church, but I am perhaps a bishop appointed by God of those outside." Whatever the motives for his decision to support Christianity, Christianity benefitted from the arrangement. So, too, did Constantine. It was a match made in heaven.
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

For perhaps the best Constantine The Great site on the web, see Victor Clark's Constantine The Great Coins: http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/
Cleisthenes
CTGVOTXXX.jpg
1403e, Constantine I (the Great), early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D. (Heraclea)28 viewsConstantine the Great, Bronze AE 3, RIC 69, VF, Heraclea, 3.38g, 19.0mm, 180o, 325 - 326 A.D. Obverse: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, laureate head right; Reverse: D N CONSTANTINI MAX AVG, VOT XXX in wreath, SMHD in exergue.

The Emperor Constantine I was effectively the sole ruler of the Roman world between 324 and 337 A.D.; his reign was perhaps one of the most crucial of all the emperors in determining the future course of western civilization. By beginning the process of making Christianity the religious foundation of his realm, he set the religious course for the future of Europe which remains in place to this very day. Because he replaced Rome with Constantinople as the center of imperial power, he made it clear that the city of Rome was no longer the center of power and he also set the stage for the Middle Ages. His philosophical view of monarchy, largely spelled out in some of the works of Eusebius of Caesarea, became the foundation for the concept of the divine right of kings which prevailed in Europe.

Constantine was not a "Christian convert" in any traditional sense. He was not baptized until close to death, and while that was not an uncommon practice, the mention of Christ in his speeches and decrees is conspicuous by its absence. Eusebius, Church historian and Constantine biographer, is responsible for much of the valorization of Constantine as the Christian Emperor. The somnambulant "sign" in which Constantine was to become victor at the Milvian Bridge is, not so surprisingly, revealed to posterity long after the "fact." Throughout his reign, Constantine continues to portray himself on coins as a sun god (Freeman, Charles. Egypt, Greece and Rome: Civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean; Second Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. 582). Above all, Constantine was a pragmatist. It would be cynical to egregiously disavow his commitment to Christianity, but it would be equally wrong to think that he would allow Christianity to meddle in the governance of his empire. As he reputedly told a group of bishops, "You are bishops of those within the church, but I am perhaps a bishop appointed by God of those outside." Whatever the motives for his decision to support Christianity, Christianity benefitted from the arrangement. So, too, did Constantine. It was a match made in heaven.
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

For perhaps the best Constantine The Great site on the web, see Victor Clark's Constantine The Great Coins: http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/
Cleisthenes
12817p00.jpg
1403f, Constantine I (the Great), early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D. (Heraclea)20 viewsBronze follis, RIC 5, F/aF, 3.513g, 20.4mm, 180o, Heraclea mint, 313 A.D.; obverse IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONSER-VATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left holding Victory and scepter, eagle with wreath in beek at feet, B in right field, SMHT in exergue.

The Emperor Constantine I was effectively the sole ruler of the Roman world between 324 and 337 A.D.; his reign was perhaps one of the most crucial of all the emperors in determining the future course of western civilization. By beginning the process of making Christianity the religious foundation of his realm, he set the religious course for the future of Europe which remains in place to this very day. Because he replaced Rome with Constantinople as the center of imperial power, he made it clear that the city of Rome was no longer the center of power and he also set the stage for the Middle Ages. His philosophical view of monarchy, largely spelled out in some of the works of Eusebius of Caesarea, became the foundation for the concept of the divine right of kings which prevailed in Europe.

Constantine was not a "Christian convert" in any traditional sense. He was not baptized until close to death, and while that was not an uncommon practice, the mention of Christ in his speeches and decrees is conspicuous by its absence. Eusebius, Church historian and Constantine biographer, is responsible for much of the valorization of Constantine as the Christian Emperor. The somnambulant "sign" in which Constantine was to become victor at the Milvian Bridge is, not so surprisingly, revealed to posterity long after the "fact." Throughout his reign, Constantine continues to portray himself on coins as a sun god (Freeman, Charles. Egypt, Greece and Rome: Civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean; Second Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. 582). Above all, Constantine was a pragmatist. It would be cynical to egregiously disavow his commitment to Christianity, but it would be equally wrong to think that he would allow Christianity to meddle in the governance of his empire. As he reputedly told a group of bishops, "You are bishops of those within the church, but I am perhaps a bishop appointed by God of those outside." Whatever the motives for his decision to support Christianity, Christianity benefitted from the arrangement. So, too, did Constantine. It was a match made in heaven.
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

For perhaps the best Constantine The Great site on the web, see Victor Clark's Constantine The Great Coins: http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/
Cleisthenes
CTGaeFolNico.jpg
1403g, Constantine I (the Great), early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D. (Nicomedia)22 viewsConstantine the Great, early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D. Bronze follis, RIC 12, aVF, Nicomedia mint, 2.760g, 22.0mm, 0o, 313 - 317 A.D. Obverse: IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; Reverse: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI, Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe and scepter, eagle with wreath in beak left, G right, SMN in exergue; scarce.

The Emperor Constantine I was effectively the sole ruler of the Roman world between 324 and 337 A.D.; his reign was perhaps one of the most crucial of all the emperors in determining the future course of western civilization. By beginning the process of making Christianity the religious foundation of his realm, he set the religious course for the future of Europe which remains in place to this very day. Because he replaced Rome with Constantinople as the center of imperial power, he made it clear that the city of Rome was no longer the center of power and he also set the stage for the Middle Ages. His philosophical view of monarchy, largely spelled out in some of the works of Eusebius of Caesarea, became the foundation for the concept of the divine right of kings which prevailed in Europe.

Constantine was not a "Christian convert" in any traditional sense. He was not baptized until close to death, and while that was not an uncommon practice, the mention of Christ in his speeches and decrees is conspicuous by its absence. Eusebius, Church historian and Constantine biographer, is responsible for much of the valorization of Constantine as the Christian Emperor. The somnambulant "sign" in which Constantine was to become victor at the Milvian Bridge is, not so surprisingly, revealed to posterity long after the "fact." Throughout his reign, Constantine continues to portray himself on coins as a sun god (Freeman, Charles. Egypt, Greece and Rome: Civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean; Second Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. 582). Above all, Constantine was a pragmatist. It would be cynical to egregiously disavow his commitment to Christianity, but it would be equally wrong to think that he would allow Christianity to meddle in the governance of his empire. As he reputedly told a group of bishops, "You are bishops of those within the church, but I am perhaps a bishop appointed by God of those outside." Whatever the motives for his decision to support Christianity, Christianity benefitted from the arrangement. So, too, did Constantine. It was a match made in heaven.
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

For perhaps the best Constantine The Great site on the web, see Victor Clark's Constantine The Great Coins: http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/
Cleisthenes
CTG.jpg
1403h, Constantine I (the Great), early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D. (Siscia)36 viewsBronze follis, RIC 232b, gVF, Siscia, 3.87g, 23.8mm, 180o, early 313 A.D. Obverse: IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; Reverse: IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG NN, Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe and scepter, eagle with wreath in beak left, E right, SIS in exergue.

The Emperor Constantine I was effectively the sole ruler of the Roman world between 324 and 337 A.D.; his reign was perhaps one of the most crucial of all the emperors in determining the future course of western civilization. By beginning the process of making Christianity the religious foundation of his realm, he set the religious course for the future of Europe which remains in place to this very day. Because he replaced Rome with Constantinople as the center of imperial power, he made it clear that the city of Rome was no longer the center of power and he also set the stage for the Middle Ages. His philosophical view of monarchy, largely spelled out in some of the works of Eusebius of Caesarea, became the foundation for the concept of the divine right of kings which prevailed in Europe.

Constantine was not a "Christian convert" in any traditional sense. He was not baptized until close to death, and while that was not an uncommon practice, the mention of Christ in his speeches and decrees is conspicuous by its absence. Eusebius, Church historian and Constantine biographer, is responsible for much of the valorization of Constantine as the Christian Emperor. The somnambulant "sign" in which Constantine was to become victor at the Milvian Bridge is, not so surprisingly, revealed to posterity long after the "fact." Throughout his reign, Constantine continues to portray himself on coins as a sun god (Freeman, Charles. Egypt, Greece and Rome: Civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean; Second Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. 582). Above all, Constantine was a pragmatist. It would be cynical to egregiously disavow his commitment to Christianity, but it would be equally wrong to think that he would allow Christianity to meddle in the governance of his empire. As he reputedly told a group of bishops, "You are bishops of those within the church, but I am perhaps a bishop appointed by God of those outside." Whatever the motives for his decision to support Christianity, Christianity benefitted from the arrangement. So, too, did Constantine. It was a match made in heaven.
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

For perhaps the best Constantine The Great site on the web, see Victor Clark's Constantine The Great Coins: http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/
Cleisthenes
CTG_SisCmpGte.jpg
1403i, Constantine I (the Great), early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D. (Siscia)42 viewsSilvered AE 3, RIC 214, VF, Siscia mint, 3.187g, 19.3mm, 0o, 328 - 329 A.D.
Obverse: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, laureate head right; Reverse PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG, campgate with two turrets, star above, ASIS and double crescent in exergue.

Flavius Valerius Constantinus, Constantine the Great, was the son of Helena and the First Tetrarchic ruler Constantius I. Constantine is most famous for his conversion to Christianity and the battle of the Milvian Bridge where he defeated emperor Maxentius. It is reputed that before the battle, he saw the words "In Hoc Signo Victor Eris" (By this sign you shall conquer) emblazoned on the sun around the Chi Rho, the symbol of Christianity. Other sources claim the vision came to Constantine I in a dream. The story continues that after placing this Christogram on the shields of his army, he defeated his opponent and thus ruled the empire through divine providence. Constantine I also shifted the capital of the empire to Constantinople, establishing the foundation for an Empire that would last another 1000 years. He died in 337 and his sons divided the Roman territories.

The Emperor Constantine I was effectively the sole ruler of the Roman world between 324 and 337 A.D.; his reign was perhaps one of the most crucial of all the emperors in determining the future course of western civilization. By beginning the process of making Christianity the religious foundation of his realm, he set the religious course for the future of Europe which remains in place to this very day. Because he replaced Rome with Constantinople as the center of imperial power, he made it clear that the city of Rome was no longer the center of power, and he also set the stage for the Middle Ages. His philosophical view of monarchy, largely spelled out in some of the works of Eusebius of Caesarea, became the foundation for the concept of the divine right of kings which prevailed in Europe.

Constantine was not a "Christian convert" in any traditional sense. He was not baptized until close to death, and while that was not an uncommon practice, the mention of Christ in his speeches and decrees is conspicuous by its absence. Eusebius, Church historian and Constantine biographer, is responsible for much of the valorization of Constantine as the Christian Emperor. The somnambulant "sign" in which Constantine was to become victor at the Milvian Bridge is, not so surprisingly, revealed to posterity long after the "fact." Throughout his reign, Constantine continues to portray himself on coins as a sun god (Freeman, Charles. Egypt, Greece and Rome: Civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean; Second Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. 582). Above all, Constantine was a pragmatist. It would be cynical to egregiously disavow his commitment to Christianity, but it would be equally wrong to think that he would allow Christianity to meddle in the governance of his empire. As he reputedly told a group of bishops, "You are bishops of those within the church, but I am perhaps a bishop appointed by God of those outside." Whatever the motives for his decision to support Christianity, Christianity benefitted from the arrangement. So, too, did Constantine. It was a match made in heaven.
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

For perhaps the best Constantine The Great site on the web, see Victor Clark's Constantine The Great Coins: http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/
Cleisthenes
CTG_ThesCmpGte.jpg
1403j, Constantine I (the Great), early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D. (Thessalonica)26 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC 153, VF, Thessalonica mint, 2.955g, 19.7mm, 0o, 326 - 328 A.D. Obverse: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, laureate head right; Reverse: PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG, campgate with two turrets, star above, dot right, SMTSG in exergue.

Flavius Valerius Constantinus, Constantine the Great, was the son of Helena and the First Tetrarchic ruler Constantius I. Constantine is most famous for his conversion to Christianity and the battle of the Milvian Bridge where he defeated emperor Maxentius. It is reputed that before the battle, he saw the words "In Hoc Signo Victor Eris" (By this sign you shall conquer) emblazoned on the sun around the Chi Rho, the symbol of Christianity. Other sources claim the vision came to Constantine I in a dream. The story continues that after placing this Christogram on the shields of his army, he defeated his opponent and thus ruled the empire through divine providence. Constantine I also shifted the capital of the empire to Constantinople, establishing the foundation for an Empire that would last another 1000 years. He died in 337 and his sons divided the Roman territories.

The Emperor Constantine I was effectively the sole ruler of the Roman world between 324 and 337 A.D.; his reign was perhaps one of the most crucial of all the emperors in determining the future course of western civilization. By beginning the process of making Christianity the religious foundation of his realm, he set the religious course for the future of Europe which remains in place to this very day. Because he replaced Rome with Constantinople as the center of imperial power, he made it clear that the city of Rome was no longer the center of power, and he also set the stage for the Middle Ages. His philosophical view of monarchy, largely spelled out in some of the works of Eusebius of Caesarea, became the foundation for the concept of the divine right of kings which prevailed in Europe.

Constantine was not a "Christian convert" in any traditional sense. He was not baptized until close to death, and while that was not an uncommon practice, the mention of Christ in his speeches and decrees is conspicuous by its absence. Eusebius, Church historian and Constantine biographer, is responsible for much of the valorization of Constantine as the Christian Emperor. The somnambulant "sign" in which Constantine was to become victor at the Milvian Bridge is, not so surprisingly, revealed to posterity long after the "fact." Throughout his reign, Constantine continues to portray himself on coins as a sun god (Freeman, Charles. Egypt, Greece and Rome: Civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean; Second Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. 582). Above all, Constantine was a pragmatist. It would be cynical to egregiously disavow his commitment to Christianity, but it would be equally wrong to think that he would allow Christianity to meddle in the governance of his empire. As he reputedly told a group of bishops, "You are bishops of those within the church, but I am perhaps a bishop appointed by God of those outside." Whatever the motives for his decision to support Christianity, Christianity benefitted from the arrangement. So, too, did Constantine. It was a match made in heaven.
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

For perhaps the best Constantine The Great site on the web, see Victor Clark's Constantine The Great Coins: http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/
Cleisthenes
ConstansVot.jpeg
1405a, Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D. (Alexandria)39 viewsBronze AE 4, RIC 37, gVF, Egypt, Alexandria, 1.54g, 15.0mm, 180o, 345-347 A.D. Obverse: D N CONSTANS P F AVG, pearl diademed head right; Reverse: VOT XX MVLT XXX in wreath, SMALA• in exergue.

Flavius Julius Constans, third and youngest son of Constantine I and Fausta, was born between 320 and 323 A.D. Primary sources for the life and reign of Constans I are scarce. To reconstruct his life and career, one must draw on a variety of references in both fourth century and later works. Raised as a Christian, he was made a Caesar on 25 December 333 A.D. Constans I and his two brothers, after the death of their father on 22 May 337 and the subsequent "massacre of the princes" in which many other relatives were purged, met in the first part of September 337 in Pannonia to re-divide the empire among themselves. There they were acclaimed Augusti by the army. Constans' new realm included Italy, Africa, Illyricum, Macedonia, and Achaea. Shortly before his father's death, Constans' engagement to Olympias, the daughter of the Praetorian Prefect Ablabius, was announced; although the match was never solemnized because of political reasons.

It would appear that Constans was successful in the military sphere. Following his accession to the purple in 337, he seems to have won a victory over the Sarmatians. In 340 Constans was able to beat back an attempt by his brother Constantine II to seize some of his realm. The latter died in a battle fought near Aquileia and Constans absorbed his late brother's territory. In 341 and 342 he conducted a successful campaign against the Franci. He also visited Britain in 343, probably on a military campaign.

As an emperor Constans gets mixed reviews. In what may be a topos, sources suggest that the first part of his reign was moderate but in later years, however, he became overbearing. The emperor apparently attempted to obtain as much money as he could from his subjects and sold government posts to the highest bidder. His favorites were allowed to oppress his subjects. Sources also condemn his homosexuality. He did have some military success and, in addition to other military threats, he had to deal with Donatist-related bandits in North Africa.

Like his father Constantine I and his brother Constantius II, Constans had a deep interest in Christianity. Together with Constantius II he issued (or perhaps re-issued) a ban against pagan sacrifice in 341. The next year, they cautioned against the destruction of pagan temples. Unlike his brother Constantius II, who supported the Arian faction, he stood shoulder to shoulder with Athanasius and other members of the Orthodox clique. In fact, it is due to his request that the Council of Serdica was called to deal with the ecclesiastical squabble between Athanasius of Alexandria and Paul of Constantinople on one side and the Arian faction on the other.

When Magnentius was declared emperor in Gaul during January 350, Constans realized his reign was at an end. When he learned of the revolt, he fled toward Helena, a town in the Pyrenees. Constans was put to death by Gaeso and a band of Magnentius' assassins, who dragged their victim from a temple in which he had sought refuge.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University and Robert Frakes, Clarion UniversityPublished: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
Constans.jpg
1405n, Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D. (Siscia)56 viewsConstans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D. Bronze AE 3, RIC 241, S 3978, VM 69, VF, Siscia, 2.32g, 18.3mm, 180o. Obverse: D N CONSTANS P F AVG, pearl diademed draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Phoenix radiate, standing on rocky mound, GSIS and symbol in ex; nice green patina.

Flavius Julius Constans, third and youngest son of Constantine I and Fausta, was born between 320 and 323 A.D. Primary sources for the life and reign of Constans I are scarce. To reconstruct his life and career, one must draw on a variety of references in both fourth century and later works. Raised as a Christian, he was made a Caesar on 25 December 333 A.D. Constans I and his two brothers, after the death of their father on 22 May 337 and the subsequent "massacre of the princes" in which many other relatives were purged, met in the first part of September 337 in Pannonia to re-divide the empire among themselves. There they were acclaimed Augusti by the army. Constans' new realm included Italy, Africa, Illyricum, Macedonia, and Achaea. Shortly before his father's death, Constans' engagement to Olympias, the daughter of the Praetorian Prefect Ablabius, was announced; although the match was never solemnized because of political reasons.

It would appear that Constans was successful in the military sphere. Following his accession to the purple in 337, he seems to have won a victory over the Sarmatians. In 340 Constans was able to beat back an attempt by his brother Constantine II to seize some of his realm. The latter died in a battle fought near Aquileia and Constans absorbed his late brother's territory. In 341 and 342 he conducted a successful campaign against the Franci. He also visited Britain in 343, probably on a military campaign.

As an emperor Constans gets mixed reviews. In what may be a topos, sources suggest that the first part of his reign was moderate but in later years, however, he became overbearing. The emperor apparently attempted to obtain as much money as he could from his subjects and sold government posts to the highest bidder. His favorites were allowed to oppress his subjects. Sources also condemn his homosexuality. He did have some military success and, in addition to other military threats, he had to deal with Donatist-related bandits in North Africa.

Like his father Constantine I and his brother Constantius II, Constans had a deep interest in Christianity. Together with Constantius II he issued (or perhaps re-issued) a ban against pagan sacrifice in 341. The next year, they cautioned against the destruction of pagan temples. Unlike his brother Constantius II, who supported the Arian faction, he stood shoulder to shoulder with Athanasius and other members of the Orthodox clique. In fact, it is due to his request that the Council of Serdica was called to deal with the ecclesiastical squabble between Athanasius of Alexandria and Paul of Constantinople on one side and the Arian faction on the other.

When Magnentius was declared emperor in Gaul during January 350, Constans realized his reign was at an end. When he learned of the revolt, he fled toward Helena, a town in the Pyrenees. Constans was put to death by Gaeso and a band of Magnentius' assassins, who dragged their victim from a temple in which he had sought refuge.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University and Robert Frakes, Clarion University
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
U2476F1OVDKUXTA.jpeg
1405t, Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D. (Thessalonica )39 viewsConstans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D., Bronze AE 3, unattributed; Thessalonica mint, 2.25g, 18.9mm, 0; aVF.

Flavius Julius Constans, third and youngest son of Constantine I and Fausta, was born between 320 and 323 A.D. Primary sources for the life and reign of Constans I are scarce. To reconstruct his life and career, one must draw on a variety of references in both fourth century and later works. Raised as a Christian, he was made a Caesar on 25 December 333 A.D. Constans I and his two brothers, after the death of their father on 22 May 337 and the subsequent "massacre of the princes" in which many other relatives were purged, met in the first part of September 337 in Pannonia to re-divide the empire among themselves. There they were acclaimed Augusti by the army. Constans' new realm included Italy, Africa, Illyricum, Macedonia, and Achaea. Shortly before his father's death, Constans' engagement to Olympias, the daughter of the Praetorian Prefect Ablabius, was announced; although the match was never solemnized because of political reasons.

It would appear that Constans was successful in the military sphere. Following his accession to the purple in 337, he seems to have won a victory over the Sarmatians. In 340 Constans was able to beat back an attempt by his brother Constantine II to seize some of his realm. The latter died in a battle fought near Aquileia and Constans absorbed his late brother's territory. In 341 and 342 he conducted a successful campaign against the Franci. He also visited Britain in 343, probably on a military campaign.

As an emperor Constans gets mixed reviews. In what may be a topos, sources suggest that the first part of his reign was moderate but in later years, however, he became overbearing. The emperor apparently attempted to obtain as much money as he could from his subjects and sold government posts to the highest bidder. His favorites were allowed to oppress his subjects. Sources also condemn his homosexuality. He did have some military success and, in addition to other military threats, he had to deal with Donatist-related bandits in North Africa.

Like his father Constantine I and his brother Constantius II, Constans had a deep interest in Christianity. Together with Constantius II he issued (or perhaps re-issued) a ban against pagan sacrifice in 341. The next year, they cautioned against the destruction of pagan temples. Unlike his brother Constantius II, who supported the Arian faction, he stood shoulder to shoulder with Athanasius and other members of the Orthodox clique. In fact, it is due to his request that the Council of Serdica was called to deal with the ecclesiastical squabble between Athanasius of Alexandria and Paul of Constantinople on one side and the Arian faction on the other.

When Magnentius was declared emperor in Gaul during January 350, Constans realized his reign was at an end. When he learned of the revolt, he fled toward Helena, a town in the Pyrenees. Constans was put to death by Gaeso and a band of Magnentius' assassins, who dragged their victim from a temple in which he had sought refuge.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University and Robert Frakes, Clarion University.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Constantine2.jpg
1406c, Constantine II, 337-340 A.D.36 viewsConstantine II, 317-340. AE3, RIC VII, 74 ('theta' = r), page 581 2.22 grams, 333-335 AD, Constantinople mint, VF. Obverse : CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C - Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS - Two soldiers looking in at each other and both holding a spear; between them, two standards. CONS (theta) (dot) in exergue. Rare.

Constantine II (February 317 - 340) was Roman Emperor (337 - 340). The eldest son of Constantine I the Great and Fausta, he was born at Arles. Following the death of his father in 337, Constantine II became Emperor jointly with his brothers Constantius II and Constans. His section of the Empire was Gaul, Britain and Spain. At first, he was the guardian of his younger brother Constans, whose portion was Italy, Africa and Illyria. As Constans came of age, Constantine would not relinquish the guardianship, and in 340 he marched against Constans in Italy, but was defeated at Aquileia and died in battle. Constans came to control Constantine II's portion of the empire.
Cleisthenes
Julian2VotXConstantinople.jpg
1409a, Julian II "the Philosopher," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.143 viewsJulian II, A.D. 360-363; RIC 167; VF; 2.7g, 20mm; Constantinople mint; Obverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted & cuirassed bust right, holding spear & shield; Reverse: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath; CONSPB in exergue; Attractive green patina. Ex Nemesis.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Julian the Apostate (360-363 A.D.)

Walter E. Roberts, Emory University
Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University

Introduction

The emperor Flavius Claudius Julianus reigned from 360 to 26 June 363, when he was killed fighting against the Persians. Despite his short rule, his emperorship was pivotal in the development of the history of the later Roman empire. This essay is not meant to be a comprehensive look at the various issues central to the reign of Julian and the history of the later empire. Rather, this short work is meant to be a brief history and introduction for the general reader. Julian was the last direct descendent of the Constantinian line to ascend to the purple, and it is one of history's great ironies that he was the last non-Christian emperor. As such, he has been vilified by most Christian sources, beginning with John Chrysostom and Gregory Nazianzus in the later fourth century. This tradition was picked up by the fifth century Eusebian continuators Sozomen, Socrates Scholasticus, and Theodoret and passed on to scholars down through the 20th century. Most contemporary sources, however, paint a much more balanced picture of Julian and his reign. The adoption of Christianity by emperors and society, while still a vital concern, was but one of several issues that concerned Julian.

It is fortunate that extensive writings from Julian himself exist, which help interpret his reign in the light of contemporary evidence. Still extant are some letters, several panegyrics, and a few satires. Other contemporary sources include the soldier Ammianus Marcellinus' history, correspondence between Julian and Libanius of Antioch, several panegyrics, laws from the Theodosian Code, inscriptions, and coinage. These sources show Julian's emphasis on restoration. He saw himself as the restorer of the traditional values of Roman society. Of course much of this was rhetoric, meant to defend Julian against charges that he was a usurper. At the same time this theme of restoration was central to all emperors of the fourth century. Julian thought that he was the one emperor who could regain what was viewed as the lost glory of the Roman empire. To achieve this goal he courted select groups of social elites to get across his message of restoration. This was the way that emperors functioned in the fourth century. By choosing whom to include in the sharing of power, they sought to shape society.

Early Life

Julian was born at Constantinople in 331. His father was Julius Constantius, half-brother of the emperor Constantine through Constantius Chlorus, and his mother was Basilina, Julius' second wife. Julian had two half-brothers via Julius' first marriage. One of these was Gallus, who played a major role in Julian's life. Julian appeared destined for a bright future via his father's connection to the Constantinian house. After many years of tense relations with his three half-brothers, Constantine seemed to have welcomed them into the fold of the imperial family. From 333 to 335, Constantine conferred a series of honors upon his three half-siblings, including appointing Julius Constantius as one of the consuls for 335. Julian's mother was equally distinguished. Ammianus related that she was from a noble family. This is supported by Libanius, who claimed that she was the daughter of Julius Julianus, a Praetorian Prefect under Licinius, who was such a model of administrative virtue that he was pardoned and honored by Constantine.

Despite the fact that his mother died shortly after giving birth to him, Julian experienced an idyllic early childhood. This ended when Constantius II conducted a purge of many of his relatives shortly after Constantine's death in 337, particularly targeting the families of Constantine's half-brothers. ulian and Gallus were spared, probably due to their young age. Julian was put under the care of Mardonius, a Scythian eunuch who had tutored his mother, in 339, and was raised in the Greek philosophical tradition, and probably lived in Nicomedia. Ammianus also supplied the fact that while in Nicomedia, Julian was cared for by the local bishop Eusebius, of whom the future emperor was a distant relation. Julian was educated by some of the most famous names in grammar and rhetoric in the Greek world at that time, including Nicocles and Hecebolius. In 344 Constantius II sent Julian and Gallus to Macellum in Cappadocia, where they remained for six years. In 351, Gallus was made Caesar by Constantius II and Julian was allowed to return to Nicomedia, where he studied under Aedesius, Eusebius, and Chrysanthius, all famed philosophers, and was exposed to the Neo-Platonism that would become such a prominent part of his life. But Julian was most proud of the time he spent studying under Maximus of Ephesus, a noted Neo-Platonic philospher and theurgist. It was Maximus who completed Julian's full-scale conversion to Neo-Platonism. Later, when he was Caesar, Julian told of how he put letters from this philosopher under his pillows so that he would continue to absorb wisdom while he slept, and while campaigning on the Rhine, he sent his speeches to Maximus for approval before letting others hear them. When Gallus was executed in 354 for treason by Constantius II, Julian was summoned to Italy and essentially kept under house arrest at Comum, near Milan, for seven months before Constantius' wife Eusebia convinced the emperor that Julian posed no threat. This allowed Julian to return to Greece and continue his life as a scholar where he studied under the Neo-Platonist Priscus. Julian's life of scholarly pursuit, however, ended abruptly when he was summoned to the imperial court and made Caesar by Constantius II on 6 November 355.

Julian as Caesar

Constantius II realized an essential truth of the empire that had been evident since the time of the Tetrarchy--the empire was too big to be ruled effectively by one man. Julian was pressed into service as Caesar, or subordinate emperor, because an imperial presence was needed in the west, in particular in the Gallic provinces. Julian, due to the emperor's earlier purges, was the only viable candidate of the imperial family left who could act as Caesar. Constantius enjoined Julian with the task of restoring order along the Rhine frontier. A few days after he was made Caesar, Julian was married to Constantius' sister Helena in order to cement the alliance between the two men. On 1 December 355, Julian journeyed north, and in Augusta Taurinorum he learned that Alamannic raiders had destroyed Colonia Agrippina. He then proceeded to Vienne where he spent the winter. At Vienne, he learned that Augustudunum was also under siege, but was being held by a veteran garrison. He made this his first priority, and arrived there on 24 June 356. When he had assured himself that the city was in no immediate danger, he journeyed to Augusta Treverorum via Autessioduram, and from there to Durocortorum where he rendezvoused with his army. Julian had the army stage a series of punitive strikes around the Dieuse region, and then he moved them towards the Argentoratum/Mongontiacum region when word of barbarian incursions reached him.

From there, Julian moved on to Colonia Agrippina, and negotiated a peace with the local barbarian leaders who had assaulted the city. He then wintered at Senonae. He spent the early part of the campaigning season of 357 fighting off besiegers at Senonae, and then conducting operations around Lugdunum and Tres Tabernae. Later that summer, he encountered his watershed moment as a military general. Ammianus went into great detail about Julian's victory over seven rogue Alamannic chieftains near Argentoratum, and Julian himself bragged about it in his later writing. After this battle, the soldiers acclaimed Julian Augustus, but he rejected this title. After mounting a series of follow-up raids into Alamannic territory, he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia, and on the way defeated some Frankish raiders in the Mosa region. Julian considered this campaign one of the major events of his time as Caesar.

Julian began his 358 military campaigns early, hoping to catch the barbarians by surprise. His first target was the Franks in the northern Rhine region. He then proceeded to restore some forts in the Mosa region, but his soldiers threatened to mutiny because they were on short rations and had not been paid their donative since Julian had become Caesar. After he soothed his soldiers, Julian spent the rest of the summer negotiating a peace with various Alamannic leaders in the mid and lower Rhine areas, and retired to winter quarters at Lutetia. In 359, he prepared once again to carry out a series of punitive expeditions against the Alamanni in the Rhine region who were still hostile to the Roman presence. In preparation, the Caesar repopulated seven previously destroyed cities and set them up as supply bases and staging areas. This was done with the help of the people with whom Julian had negotiated a peace the year before. Julian then had a detachment of lightly armed soldiers cross the Rhine near Mogontiacum and conduct a guerilla strike against several chieftains. As a result of these campaigns, Julian was able to negotiate a peace with all but a handful of the Alamannic leaders, and he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia.

Of course, Julian did more than act as a general during his time as Caesar. According to Ammianus, Julian was an able administrator who took steps to correct the injustices of Constantius' appointees. Ammianus related the story of how Julian prevented Florentius, the Praetorian Prefect of Gaul, from raising taxes, and also how Julian actually took over as governor for the province of Belgica Secunda. Hilary, bishop of Poitiers, supported Ammianus' basic assessment of Julian in this regard when he reported that Julian was an able representative of the emperor to the Gallic provincials. There is also epigraphic evidence to support Julian's popularity amongst the provincial elites. An inscription found near Beneventum in Apulia reads:
"To Flavius Claudius Julianus, most noble and sanctified Caesar, from the caring Tocius Maximus, vir clarissimus, for the care of the res publica from Beneventum".

Tocius Maximus, as a vir clarissimus, was at the highest point in the social spectrum and was a leader in his local community. This inscription shows that Julian was successful in establishing a positive image amongst provincial elites while he was Caesar.

Julian Augustus

In early 360, Constantius, driven by jealousy of Julian's success, stripped Julian of many troops and officers, ostensibly because the emperor needed them for his upcoming campaign against the Persians. One of the legions ordered east, the Petulantes, did not want to leave Gaul because the majority of the soldiers in the unit were from this region. As a result they mutinied and hailed Julian as Augustus at Lutetia. Julian refused this acclamation as he had done at Argentoratum earlier, but the soldiers would have none of his denial. They raised him on a shield and adorned him with a neck chain, which had formerly been the possession of the standard-bearer of the Petulantes and symbolized a royal diadem. Julian appeared reluctantly to acquiesce to their wishes, and promised a generous donative. The exact date of his acclamation is unknown, but most scholars put it in February or March. Julian himself supported Ammianus' picture of a jealous Constantius. In his Letter to the Athenians, a document constructed to answer charges that he was a usurper, Julian stated that from the start he, as Caesar, had been meant as a figurehead to the soldiers and provincials. The real power he claimed lay with the generals and officials already present in Gaul. In fact, according to Julian, the generals were charged with watching him as much as the enemy. His account of the actual acclamation closely followed what Ammianus told us, but he stressed even more his reluctance to take power. Julian claimed that he did so only after praying to Zeus for guidance.

Fearing the reaction of Constantius, Julian sent a letter to his fellow emperor justifying the events at Lutetia and trying to arrange a peaceful solution. This letter berated Constantius for forcing the troops in Gaul into an untenable situation. Ammianus stated that Julian's letter blamed Constantius' decision to transfer Gallic legions east as the reason for the soldiers' rebellion. Julian once again asserted that he was an unwilling participant who was only following the desire of the soldiers. In both of these basic accounts Ammianus and Julian are playing upon the theme of restoration. Implicit in their version of Julian's acclamation is the argument that Constantius was unfit to rule. The soldiers were the vehicle of the gods' will. The Letter to the Athenians is full of references to the fact that Julian was assuming the mantle of Augustus at the instigation of the gods. Ammianus summed up this position nicely when he related the story of how, when Julian was agonizing over whether to accept the soldiers' acclamation, he had a dream in which he was visited by the Genius (guardian spirit) of the Roman state. The Genius told Julian that it had often tried to bestow high honors upon Julian but had been rebuffed. Now, the Genius went on to say, was Julian's final chance to take the power that was rightfully his. If the Caesar refused this chance, the Genius would depart forever, and both Julian and the state would rue Julian's rejection. Julian himself wrote a letter to his friend Maximus of Ephesus in November of 361 detailing his thoughts on his proclamation. In this letter, Julian stated that the soldiers proclaimed him Augustus against his will. Julian, however, defended his accession, saying that the gods willed it and that he had treated his enemies with clemency and justice. He went on to say that he led the troops in propitiating the traditional deities, because the gods commanded him to return to the traditional rites, and would reward him if he fulfilled this duty.

During 360 an uneasy peace simmered between the two emperors. Julian spent the 360 campaigning season continuing his efforts to restore order along the Rhine, while Constantius continued operations against the Persians. Julian wintered in Vienne, and celebrated his Quinquennalia. It was at this time that his wife Helena died, and he sent her remains to Rome for a proper burial at his family villa on the Via Nomentana where the body of her sister was entombed. The uneasy peace held through the summer of 361, but Julian concentrated his military operations around harassing the Alamannic chieftain Vadomarius and his allies, who had concluded a peace treaty with Constantius some years earlier. By the end of the summer, Julian decided to put an end to the waiting and gathered his army to march east against Constantius. The empire teetered on the brink of another civil war. Constantius had spent the summer negotiating with the Persians and making preparations for possible military action against his cousin. When he was assured that the Persians would not attack, he summoned his army and sallied forth to meet Julian. As the armies drew inexorably closer to one another, the empire was saved from another bloody civil war when Constantius died unexpectedly of natural causes on 3 November near the town of Mopsucrenae in Cilicia, naming Julian -- the sources say-- as his legitimate successor.

Julian was in Dacia when he learned of his cousin's death. He made his way through Thrace and came to Constantinople on 11 December 361 where Julian honored the emperor with the funeral rites appropriate for a man of his station. Julian immediately set about putting his supporters in positions of power and trimming the imperial bureaucracy, which had become extremely overstaffed during Constantius' reign. Cooks and barbers had increased during the late emperor's reign and Julian expelled them from his court. Ammianus gave a mixed assessment of how the new emperor handled the followers of Constantius. Traditionally, emperors were supposed to show clemency to the supporters of a defeated enemy. Julian, however, gave some men over to death to appease the army. Ammianus used the case of Ursulus, Constantius' comes sacrum largitionum, to illustrate his point. Ursulus had actually tried to acquire money for the Gallic troops when Julian had first been appointed Caesar, but he had also made a disparaging remark about the ineffectiveness of the army after the battle of Amida. The soldiers remembered this, and when Julian became sole Augustus, they demanded Ursulus' head. Julian obliged, much to the disapproval of Ammianus. This seems to be a case of Julian courting the favor of the military leadership, and is indicative of a pattern in which Julian courted the goodwill of various societal elites to legitimize his position as emperor.

Another case in point is the officials who made up the imperial bureaucracy. Many of them were subjected to trial and punishment. To achieve this goal, during the last weeks of December 361 Julian assembled a military tribunal at Chalcedon, empanelling six judges to try the cases. The president of the tribunal was Salutius, just promoted to the rank of Praetorian Prefect; the five other members were Mamertinus, the orator, and four general officers: Jovinus, Agilo, Nevitta, and Arbetio. Relative to the proceedings of the tribunal, Ammianus noted that the judges, " . . . oversaw the cases more vehemently than was right or fair, with the exception of a few . . .." Ammianus' account of Julian's attempt at reform of the imperial bureaucracy is supported by legal evidence from the Theodosian Code. A series of laws sent to Mamertinus, Julian's appointee as Praetorian Prefect in Italy, Illyricum, and Africa, illustrate this point nicely. On 6 June 362, Mamertinus received a law that prohibited provincial governors from bypassing the Vicars when giving their reports to the Prefect. Traditionally, Vicars were given civil authority over a group of provinces, and were in theory meant to serve as a middle step between governors and Prefects. This law suggests that the Vicars were being left out, at least in Illyricum. Julian issued another edict to Mamertinus on 22 February 362 to stop abuse of the public post by governors. According to this law, only Mamertinus could issue post warrants, but the Vicars were given twelve blank warrants to be used as they saw fit, and each governor was given two. Continuing the trend of bureaucratic reform, Julian also imposed penalties on governors who purposefully delayed appeals in court cases they had heard. The emperor also established a new official to weigh solidi used in official government transactions to combat coin clipping.

For Julian, reigning in the abuses of imperial bureaucrats was one step in restoring the prestige of the office of emperor. Because he could not affect all elements of society personally, Julian, like other Neo-Flavian emperors, decided to concentrate on select groups of societal elites as intercessors between himself and the general populace. One of these groups was the imperial bureaucracy. Julian made it very clear that imperial officials were intercessors in a very real sense in a letter to Alypius, Vicar of Britain. In this letter, sent from Gaul sometime before 361, the emperor praises Alypius for his use of "mildness and moderation with courage and force" in his rule of the provincials. Such virtues were characteristic of the emperors, and it was good that Alypius is representing Julian in this way. Julian courted the army because it put him in power. Another group he sought to include in his rule was the traditional Senatorial aristocracy. One of his first appointments as consul was Claudius Mamertinus, a Gallic Senator and rhetorician. Mamertinus' speech in praise of Julian delivered at Constantinople in January of 362 is preserved. In this speech, Claudius presented his consular selection as inaugurating a new golden age and Julian as the restorer of the empire founded by Augustus. The image Mamertinus gave of his own consulate inaugurating a new golden age is not merely formulaic. The comparison of Julian to Augustus has very real, if implicit, relevance to Claudius' situation. Claudius emphasized the imperial period as the true age of renewal. Augustus ushered in a new era with his formation of a partnership between the emperor and the Senate based upon a series of honors and offices bestowed upon the Senate in return for their role as intercessor between emperor and populace. It was this system that Julian was restoring, and the consulate was one concrete example of this bond. To be chosen as a consul by the emperor, who himself had been divinely mandated, was a divine honor. In addition to being named consul, Mamertinus went on to hold several offices under Julian, including the Prefecture of Italy, Illyricum, and Africa. Similarly, inscriptional evidence illustrates a link between municipal elites and Julian during his time as Caesar, something which continued after he became emperor. One concrete example comes from the municipal senate of Aceruntia in Apulia, which established a monument on which Julian is styled as "Repairer of the World."

Julian seems to have given up actual Christian belief before his acclamation as emperor and was a practitioner of more traditional Greco-Roman religious beliefs, in particular, a follower of certain late antique Platonist philosophers who were especially adept at theurgy as was noted earlier. In fact Julian himself spoke of his conversion to Neo-Platonism in a letter to the Alexandrians written in 363. He stated that he had abandoned Christianity when he was twenty years old and been an adherent of the traditional Greco-Roman deities for the twelve years prior to writing this letter.

(For the complete text of this article see: http://www.roman-emperors.org/julian.htm)

Julian’s Persian Campaign

The exact goals Julian had for his ill-fated Persian campaign were never clear. The Sassanid Persians, and before them the Parthians, had been a traditional enemy from the time of the Late Republic, and indeed Constantius had been conducting a war against them before Julian's accession forced the former to forge an uneasy peace. Julian, however, had no concrete reason to reopen hostilities in the east. Socrates Scholasticus attributed Julian's motives to imitation of Alexander the Great, but perhaps the real reason lay in his need to gather the support of the army. Despite his acclamation by the Gallic legions, relations between Julian and the top military officers was uneasy at best. A war against the Persians would have brought prestige and power both to Julian and the army.

Julian set out on his fateful campaign on 5 March 363. Using his trademark strategy of striking quickly and where least expected, he moved his army through Heirapolis and from there speedily across the Euphrates and into the province of Mesopotamia, where he stopped at the town of Batnae. His plan was to eventually return through Armenia and winter in Tarsus. Once in Mesopotamia, Julian was faced with the decision of whether to travel south through the province of Babylonia or cross the Tigris into Assyria, and he eventually decided to move south through Babylonia and turn west into Assyria at a later date. By 27 March, he had the bulk of his army across the Euphrates, and had also arranged a flotilla to guard his supply line along the mighty river. He then left his generals Procopius and Sebastianus to help Arsacius, the king of Armenia and a Roman client, to guard the northern Tigris line. It was also during this time that he received the surrender of many prominent local leaders who had nominally supported the Persians. These men supplied Julian with money and troops for further military action against their former masters. Julian decided to turn south into Babylonia and proceeded along the Euphrates, coming to the fortress of Cercusium at the junction of the Abora and Euphrates Rivers around the first of April, and from there he took his army west to a region called Zaitha near the abandoned town of Dura where they visited the tomb of the emperor Gordian which was in the area. On April 7 he set out from there into the heart of Babylonia and towards Assyria.

Ammianus then stated that Julian and his army crossed into Assyria, which on the face of things appears very confusing. Julian still seems to be operating within the province of Babylonia between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. The confusion is alleviated when one realizes that,for Ammianus, the region of Assyria encompassed the provinces of Babylonia and Assyria. On their march, Julian's forces took the fortress of Anatha, received the surrender and support of several more local princes, and ravaged the countryside of Assyria between the rivers. As the army continued south, they came across the fortresses Thilutha and Achaiachala, but these places were too well defended and Julian decided to leave them alone. Further south were the cities Diacira and Ozogardana, which the Roman forces sacked and burned. Soon, Julian came to Pirisabora and a brief siege ensued, but the city fell and was also looted and destroyed. It was also at this time that the Roman army met its first systematic resistance from the Persians. As the Romans penetrated further south and west, the local inhabitants began to flood their route. Nevertheless, the Roman forces pressed on and came to Maiozamalcha, a sizable city not far from Ctesiphon. After a short siege, this city too fell to Julian. Inexorably, Julian's forces zeroed in on Ctesiphon, but as they drew closer, the Persian resistance grew fiercer, with guerilla raids whittling at Julian's men and supplies. A sizable force of the army was lost and the emperor himself was almost killed taking a fort a few miles from the target city.
Finally, the army approached Ctesiphon following a canal that linked the Tigris and Euphrates. It soon became apparent after a few preliminary skirmishes that a protracted siege would be necessary to take this important city. Many of his generals, however, thought that pursuing this course of action would be foolish. Julian reluctantly agreed, but became enraged by this failure and ordered his fleet to be burned as he decided to march through the province of Assyria. Julian had planned for his army to live off the land, but the Persians employed a scorched-earth policy. When it became apparent that his army would perish (because his supplies were beginning to dwindle) from starvation and the heat if he continued his campaign, and also in the face of superior numbers of the enemy, Julian ordered a retreat on 16 June. As the Roman army retreated, they were constantly harassed by guerilla strikes. It was during one of these raids that Julian got caught up in the fighting and took a spear to his abdomen. Mortally wounded he was carried to his tent, where, after conferring with some of his officers, he died. The date was 26 June 363.

Conclusion

Thus an ignominious end for a man came about who had hoped to restore the glory of the Roman empire during his reign as emperor. Due to his intense hatred of Christianity, the opinion of posterity has not been kind to Julian. The contemporary opinion, however, was overall positive. The evidence shows that Julian was a complex ruler with a definite agenda to use traditional social institutions in order to revive what he saw as a collapsing empire. In the final assessment, he was not so different from any of the other emperors of the fourth century. He was a man grasping desperately to hang on to a Greco-Roman conception of leadership that was undergoing a subtle yet profound change.
Copyright (C) 2002, Walter E. Roberts and Michael DiMaio, Jr. Used by permission.

In reality, Julian worked to promote culture and philosophy in any manifestation. He tried to reduce taxes and the public debts of municipalities; he augmented administrative decentralisation; he promoted a campaign of austerity to reduce public expenditure (setting himself as the example). He reformed the postal service and eliminated the powerful secret police.
by Federico Morando; JULIAN II, The Apostate, http://www.forumancientcoins.com/NumisWiki/view.asp?key=Julian%20II

Flavius Claudius Iulianus was born in 331 or maybe 332 A.D. in Constantinople. He ruled the Western Empire as Caesar from 355 to 360 and was hailed Augustus by his legions in Lutetia (Paris) in 360. Julian was a gifted administrator and military strategist. Famed as the last pagan emperor, his reinstatement of the pagan religion earned him the moniker "the Apostate." As evidenced by his brilliant writing, some of which has survived to the present day, the title "the Philosopher" may have been more appropriate. He died from wounds suffered during the Persian campaign of 363 A.D. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.




2 commentsCleisthenes
jovian.jpg
1410a, Jovian, 27 June 363 - 17 February 364 A.D.78 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC 179, aVF, Constantinople, 3.126g, 21.6mm, 180o. Obverse: D N IOVIANVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left; Reverse: VOT V MVLT X within wreath, CONSPG in exergue; scarce.

Flavius Jovianuswas born in 331 at Singidunum, modern Belgrade. His distinguished father, Varronianus, had been a tribune of the legion Ioviani and a comes domesticorum, perhaps under Constantius II, who had retired to private life shortly before Jovian's elevation to the purple. Jovian married a daughter of Lucillianus, perhaps named Charito, and by her produced at least two children.

Jovian himself was a protector domesticus under Constantius II and Julian and, under Julian, primicerius domesticorum. Various Christian sources maintain that Jovian's Christianity led to his deposition by Julian, though most modern scholars dismiss this as ex post facto Christian apologetic. Jovian, recalled to the ranks if he had ever been dismissed, marched with Julian against Sapor in 363, and on 27 June, the day after that emperor's death, was acclaimed Augustus.

Ammianus and Zosimus, among others, detail the difficult straits of the Roman army during its withdrawal from Persian territory, Ammianus from the perspective of a proud soldier confident even in defeat of the superiority of Roman arms, Zosimus, in a much shorter and confused version, concentrating on the predicament of Jovian's troops and on the dire effects to the empire of the peace terms agreed to with Sapor. These terms entailed the cessation to Persia of Roman territory beyond the Tigris -- the cities of Singara and Nisibis, however, to be surrendered on the condition of the safe passage of their inhabitants -- and the guarantee of the neutrality of Rome's ally Arsaces, King of Armenia, in the event of future hostilities between Roman and Persia. Ammianus asserts that in agreeing to these terms Jovian misjudged his tactical strength and wasted an opportunity presented by negotiations with Sapor to move his forces closer to supplies at Corduena, and that Jovian acted on the advise of flatterers to preserve the fighting strength of his forces in the event of an attempt by Julian's relative Procopius to seize the throne. Others present the treaty terms as unavoidable given the Roman predicament.

Jovian appears to have treaded cautiously with regard to religious matters during the early months of his reign. Eunapius says that Jovian continued to honor Maximus and Priscus, the Neoplatonist advisors of Julian, and, upon reaching Tarsus, Jovian performed funeral rites for Julian. Nonetheless, various Christians, most notably Athanasius, took the initiative in an effort to gain Jovian's favor and support. An adherent of the Nicaean creed, Jovian did eventually recall various bishops of homoousian disposition and restore to their followers churches lost under earlier emperors. But in spite of such measures, unity among various Christian sects seems to have been the foremost concern of Jovian, whose ipsissima verba Socrates Scholasticus purports to give: "I abhor contentiousness, but love and honor those hurrying towards unanimity" (Hist. Eccl. 3.25).

Jovian died at the age of thirty-two on 17 February 364 at Dadastana on the boundary of Bithynia and Galatia. The cause of his death was most probably natural and is variously attributed to overeating, the consumption of poisonous mushrooms, or suffocation from fumes of charcoal or of the fresh paint on the room in which he was sleeping. Ammianus' comparison of the circumstances of Jovian's death to those of Scipio Aemilianus suggest the possibility of foul play, as does John of Antioch's reference to a poisoned rather than a poisonous mushroom, while John Chrysostom -- in a highly suspect literary context of consolatio-- asserts outright that the emperor was murdered. Eutropius records that he was enrolled among the gods, inter Divos relatus est. Zonaras says he was buried in the Church of the Holy Apostles and that his wife, Charito, was eventually laid to rest beside him.

Ancient authors agree that Jovian was of modest intellect but imposing physique and disposed to excessive eating and drinking.

By Thomas Banchich, Canisius College
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited By J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
JohnVIIISear2564.jpg
1423-1448 AD - John VIII Palaeologus - Stavraton - Constantinople mint13 viewsEmperor: John VIII Palaeologus (r. 1423-1448 AD)
Date: 1423-1448 AD
Condition: aVF
Denomination: Stavraton

Obverse: -
Facing bust of Christ Pantokrator.

Reverse: / or variants in two lines around crowned facing bust of John with pellets flanking.

Constantinople mint
DO 1706; Sear 2564; Bendall 348.20, sigla 18
6.59g; 23.8mm; 225°

Ex CNG
Pep
Hannibalianus_AE-3_FL-HANNIBALLIANO-REGI_SECVRITAS-PVBLICA_CONSS_RIC-VII-147-p-589_Constantinople_336-37-AD_Q-001_6h_15mm_1,32g-s.jpg
144 Hannibalianus (335-337 A.D.), Constantinoplis, RIC VII 147, AE-3, -/-//CONSS, SECVRITAS PVBLICA, Euphrates seated right on ground, Very Rare!!101 views144 Hannibalianus (335-337 A.D.), Constantinoplis, RIC VII 147, AE-3, -/-//CONSS, SECVRITAS PVBLICA, Euphrates seated right on ground, Very Rare!!
avers: F L HANNIBALLIANO REGI (11b, A4), Bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: SECVRITAS PVBLICA (no break in the legend !!!), Euphrates seated right on ground, holding sceptre, overturned urn at his side, from which waters flow, reed in background.
exergue: -/-//CONSS, diameter: 15mm, weight: 1,32g, axis: 6h,
mint: Constantinoplis, date: 336-337 A.D., ref: RIC VII 147-p-589, Very Rare!!
Q-001
quadrans
Constans_II_Solidus.jpg
15. Constans II with Constantine IV8 viewsConstans II, with Constantine IV.
641-668.
AV Solidus (19mm, 4.32 g, 7h).
Constantinople mint, 10th officina. Struck 654-659.

O: ∂ N CONSτA τINЧS C CONSτA, crowned and draped busts facing; cross between

R: VICTORIA AVςЧ, cross potent set on three steps; I//CONOB. DOC 25j; MIB 26; SB 959.

Good VF, graffiti on the reverse.

Ex CNG
Sosius
Constans_II_Solidus_2.jpg
15. Constans II with Constantine IV11 viewsConstans II, with Constantine IV.
641-668.
AV Solidus (19mm, 4.39 g, 7h).
Constantinople mint, 7th officina.
Struck 654-659.

O: ∂ N CONSτAτINЧS C CONSτ, crowned and draped busts facing; cross between

R: VICTORIA AVςЧ, cross potent set on three steps; Z (retrograde)//CONOB+.

DOC 27; MIB 27; SB 961. VF.

Ex CNG
Sosius
LarryW1802.jpg
150 Leo I the Great, AD 457-474105 viewsGold solidus, 21.7mm, 4.50g, Mint State
Struck c. AD 462 or 466 at Constantinople
D N LEO PE—RPET AVC, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, head slightly right, holding spear over right shoulder and shield with horseman motif on left arm / VICTORI—A AVCCC Θ, Victory standing half left holding long jeweled cross; star to right, CON OB in exg.
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
Ex: Forvm Ancient Coins
RIC 605; DOC 528; MIRB 3b
2 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
Val.jpg
1501s, Valentinian I, 25 February 364 - 17 November 375 A.D. (Siscia)104 viewsValentinian I, 25 February 364 - 17 November 375 A.D., Bronze AE 3, S 4103, VF, Siscia mint, 2.012g, 18.7mm, 180o, 24 Aug 367 - 17 Nov 375 A.D.obverse D N VALENTINI-ANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS - REIPVBLICAE, Victory advancing left, wreath in right and palm in left, symbols in fields, mintmark in exergue.


De Imperatoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of the Roman Emperors and their Families

Valentinian I (364-375 AD.)

Walter E. Roberts, Emory University

Valentinian was one of Rome's last great warrior emperors. Flavius Valentinianus, was born in A.D. 321 at Cibalis (modern Vinkovci) in southern Pannonia. His father Gratian was a soldier renowned for his strength and wrestling skills. Gratian had an illustrious career in the army, rising from staff officer to tribune, to comes Africae, and finally [i/comes Britanniae.

The emperor Jovian died on 17 February 364, apparently of natural causes, on the border between Bithynia and Galatia. The army marched on to Nicaea, the nearest city of any consequence, and a meeting of civil and military officials was convened to choose a new emperor. The assembly finally agreed upon Valentinian.

On 26 February 364, Valentinian accepted the office offered to him. As he prepared to make his accession speech, the soldiers threatened to riot, apparently uncertain as to where his loyalties lay. Valentinian reassured them that the army was his greatest priority. Furthermore, to prevent a crisis of succession if he should die prematurely, he agreed to pick a co-Augustus. According to Ammianus, the soldiers were astounded by Valentinian’s bold demeanor and his willingness to assume the imperial authority. His decision to elect a fellow-emperor could also be construed as a move to appease any opposition among the civilian officials in the eastern portion of the empire. By agreeing to appoint a co-ruler, he assured the eastern officials that someone with imperial authority would remain in the east to protect their interests. After promoting his brother Valens to the rank of tribune and putting him in charge of the royal stables on March 1, Valentinian selected Valens as co-Augustus at Constantinople on 28 March 364, though this was done over the objections of Dagalaifus. Ammianus makes it clear, however, that Valens was clearly subordinate to his brother.

Ammianus and Zosimus as well as modern scholars praise Valentinian for his military accomplishments. He is generally credited with keeping the Roman empire from crumbling away by “. . . reversing the generally waning confidence in the army and imperial defense . . ..” Several other aspects of Valentinian's reign also set the course of Roman history for the next century.

Valentinian deliberately polarized Roman society, subordinating the civilian population to the military. The military order took over the old prestige of the senatorial nobility. The imperial court, which was becoming more and more of a military court, became a vehicle for social mobility. There were new ideas of nobility, which was increasingly provincial in character. By this it is meant that the imperial court, not the Senate, was the seat of nobility, and most of these new nobles came from the provinces. With the erosion of the old nobility, the stage was set for the ascendancy of Christianity. Ammianus makes it clear that actions such as these were part of a systematic plan by Valentinian to erode the power and prestige of the senatorial aristocracy. Several pieces of extant legislation seem to confirm Ammianus’ allegations that Valentinian was eroding senatorial prestige.

Valentinian's reign affords valuable insights into late Roman society, civilian as well as military. First, there was a growing fracture between the eastern and western portions of the empire. Valentinian was the last emperor to really concentrate his resources on the west. Valens was clearly in an inferior position in the partnership. Second, there was a growing polarization of society, both Christian versus pagan, and civil versus military. Finally there was a growing regionalism in the west, driven by heavy taxation and the inability of Valentinian to fully exercise military authority in all areas of the west. All of these trends would continue over the next century, profoundly reshaping the Roman empire and western Europe.

By Walter E. Roberts, Emory University
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
ValentGlRom.jpg
1501s, Valentinian I, 25 February 364 - 17 November 375 A.D. (Siscia)59 viewsValentinian I, 25 February 364 - 17 November 375 A.D. Bronze AE 3, RIC 5(a) ii, VF, Siscia, 1.905g, 19.3mm, 0o, 25 Feb 364 - 24 Aug 367 A.D. Obverse: D N VALENTINI-ANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: GLORIA RO-MANORVM, Emperor dragging captive with right, labarum (chi-rho standard) in left, •GSISC in exergue.


De Imperatoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of the Roman Emperors and their Families

Valentinian I (364-375 AD.)

Walter E. Roberts, Emory University

Valentinian was one of Rome's last great warrior emperors. Flavius Valentinianus, was born in A.D. 321 at Cibalis (modern Vinkovci) in southern Pannonia. His father Gratian was a soldier renowned for his strength and wrestling skills. Gratian had an illustrious career in the army, rising from staff officer to tribune, to comes Africae, and finally [i/comes Britanniae.

The emperor Jovian died on 17 February 364, apparently of natural causes, on the border between Bithynia and Galatia. The army marched on to Nicaea, the nearest city of any consequence, and a meeting of civil and military officials was convened to choose a new emperor. The assembly finally agreed upon Valentinian.

On 26 February 364, Valentinian accepted the office offered to him. As he prepared to make his accession speech, the soldiers threatened to riot, apparently uncertain as to where his loyalties lay. Valentinian reassured them that the army was his greatest priority. Furthermore, to prevent a crisis of succession if he should die prematurely, he agreed to pick a co-Augustus. According to Ammianus, the soldiers were astounded by Valentinian’s bold demeanor and his willingness to assume the imperial authority. His decision to elect a fellow-emperor could also be construed as a move to appease any opposition among the civilian officials in the eastern portion of the empire. By agreeing to appoint a co-ruler, he assured the eastern officials that someone with imperial authority would remain in the east to protect their interests. After promoting his brother Valens to the rank of tribune and putting him in charge of the royal stables on March 1, Valentinian selected Valens as co-Augustus at Constantinople on 28 March 364, though this was done over the objections of Dagalaifus. Ammianus makes it clear, however, that Valens was clearly subordinate to his brother.

Ammianus and Zosimus as well as modern scholars praise Valentinian for his military accomplishments. He is generally credited with keeping the Roman empire from crumbling away by “. . . reversing the generally waning confidence in the army and imperial defense . . ..” Several other aspects of Valentinian's reign also set the course of Roman history for the next century.

Valentinian deliberately polarized Roman society, subordinating the civilian population to the military. The military order took over the old prestige of the senatorial nobility. The imperial court, which was becoming more and more of a military court, became a vehicle for social mobility. There were new ideas of nobility, which was increasingly provincial in character. By this it is meant that the imperial court, not the Senate, was the seat of nobility, and most of these new nobles came from the provinces. With the erosion of the old nobility, the stage was set for the ascendancy of Christianity. Ammianus makes it clear that actions such as these were part of a systematic plan by Valentinian to erode the power and prestige of the senatorial aristocracy. Several pieces of extant legislation seem to confirm Ammianus’ allegations that Valentinian was eroding senatorial prestige.

Valentinian's reign affords valuable insights into late Roman society, civilian as well as military. First, there was a growing fracture between the eastern and western portions of the empire. Valentinian was the last emperor to really concentrate his resources on the west. Valens was clearly in an inferior position in the partnership. Second, there was a growing polarization of society, both Christian versus pagan, and civil versus military. Finally there was a growing regionalism in the west, driven by heavy taxation and the inability of Valentinian to fully exercise military authority in all areas of the west. All of these trends would continue over the next century, profoundly reshaping the Roman empire and western Europe.

By Walter E. Roberts, Emory University
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
13594p00.jpg
1502c, Valens, 28 March 364 - 9 August 378 A.D. (Cyzikus)55 viewsBronze AE 3, S 4118, 2.42g, 16.5mm, 180o,Cyzikus, F/F, obverse D N VALENS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Victory advancing left, wreath in right, palm frond in left, SMK L(?) in exergue. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of the Roman Emperors and their Families

Valens (365-369 AD.)

Noel Linski, University of Colorado

Valens was the brother of Valentinian I. On March 28, 364, precisely one month after his accession by Roman reckoning, Valentinian appointed his brother Flavius Valens co-emperor at the Hebdomon, the first in a long line of emperors proclaimed there. Themistius was present and later recounted the occasion in his Or. 6. After only two months of co-rulership, the two departed from Constantinople for their native Illyricum. Outside Naissus, in Moesia, they divided their administrative staff between them and at Sirmium they did the same with their mobile forces. Valens was to rule the east, from Thrace in the North and Cyrenaica in the South eastward to the Persian frontier. Valentinian ruled the west. They did not spend long in Sirmium. By late August 365 Valentinian had moved on toward Milan, where he resided for the following year before moving on to Trier, which remained his capital until 375. Similarly, Valens was back in Constantinople by December 364.and he was declared Augustus in 364 A.D. He was given command of the Eastern provinces, where he spent much of his time campaigning against the Goths and Persians.

In 376 A.D., Valens allowed Gothic tribes, who were being driven forward by the Huns to settle in the Danube provinces. The Goths were so badly treated by the Romans that they rebelled. Valens marched against the confederated barbarian army, and on August 9, 378, the two forces met at Adrianople. Although negotiations were attempted, these broke down when a Roman unit sallied forth and carried both sides into battle. The Romans held their own early on but were crushed by the surprise arrival of Greuthungi cavalry which split their ranks.

In one historical account, Valens was wounded in battle but escaped to a nearby farmstead where he was burned to death in a tower by Gothic marauders. The fourth century A.D. Roman historian Ammianus Marcellinus does not seem to concur with this story. Regardless, when the battle was over Valens' body was never recovered, 10,000 roman soldiers lay dead and the perception of Roman military invincibility was destroyed.

Adrianople was the most significant event in Valens' career. Though he displayed some talent as an administrator, Valens' persecutions of Nicene Christians and pagan philosophers, his halting efforts at military achievement and his obtuse personality rendered him a less than glorious emperor. To have died in so inglorious a battle has thus come to be regarded as the nadir of an unfortunate career. This is especially true because of the profound consequences of Valens' defeat.

Adrianople spelled the beginning of the end for Roman territorial integrity in the late empire and this fact was recognized even by contemporaries. The Roman historian Ammianus (325-391 AD) understood that it was the worst defeat in Roman history since Cannae. Rufinus (340–410 CE), monk, historian, and theologian; called it "the beginning of evils for the Roman empire then and thereafter."

Noel Lenski, University of Colorado
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Valens.jpg
1502h, Valens, 364-378 A.D. (Heraclea)51 viewsValens, 364-378 A.D., Heraclea mint, VF, Chi-Rho standard reverse.


De Imperatoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of the Roman Emperors and their Families

Valens (365-369 AD.)

Noel Linski, University of Colorado

Valens was the brother of Valentinian I. On March 28, 364, precisely one month after his accession by Roman reckoning, Valentinian appointed his brother Flavius Valens co-emperor at the Hebdomon, the first in a long line of emperors proclaimed there. Themistius was present and later recounted the occasion in his Or. 6. After only two months of co-rulership, the two departed from Constantinople for their native Illyricum. Outside Naissus, in Moesia, they divided their administrative staff between them and at Sirmium they did the same with their mobile forces. Valens was to rule the east, from Thrace in the North and Cyrenaica in the South eastward to the Persian frontier. Valentinian ruled the west. They did not spend long in Sirmium. By late August 365 Valentinian had moved on toward Milan, where he resided for the following year before moving on to Trier, which remained his capital until 375. Similarly, Valens was back in Constantinople by December 364.and he was declared Augustus in 364 A.D. He was given command of the Eastern provinces, where he spent much of his time campaigning against the Goths and Persians.

In 376 A.D., Valens allowed Gothic tribes, who were being driven forward by the Huns to settle in the Danube provinces. The Goths were so badly treated by the Romans that they rebelled. Valens marched against the confederated barbarian army, and on August 9, 378, the two forces met at Adrianople. Although negotiations were attempted, these broke down when a Roman unit sallied forth and carried both sides into battle. The Romans held their own early on but were crushed by the surprise arrival of Greuthungi cavalry which split their ranks.

In one historical account, Valens was wounded in battle but escaped to a nearby farmstead where he was burned to death in a tower by Gothic marauders. The fourth century A.D. Roman historian Ammianus Marcellinus does not seem to concur with this story. Regardless, when the battle was over Valens' body was never recovered, 10,000 roman soldiers lay dead and the perception of Roman military invincibility had been destroyed.

Adrianople was the most significant event in Valens' career. Though he displayed some talent as an administrator, Valens' persecutions of Nicene Christians and pagan philosophers, his halting efforts at military achievement and his obtuse personality rendered him a less than glorious emperor. To have died in so inglorious a battle has thus come to be regarded as the nadir of an unfortunate career. This is especially true because of the profound consequences of Valens' defeat.

Adrianople spelled the beginning of the end for Roman territorial integrity in the late empire and this fact was recognized even by contemporaries. The Roman historian Ammianus (325-391 AD) understood that it was the worst defeat in Roman history since Cannae. Rufinus (340–410 CE), monk, historian, and theologian; called it "the beginning of evils for the Roman empire then and thereafter."

Noel Lenski, University of Colorado
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
Theod1GlrMan.jpg
1505c, Theodosius I, 379 - 395 A.D. (Constantinople)84 viewsTheodosius I (379 - 395 AD) AE3. 388-394 AD, RIC IX 27(a)3, Third Officina. Seventh Period. 20.27 mm. 4.8gm. Near VF with black and earthen patina. Constantinople. Obverse: DN THEODO-SIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, & cuirassed bust right; Reverse: GLORIA-ROMANORVM, Theodosius I standing, facing, holding labarum and globe, CONSB in exergue (scarcer reverse). A Spanish find.



De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

THEODOSIUS I (379-395 A.D.)
David Woods
University College of Cork


Origin and Early Career
Flavius Theodosius was born at Cauca in Spain in about 346 to Thermantia and Theodosius the Elder (so-called to distinguish him from his son). Theodosius the Elder was a senior military officer serving in the Western empire and rose to become the magister equitum praesentalis under the emperor Valentinian I from late 368 until his execution in early 375. As the son of a soldier, Theodosius was legally obliged to enter upon a military career. He seems to have served under his father during his expedition to Britain in 367/8, and was the dux Moesiae Primae by late 374. Unfortunately, great controversy surrounds the rest of his career until Gratian had him hailed as his imperial colleague in succession to the emperor Valens at Sirmium on 19 January 379. It is clear that he was forced to retire home to Spain only to be recalled to active service shortly thereafter, but the circumstances of his forced retirement are shrouded in mystery. His father was executed at roughly the same time, and much speculation has centred on the relationship between these events.

[For a very detailed and interesting discussion of the Foreign Policy of Theodosius and the Civil Wars that plagued his reign, please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/theo1.htm]

Family and Succession
Theodosius married twice. His first wife was the Spanish Aelia Flavia Flaccilla. She bore him Arcadius ca. 377, Honorius on 9 September 384, and Pulcheria ca. 385. Theodosius honoured her with the title of Augusta shortly after his accession, but she died in 386. In late 387 he married Galla, daughter of Valentinian I and full-sister of Valentinian II. She bore him Gratian ca. 388, Galla Placidia ca. 388/390, and died in childbirth in 394, together with her new-born son John. Of his two sons who survived infancy, he appointed Arcadius as Augustus on 19 January 383 and Honorius as Augustus on 23 January 393. His promotion of Arcadius as a full Augustus at an unusually young age points to his determination right from the start that one of his own sons should succeed him. He sought to strengthen Arcadius' position in particular by means of a series of strategic marriages whose purpose was to tie his leading "generals" irrevocably to his dynasty. Hence he married his niece and adoptive daughter Serena to his magister militum per Orientem Stilicho in 387, her elder sister Thermantia to a "general" whose name has not been preserved, and ca. 387 his nephew-in-law Nebridius to Salvina, daughter of the comes Africae Gildo. By the time of his death by illness on 17 January 395, Theodosius had promoted Stilicho from his position as one of the two comites domesticorum under his own eastern administration to that of magister peditum praesentalis in a western administration, in an entirely traditional manner, under his younger son Honorius. Although Stilicho managed to increase the power of the magister peditum praesentalis to the disadvantage of his colleague the magister equitum praesentalis and claimed that Theodosius had appointed him as guardian for both his sons, this tells us more about his cunning and ambition than it does about Theodosius' constitutional arrangements.

Theodosius' importance rests on the fact that he founded a dynasty which continued in power until the death of his grandson Theodosius II in 450. This ensured a continuity of policy which saw the emergence of Nicene Christianity as the orthodox belief of the vast majority of Christians throughout the middle ages. It also ensured the essential destruction of paganism and the emergence of Christianity as the religion of the state, even if the individual steps in this process can be difficult to identify. On the negative side, however, he allowed his dynastic interests and ambitions to lead him into two unnecessary and bloody civil wars which severely weakened the empire's ability to defend itself in the face of continued barbarian pressure upon its frontiers. In this manner, he put the interests of his family before those of the wider Roman population and was responsible, in many ways, for the phenomenon to which we now refer as the fall of the western Roman empire.


Copyright (C) 1998, David Woods.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

There is a nice segue here, as we pick-up John Julius Norwich's summation of the reign of Theodosius, "Readers of this brief account of his career may well find themselves wondering, not so much whether he deserved the title of 'the Great' as how he ever came to acquire it in the first place. If so, however, they may also like to ask themselves another question: what would have been the fate of the Empire if, at that critical moment in its history after the battle of Adrianople, young Gratian had not called him from his Spanish estates and put the future of the East into his hands? . . . the probability is that the whole Empire of the East would have been lost, swallowed up in a revived Gothic kingdom, with effects on world history that defy speculation.

In his civil legislation he showed, again and again, a consideration for the humblest of his subjects that was rare indeed among rulers of the fourth century. What other prince would have decreed that any criminal, sentenced to execution, imprisonment or exile, must first be allowed thirty days' grace to put his affairs in order? Or that a specified part of his worldly goods must go to his children, upon whom their father's crimes must on no account be visited? Or that no farmer should be obliged to sell his produce to the State at a price lower than he would receive on the open market?

Had he earned his title? Not, perhaps, in the way that Constantine had done or as Justinian was to do. But, if not ultimately great himself, he had surely come very close to greatness; and had he reigned as long as they did his achievements might well have equalled theirs. He might even have saved the Western Empire. One thing only is certain: it would be nearly a century and a half before the Romans would look upon his like again" (Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium, the Early Centuries. London: Penguin Group, 1990. 116-7;118).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
LarryW1941.jpg
160 Tiberius II Constantine, AD 578-58242 viewsGold solidus, 23mm, 4.36g, gVF
Struck at Constantinople c. AD 579-582
D M Tib CONS-TANT PP AVI, bust facing, wears cuirass and crown with cross and pendilia, holds globus cruciger in right and shield decorated with horseman with left / VICTO(R)I-A AVCC Θ cross potent on four steps, CONOB in exegrue
Ex: Harlan Berk
DOC 4i; Sear 422; Berk 76
Lawrence Woolslayer
RI 161h img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Constantinople 7930 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev:– –, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Constantinople. CONSIA. in exe.
Reference:– RIC Constantinople 79
maridvnvm
RI_161af_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Constantinople 7822 viewsObv:– VRBS ROMA, Helmeted bust of Roma left
Rev:– –, She wolf feeding Romulus and Remus, two stars above
Minted in Constantinople (//CONSE•).
Reference:– RIC VII Constantinople 78 (R1)
maridvnvm
RI_163a_img.jpg
163 - Helena - RIC VII Constantinople 011 (AE3)34 viewsObv:– FL HELENA AVGVSTA, Diademed draped bust right, with necklace
Rev:– SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE, Helena standing left, holding branch
Minted in Constantinople. B in left field, CONS in exe. A.D. 326-327
Reference:– RIC VII Constantinople 11 (R2)
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 163e img.JPG
163 - Helena - RIC VIII Constantinople 048 (AE4)33 viewsObv:– FL IVL HELENA AVG, Diademed, draped bust right
Rev:– PAX PVBLICA, Pax, standing left, holding staff and branch
Minted in Constantinople. CONSE in exe.
Reference:– RIC VIII Constantinople 48 (S)
maridvnvm
LarryW8000.jpg
165 Tiberius II Constantine, AD 578-58245 viewsGold solidus, 21mm, 4.41g, VF
Struck at Constantinople c. AD 579-582
D M Tib CONS-TANT PP AVI, bust facing, wears cuirass and crown with cross and pendilia, holds globus cruciger in right and shield decorated with horseman with left / VICTORI-A AVCC E cross potent on four steps, CONOB in exegrue
Ex: Beast Coins
DOC 4e; Sear 422; Berk 76
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW8001.jpg
168 Constans II, AD 641-66834 viewsGold solidus, 18mm, 4.46g, aEF
Struck c. AD 659-662 at Constantinople
[legend blundered and fragmentary], facing busts of Contans II with long beard (on left), and beardless Constantine IV, each clad in chlamys, Constans wearing plumed crown (or helmet), his son wearing simple crown, cross in upper field between their heads / VICTORI-A A-VGU Δ+, long cross on globus between facing standing figures of Heraclius (on left) and Tiberius, both beardless, each wearing crown and chlamys and holding globus cruciger in right hand; CoNoB in exergue. Obverse double struck, reverse flan mark in center.
Ex: Glenn Woods
Sear 963; DOC 29g var; MIB 30
Lawrence Woolslayer
RI_169bv_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE2 - RIC VIII Constantinople 083 var 17 viewsAE2
Obv:- D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Rosette and laureate diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:- FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, emperor in military dress standing left on galley, holding phoenix on globe, Victory sitting at the stern, steering the ship
Minted in Constantinople; (_ | S // CONSIA*)
Reference:– RIC VIII Constantinople 83 var (Unlisted officina - All other officina are R)

Cast Fake
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_169v_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE2 - RIC VIII Constantinople 8826 viewsAE2
Obv:- D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand.
Rev:- FEL TEMP REPA-RATIO, Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points downwards, between the soldier's legs.
Minted in Constantinople; (//CONSI*), A.D. 348-350 A.D.
Reference:– RIC VIII Constantinople 88; LRBC 2014
maridvnvm
RI_169aq_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE2 - RIC VIII Constantinople 88 26 viewsAE2
Obv:- D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand.
Rev:- FEL TEMP REPA-RATIO, Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points downwards, between the soldier's legs.
Minted in Constantinople; (//CONSG*), A.D. 348-350 A.D.
Reference:– RIC VIII Constantinople 88
maridvnvm
RI_169bb_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE2 - RIC VIII Constantinople 9231 viewsAE2
Obv:– D N CONSTANS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left, holding globe
Rev:– Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points downwards, between the soldier's legs
Minted in Constantinople (G //CONSI*).
Reference:- RIC VIII Constantinople 92 (C)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_169o_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE3/4 - RIC VII Constantinople 140 15 viewsAE3/4
Obv:- FL CONSTANS NOB CAES, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left.
Rev:- GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing a standard between them
Minted in Constantinople; (//CONSIA), A.D. 336-337
Reference:– RIC VII Constantinople 140 (R2)
maridvnvm
RI_170at_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Constantinople 081 27 viewsAE2
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman is bearded and falls forward (FH4)
Minted in Constantinople (Gamma | _ //CONSA*). A.D. 348-351
Reference:- RIC VIII, Constantinople 81 (Noted as a scarcer reverse legend break R-E rather than RE-P).
maridvnvm
RI_170dn_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Constantinople 08127 viewsAE2
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman wears a phrygian helmet and falls forward (FH4)
Minted in Constantinople (Gamma | _ //CONSA*). A.D. 348-351
Reference:- RIC VIII, Constantinople 81 (C).

21.47 mm. 6.12 gms. 0 degrees
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170dv_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Constantinople 08122 viewsAE2
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman wears a phrygian helmet and falls forward (FH4)
Minted in Constantinople (Gamma | _ //CONSS*). A.D. 348-351
Reference:- RIC VIII, Constantinople 81 (C).

24.84 mm. 5.29 gms. 180 degrees
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170ey_img~0.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Constantinople 08126 viewsAE2
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman wears a phrygian helmet and falls forward (FH4)
Minted in Constantinople (Gamma | _ //CONS Theta *). A.D. 348-351
Reference:- RIC VIII, Constantinople 81 (C).
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170ev_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Constantinople 08237 viewsÆ Centenionalis
Obv:- D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:- FEL TEMP R-EPARATIO, Helmeted soldier left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield at ground to right. Horseman turns to face the soldier, and reaches his left arm up towards him. He is bare headed and bearded
Minted in Constantinople (G | _ // CONSIA*).
References:- RIC VIII Constantinople 82 (Rare reverse legend break)

4.91g. 23.68 mm. 180 degrees.

Attractive golden toning
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170bj_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Constantinople 08246 viewsÆ Centenionalis
Obv:- D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:- FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, Helmeted soldier left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield at ground to right. Horseman turns to face the soldier, and reaches his left arm up towards him. He wears a Phrygian hemlet and a beard
Minted in Constantinople (G | _ // CONSD*).
References:- RIC VIII Constantinople 82
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170y_img~0.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Constantinople 084 21 viewsAE2
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left, holding globe
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Emperor bare headed & in military dress standing, holding standard with chi-rho on banner in his right hand, resting left hand on shield, two bound captives in Phrygian helmets standing, facing each other before him
Minted in Constantinople (//CONSZ).
Reference:– RIC VIII Constantinople 84 (C)
maridvnvm
RI_170fd_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Constantinople 10641 viewsAE2
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman is bearded and falls forward clutching his horse. his hair is tied in a top-knot.
Minted in Constantinople (G | dot | _ //CONSI).
Reference:- RIC VIII Constantinople 106

Unusual 3 dimensional wave effect created on shield.
4 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170dg_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Constantinople 106 var 28 viewsAE2
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman is bearded and falls forward clutching his horse. his hair is tied in a top-knot.
Minted in Constantinople (G | dot | _ //CONSD).
Reference:- RIC VIII Constantinople 106 var (106 is C3, Phrygian Cap)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170cy_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Constantinople 109 44 viewsAE2
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, Delta behind bust
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield at ground to right. Horsemanis falling forward clutching his horse. He is wearing a phrygian cap
Minted in Constantinople (G | . | _ /CONSG).
Reference:- RIC VIII Constantinople 109 (C2)
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170an_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE3 - RIC VII Constantinople 151 9 viewsAE3
Obv:– FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing a single standard between them
Minted in Constantinople (//CONSG).
Reference:– RIC VII Constantinople 151 (R2)
maridvnvm
RI_170cb_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE3 - RIC VIII Constantinople 093 32 viewsAE3
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Phoenix nimbate and radiate, standing right on globe,
Minted in Constantinople (//CONSIA*). A.D. 348 - A.D. 350
Reference:– RIC VIII Constantinople 93 (Rated S)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170av_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE3 - RIC VIII Constantinople 121 21 viewsAE3
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP R-EPARATIO, Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman wears helmet and falls forward reaching towards emperor
Minted in Constantinople (dot //CONSS). 15th March A.D. 351 - Winter A.D. 354
Reference:- RIC VIII Constantinople 121 (Rated rare with R-E reverse legend break)
maridvnvm
RI_170cm_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE3 - RIC VIII Constantinople 12116 viewsAE3
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right,
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield at ground to right. Horseman turns to face the soldier, and reaches his left arm up towards him. He is bare headed
Minted in Constantinople (Dot //CONSIA).
Reference:- RIC VIII Constantinople 121
maridvnvm
RI_170dx_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE3 - RIC VIII Constantinople 13512 viewsAE3
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman is bare headed and reaches back towards the emperor
Minted in Constantinople (//CONSIA dot).
Reference:- RIC VIII, Constantinople 135 (C2).

18.29 mm. 3.08 gms. 0 degrees
maridvnvm
LarryW1929.jpg
170 Constans II, AD 641-66857 viewsGold solidus, 20.2mm, 4.48g, EF
Struck AD 661-663 at Constantinople
[legend blundered and fragmentary], facing busts of Contans II with long beard (on left), and Constantine IV, beardless (on right), each clad in chlamys, Constans wearing plumed crown (or helmet), his son wearing simple crown, cross in upper field between their heads / VICTORIA AVGU H, cross potent on three steps between facing standing figures of Heraclius (on left) and Tiberius, both beardless, each wearing crown and chlamys and holding globus cruciger in right hand; CoNoB in exergue.
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
Sear 964; DOC 30g; Wroth 58; Tolstoi 304; Ratto 1606
Lawrence Woolslayer
Marcianus_AE-9_DN-MARCIANVS-P-F-AVG_Monogram-S-below-Cross-above_CON_RIC-X-545_450-457-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_9mm_0,91g-s.jpg
170 Marcianus ( 450-457 A.D.), Constantinople, RIC X 545, -/-//CON, AE-4, Monogram type-2, #186 views170 Marcianus ( 450-457 A.D.), Constantinople, RIC X 545, -/-//CON, AE-4, Monogram type-2, #1
avers:- D N MARCIANVS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right. (M3/D3)
revers:- Monogram of Marcian within wreath, S below, cross above. Monogram type-2.
exe: -/-//CON, diameter: 9 mm, weight: 0,91 g, axis: 6h,
mint: Constantinople, date: 450-457 A.D., ref: RIC X 545, p-282,
Q-001
quadrans
Marcianus_AE-4_DN-MARCIANVS-P-F-AVG_Monogram-type-2_S-below-Cross-above_CON_RIC-X-545_450-457-AD_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
170 Marcianus ( 450-457 A.D.), Constantinople, RIC X 545, -/-//CON, AE-4, Monogram type-2, #272 views170 Marcianus ( 450-457 A.D.), Constantinople, RIC X 545, -/-//CON, AE-4, Monogram type-2, #2
avers:- D N MARCIANVS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right. (M3/D3)
revers:- Monogram of Marcian within wreath, S below, cross above. Monogram type-2.
exe: -/-//CON, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis:h,
mint: Constantinople, date: 450-457 A.D., ref: RIC X 545, p-282.
Q-002
quadrans
Marcianus_AE-9_DN-MARCIANVS-P-F-AVG_Monogram-type-2_S-below-Cross-above_CON_RIC-X-545_450-457-AD_Q-001_axis-0h_10mm_0,88g-s.jpg
170 Marcianus ( 450-457 A.D.), Constantinople, RIC X 545, -/-//CON, AE-4, Monogram type-2, #3215 views170 Marcianus ( 450-457 A.D.), Constantinople, RIC X 545, -/-//CON, AE-4, Monogram type-2, #3
avers:- D N MARCIANVS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right. (M3/D3)
revers:- Monogram of Marcian within wreath, S below, cross above. Monogram type-2.
exe: -/-//CON, diameter: 10 mm, weight: 0,88 g, axis: 0h,
mint: Constantinople, date: 450-457 A.D., ref: RIC-X-545, p-282.
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
IMG_4396~0.jpg
171. Constantine I (307-337 A.D.)36 viewsAv.: CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG
Rv.: CONSTANTINIANA DAFNE
Left: gamma
Ex.: CONS

AE Follis Ø20 / 3.2g
RIC VII 30 Constantinople
RIC Rarity rating R4!
1 commentsJuancho
LarryW8002.jpg
172 Constans II, AD 641-66838 viewsGold solidus, 20mm, 4.41g, EF
Struck c. AD 661-663 at Constantinople
[legend blundered and fragmentary], facing busts of Contans II with long beard (on left), and beardless Constantine IV, each clad in chlamys, Constans wearing plumed crown (or helmet), his son wearing simple crown, cross in upper field between their heads / VICTORIA AVGU A, cross potent on three steps between facing standing figures of Heraclius (on left) and Tiberius, both beardless, each wearing crown and chlamys and holding globus cruciger in right hand; CoNoB in exergue.
Ex: Glenn Woods
Sear 964; DOC 30a; MIB 31
Lawrence Woolslayer
RI_175m_img.jpg
175 - Constantius Gallus - AE3 - RIC VIII Constantinople 117 18 viewsAE3
Obv:– DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Bare, bust draped and cuirassed right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing fallen horseman, who is wearing a cap, clutching his horse
Minted in Constantinople (Dot S Dot | * | _ // CONSZ),
Reference:– RIC VIII Constantinople 117 (C2)
maridvnvm
RI_175w_img.jpg
175 - Constantius Gallus - AE3 - RIC VIII Constantinople 122 23 viewsAE3
Obv:– DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Bare, bust draped and cuirassed right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing fallen horseman, who is bare headed, reaching back towards emperor
Minted in Constantinople (dot //CONSTh),
Reference:– RIC VIII Constantinople 122 (C3)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_175y_img.jpg
175 - Constantius Gallus - AE3 - RIC VIII Constantinople 122 var18 viewsAE3
Obv:– DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Bare, bust draped and cuirassed right
Rev:– FEL TEMP - REPARATIO, Soldier spearing fallen horseman, who is bare helmeted, reaching back towards emperor
Minted in Constantinople (dot //CONSD),
Reference:– RIC VIII Constantinople 122 var (Solder headwear and legend break are both unlisted)

18.29 mm. 2.37 gms, 0 degrees
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 175a img.jpg
175 - Constantius Gallus - RIC VIII Constantinople 107 (AE2)45 viewsObv:– DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Bare, bust draped and cuirassed right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing fallen Persian horseman
Minted in Constantinople (Γ • in left field, CONSS in exe).
Reference:– RIC VIII Constantinople 107
maridvnvm
RI_176c_img.jpg
176 - Julian II, AE1, RIC VIII Constantinople 16335 viewsObv:– DN FL CL IVLI-ANVS PF AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above
Minted in Constantinople (palm branch CONSPA palm branch), A.D. 360-363
Reference:– RIC VIII 163 (Rare)
maridvnvm
IMG_4454~0.jpg
179. Constantius II (337-361 A.D.)32 viewsAv.: DN CONSTANTIVS PF AVG
Rv.: FEL TEMP REPARATIO
Left: gamma
Ex.: CONSIA

AE Maiorina Ø22 / 5.2g
RIC VIII 79 Constantinople
Juancho
LarryW1940.jpg
180 Constantine IV Pogonatus, AD 668-68533 viewsGold solidus, 18mm, 4.31g, aEF
Struck at Constantinople c. 674-681
DN C-A-NUS P, bust facing, head slightly to right, wears short beard, cuirass, and helmet with plume and diadem; holds spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman / VICT(O)A [AVGU], cross potent on base with three steps between Heraclius (left) and Tiberius; each figure wears chlamys and crown, and holds globus cruciger, CoNoB in exergue
Ex: Harlan Berk
DOC 8 var; Sear 1154v; Berk -
Lawrence Woolslayer
181- Theodosius -2.JPG
181- Theodosius -249 viewsAE4 , Theodosius I, 388-392 AD , Constantinople mint.
Obv: DN THEODO-SIVS PF AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory advancing left , dragging captive, trophy over shoulder.
CONSA in exergue, RIC 86b
12mm , .8 gm.
jdholds
RI 183b img.jpg
183 - Theodosius- RIC IX Constantinople 86b35 viewsAE4
Obv:– D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory advancing left, carrying trophy over shoulder and dragging captive (no sign of wings!)
Minted in Constantinople (CONSA in exe.) Tau-Rho in reverse field.
maridvnvm
IMG_4322~0.jpg
185. Julian II Apostata (360-363 A.D.)24 viewsAv.: DN FL CL IVLIANVS PF AVG
Rv.: SECVRITAS REIPVB dot
Ex.: palm branch CONSPB palm branch

AE Double Maiorina Ø29 / 8.5g
RIC VIII 164 Constantinople
Scarce!
Juancho
IMG_4736.JPG
188. Valens (364-378 A.D.) 16 viewsAv.: DN VALENS PF AVG
Rv.: RESTITVTOR REIP
Ex.: CONSP gamma

AE Follis Ø19 / 2.7g
RIC IX 20b Constantinople
Rare!
Juancho
IMG_3923.jpg
19 Constantius Gallus30 viewsConstantius Gallus
DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES
bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right
FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO
Soldier with 2 braids, spearing fallen horseman, no beard, Phrygian helmet, 3 braids, clutching
CONS[?] / gamma left / dot centre
Constantinople 107
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
v09.JPG
19 Constantius II70 viewsConstantinople 109randy h2
000_017.JPG
19 Constantius II65 viewsConstantius II AE2 some silvering. 348-351 AD. DN CONSTANTIVS PF AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman,no beard, Phrygian? helmet, clutching, Gamma to left, CONS[S?](star) in ex.
Constantinople
RIC VIII 81,S
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
2-pb-dx.jpg
1916 ALEXIUS PB Tetarteron S-Unlisted DOC 32 Constantinople mint71 viewsOBV Half length figures of John II beardless on r., and Christ holding between them labarum on long shaft. Emperor wears stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type. Christ wears tunic and kolobion.

REV Half length figures of Alexius on l. and of Irene, holding between them cross on long shaft. Both wear stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type.

Size 19.29mm

Weight 5.8gm

These lead Tetarteron are coronation issues of John II and believed to be the origin of the series of tetartera.
DOC lists 6 examples with sizes from 17mm to 20mm and weights 4.22gm to 4. 74gm
1 commentsSimon
IMG_8324.JPG
192. Theodosius I (378-395 A.D.)26 viewsAv.: DN THEODOSIVS PF AVG
Rv.: GLORIA ROMANORVM
Ex.: CONSB

AE Maiorina Ø21 / 5.0g
RIC IX 88a Constantinople
Juancho
s-1920.jpg
1920 ALEXIUS METROPOLITAN TETARTERON S-1920 DOC 33 CLBC 2.4.1 Grierson 1042 48 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion holding gospels (open) in left hand.

REV Alexius bust facing wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and paneled loros of simplified type and holds in r. hand labarum-headed scepter and in l. hand Globus crucifer.

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% ( 3.84 is recorded by Hendy) and were also issued more than likely with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Metropolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. This would make them a separate denomination. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues. Grierson thought them to be for ceremonial use only, I disagree, it was a denomination used in the Capital

Size 16.55mm

Weight 4.4gm

All around very nice coin, I would consider the rarity for this coin 3/5

DOC catalog lists 13 examples with weights ranging from 2.9 gm to 4.7 gm and size from 17mm to 21mm

CLBC Lists weights from 2.93 to 4.80gm. Die Diameter 16mm
Simon
c6.jpg
1920 ALEXIUS METROPOLITAN TETARTERON S-1920 DOC 33 CLBC 2.4.1 Grierson 1042 31 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion holding gospels (open) in left hand.

REV Alexius bust facing wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and paneled loros of simplified type and holds in r. hand labarum-headed scepter and in l. hand Globus crucifer.

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% ( 3.84 is recorded by Hendy) and were also issued more than likely with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Metropolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. This would make them a separate denomination. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues. Grierson thought them to be for ceremonial use only, I disagree, it was a denomination used in the Capital

Size 19.56mm

Weight 3.8gm

DOC catalog lists 13 examples with weights ranging from 2.9 gm to 4.7 gm and size from 17mm to 21mm

CLBC Lists weights from 2.93 to 4.80gm. Die Diameter 16mm
Simon
o3~0.jpg
1920B ALEXIUS METROPOLITAN TETARTERON S-1920 DOC 33 CLBC 2.4.1 Grierson 104228 views
OBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion holding gospels (open) in left hand.

REV Alexius bust facing wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and paneled loros of simplified type and holds in r. hand labarum-headed scepter and in l. hand Globus crucifer.

Size 18/21mm

Weight 3.5gm

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% ( 3.84 is recorded by Hendy) and were also issued more than likely with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Metropolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. This would make them a separate denomination. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues. Grierson thought them to be for ceremonial use only, I disagree, it was a denomination used in the Capital.
Simon
4c~0.jpg
1920C ALEXIUS METROPOLITAN TETARTERON S-1920 DOC 33 CLBC 2.4.1 Grierson 1042 24 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion holding gospels (open) in left hand.

REV Alexius bust facing wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and paneled loros of simplified type and holds in r. hand labarum-headed scepter and in l. hand Globus crucifer.

Size 17/16mm

Weight 3.9 gm

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% ( 3.84 is recorded by Hendy) and were also issued more than likely with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Metropolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. This would make them a separate denomination. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues. Grierson thought them to be for ceremonial use only, I disagree, it was a denomination used in the Capital.

This particular coin grades as aF/aVF , this has the most interesting portrait of Alexius, seems to be much older in age than other examples.

DOC catalog lists 13 examples with weights ranging from 2.9 gm to 4.7 gm and size from 17mm to 21mm
CLBC Lists weights from 2.93 to 4.80gm. Die Diameter 16mm
Simon
i3~1.jpg
1920d ALEXIUS Constantinople Tetarteron SBCV-1920 DOC 33 CLBC 2.4.1 Grierson 1042 1 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion holding gospels (open) in left hand.

REV Alexius bust facing wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and paneled loros of simplified type and holds in r. hand labarum-headed scepter and in l. hand Globus crucifer.

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% ( 3.84 is recorded by Hendy) and were also issued more than likely with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Metropolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. This would make them a separate denomination. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues. Grierson thought them to be for ceremonial use only, I disagree, it was a denomination used in the Capital

Size 18mm

Weight 3.8gm

This coin has an excellent portrait of Christ, I would grade the coin EF/F

DOC catalog lists 13 examples with weights ranging from 2.9 gm to 4.7 gm and size from 17mm to 21mm
CLBC Lists weights from 2.93 to 4.80gm. Die Diameter 16mm
Simon
p6~1.jpg
1920F ALEXIUS METROPOLITAN TETARTERON S-1920 DOC 33 CLBC 2.4.1 Grierson 1042 0 views
OBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion holding gospels (open) in left hand.

REV Alexius bust facing wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and paneled loros of simplified type and holds in r. hand labarum-headed scepter and in l. hand Globus crucifer.

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% ( 3.84 is recorded by Hendy) and were also issued more than likely with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Metropolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. This would make them a separate denomination. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues. Grierson thought them to be for ceremonial use only, I disagree, it was a denomination used in the Capital

Size 16.55mm

Weight 4.4gm

All around very nice coin, I would consider the rarity for this coin 3/5

DOC catalog lists 13 examples with weights ranging from 2.9 gm to 4.7 gm and size from 17mm to 21mm

CLBC Lists weights from 2.93 to 4.80gm. Die Diameter 16mm
Simon
n4.jpg
1921 ALEXIUS Metropolitan TETARTERON S-1921 Doc 34 CLBC 2.4.2 Grierson 1043 4 viewsBust of Christ, bearded with cross behind head, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds gospels in l. hand. UU in fields of cross.

Rev Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of simplified type; holds in r hand jeweled scepter and in l, gl. cr.

Size 18mm

Weight 3.5gm

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

DOC catalog lists 3 examples with weights ranging from 1.6gm to 3.49gm and size is universal at 18mm

All of the Constantinople coins are uncommon but this one appears very rarely, I would mark its rarity 4/5 This example has a very dark patina in hand, I lightened this pic for a better view of the details. This is one of the most difficult of Alexius coins to obtain.
Simon
s-1921c.jpg
1921c ALEXIUS Metropolitan TETARTERON S-1921 Doc 34 CLBC 2.4.2 Grierson 1043 22 viewsBust of Christ, bearded with cross behind head, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds gospels in l. hand. UU in fields of cross.

Rev Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of simplified type; holds in r hand jeweled scepter and in l, gl. cr.

Size 15.63mm

Weight 4.0gm

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

DOC catalog lists 3 examples with weights ranging from 1.6gm to 3.49gm and size is universal at 18mm

This is one of the most difficult of Alexius coins to obtain. This is only the third example I have seen in twenty years, not in great condition but is a great rarity.
Simon
f7.jpg
1922 ALEXIUS METROPOLITAN TETARTERON S-1922 DOC 35 CLBC 2.4.3 4 viewsOBV Christ Bearded and nimbate wearing tunic and kolobion, seated on a throne without back; holds gospel in l. hand.

REV: Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. hand Globus crucifer.

Size 16.6mm

Weight 3.0 gm

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

DOC catalog lists 9 examples with weights ranging from 2.95gm to 3.72 and size from 16mm to 20mm
Simon
4m.jpg
1922A ALEXIUS METROPOLITAN TETARTERON S-1922 DOC 35 CLBC 2.4.3 42 viewsOBV Christ Bearded and nimbate wearing tunic and kolobion, seated on a throne without back; holds gospel in l. hand.

REV: Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. hand Globus crucifer.

Size 14/16mm

Weight 2.9gm

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Metropolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

DOC catalog lists 9 examples with weights ranging from 2.95gm to 3.72 and size from 16mm to 20mm
Simon
s-1922c.jpg
1922B ALEXIUS METROPOLITAN TETARTERON S-1922 DOC 35 CLBC 2.4.3 21 viewsOBV Christ Bearded and nimbate wearing tunic and kolobion, seated on a throne without back; holds gospel in l. hand.

REV: Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. hand Globus crucifer.

Size 14/12mm

Weight 3.6 gm

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Metropolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

This is a thick square coin, very unusual beveled edges.
Simon
4p.jpg
1922C ALEXIUS METROPOLITAN TETARTERON S-1922 DOC 35 CLBC 2.4.3 21 viewsOBV Christ Bearded and nimbate wearing tunic and kolobion, seated on a throne without back; holds gospel in l. hand. ( This is what it should be , coin is a brokerage of sorts.)

REV: Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. hand Globus crucifer.

Size 15/16mm

Weight 4.00gm

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Metropolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

This coin was attributed by rev alone, it is the only possible match for Alexius and it is clearly by inscription, his rule.

DOC catalog lists 9 examples with weights ranging from 2.95gm to 3.72 and size from 16mm to 20mm
Simon
l3~0.jpg
1922D ALEXIUS METROPOLITAN TETARTERON S-1922 DOC 35 CLBC 2.4.3 44 viewsOBV Christ Bearded and nimbate wearing tunic and kolobion, seated on a throne without back; holds gospel in l. hand.

REV: Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. hand Globus crucifer.

Size 18.35

Weight 3.3gm

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash, ,HOWEVER this coin is not the norm of black silver, very grainy and hard to photograph but white silver in color, much higher than what was normal.

DOC catalog lists 9 examples with weights ranging from 2.95gm to 3.72 and size from 16mm to 20mm
Simon
sear1923b.jpg
1923 ALEXIUS METROPOLITAN TETARTERON S-1923 DOC 36 CLBC 2.4.439 viewsOBV Christ bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion, seated on throne without back; r. hand raised in benediction holds Gospels in l.

REV Full length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, jeweled loros of simplified type, and sagion; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft, and in l. gl.cr.

Size 17.48mm

Weight 4.8

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Metropolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

DOC Catalog lists 4 examples with weights fairly consistent from 3.49 gm. to 3.99gm and size from 16mm to 18mm.
Simon
c1.jpg
1923 ALEXIUS METROPOLITAN TETARTERON S-1923 DOC 36 CLBC 2.4.4 43 viewsOBV Christ bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion, seated on throne without back; r. hand raised in benediction holds Gospels in l.

REV Full length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, jeweled loros of simplified type, and sagion; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft, and in l. gl.cr.

Size 15.64mm

Weight 4.6

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Metropolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

DOC Catalog lists 4 examples with weights fairly consistent from 3.49 gm. to 3.99gm and size from 16mm to 18mm. My example is running heavy at 4.6gm
Simon
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1923 ALEXIUS METROPOLITAN TETARTERON S-1923 DOC 36 CLBC 2.4.4 4 viewsOBV Christ bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion, seated on throne without back; r. hand raised in benediction holds Gospels in l.

REV Full length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, jeweled loros of simplified type, and sagion; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft, and in l. gl.cr.

Size 3.96

Weight 17.mm

A really nice example

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Metropolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.)


DOC Catalog lists 4 examples with weights fairly consistent from 3.49 gm. to 3.99gm and size from 16mm to 18mm
Simon
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1929 ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1929 DOC 38 CLBC 2.4.5 21 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds gospels open in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV. Bust facing wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 18/20mm

Weight 4.2

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 9 examples with weight s running from 1.82gm to 5.10gm and size from 18mm to 22mm

My example has more detail than normally seen, most of these coins have no faces recognizable on either side.
Simon
s-1929-3c.jpg
1929A ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1929 DOC 38 CLBC 2.4.5 18 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds gospels open in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.
REV. Bust facing wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 19.5/21mm

Weight 3.3

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 9 examples with weight s running from 1.82gm to 5.10gm and size from 18mm to 22mm
Simon
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1929B ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1929 DOC 38 CLBC 2.4.5 21 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds gospels open in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV. Bust facing wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 19/22mm

Weight 2.2gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 9 examples with weight s running from 1.82gm to 5.10gm and size from 18mm to 22mm
Simon
a6.jpg
1929E ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1929 DOC 38 CLBC 2.4.5 27 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds gospels open in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.
REV. Bust facing wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 18/20mm

Weight 3.5

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 9 examples with weight s running from 1.82gm to 5.10gm and size from 18mm to 22mm
Simon
s-1929-5c.jpg
1929g ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1929 DOC 38 CLBC 2.4.5 50 views
OBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds gospels open in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV. Bust facing wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 19.11mm

Weight 2.6gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 9 examples with weight s running from 1.82gm to 5.10gm and size from 18mm to 22mm

My nicest example. Very Fine
Simon
s-1929-4c.jpg
1929h ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1929 DOC 38 CLBC 2.4.5 39 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds gospels open in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV. Bust facing wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 21.97mm

Weight 2.9gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 9 examples with weight s running from 1.82gm to 5.10gm and size from 18mm to 22mm
Simon
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1929J ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1929 DOC 38 CLBC 2.4.5 Imitation 40 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds gospels open in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV. Bust facing wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 20mm

Weight 2.5gm

This is a regional minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 9 examples with weight s running from 1.82gm to 5.10gm and size from 18mm to 22mm

This is a strange example, Alexius side fits the norm a bit cruder but with good detail, the Christ side lacks the book and Christ's blessing. Imitations of this particular type of coin were created well into the 14th century. This coin was a very recent find in Paphos Cyprus.
Simon
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1929k ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1929 DOC 38 CLBC 2.4.5 62 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds gospels open in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV. Bust facing wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 19.99mm

Weight 4.8 gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 9 examples with weight s running from 1.82gm to 5.10gm and size from 18mm to 22mm
2 commentsSimon
s-1929-7c.jpg
1929L ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1929 DOC 38 CLBC 2.4.5 67 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds gospels open in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV. Bust facing wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 19.00mm

Weight 2.66gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 9 examples with weight s running from 1.82gm to 5.10gm and size from 18mm to 22mm
2 commentsSimon
IMG_4541.JPG
193. Aelia Flaccilla (Wife of Theodosius I)18 viewsAv.: AEL FLACCILLA AVG
Rv.: SALVS REIPVBLICAE
Ex.: CON ?

AE Maiorina Ø23 / 4.2g
RIC IX 55 Constantinople
Scarce!
Juancho
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1930 ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1930 DOC 39 CLBC 2.4.6 51 viewsOBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans, wearing tunic and maphorion.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum on a long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 20.10

Weight 2.8gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 5 examples with weights ranging from 2.05gm to 4.02gm and sizes ranging from 20mm to 22m

It is difficult to find a clean strike of this issue. This one is unusually clean. They way to differ this coin from Manuel's version is the position of Alexius arm on the labrum.
Simon
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1930 ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1930 DOC 39 CLBC 2.4.6 62 viewsOBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans, wearing tunic and maphorion.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum on a long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 22.75

Weight 3.6mm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 5 examples with weights ranging from 2.05gm to 4.02gm and sizes ranging from 20mm to 22m

This coin has been clearly overstruck over an earlier follis. DOC also notes 3 out the five examples are also overstruck. I believe this issue was created quickly when a shortage of the new coinage occurred. It is difficult to find a clean strike of this
1 commentsSimon
s-1930c.jpg
1930A ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1930 DOC 39 CLBC 2.4.6 37 viewsOBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans, wearing tunic and maphorion.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum on a long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 18mm

Weight 3.5 gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 5 examples with weights ranging from 2.05gm to 4.02gm and sizes ranging from 20mm to 22m

This is considered to be very nice condition for this type of coin, normally they appear overstruck or just messy, this one I had almost confused with a Manuel S-1970 but the key of these coins is the position of Alexius right arm being raised, the Manuel has the emperors r. arm in a lower position.
Simon
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1930B ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1930 DOC 39 CLBC 2.4.6 22 viewsOBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans, wearing tunic and maphorion.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum on a long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 20/21mm

Weight 1.9gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

This coin is a mangled mess overstruck and made quickly.

DOC lists 5 examples with weights ranging from 2.05gm to 4.02gm and sizes ranging from 20mm to 22m
Simon
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1930c ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1930 DOC 39 CLBC 2.4.6 20 viewsOBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans, wearing tunic and maphorion.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum on a long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 21.58mm

Weight 2.8gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 5 examples with weights ranging from 2.05gm to 4.02gm and sizes ranging from 20mm to 22m

It is difficult to find a clean strike of this issue.
Simon
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1931 ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1931 DOC 40 CLBC 2.4.7 61 viewsOBV Jeweled radiate Cross, decorated at the end of each limb with one large globule and two smaller, all on two steps.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and jeweled loros of traditional type; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 18/21mm

Weight 3.3gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 25 examples with weights running from1.09gm to 4.22gm and sizes ranging from 17mm to 23mm

I have another example in my collection that has a weight of 6.2 gm and 25mm
Simon
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1931A ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1931 DOC 40 CLBC 2.4.7 21 views
OBV Jeweled radiate Cross, decorated at the end of each limb with one large globule and two smaller, all on two steps.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and jeweled loros of traditional type; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 23/20mm

Weight 5.2gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 25 examples with weights running from1.09gm to 4.22gm and sizes ranging from 17mm to 23mm

I have another example in my collection that has a weight of 6.2 gm and 25mm This coin is its brother being purchased from the same dealer at the same auction.
Simon
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1931B ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1931 DOC 40 CLBC 2.4.7 SBCV-1910???52 viewsOBV Jeweled radiate Cross, decorated at the end of each limb with one large globule and two smaller, all on two steps.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and jeweled loros of traditional type; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 25/22mm

Weight 3.2gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 25 examples with weights running from1.09gm to 4.22gm and sizes ranging from 17mm to 23mm

This example is more than likely the coin listed as S-1910 , Sear 1931 struck over a Class I or Class K anonymous follis. Hendys ( S-1910) lists at 2.96gm around 23mm
Simon
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1931C ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1931 DOC 40 CLBC 2.4.7 25 viewsOBV Jeweled radiate Cross, decorated at the end of each limb with one large globule and two smaller, all on two steps.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and jeweled loros of traditional type; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 23/25mm

Weight 6.2

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 25 examples with weights running from1.09gm to 4.22gm and sizes ranging from 17mm to 23mm

This is the heaviest example noted, at 6.2 gm
Simon
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1931D ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1931 DOC 40 CLBC 2.4.7 26 viewsOBV Jeweled radiate Cross, decorated at the end of each limb with one large globule and two smaller, all on two steps.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and jeweled loros of traditional type; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 18/20mm

Weight 3.2 gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 25 examples with weights running from1.09gm to 4.22gm and sizes ranging from 17mm to 23mm

This coin is a very pleasing example grading VF/F

I have another example in my collection that has a weight of 6.2 gm and 25mm
Simon
3f.jpg
1931E ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1931 DOC 40 CLBC 2.4.7 29 viewsOBV Jeweled radiate Cross, decorated at the end of each limb with one large globule and two smaller, all on two steps.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and jeweled loros of traditional type; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 21/16 mm

Weight 2.6

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 25 examples with weights running from1.09gm to 4.22gm and sizes ranging from 17mm to 23mm

This is my smallest example, I love the green patina, it was one of my earliest acquisitions.
Simon
s-1931c.jpg
1931x ALEXIUS AE TETARTERON S-1931 DOC 40 CLBC 2.4.7 44 viewsOBV Jeweled radiate Cross, decorated at the end of each limb with one large globule and two smaller, all on two steps.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and jeweled loros of traditional type; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 19.72mm

Weight 3.2 gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 25 examples with weights running from1.09gm to 4.22gm and sizes ranging from 17mm to 23mm

This coin is a very pleasing example grading, the patina makes the photo.
Simon
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1932A ALEXIUS AE HALF TETARTERON S-1932 DOC 45 CLBC 2.4.8 17 viewsOBV Patriarchal cross on two steps.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma divitision and jeweled loros and in r. hand holding jeweled scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 13mm

Weight 2.09gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 42 examples with weights ranging from .59gm to 3.22gm and sizes ranging from 13mm to 18mm

This is an easy coin to acquire, the trick is finding the nice ones and with a denomination so small little effort was put into minting perfect coins. This example has good relief on both sides , it is a thicker but smaller in size version, I believe this example to be from the Thessalonica mint.
Simon
s-1932-5c.jpg
1932E ALEXIUS AE HALF TETARTERON S-1932 DOC 45 CLBC 2.4.8 21 viewsOBV Patriarchal cross on two steps.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma divitision and jeweled loros and in r. hand holding jeweled scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 17.5/14

Weight 1.6mm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 42 examples with weights ranging from .59gm to 3.22gm and sizes ranging from 13mm to 18mm

I have many of these coins that very much vary in their design, I do not believe these coins came from one mint but many different mints. The cross design changes in many different ways. This is an easy coin to acquire, the trick is finding the nice ones and with a denomination so small little effort was put into minting perfect coins

Again the cross on this coin was my main interest for the collection.
Simon
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1938 JOHN II HYPERPYRON NOMISMA IV DOC 1 Constantinople First Coinage SBCV-193834 viewsOBV Christ Bearded and Nimbate , wearing tunic and kolobion, seated upon a throne without back: r. hand raised in benediction , holds gospels in l.

REV Half length figure of emperor on l. and of Virgin , holding between them Partriarcghal cross on long shaft. Emperor wears stemma, divitision, collar piece, and paneled loros of simplified type; holds anexikakia in r. hand. Virgin wears tunic and maphorion. Manus Dei in upeer left field.

Size 30mm

Weight 4.0gm
.
DOC lists 17 examples with weights from 4.04gm to 4.40gm and sizes ranging from 30mm to 36mm

Not a perfect example but had a wonderful Provenance, has original ticket from J Schulman coin dealers in Amsterdam before WWII, (From the start Jacques Schulman kept meticulous records of every coin and medal in his inventory, sales, and auctions. These were index cards that formed a database in the exact same way libraries kept their catalogue card index for books, and other printed materials.
Simon
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1939 JOHN II HYPERPYRON NOMISMA IV DOC 2 Constantinople Second Coinage SBCV-193931 viewsOBV IC XC in upper field.

Christ bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion, seated upon throne without back: r hand raised in benediction , holds gospels in l.
REV Full length figure of emperor on l. , crowned by Virgin. Emperor wears stemma, divitision. Collar piece, and paneled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft, and in l., anexikakia. Virgin wears tunic and maphorion.

Size 32mm

Weight 4.38gm

DOC lists 22 examples with weights from 3.73gm to 4.45gm and sizes from 30 mm to 34mm
Simon
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1940 JOHN II HYPERPYRON NOMISMA IV DOC 3 Constantinople Third Coinage Variation B SBCV-194038 viewsOBV IC XC in upper field.

Christ bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion, seated upon throne without back: , holds gospels in l. Pellet in each limb of the cross.

REV Full length figure of emperor on l. , crowned by Virgin. Emperor wears stemma, divitision. Collar piece, and paneled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft, and in l., anexikakia. Virgin wears tunic and maphorion.

Size 30.57mm

Weight 4.3gm

DOC lists 5 examples of type B with weights from 4.22gm to 4.43gm and sizes from 30 mm to 31mm
Simon
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1941 JOHN II ASPRON TRACHY NOMISA IV DOC 8 Constantinople SBCV-194127 viewsOBV IC XC in upper field.
Christ bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion, seated upon throne without back: , holds gospels in l. Single pellet at each end of cushion on throne.

REV Full length figure of emperor on l. and of St. George, nimbate and beardless, holding between them patriarchal cross on long shaft at the base of which a small globe. Emperor wears stemma, divitision and chlamys; saint wears short military tunic, breastplate and sagion, holds sword in l. hand.

Size 31.13 mm

Weight 4.0gm

DOC lists several variations 4 examples total with weights from 3.56gm to 4.45gm and sizes from 32 to 34 mm.
Simon
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1942 JOHN II ASPRON TRACHY NOMISA IV DOC 8c Variation II Constantinople SBCV-194224 viewsOBV IC XC in upper field.
Christ bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion, seated upon throne without back: , holds gospels in l. Single pellet at each end of cushion on throne.

REV Full length figure of emperor on l. and of St. George, nimbate and beardless, holding between them patriarchal cross on long shaft at the base of which a small globe. Emperor wears stemma, divitision and chlamys; saint wears short military tunic, breastplate and sagion, Emperor and Saint hold patriarchal cross on a long shaft at the base of which three steps.

Size 30.47mm

Weight 3.7gm

DOC lists 9 examples total with weights from 3.11gm to 4.40gm and sizes from 30 to 33 mm.
Simon
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1943 JOHN II BILLION TRACHY NOMISA IV DOC 9 Constantinople SBCV-194328 viewsOBV MP OV in field
Virgin nimbate, wearing tunic and maphorion, seated upon throne without back; holds beardless, nimbate head of Christ on breast.

REV Full length figure of emperor wearing stemma,short military tunic, and sagion; holds in right hand labarum on long shaft, and in left gl.cr

Size 28.71mm

Weight 3.6gm

DOC lists 3 examples total with weights from 3.59gm to 3.92gm and sizes from 29 to 30 mm.
Simon
1944.jpg
1944 JOHN II BILLION TRACHY NOMISA IV DOC 10 Constantinople SBCV-194433 viewsOBV IC XC in field
Bust of Christ bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion, holds Gospels in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision,collar piece and paneled loros of a simplified type; holds in r hand scepter cruciger and in l. gl.cr

Size 29.10

Weight 4.9gm

DOC lists 20 examples total with weights from 2.59gm to 5.00 gm and sizes from 28 to 30 mm. It has two variations A and B , both are equal in rarity , the difference is a stroke on shaft on type B.

This coin is very heavily silvered, it was part of a hoard that was once thought to be electrum, it is not, just very heavily silvered.
Simon
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1945 JOHN II METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1945 DOC 12 CLBC 3.4.1 24 viewsOBV Full length figure of Christ standing on a dais, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds Gospels in l. hand.

REV Full length figure of Emperor wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type. Holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. hand gl. cr.

Size 20.14mm

Weight 4.5.gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

DOC lists 27 examples with weights from 2,79gm to 4.69gm and sizes ranging from 18mm to 22mm
Simon
s-1945-1c.jpg
1945A JOHN II Metropolitan Tetarteron S-1945 DOC 12 CLBC 3.4.1 22 viewsOBV Full length figure of Christ standing on a dais, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds Gospels in l. hand.

REV Full length figure of Emperor wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type. Holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. hand gl. cr.

Size 17.87mm

Weight 4.3gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

DOC lists 27 examples with weights from 2,79gm to 4.69gm and sizes ranging from 18mm to 22mm

Interesting example because of the ancient graffiti on Christ, also the OC of the obverse gives the impression Christ is seated, he is not
Simon
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1945B JOHN II Metropolitan Tetarteron S-1945 DOC 12 CLBC 3.4.1 17 viewsOBV Full length figure of Christ standing on a dais, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds Gospels in l. hand.

REV Full length figure of Emperor wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type. Holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. hand gl. cr.

Size 18/19mm

Weight 3.8gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

DOC lists 27 examples with weights from 2,79gm to 4.69gm and sizes ranging from 18mm to 22mm

John IIs Metro tetartera are easy to come by, the do not have the same rarity as the other emperors metro issues. This one has been in my collection near the beginning , it grades as fine an evenly worn.
Simon
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1945C JOHN II METROPOLITIAN ( HALF?)TETARTERON S-1945 DOC 12 CLBC 3.4.1 51 viewsOBV Full length figure of Christ standing on a dais, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds Gospels in l. hand.

REV Full length figure of Emperor wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type. Holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. hand gl. cr.

Size 17mm

Weight 2.18 gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

DOC lists 27 examples with weights from 2,79gm to 4.69gm and sizes ranging from 18mm to 22mm
Simon
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1946 JOHN II METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1946 DOC 13 CLBC 3.4.2 49 viewsOBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans, wearing tunic and maphorion.

REV Full length figure of Emperor wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type. Holds in r. hand jeweled scepter and in l. hand gl. cr.

Size 17.71mm

Weight 4.2gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

DOC lists 9 examples with weights from 2.97gm to 4.57gm and sizes from 17mm to 20mm

Beautiful unique coin design that no other emperor duplicated.
Simon
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1946 JOHN II METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1946 DOC 13 CLBC 3.4.2 29 views
OBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans, wearing tunic and maphorion.

REV Full length figure of Emperor wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type. Holds in r. hand jeweled scepter and in l. hand gl. cr.

Size 19mm

Weight 3.2gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

DOC lists 9 examples with weights from 2.97gm to 4.57gm and sizes from 17mm to 20mm
Simon
s-1946-2c.jpg
1946a JOHN II METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1946 DOC 13 CLBC 3.4.224 views1946 JOHN II METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1946 DOC 13 CLBC 3.4.2

OBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans, wearing tunic and maphorion.

REV Full length figure of Emperor wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type. Holds in r. hand jeweled scepter and in l. hand gl. cr.

Size

Weight

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

DOC lists 9 examples with weights from 2.97gm to 4.57gm and sizes from 17mm to 20mm

Very old example in my collection, would grade as only fine. These coins rarely come to market and when they do the design does not command a high price. Mary was the patron of Constantinople, she is seen in much of the coinage minted there.
Simon
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1947 JOHN II HYPERPYRON NOMISMA IV DOC 1 Thessalonica First Coinage SBCV-194724 views JOHN II HYPERPYRON NOMISMA IV DOC 1 Thessalonica First Coinage SBCV-1947
OBV Christ Bearded and Nimbate , wearing tunic and kolobion, seated upon a throne without back: r. hand raised in benediction , holds gospels in l.

REV Half length figure of emperor on l. and of Virgin , holding between them Partriarcghal cross on long shaft. Emperor wears stemma, divitision, collar piece, and paneled loros of simplified type; holds anexikakia in r. hand. Virgin wears tunic and maphorion. Manus Dei in upeer left field.

Size 29mm

Weight 4.5gm

Thicker metal than Constantinople issue, very difficult to differentiate between the same issue from different mints.
Simon
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1953 JOHN II AE TETARTERON S-1953 DOC 14 CLBC 3.4.3 29 views
OBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds gospels open in l. hand

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys; holds in r. hand jeweled scepter on a long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 19/22mm

Weight 4.1gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC list 9 examples with weights ranging from 2.63gm to 4.19gm and sizes ranging from 19mm to 24mm

A personal favorite that has been in my collection for at least ten years. An ex Forum Coin.
1 commentsSimon
i3.jpg
1953A JOHN II AE TETARTERON S-1953 DOC 14 CLBC 3.4.3 53 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds gospels open in l. hand

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys; holds in r. hand jeweled scepter on a long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 17mm

Weight 3.8gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC list 9 examples with weights ranging from 2.63gm to 4.19gm and sizes ranging from 19mm to 24mm

This is a smaller flan example, still has the weight of a full Tetarteron but a smaller flan than most. The details on this coin give it a grade of VF , very pleasing example.
Simon
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1953B JOHN II AE Tetarteron S-1953 DOC 14 CLBC 3.4.3 24 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds gospels open in l. hand

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys; holds in r. hand jeweled scepter on a long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 21mm

Weight 6.1gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC list 9 examples with weights ranging from 2.63gm to 4.19gm and sizes ranging from 19mm to 24mm

This one is in the collection because of its heavy weight. I would grade it at VG/aF However this is the heaviest I have seen listed anywhere.
Simon
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1954 JOHN II AE HALF TETARTERON S-1954 DOC 16 CLBC 3.4.5 23 viewsOBV Full length figure of Christ standing on a dais, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds Gospels in l. hand.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys; holds in r. labrum headed scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 15.59mm

Weight 2.2gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

This is a choice example easily grading EF/VF

DOC lists 14 examples with weights from 1.16 gm. to 2.52 and sizes from 15mm to 19mm
Simon
sear1954.jpg
1954A JOHN II AE HALF TETARTERON S-1954 DOC 16 CLBC 3.4.5 56 viewsOBV Full length figure of Christ standing on a dais, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds Gospels in l. hand.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys; holds in r. labrum headed scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 16.38mm

Weight 1.7mm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 14 examples with weights from 1.16 gm. to 2.52 and sizes from 15mm to 19mm
Simon
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1954A JOHN II AE HALF TETARTERON S-1954 DOC 16 CLBC 3.4.54 viewsOBV Full length figure of Christ standing on a dais, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds Gospels in l. hand.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys; holds in r. labrum headed scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size

Weight

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

This is a nice example easily grading aEF/EF Off center slightly on OBV cutting off part Christs head.

DOC lists 14 examples with weights from 1.16 gm. to 2.52 and sizes from 15mm to 19mm
Simon
Sear1954A.jpg
1954B JOHN II AE HALF TETARTERON S-1954 DOC 16 CLBC 3.4.555 viewsOBV Full length figure of Christ standing on a dais, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds Gospels in l. hand.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys; holds in r. labrum headed scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 16.25mm

Weight 2.5gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today�s marketplace.

DOC lists 14 examples with weights from 1.16 gm. to 2.52 and sizes from 15mm to 19mm
Simon
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1954CV JOHN II AE HALF TETARTERON S-1954V DOC NL CLBC NL Hand Raised Variation 18 viewsOBV Full length figure of Christ standing on a dais, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; right hand raised high in benediction holds Gospels in l. hand.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys; holds in r. labrum headed scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.
This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

Size 19mm

Weight 2.6 gm

Several examples of this coin have been identified, the only variation is the R. hand is raised much higher than normal as if a blessing. I have seen enough examples of this coin with the variation for it to be an unlisted issue.
Simon
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1954DV JOHN II AE HALF TETARTERON S-1954V DOC NL CLBC NL 17 viewsOBV Full length figure of Christ standing on a dais, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; right hand raised high in benediction holds Gospels in l. hand.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys; holds in r. labrum headed scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.
This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

Size 16mm

Weight 1.9gm
This coin even though in poor condition is also an example of the Right arm raised .l. However it is of mixed consensus to this being a new variation
Simon
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1967 MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1967 DOC 14 CLBC 4.4.1 46 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, beardless and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds scroll n in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and collar piece, and paneled loros of simplified type; holds in r. labarum on long shaft , and in l. Globus cruciger

Size 18/17mm

Weight 2.4gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

This is one of my two examples of this coin and would grade as only fine, few years back a small batch of these in beautiful condition were on ebay but I lacked the funding to add to my collection. To this day nice examples or any examples are rarely seen.

DOC lists 14 examples with weights from 2.63mm to 4.8mm and sizes from 18mm to 20mm
Simon
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1967 MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1967 DOC 14 CLBC 4.4.1 22 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, beardless and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds scroll n in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and collar piece, and paneled loros of simplified type; holds in r. labarum on long shaft , and in l. Globus cruciger

Size 19mm

Weight 3.54gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

My nicest example, Both Christ and Manuel are depicted as young men.

DOC lists 14 examples with weights from 2.63mm to 4.8mm and sizes from 18mm to 20mm
Simon
s1967.jpg
1967A MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1967 DOC 14 CLBC 4.4.1 51 viewsOBV Bust of Christ, beardless and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds scroll n in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and collar piece, and paneled loros of simplified type; holds in r. labarum on long shaft , and in l. Globus cruciger

Size 17.97 mm

Weight 3.2 gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

Lightly nicer than my other example , the reverse would grade as aVF, the obv has an old collectors mark or museum mark on it.

DOC lists 14 examples with weights from 2.63mm to 4.8mm and sizes from 18mm to 20mm
Simon
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1968 MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1968 DOC 15 CLBC 4.4.2 49 viewsOBV Full length figure of the Virgin, nimbate, orans, wearing tunic, and maphorion turned to the r. Manus Dei (Hands of God) in upper field to r.

REV Full length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, jeweled loros of a simplified type and Saigon; holds in right hand scepter cruciger and in l. anexikakia

Size 16/20mm

Weight 3.2gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

DOC lists 34 examples with weights from 2.32 to 4.9gm and size from 17mm to 22mm
Simon
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1968B MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1968 DOC 15 CLBC 4.4.2 25 viewsOBV Full length figure of the Virgin, nimbate, orans, wearing tunic, and maphorion turned to the r. Manus Dei (Hands of God) in upper field to r.

REV Full length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, jeweled loros of a simplified type and Saigon; holds in right hand scepter cruciger and in l. anexikakia

Size 17/20mm

Weight 3.2gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

DOC lists 34 examples with weights from 2.32 to 4.9gm and size from 17mm to 22mm

It is a shame for the cut at the head of Manuel, this coin would grade EF otherwise.
Simon
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1968CV MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1968v DOC NL A CLBC 4.4.2A 30 viewsOBV Full length figure of the Virgin, nimbate, orans ,wearing tunic, and maphorion turned to the r. Manus Dei (Hands of God) in upper field to r.

REV Full length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, jeweled loros of a simplified type and Saigon; holds in right a labrum headed scepter and in l. anexikakia

Size 19.84mm

Weight 3.2gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues
Simon
c5.jpg
1968d MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON SBCV-1968 DOC 15 CLBC 4.4.232 viewsOBV Full length figure of the Virgin, nimbate, orans, wearing tunic, and maphorion turned to the r. Manus Dei (Hands of God) in upper field to r.

REV Full length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, jeweled loros of a simplified type and Saigon; holds in right hand scepter cruciger and in l. anexikakia

Size 20.53mm

Weight 4.2gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

DOC lists 34 examples with weights from 2.32 to 4.9gm and size from 17mm to 22mm

The coins only flaw, wear on the Virgins face. Other that near perfect centering and a wonderful reverse strike.
2 commentsSimon
k6~0.jpg
1968DV MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1968v DOC NL A CLBC 4.4.2A 5 views
OBV Full length figure of the Virgin, nimbate, orans ,wearing tunic, and maphorion turned to the r. Manus Dei (Hands of God) in upper field to r.

REV Full length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, jeweled loros of a simplified type and Saigon; holds in right a labrum headed scepter and in l. anexikakia

Size 18mm

Weight 3.5gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues
Simon
sear1968v3.jpg
1968DV MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1968v DOC NL A CLBC 4.4.2A 55 viewsOBV Full length figure of the Virgin, nimbate, orans ,wearing tunic, and maphorion turned to the r. Manus Dei (Hands of God) in upper field to r.

REV Full length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, jeweled loros of a simplified type and Saigon; holds in right a labrum headed scepter and in l. anexikakia

Size 18/19.7mm

Weight 3.4gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues
Simon
i5~0.jpg
1968f MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON SBCV-1968 variation patriarchal cross 5 viewsOBV Full length figure of the Virgin, nimbate, orans, wearing tunic, and maphorion turned to the r. Manus Dei (Hands of God) in upper field to r.

REV Full length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, jeweled loros of a simplified type and Saigon; holds in right hand patriarchal cross and in l. anexikakia

Size 20.53mm

Weight 4.2gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

DOC lists 34 examples with weights from 2.32 to 4.9gm and size from 17mm to 22mm

Tis is the only type I have seen with this type cross.
Simon
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1969B MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1969 DOC 16 CLBC 4.4.3 48 viewsOBV Full length figure of Christ standing on a dais, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; right hand raised high in benediction holds Gospels in l. hand. Pellets in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV Full length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, jeweled loros of a simplified type and Saigon; holds in right a labrum on a long shaft. On which X and in l. globus cruciger


Size 18.19 mm

Weight 3.6gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

DOC lists 11 examples with weights from 2.76 to 4.14 gm and sizes from 18mm to 20mm
Simon
s1969b.jpg
1969B MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1969 DOC 16 CLBC 4.4.3 57 viewsOBV Full length figure of Christ standing on a dais, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; right hand raised high in benediction holds Gospels in l. hand. Pellets in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV Full length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, jeweled loros of a simplified type and Saigon; holds in right a labrum on a long shaft. On which X and in l. globus cruciger


Size 21.5mm

Weight 4.2gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

DOC lists 11 examples with weights from 2.76 to 4.14 gm and sizes from 18mm to 20mm

This is my second example added to the collection, condition is a bit sad VG/ aF however it shows the other details my other example lacks. This is the hardest of the Manuel tetartera to acquire.
Simon
s-1969-1c.jpg
1969C MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1969 DOC 16 CLBC 4.4.3 Imitation?63 viewsOBV Full length figure of Christ standing on a dais, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; right hand raised high in benediction holds Gospels in l. hand. Pellets in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV Full length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, jeweled loros of a simplified type and Saigon; holds in right a labrum on a long shaft. On which X and in l. globus cruciger


Size 19.84

Weight 1.8gm

Not certain but I now believe this to be an imitation, the biggest reason for this is the low weight and thin flan. Does not have the look of a Constantinople minted coin. This coin was found in Cyprus.
1 commentsSimon
IMG_4404~0.jpg
197. Arcadius (383-408 A.D.)18 viewsAv.: DN ARCADIVS PF AVGVSTVS
Rv.: VIRTVS EXERCITI
Left: chi-rho
Ex.: CONS gamma

AE Maiorina Ø21-23 / 5.5g
RIC IX 83c Constantinople
Juancho
b3~0.jpg
1970 MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1970 DOC 17CLBC 4.4.4 26 viewsOBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans wearing tunic and maphorion.

REV. Bust of emperor bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum headed and scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 18/22mm

Weight 3.3gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

DOC lists 18 examples with weights ranging from 2.52 to 4.87 and sizes from 17mm to 23mm
Simon
s1970b.jpg
1970A MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1970 DOC 17CLBC 4.4.452 viewsOBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans wearing tunic and maphorion.

REV. Bust of emperor bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum headed and scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 22/24.76mm

Weight 4.1gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

DOC lists 18 examples with weights ranging from 2.52 to 4.87 and sizes from 17mm to 23mm
Simon
g5~0.jpg
1970B MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1970 DOC 17CLBC 4.4.4 21 viewsOBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans wearing tunic and maphorion.

REV. Bust of emperor bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum headed and scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 16/19mm

Weight 4.6gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.)

DOC lists 18 examples with weights ranging from 2.52 to 4.87 and sizes from 17mm to 23mm
Simon
s-1970c.jpg
1970c MANUEL METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1970 DOC 17CLBC 4.4.4 21 viewsOBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans wearing tunic and maphorion.

REV. Bust of emperor bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum headed and scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 21.07mm

Weight 3.5gm

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.)

I know CLBC issues this as Rarity level 1, I very much disagree, they are not that easily found. Using his scale I would call it a 3.

This example is very worn and light weight. Still attractive to some :)

DOC lists 18 examples with weights ranging from 2.52 to 4.87 and sizes from 17mm to 23mm
Simon
v5.jpg
1975 MANUEL AE Tetarteron S-1975 DOC 18 CLBC 4.4.5. 36 viewsOBV Bust of St. George facing beardless wearing nimbus, tunic, cuirass and sagion and holding spear in r. hand and in l. hand shield.

REV Bust of emperor, bearded , wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum headed scepter, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 22.48mm

Weight. 4.9gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 23 examples with weights ranging from 2.78gm to 7.16gm with sizes from 19mm to 24mm.
Simon
Sear1975E.jpg
1975A MANUEL AE Tetarteron S-1975 DOC 18 CLBC 4.4.5. 54 viewsOBV Bust of St. George facing beardless wearing nimbus, tunic, cuirass and sagion and holding spear in r. hand and in l. hand shield.

REV Bust of emperor, bearded , wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum headed scepter, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 20.83

Weight. 6.00gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 23 examples with weights ranging from 2.78gm to 7.16gm with sizes from 19mm to 24mm.
Simon
h5~1.jpg
1975a MANUEL AE Tetarteron S-1975 DOC 18 CLBC 4.4.5. 10 views
OBV Bust of St. George facing beardless wearing nimbus, tunic, cuirass and sagion and holding spear in r. hand and in l. hand shield.

REV Bust of emperor, bearded , wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum headed scepter, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 22.06mm

Weight. 4.7gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

Very nice example of a common coin. aEF

DOC lists 23 examples with weights ranging from 2.78gm to 7.16gm with sizes from 19mm to 24mm.
Simon
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1975B MANUEL AE Tetarteron S-1975 DOC 18 CLBC 4.4.5.24 views
OBV Bust of St. George facing beardless wearing nimbus, tunic, cuirass and sagion and holding spear in r. hand and in l. hand shield.

REV Bust of emperor, bearded , wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum headed scepter, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 19.93mm

Weight. 5.1gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 23 examples with weights ranging from 2.78gm to 7.16gm with sizes from 19mm to 24mm
Simon
h5~0.jpg
1975C MANUEL AE Tetarteron S-1975 DOC 18 CLBC 4.4.5.24 viewsOBV Bust of St. George facing beardless wearing nimbus, tunic, cuirass and sagion and holding spear in r. hand and in l. hand shield.

REV Bust of emperor, bearded , wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum headed scepter, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 23mm

Weight. 4.3gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 23 examples with weights ranging from 2.78gm to 7.16gm with sizes from 19mm to 24mm

This is a very nice example with large but broken flan.
Simon
sear1975f.jpg
1975F MANUEL AE Tetarteron S-1975 DOC 18 CLBC 4.4.5.56 viewsOBV Bust of St. George facing beardless wearing nimbus, tunic, cuirass and sagion and holding spear in r. hand and in l. hand shield.

REV Bust of emperor, bearded , wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum headed scepter, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 22.06mm

Weight. 4.7gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

Very nice example of a common coin. aEF

DOC lists 23 examples with weights ranging from 2.78gm to 7.16gm with sizes from 19mm to 24mm.
Simon
w3.jpg
1976 MANUEL AE TETARTERON S-1976 DOC 19 CLBC 4.4.6 51 views
OBV Radiate cross on three steps.

REV. Half-length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum on laft shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 23.17mm

Weight 5.1gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace

Very nice example on a large flan.
.
DOC lists 24 examples with weights from 18mm to 25mm and weights from 2.55 to 6.54 gm
Simon
e3.jpg
1976A MANUEL AE TETARTERON S-1976 DOC 19 CLBC 4.4.6 32 viewsOBV Radiate cross on three steps.

REV. Half-length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum on laft shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 17/20mm

Weight 4.5gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace

Older coin in my collection, very nice relief on both sides.
.
DOC lists 24 examples with weights from 18mm to 25mm and weights from 2.55 to 6.54 gm.
Simon
s-1976c.jpg
1976b MANUEL AE TETARTERON S-1976 DOC 19 CLBC 4.4.6 14 viewsOBV Radiate cross on three steps.

REV. Half-length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum on laft shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 22.93mm

Weight 3.5gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace

Good example
Simon
h7.jpg
1976B MANUEL AE TETARTERON S-1976 DOC 19 CLBC 4.4.6 6 viewsOBV Radiate cross on three steps.

REV. Half-length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum on laft shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 24mm

Weight 5.78gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace

Very nice example on a large flan.
.
DOC lists 24 examples with weights from 18mm to 25mm and weights from 2.55 to 6.54 gm
Simon
k6.jpg
1977 MANUEL AE HALF TETARTERON S-1977 DOC 20 CLBC 4.4.719 views
OBV Small neat letters

REV Bust of emperor, beardless, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece ( Most frequently decorated 5 jewels) and paneled loros of simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 16.40mm

Weight 2.8gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.
DOC lists 12 examples with weights ranging from 2.04gm to 2.77 gm with sizes from 18mm to 21mm.

The rarer of the two monograms of Manuel, this coin is always heavier than the the other monogram coin. This example has a beautiful darkened highlights on a copper base.
Simon
s-1977-2c.jpg
1977A MANUEL AE HALF TETARTERON S-1977 DOC 20 CLBC 4.4.7 17 viewsOBV Small neat letters

REV Bust of emperor, beardless, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece ( Most frequently decorated 5 jewels) and paneled loros of simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 18.34mm

Weight 2.7gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.
DOC lists 12 examples with weights ranging from 2.04gm to 2.77 gm with sizes from 18mm to 21mm.

The rarer of the two monograms of Manuel, this coin is always heavier than the the other monogram coin. This example is actually a black patina.
Simon
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1977a MANUEL AE HALF TETARTERON S-1977 DOC 20 CLBC 4.4.7 24 viewsOBV Small neat letters Monogram Sear 57

REV Bust of emperor, beardless, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece ( Most frequently decorated 5 jewels) and paneled loros of simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 18.88

Weight 2.89gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 12 examples with weights ranging from 2.04gm to 2.77 gm with sizes from 18mm to 21mm.

Ex forum coin!
Simon
c3.jpg
1978A MANUEL AE HALF TETARTERON S-1978 DOC 21 CLBC 4.4.8 33 viewsOBV Bust of Christ beardless and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds scrolls in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross
.
REV Full length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing uncertain dress (stemma, short military tunic, breastplate and sagion?) holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 19.92mm

Weight 2.3 gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 3 examples with weights ranging from 2.66 gm to 2.75 gm with sizes all 20mm

This coin differs from S-1981 not only by size but DOC notes a beard on Christ on S-1981 where as S-1978 is beardless.
Simon
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1979 MANUEL AE HALF TETARTERON S-1979 DOC 22 CLBC 4.4.11 56 viewsOBV Large, often ill formed letters

REV Bust of emperor, beardless, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece ( Most frequently decorated with 6 jewels) and paneled loros of simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 14.5/17mm

Weight 2.0gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

This coin is in beautiful condition, the centering is off but as you can see a lovely example. Not rare but in this condition they are.

DOC lists 27 examples with weights ranging from 1.10gm to 2.96 gm with sizes from 14mm to 18mm.
Simon
s1979.jpg
1979A MANUEL AE HALF TETARTERON S-1979 DOC 22 CLBC 4.4.11 Imitation ?92 viewsOBV Large, often ill formed letters

REV Bust of emperor, beardless, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece ( Most frequently decorated with 6 jewels) and paneled loros of simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 12.54mm

Weight 1.1gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 27 examples with weights ranging from 1.10gm to 2.96 gm with sizes from 14mm to 18mm.


1 commentsSimon
3k.jpg
1979B MANUEL AE HALF TETARTERON S-1979 DOC 22 CLBC 4.4.11 Imitation? 30 viewsOBV Large, often ill formed letters

REV Bust of emperor, beardless, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece ( Most frequently decorated with 6 jewels) and paneled loros of simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 16mm

Weight 2.4gm

This style is very unique, I do not believe it was minted at one of the main mints, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 27 examples with weights ranging from 1.10gm to 2.96 gm with sizes from 14mm to 18mm.
Simon
1979.jpg
1979s MANUEL AE HALF TETARTERON S-1979 DOC 22 CLBC 4.4.11 29 viewsOBV Large, often ill formed letters

REV Bust of emperor, beardless, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece ( Most frequently decorated with 6 jewels) and paneled loros of simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 17.33mm

Weight 2.59 gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

This coin is good Very fine, lightly circulated. I believe this to be a perfect example.

DOC lists 27 examples with weights ranging from 1.10gm to 2.96 gm with sizes from 14mm to 18mm.
Simon
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1980 MANUEL AE HALF TETARTERON S-1980 DOC 23 CLBC 4.4.9 39 viewsOBV Bust of St. George, beardless and nimbate, wearing tunic, breastplate, and Saigon; holds in r. hand spear, and in l. shield.

REV Bust of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum headed scepter, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 17.09 mm

Weight 2.1gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 7 examples with weights ranging from .91 gm to 2.26 gm with sizes from 14mm to 17mm.
Simon
S1980A.jpg
1980A MANUEL AE HALF TETARTERON S-1980 DOC 23 CLBC 4.4.9 60 viewsOBV Bust of St. George, beardless and nimbate, wearing tunic, breastplate, and Saigon; holds in r. hand spear, and in l. shield.

REV Bust of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum headed scepter, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 15.95mm

Weight 1.2gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 7 examples with weights ranging from .91 gm to 2.26 gm with sizes from 14mm to 17mm.
Simon
Sear1980B.jpg
1980B MANUEL AE HALF TETARTERON S-1980 DOC 23 CLBC 4.4.9 51 viewsOBV Bust of St. George, beardless and nimbate, wearing tunic, breastplate, and Saigon; holds in r. hand spear, and in l. shield.

REV Bust of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum headed scepter, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 15.01mm

Weight 1.6 gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 7 examples with weights ranging from .91 gm to 2.26 gm with sizes from 14mm to 17mm.

This coin is very similar to Griersons Plate coin.
Simon
a5.jpg
1980d MANUEL AE HALF TETARTERON S-1980 DOC 23 CLBC 4.4.9 22 viewsOBV Bust of St. George, beardless and nimbate, wearing tunic, breastplate, and Saigon; holds in r. hand spear, and in l. shield.

REV Bust of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum headed scepter, and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 17.30 mm

Weight 2.4gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

This example is beautiful considering its size. I would grade aEF , rarity 1/5 Common coin , uncommon condition.

DOC lists 7 examples with weights ranging from .91 gm to 2.26 gm with sizes from 14mm to 17mm.
Simon
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1981 MANUEL AE HALF TETARTERON S-1981 DOC 24 CLBC 4.4.12 17 views

OBV Bust of Christ bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; holds scrolls in l. hand. Pellet in each limb of nimbus cross.

REV Full length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing uncertain dress (stemma, short military tunic, breastplate and sagion?) holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 17.8mm

Weight 2.0gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron.These coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 19 examples with weights ranging from 1.28 gm to 2.75 gm with sizes from 16mm to 18mm.

Ex Forum Coin.
Simon
g7.jpg
1982 MANUEL AE HALF TETARTERON S-1982 DOC 25 CLBC 4.4.10 18 views

OBV Radiate cross on three steps

REV Half length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 14/16mm

Weight 2.0gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.
DOC lists 6 examples with weights ranging from 1.26 gm to 2.24 gm with sizes from 16mm to 19mm.

This example is excellent , one of the few tetartera that can be listed as EF The portrait of Manuel on this coin is exceptional, especially considering its size.
Simon
1f.jpg
1982A MANUEL AE HALF TETARTERON S-1982 DOC 25 CLBC 4.4.10 34 viewsOBV Radiate cross on three steps

REV Half length figure of emperor, bearded, wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of simplified type; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 18/17mm

Weight 2.2gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 6 examples with weights ranging from 1.26 gm to 2.24 gm with sizes from 16mm to 19mm.

I am uncertain if this is an official issue, Many of Alexius and Manuel's tetartera were imitated as late as the 1300's , my only reason to suspect this coin is style , the weight seems correct for the issue
Simon
r3.jpg
1986 ANDRONICUS METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1986 DOC 5 CLBC 5.4.1 65 viewsOBV Full length figure of Virgin nimbate, wearing tunic and maphorion, standing on dais, holds nimbate beardless, nimbate head of Christ on breast.

REV Full length figure of emperor on l. crowned by Christ bearded and nimbate. Emperor wears stemma, divitision, and chlamys holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. anexikakia, Christ wearing tunic and kolobion, holds gospels in l. hand.

Size 19.51mm

Weight 3.3 gm

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content added but for Andronicus I can’t find how much under Manuel it fluctuated between 1% and 4% however by this time I would assume a decline. By the time of Isaac II the amount was 1% to 2% these still were more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

DOC lists 14 examples with weights from 2.49gm to 4.54gm and sizes from 18mm to 23mm

I have had this one from the early years of my collection, it far surpasses my other example
Simon
z5~0.jpg
1986 ANDRONICUS METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON SBCV-1986 DOC 5 CLBC 5.4.1 11 viewsOBV Full length figure of Virgin nimbate, wearing tunic and maphorion, standing on dais, holds nimbate beardless, nimbate head of Christ on breast.

REV Full length figure of emperor on l. crowned by Christ bearded and nimbate. Emperor wears stemma, divitision, and chlamys holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. anexikakia, Christ wearing tunic and kolobion, holds gospels in l. hand.

Size 20.84

Weight 4.55gm

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content added but for Andronicus I can’t find how much under Manuel it fluctuated between 1% and 4% however by this time I would assume a decline. By the time of Isaac II the amount was 1% to 2% these still were more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

DOC lists 14 examples with weights from 2.49gm to 4.54gm and sizes from 18mm to 23mm

I have had this one from the early years of my collection, it far surpasses my other example
Simon
s-1986b.jpg
1986A ANDRONICUS METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1986 DOC 5 CLBC 5.4.1 57 views OBV Full length figure of Virgin nimbate, wearing tunic and maphorion, standing on dais, holds nimbate beardless, nimbate head of Christ on breast.

REV Full length figure of emperor on l. crowned by Christ bearded and nimbate. Emperor wears stemma, divitision, and chlamys holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. anexikakia, Christ wearing tunic and kolobion, holds gospels in l. hand.

Size 20/16mm

Weight 4.2gm

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content added but for Andronicus I can’t find how much under Manuel it fluctuated between 1% and 4% however by this time I would assume a decline. By the time of Isaac II the amount was 1% to 2% these still were more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

In todays marketplace this is a true rarity. This one is flawed by scrapes from time.

DOC lists 14 examples with weights from 2.49gm to 4.54gm and sizes from 18mm to 23mm


Simon
s-1986.jpg
1986C ANDRONICUS METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1986 DOC 5 CLBC 5.4.1 35 viewsOBV Full length figure of Virgin nimbate, wearing tunic and maphorion, standing on dais, holds nimbate beardless, nimbate head of Christ on breast.

REV Full length figure of emperor on l. crowned by Christ bearded and nimbate. Emperor wears stemma, divitision, and chlamys holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. anexikakia, Christ wearing tunic and kolobion, holds gospels in l. hand.

Size

Weight

Metropolitan Issues were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content added but for Andronicus I can’t find how much under Manuel it fluctuated between 1% and 4% however by this time I would assume a decline. By the time of Isaac II the amount was 1% to 2% these still were more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Metropolitan issues are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

DOC lists 14 examples with weights from 2.49gm to 4.54gm and sizes from 18mm to 23mm

This is a new acquisition as par of an old collection, not great but some details not usually seen.
Simon
1c~3.jpg
1987 ANDRONICUS AE TETARTERON S-1987 DOC 6 CLBC 5.4.2 58 viewsOBV Bust of Virgin nimbate orans, wearing tunic and maphorion; beardless, nimbate head of Christ on breast.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma, skaramangion or divitision, and sagion; holds in r. hand labarum headed scepter, and in left globus cruciger.

Size 22mm

Weight 5.9gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

A really nice example much heaver than norm, beautiful portrait of Virgin.

DOC lists 6 examples with weights ranging from 2.54 gm to 4.91 gm with sizes from 20mm to 23mm.
1 commentsSimon
f6.jpg
1987A ANDRONICUS AE TETARTERON S-1987 DOC 6 CLBC 5.4.2 31 views

OBV Bust of Virgin nimbate orans, wearing tunic and maphorion; beardless, nimbate head of Christ on breast.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma, skaramangion or divitision, and sagion; holds in r. hand labarum headed scepter, and in left globus cruciger.

Size 21.96 mm

Weight 5.1gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 6 examples with weights ranging from 2.54 gm to 4.91 gm with sizes from 20mm to 23mm

One of my first tetartera, still a favorite.
1 commentsSimon
sear1989c.jpg
1989A ANDRONICUS HALF TETARTERON S-1989 DOC 8 CLBC 5.4.349 viewsOBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans, wearing tunic and maphorion; beardless. Nimbate head of Christ on breast.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma, skaramangion or divitision and sagion; holds in r hand labrum headed scepter, and in l. globus cruciger.

Size 15.48

Weight 2.5m

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 3 examples with weights ranging from 1.38 gm to 2.46 gm with sizes from 15mm to 18mm.

This is my third example of this Very rare coin, it has a chipped patina but detail is a bit better than my other examples.
Simon
b6.jpg
1989a ANDRONICUS HALF TETARTERON S-1989 DOC 8 CLBC 5.4.3 33 views
OBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans, wearing tunic and maphorion; beardless. Nimbate head of Christ on breast.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma, skaramangion or divitision and sagion; holds in r hand labrum headed scepter, and in l. globus cruciger.

Size 22 mm

Weight 3.4 gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

Size is off on this example but the die size is 12mm making it a half tetartera, it is aEF example, again large flan making it an excellent example.

DOC lists 3 examples with weights ranging from 1.38 gm to 2.46 gm with sizes from 15mm to 18mm.
1 commentsSimon
sear1989B.jpg
1989B ANDRONICUS HALF TETARTERON S-1989 DOC 8 CLBC 5.4.344 viewsOBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans, wearing tunic and maphorion; beardless. Nimbate head of Christ on breast.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma, skaramangion or divitision and sagion; holds in r hand labrum headed scepter, and in l. globus cruciger.

Size 15.32

Weight 2.0gm

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron.The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

DOC lists 3 examples with weights ranging from 1.38 gm to 2.46 gm with sizes from 15mm to 18mm.

This is my third example of this Very rare coin, well worn but all three examples have a die diameter of 12mm
Simon
JulianIIAE3VotX.jpg
1en Julian II "Apostate"26 views360-363

AE3

Pearl-diademed, helmeted, cuirassed bust left, holding shield & spear, D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG
VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath, palm branch-BSIS-palm branch in ex [?].

RIC 415

According to Zosimus: Constantius, having so well succeeded in his design against Vetranio, marched against Magnentius, having first conferred the title of Caesar on Gallus, the son of his uncle, and brother to Julian who was afterwards emperor, and given him in marriage his sister Constantia. . . . CONSTANTIUS, after having acted towards Gallus Caesar in the manner I have related, left Pannonia to proceed into Italy. . . . He scarcely thought himself capable of managing affairs at this critical period. He was unwilling, however, to associate any one with himself in the government, because he so much desired to rule alone, and could esteem no man his friend. Under these circumstances he was at a loss how to act. It happened, however, that when the empire was in the greatest danger, Eusebia, the wife of Constantius, who was a woman of extraordinary learning, and of greater wisdom than her sex is usually endowed with, advised him to confer the government of the nations beyond the Alps on Julianus Caesar, who was brother to Gallus, and grandson to Constantius. As she knew that the emperor was suspicious of all his kindred, she thus circumvented him. She observed to him, that Julian was a young man unacquainted with the intrigues of state, having devoted himself totally to his studies; and that he was wholly inexperienced in worldly business. That on this account he would be more fit for his purpose than any other person. That either he would be fortunate, and his success would be attributed to the emperor's conduct, or that he would fail and perish; and that thus Constantius would have none of the imperial family to succeed to him.

Constantius, having approved her advice, sent for Julian from Athens, where he lived among the philosophers, and excelled all his masters in every kind of learning. Accordingly, Julian returning from Greece into Italy, Constantius declared him Caesar, gave him in marriage his sister Helena, and sent him beyond the Alps. . . .

Constantius, having thus disposed of Julian, marched himself into Pannonia and Moesia, and having there suppressed the Quadi and the Sarmatians, proceeded to the east, and was provoked to war by the inroads of the Persians. Julian by this time had arrived beyond the Alps into the Gallic nations which he was to rule. Perceiving that the Barbarians continued committing the same violence, Eusebia, for the same reasons as before, persuaded Constantius to place the entire management of those countries into the hands of Julian. . . . Julian finding the military affairs of Gallia Celtica in a very ruinous state, and that the Barbarians pased the Rhine without any resistance, even almost as far as the sea-port towns, he took a survey of the remaining parts of the enemy. And understanding that the people of those parts were terrified at the very name of the Barbarians, while those whom Constantius had sent along with him, who were not more than three hundred and sixty, knew nothing more, as he used to say, than how to say their prayers, he enlisted as many more as he could and took in a great number of volunteers. He also provided arms, and finding a quantity of old weapons in some town he fitted them up, and distributed them among the soldiers. The scouts bringing him intelligence, that an immense number of Barbarians had crossed the river near the city of Argentoratum (Strasburg) which stands on the Rhine, he no sooner heard of it, than he led forth his army with the greatest speed, and engaging with the enemy gained such a victory as exceeds all description.

After these events he raised a great army to make war on the whole German nation; He was opposed however by the Barbarians in vast numbers. Caesar therefore would not wait while they came up to him, but crossed the Rhine, preferring that their country should be the seat of war, and not that of the Romans, as by that means the cities would escape being again pillaged by the Barbarians. A most furious battle therefore took place; a great number of the Barbarians being slain on the field of battle, while the rest fled, and were pursued by Caesar into the Hercynian forest, and many of them killed. . . .

But while Julian was at Parisium, a small town in Germany, the soldiers, being ready to march, continued at supper till midnight in a place near the palace, which they so called there. They were as yet ignorant of any design against Caesar [by Constantius], when some tribunes, who began to suspect the contrivance against him, privately distributed a number of anonymous billets among the soldiers, in which they represented to them, that Caesar, by his judicious conduct had so managed affairs, that almost all of them had erected trophies over the Barbarians ; that he had always fought like a private soldier, and was now in extreme danger from the emperor, who would shortly deprive him of his whole army, unless they prevented it. Some of the soldiers having read these billets, and published the intrigue to the whole army, all were highly enraged. They suddenly rose from their seats in great commotion, and with the cups yet in their hands went to the palace. Breaking open the doors without ceremony, they brought out Caesar, and lifting him on a shield declared him emperor and Augustus. They then, without attending to his reluctance, placed a diadem upon his head. . . .

Arriving at Naisus, he consulted the soothsayers what measures to pursue. As the entrails signified that he must stay there for some time, he obeyed, observing likewise the time that was mentioned in his dream. When this, according to the motion of the planets, was arrived, a party of horsemen arrived from Constantinople at Naisus, with intelligence that Constantius was dead, and that the armies desired Julian to be emperor. Upon this he accepted what the gods had bestowed upon him, and proceeded on his journey. On his arrival at. Byzantium, he was received with joyful acclamations. . . .

[After slashing through Persia and crossing the Tigris,] they perceived the Persian army, with which they engaged, and having considerably the advantage, they killed a great number of Persians. Upon the following day, about noon, the Persians drew up in a large body, and once more attacked the rear of the Roman army. The Romans, being at that time out of their ranks, were surprised and alarmed at the suddenness of the attack, yet made a stout and spirited defence. The emperor, according to his custom, went round the army, encouraging them to fight with ardour. When by this means all were engaged, the emperor, who sometimes rode to the commanders and tribunes, and was at other times among the private soldiers, received a wound in the heat of the engagement, and was borne on a shield to his tent. He survived only till midnight. He then expired, after having nearly subverted the Persian empire.

Note: Julian favored the pagan faith over Christianity and was tarred by the church as "the apostate."
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JovianIIAE3VotMult.jpg
1eo Jovian85 views363-364

AE 3, Heraclea

Diademed bust left, draped & cuirassed, D N IOVIANVS P F AVG
VOT V MVLT X in wreath, Mintmark HERACA

RIC 110A

Zosimus recorded: A meeting of the officers and soldiers was afterwards convened, in order to appoint a successor to the empire : since it would be impossible for them without a ruler to avoid the dangers to which they were exposed in the midst of an enemy's country. The general voice was in favour of Jovianus, the son of Varronianus, tribune of the domestic forces. When Jovian had assumed the purple and the diadem, he directed his course homewards with all possible speed. . . . They then marched forward four days, continually harassed by the enemy, who followed them when they were proceeding, but fled when the Romans offered any resistance. At length, having gained some distance of the enemy, they resolved to crops the Tigris. For this purpose they fastened skins together, and floated over. When the greater part had gained the opposite bank, the commanders crossed over in safety with the remainder. The Persians, however, still accompanied them, and followed them with a large army so assiduously, that the Romans were in perpetual danger, both from the unfavourable circumstances in which they were placed, and from the want, of provisions. Although the Roman army was in this condition, the Persians were willing to treat for peace, and for that purpose sent Surenas with other |90 officers to the Roman camp. Jovian, upon hearing this, sent to them Sallustius, prefect of the court, together with Aristaeus, who, after some discussion, agreed on a truce for thirty years. The conditions were, that the Romans should give up to the Persians the country of the Rabdiceni, and that of the Candueni, Rhemeni, and Zaleni, besides fifteen castles in those provinces, with the inhabitants, lands, cattle, and all their property ; that Nisibis should be surrendered without its inhabitants, who were to be transplanted into whatever colony the Remans pleased. The Persians also deprived the Romans of great part of Armenia, leaving them but a very small part of it. The truce having been concluded on these conditions, and ratified on both sides, the Romans had an opportunity of returning home unmolested, neither party offering or sustaining any injury, either by open force; or secret machination.

Jovian marched through all the towns in great speed, because they were so filled with grief [because they were being given over to Persian rule], that the inhabitants could not look patiently on him; such being the custom and disposition of those countries. Taking with him the imperial guard, he proceeded to Antioch. . . . Jovian now turning his attention to the affairs of government, made various arrangements, and sent Lucilianus his father-in-law, Procopius, and Valentinian, who was afterwards emperor, to the armic.s in Pannoriia, to inform them of the death of Julian, and of his being chosen emperor. The Bavarians who were at Sirmium, and were left there for its protection, as soon as they received the news, put to death Lucilianus who brought such unwelcome intelligence, without regard to his relationship to the emperor. Such was the respect they had to Jovian's relations, that Valentinian himself only escaped from the death they intended to inflict on him. Jovianus proceeding from Antioch towards Constantinople, suddenly fell sick at Dadostana in Bithynia, and died after a reign of eight months, in which short time he had not been able to render the public any essential service.
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ValentinianAE3GlorRom.jpg
1ep Valentinian22 views364-375

AE3

Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right , D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG
Emperor in military dress, advancing right, head left, holding labarum, dragging captive behind him. No fieldmarks. Mintmark: dot GSISC, GLORIA ROMANORVM

RIC 5a

According to Zosimus: Several discussions were held among the soldiers and their officers, and various persons were nominated. At length Sallustius, the prefect of the court, was unanimously elected. He excused himself on the pretext of his advanced age, which disabled him from being of service in the present critical circumstances. They then desired that his son might be emperor in lieu of himself. But his son he told them was too young, and from that as well as other causes unable to sustain the weight of an imperial diadem. They thus failed in their wish to appoint so distinguished a person, who was the most worthy of the age. They therefore elected Valentinian, a native of Cibalis in Pannonia. He was an excellent soldier, but extremely illiterate. They sent for him, he being then at some distance: and the state was not long without a ruler. Upon his arrival at the army, at Nicaea in Bithynia, he assumed the imperial authority, and proceeded forward. . . .

I have now to state, that while Valentinian was on his journey towards Constantinople, he was seized with a distemper, which increased his natural choleric temper to a degree of cruelty, and even to madness, so that he falsely suspected his sickness to proceed from some charm or poison which Julian's friends had prepared for him through malice. Accusations to that effect were drawn up against some distinguished persons, which were set aside by the discretion of Sallustius, who still was prefect of the court. After his distemper abated, he proceeded from Nicaea to Constantinople. The army and his friends in that city advised him to choose an associate in the empire, that if occasion should require, he might have some one to assist him, and prevent their again suffering as at the death of Julian. He complied with their advice, and after consideration, selected his brother Valens, whom he thought most likely to prove faithful to him. He declared him associate in the empire. . . . Affairs being thus disposed, Valentinian deemed it most prudent to place the east as far as Egypt, Bithynia, and Thrace, under the care of his brother, and to take charge of Illyricum himself. From thence he designed to proceed to Italy, and to retain in his own possession all the cities in that country, and the countries beyond the Alps, with Spain, Britain, and Africa. The empire being thus divided, Valentinian began to govern more rigorously, correcting the faults of the magistrates. He was very severe in the collection of the imposts, and particularly in observing that the soldiers were duly paid. . . .

Meantime the Barbarians beyond the Rhine, who while Julian lived held the Roman name in terror, and were contented to remain quiet in their own territories, as soon as they heard of his death, immediately marched out of their own country, and prepared for a war with the Romans. Valentinian. on bring informed of this, made a proper disposition of his forces, and placed suitable garrisons in all the towns along the Rhine. Valentinian was enabled to make these arrangements by his experience in military affairs. . . . [T] he emperor Valentinian, having favourably disposed the affairs of Germany, made provisions for the future security of the Celtic nations. . . . Valentinian was now attacked by a disease which nearly cost him his life. Upon his recovery the countries requested him to appoint a successor, lest at his decease the commonwealth should be in danger. To this the emperor consented, and declared his son Gratian emperor and his associate in the government, although he was then very young, and not yet capable of the management of affairs. . . .

Valentinian, thinking he had sufficiently secured himself from a German war, acted towards his subjects with great severity, exacting from them exorbitant tributes, such as they had never before paid; under pretence that the military expenditure compelled him to have recourse to the public. Having thus acquired universal hatred, he became still more severe; nor would he enquire into the conduct of the magistrates, but was envious of all whe had the reputation of leading a blameless life. . . . For this cause, the Africans, who could not endure the excessive avarice of the person who held the military command in Mauritania, gave the purple robe to Firmus, and proclaimed him emperor. This doubtless gave much uneasiness to Valentinian, who immediately commanded some legions from the stations in Pannonia and Moesia, to embark for Africa. On this the Sarmatians and the Quadi, who had long entertained a hatred for Celestius, the governor of those countries, availing themselves, of the opportunity afforded by the departure of the legions for Africa, invaded the Pannonians and Moesians. . . . .

Valentinian, roused by the intelligence of these events, marched from Celtica into Illyricum, for the purpose of opposing the Quadi and the Sarmatians, and consigned the command of his forces to Merobaudes, who was a person of the greatest military experience. The winter continuing unusually late, the Quadi sent ambassadors to him with insolent and unbecoming messages. These so exasperated the emperor, that through the violence of his rage, the blood flowed from his head into his mouth, and suffocated him. He thus died after having resided in Illyricum nearly nine months, and after a reign of twelve years.
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ValensAE3SecurReip.jpg
1eq Valens75 views364-378

AE 3, Siscia

Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right, D N VALENS P F AVG
Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm, SECVRITAS REIPUBLICAE. Mintmark dot ASISC.

RIC 7b

Zosimus recorded: [Valentinian was an experienced military man, but] Valens was surrounded with disquietude on every side, having always lived inactively, and having been raised to the empire suddenly. He could not indeed sustain the weight of business. He was disturbed, not by the Persians only, who were elated with their prosperity, which had increased since their truce with Jovian. They made incursions on the provinces without controul, since Nisibis was in their possession, and by distressing the eastern towns, constrained the emperor to march against them. On his departure from Constantinople, the rebellion of Procopius commenced. . . .

{With Valentiniand dead,] Valens was inundated with wars on every side. . . . [Valens' advisers] persuaded him to |107 march forward with his whole army; that the Barbarians were almost destroyed, and the emperor might gain a victory without trouble. Their counsel, though the least prudent, so far prevailed, that the emperor led forth his whole army without order. The Barbarians resolutely opposed them, and gained so signal a victory, that they slew all, except a few with whom the emperor fled into an unfortified village. The Barbarians, therefore, surrounded the place with a quantity of wood, which they set on fire. All who had fled thither, together with the inhabitants, were consumed in the tlames, and in such a manner, that the body of the emperor could never be found.
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ProcopiusAEChiRo.jpg
1er Procopius18 views365-366

AE3

Diademed, draped & cuirassed bust left, D N PROCOPIVS P F AVG
Procopius standing facing, head right, holding labarum in right hand, left resting on shield set on the ground; Chi-rho in upper right field & unidentified object in left at foot; mintmark CONS Gamma.

RIC 17a

Zosimus tells us: On [Valens'] departure from Constantinople, the rebellion of Procopius commenced. This person had been intrusted by Julian, being one of his relations, with a part of his forces, and had been charged to march with Sebastianus through Adiabene, and to meet Julian, who took another route. Permission, moreover, was given him to wear a purple robe, for a reason which no other person was acquainted with. But the deity being pleased to ordain it otherwise, and Jovian having succeeded to the imperial dignity, Procopius immediately delivered up the imperial robe which he had received from Julian, confessing why it had been given to him, and entreating the emperor to absolve him from his military oath, and to allow him to live in retirement, and to attend to agriculture and his own private affairs. Having obtained this, he went with his wife and children to Caesarea in Cappadocia, intending to reside in that place, where he possessed a valuable estate. During his abode there, Valentinian and Valens being made emperors, and being suspicious of him, sent persons to take him into custody. In that they found no difficulty, for he surrendered himself voluntarily; and desired them to carry him wherever they pleased, if they would suffer him first to see his children. To this they consented, and he prepared an entertainment for them. When he perceived them to be intoxicated, he and his family fled towards the Taurica Chersonesus. Having remained there for some time, he found the inhabitants to he a faithless race, and was apprehensive lest they should deliver him to his persecutors. He, therefore, put himself and his family on board a trading vessel, and arrived in the night at Constantinople. He there resided in the house of an old acquaintance, and making observations on the state of the city after the departure of the emperor, he attempted to raise himself to the empire, and formed his design on the following incident.

A eunuch, named Eugenius, had not long before been discharged from the court, who entertained but little friendship for the emperors. Procopius therefore won this man to his interest. . . . Their first attempt was to bribe the court guards, which consisted of two legions. Then arming the slaves, and collecting with ease a considerable multitude, chiefly volunteers, they sent them in the night into the city, and occasioned a general commotion; the people issuing from their houses, and gazing on Procopiusas on a king made in a theatre. But the city being in general confusion, and no person being sufficiently collected in mind by reason of the surprise to know how to act, Procopius imagined his design to be still undiscovered, and that he might secure the empire if the enterprise were no further revealed. Having then seized on Cesarius, whom the emperors had made prefect of the city, and on Nebridius, who was appointed to succeed Sallustius in tbe prefecture of the court, he compelled them to write to the subjects of the empire whatever he wished. He also kept them separate, that they might not consult with each other. Having formed these projects, he proceeded in a splendid manner towards the palace. Ascending a tribunal before the gate, he gave the people great hopes and promises. He then entered the palace to provide for the remainder of his affairs.

The new emperors having divided the army between them, Procopius determined to send persons to the soldiers, who were as yet in confusion, and went by the command of the emperors from place to place without any order. He thus hoped to seduce some of them to his party. Nor did he fail of accomplishing his purpose with ease by distributing money amongst the soldiers and their officers; by which means he collected a considerable force, and prepared to make an open attack on the enemy. Procopius then sent Marcellus into Bithynia with an army against Serenianus and the imperial cavalry that was under his command, in hope of cutting them to pieces. This force having fled to Cyzicus, Marcellus, whose army was superior to theirs both by sea and land, took possession of that town; and having taken Serenianus, who fled into Lydia, put him to death. Procopius was so elevated by this fortunate commencement, that his forces considerably augmented, many being of opinion that he was able to contend with the emperors. Both the Roman legions and the Barbarian troops now flocked to his standard. Besides the reputation of being related to Julian, and of having accompanied him in all the wars he had ever been engaged in, attracted many partizans. He likewise sent ambassadors to the chief of Scythia beyond the Ister, who sent to his assistance ten thousand men. The other Barbarian nations likewise sent auxiliaries to share in the expedition. Procopius however considered that it would be imprudent in him to engage with both emperors together, and therefore thought it best to advance against him who was nearest, and afterwards deliberate on what course to pursue.

Thus was Procopius employed; while the emperor Valens, who heard of this insurrection at Galatia in Phrygia, was filled with consternation at the news. Arbitrio having encouraged him not to despair, he prepared the troops that were with him for war, and sent to his brother to inform him of the designs of Procopius. Valentinian however was little disposed for sending auxiliaries to one who was incapable of defending the empire committed to his charge. Valens was therefore under the necessity of. preparing for war, and appointed Arbitrio to the command of his army. When the armies were ready to engage, Arbitrio circumvented Procopius by a stratagem, and thereby seduced from him a great number of his men, from whom he received previous information of the designs of Procopius. On the advance of the emperor and Procopius towards each other, the two armies met near Thyatira. Procopius at first appeared to have the advantage, by which he would have gained the supreme authority, Hormisdas in the engagement having overpowered the enemy. But Gomarius, another of the commanders of Procopius, imparting his intention to all the soldiers of Procopius who were attached to the emperor, in the midst of the battle cried out Augustus, and gave a signal for them to imitate his example. Thus the most of the troops of Procopius went over to Valens.

After having obtained this victory, Valens marched to Sardes, and from thence into Phrygia, where he found Procopius in a town called Nacolia. Affairs having been ordered for the advantage of the emperor by Naplo, an officer of Procopius, Valens again prevailed, and took him prisoner, and soon afterwards Marcellus, both of whom he put to death.
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TheodosAE4VotMult~0.jpg
1eu Theodosius25 views379-395

AE4

Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG
VOT V MVLT X within wreath, ASISC in ex

RIC 29d

Zosimus recorded: [Valentinian] commanded some legions from the stations in Pannonia and Moesia, to embark for Africa [to crush a rebellion]. On this the Sarmatians and the Quadi. . . , availing themselves, of the opportunity afforded by the departure of the legions for Africa, invaded the Pannonians and Moesians. . . . The barbarians therefore revenged themselves by plundering all the country along the Ister, carrying off all that they found in the towns. The Pannonians were by these means exposed to the cruelty of the barbarians, while the soldiers were extremely negligent in the defence of their towns, and committed as much mischief as the Barbarians themselves in all places on this side of the river. But Moesia was free from harm, because Theodosius, who commanded the forces there, courageously resisted the Barbarians, and routed them when they attacked him. By that victory he not only acquired great renown, but subsequently attained the imperial dignity. . . .

When the affairs of the empire were reduced to this low condition, Victor, who commanded the Roman cavalry, escaping the danger with some of his troops, entered Macedon and Thessaly. From thence he proceeded into Moesia and Pannonia, and informed Gratian, who was then in that quarter, of what had occurred, and of the loss of the emperor [Valens] and his army. Gratian received the intelligence without uneasiness, and was little grieved at the death of his uncle, a disagreement having existed between them. Finding himself unable to manage affairs, Thrace being ravaged by the Barbarians, as were likewise Pannonia and Moesia, and the towns upon the Rhine being infested by the neighbouring Barbarians without controul, he chose for his associate in the empire, Theodosius, who was a native of a town called Cauca, in the part of Spain called Hispania Callaecia, and who possessed great knowledge and experience of military affairs. Having given him the government of Thrace and the eastern provinces, Gratian himself proceeded to the west of Gaul, in order, if possible, to compose affairs in that quarter. . . .

During the stay of the new emperor, Theodosius, at Thesslonica, a great concourse arrived there from all parts of persons soliciting him on business, both public and private; who having obtained of him whatever he could conveniently grant, returned, to their homes. As a great multitude of the Scythians beyond the Ister, the Gotthi, and the Taiphali, and other tribes that formerly dwelt among them, had crossed the river, and were driven to infest the Roman dominions, because the Huns, had expelled them from their own country, the emperor Theodosius prepared for war with all his forces. . . . The army having made this good use of the occasion afforded by fortune, the affairs of Thrace, which had been on the brink of ruin, were now, the Barbarians being crushed beyond all hope, re-established in peace. . . .

Meanwhile, the emperor Theodosius, residing in Thessalonica, was easy of access to all who wished to see him. Having commenced his reign in luxury and indolence, he threw the magistracy into disorder, and increased the number of his military officers. . . . As he squandered the public money without consideration, bestowing it on unworthy persons, he consequently impoverished himself. He therefore sold the government of provinces to any who would purchase them, without regard to the reputation or ablity of the persons, esteeming him the best qualified who brought him the most gold or silver. . . .

Maximus, who deemed his appointments inferior to his merits, being only governor of the countries formerly under Gratian, projected how to depose the young Valentinian from the empire. . . . This so much surprised Valentinian, and rendered his situation so desperate, that his courtiers were alarmed lest he should be taken by Maximus and put to death. He, therefore, immediately embarked,and sailed to Thessalonica with his mother Justina. . . . [A]rriving at Thessalonica, they sent messengers to the emperor Theodosius, intreating him now at least to revenge the injuries committed against the family of Valentinian. . . . The emperor, being delivered from this alarm, marched with great resolution with his whole army against Maximus. . . . Theodosius, having passed through Pannonia and the defiles of the Appennines, attacked unawares the forces of Maximus before they were prepared for him. A part of his army, having pursued them with the utmost speed, forced their way through the gates of Aquileia, the guards being too few to resist them. Maximus was torn from his imperial throne while in the act of distributing money to his soldiers, and being stripped of his imperial robes, was brought to Theodosius, who, having in reproach enumerated some of his crimes against the commonwealth, delivered him to the common executioner to receive due punishment. . . . The emperor Theodosius, having consigned Italy, Spain, Celtica, and Libya to his son Honorius, died of a disease on his journey towards Constantinople.
Blindado
HonoriusAE3Emperors.jpg
1fa Honorius20 views393-423

AE3

RIC 403

Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right, DN HONORIVS PF AVG
Two emperors standing facing, heads turned to one another, each holding spear and resting hand on shield, GLORIA ROMANORVM. Mintmark SMKA.

Zosimus wrote: [Theodosius] proceeded with his army to the war [against Eugenius], leaving behind him his son Arcadius, who had some time previously been made emperor. . . . Having done this, he took with him his younger son Honorius, quickly passed through the intermediate countries, and having exceded his expectations in crossing the Alps, arrived where the enemy was stationed. . . . The emperor Theodosius after these successes proceeded to Rome, where he declared his son Honorius emperor, and appointing Stilico to the command of his forces there, left him as guardian to his son. . . . The emperor Theodosius, having consigned Italy, Spain, Celtica, and Libya to his son Honorius, died of a disease on his journey towards Constantinople. . . .

THE whole empire being vested in Arcadius and Honorius, they indeed appeared by their title to possess the sovereign authority, although the universal administration of affairs was under Rufinus in the east, and under Stilico in the west. By these all causes were determined, at their own pleasure; for whoever bribed plentifully, or by any other means of friendship or consanguinity could make the judge his advocate, was sure to succeed in the process. From hence it happened that most of those great estates, which cause the possessors to be generally esteemed fortunate, devolved to these two; since some endeavoured by gifts to avoid false accusations, and others relinquished all their possessions to obtain an office, or in any other manner to purchase the ruin of particular cities. While iniquity of every kind presided, therefore, in the respective cities, the money from all quarters flowed into the coffers of Rufinus and Stilico ; while on the reverse, poverty preyed on the habitations of those who had formerly been rich. Nor were the emperors acquainted with anything that was done, but thought all that Rufinus and Stilico commanded was done by virtue of some unwritten law. . . .

After the autumn was terminated, and winter had commenced, Bassus and Philippus being chosen consuls, the emperor Honorius, who had long before lost his wife Maria, desired to marry her sister Thermantia. But Stilico appeared not to approve of the match, although it was promoted by Serena, who wished it to take place from these motives. When Maria was about to be married to Honorius, her mother, deeming her too young for the marriage-state and being unwilling to defer the marriage, although she thought that to submit so young and tender a person to the embraces of a man was offering violence to nature, she had recourse to a woman who knew how to manage such affairs, and by her means contrived that Maria should live with the emperor and share his bed, but that he should not have the power to deprive her of virginity. In the meantime Maria died a virgin, and Serena, who, as may readily be supposed, was desirous to become the grandmother of a young emperor or empress, through fear of her influence being diminished, used all her endeavours to marry her other daughter to Honorius. This being accomplished, the young lady shortly afterwards died in the same manner as the former. . . . .

For Stilico was desirous of proceeding to the east to undertake the management of the affairs of Theodosius, the son of Arcadius, who was very young, and in want of a guardian. Honorius himself was also inclined to undertake the same journey, with a design to secure the dominions of that emperor. But Stilico, being displeased at that, and laying before the emperor a calculation of the immense sum of money it would require to defray the expence of such an expedition, deterred him from the enterprise. . . .

In the mean time, the emperor Honorius commanded his wife Thermantia to be taken from the imperial throne, and to be restored to her mother, who notwithstanding was without suspicion. . . . Alaric began his expedition against Rome, and ridiculed the preparations made by Honorius. . . . The emperor Honorius was now entering on the consulship, having enjoyed that honour eight times, and the emperor Theodosius in the east three times. At this juncture the rebel Constantine sent some eunches to Honorius, to intreat pardon from him for having accepted of the empire. When the emperor heard this petition, perceiving that it was not easy for him, since Alaric and his barbarians were so near, to prepare for other wars ; and consulting the safety of his relations who were in the hands of the rebel, whose names were Verenianus and Didymius; he not only granted his request, but likewise sent him an imperial robe. . . .

Note: No ancient source reports the sack of Rome by the Goths in 410, they having besieged the city three times, all while Honorius huddled in a besieged Ravenna. Honorius retained his nominal capacity until he died in 423.
Blindado
IMG_4427.jpg
2 Constantius II37 views DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left holding globe / FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, Emperor in military dress standing left with labarum, two captives before, leaning left in left field. Γ in left field. Mintmark CONSZ star. RIC VIII Constantinople 89.4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
Bithynia_Kalchedon,_AR_Drachm_4th_Cent__BC.jpg
2. Bithynia, Kalchedon, 340-320 BC, AR Siglos 17 viewsBull standing left on grain ear, KAΛX above.
Granulated mill-sail incuse square.

SNG BM Black Sea 112; SNG von Aulock 482; Sear 3738.

(18 mm, 5.31 g).
Ephesus Numismatics.

The symbolism of the bull and the heifer on the obverse of the coins of twin cities of Kalchedon (Asia Minor) and Byzantion (Europe) respectively is striking and points to a shared identity. They stood astride the southern entrance to the Bosporus. Both were 7th century BC foundations of Megara and jointly they controlled the vital grain trade from the Black Sea into the Mediterranean.

The grain ear upon which the bull of Kalchedon stands alludes to this fact. That of the dolphin beneath the Heifer of Byzantion is a reflection of the maritime orientation of the city and the bountiful pods of dolphins that even to this day frolic in swift flowing waters of the Bosporus beneath the old city walls of Constantinople which succeded Byzantion and was in turn succeded by Istanbul.

The twin cities merged in the modern era to become the great and fascinating metropolis of Istanbul. Ancient Kalchedon dominated the Asian side of the Bosporus. The remains of the ancient city lie be
n.igma
IMG_0148.JPG
2. Byzantine - Justinian54 viewsJustinian Follis
Constantinople Mint
527 - 565 AD
Zam
IMG_0152~0.JPG
2.1 Byzantine - Justinian42 viewsJustinian Follis
Constantinople Mint
527 - 565 AD
Zam
Sear-2005.jpg
2004 ISAAC II ANGELUS METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-2004 DOC 4 CLBC 7.4.1 40 viewsOBV Full length figure of Virgin nimbate, orans, standing on dais, wearing tunic and maphorion; beardless, nimbate head of Christ on breast.

REV Full length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. anexikakia. Manus Dei in upper right field

Metropolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of around 1% for this issue. These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

Size 20.36mm

Weight 3.2gm

DOC lists 16 examples with weights from 1.70gm to 4.36 and sizes 19mm to 24x18mm
Simon
sear2005d.jpg
2004A ISAAC II ANGELUS METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-2004 DOC 4 CLBC 7.4.141 viewsOBV Full length figure of Virgin nimbate, orans, standing on dais, wearing tunic and maphorion; beardless, nimbate head of Christ on breast.

REV Full length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. anexikakia. Manus Dei in upper right field

Metropolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of around 1% for this issue. These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

Size 18/20.5 mm

Weight 3.2gm

DOC lists 16 examples with weights from 1.70gm to 4.36 and sizes 19mm to 24x18mm
Simon
Sear2005b.jpg
2004B ISAAC II ANGELUS METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-2004 DOC 4 CLBC 7.4.1 41 viewsOBV Full length figure of Virgin nimbate, orans, standing on dais, wearing tunic and maphorion; beardless, nimbate head of Christ on breast.

REV Full length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. anexikakia. Manus Dei in upper right field

Metropolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of around 1% for this issue. These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

Size 16./19mm

Weight 2.7gm

DOC lists 16 examples with weights from 1.70gm to 4.36 and sizes 19mm to 24x18mm
Simon
sear2005c.jpg
2004C ISAAC II ANGELUS METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-2004 DOC 4 CLBC 7.4.1 43 viewsOBV Full length figure of Virgin nimbate, orans, standing on dais, wearing tunic and maphorion; beardless, nimbate head of Christ on breast.

REV Full length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. anexikakia. Manus Dei in upper right field

Metropolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of around 1% for this issue. These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues

Size 20/17mm

Weight 3.6 gm

DOC lists 16 examples with weights from 1.70gm to 4.36 and sizes 19mm to 24x18mm
Simon
b3~1.jpg
2005 ISAAC II ANGELUS AE TETARTERON S-2005V C DOC 5 CLBC 7.4.2 39 viewsOBV Bust of Archangel Michael, beardless and nimbate, wearing divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of a simplified type, holds in r. a trefoil- headed scepter, and in l. Globus cruciger.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma. Divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. anexikakia.

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

Size 22mm

Weight 4.8gm

DOC lists 11 examples with weights ranging from 3.21 gm to 5.37gm
Simon
s-2005c.jpg
2005A ISAAC II ANGELUS AE TETARTERON S-2005V B DOC 5 CLBC 7.4.2 55 viewsOBV Bust of Archangel Michael, beardless and nimbate, wearing divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of a simplified type, holds in r. a spear, and in l. Globus cruciger.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma. Divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. anexikakia.

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

Size 20/17mm

Weight 3.8gm

DOC lists 11 examples with weights ranging from 3.21 gm to 5.37gm

Really a Beautiful coin, I am sure under that green patina full detail remains.
Simon
p3.jpg
2005B ISAAC II ANGELUS AE TETARTERON S-2005V A DOC 5 CLBC 7.4.2 2 viewsOBV Bust of Archangel Michael, beardless and nimbate, wearing divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of a simplified type, holds in r. a jeweled sceptre, and in l. Globus cruciger.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma. Divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. anexikakia.

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

Size 20mm

Weight 4.1gm

Interesting example of the three known devices that Michael holds in this version a jeweled scepter.

DOC lists 11 examples with weights ranging from 3.21 gm to 5.37gm
Simon
S-2006c.jpg
2005C ISAAC II ANGELUS AE TETARTERON S-2005V A DOC 5 CLBC 7.4.262 viewsOBV Bust of Archangel Michael, beardless and nimbate, wearing divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of a simplified type, holds in r. a jeweled sceptre, and in l. Globus cruciger.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma. Divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r. hand scepter cruciger and in l. anexikakia.

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins and very abundant in today’s marketplace.

Size 19.91mm

Weight 3.2gm

Interesting example of the three known devices that Michael holds in this version a jeweled scepter.

DOC lists 11 examples with weights ranging from 3.21 gm to 5.37gm
Simon
u3.jpg
2014 ALEXIUS III ANGELUS-COMNENUS METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-2014 DOC 4 CLBC 8.4.1 33 views

OBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans, wearing tunic and maphorion, turned to r. Manus Dei in upper r. field

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r hand labarum headed scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.

Metropolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content unknown for this issue. The entire tetartera of Alexius III are much harder to find due to debasement of trachea virtually rendering the Tetarteron useless. The Metropolitan issues were believed to be produced only for two years 1195-1197.

Size 18/21mm

Weight 2.7gm

DOC lists 1 example with weight of 3.38gm and 19mm

Unlike the one listed in DOC this example has a full family name and was perhaps minted after 1197. The half Tetarteron from the Thessalonica mint has two variations and is listed in Sear as two separate coins, that variation is a short or full version of the family name
Simon
r5.jpg
2014A ALEXIUS III ANGELUS-COMNENUS METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-2014 DOC 4 CLBC 8.4.1 27 viewsOBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans, wearing tunic and maphorion, turned to r. Manus Dei in upper r. field

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece, and jeweled loros of a simplified type; holds in r hand labarum headed scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.

Metropolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content unknown for this issue. The entire tetartera of Alexius III are much harder to find due to debasement of trachea virtually rendering the Tetarteron useless. The Metropolitan issues were believed to be produced only for two years 1195-1197.

Size 18/19mm

Weight 2.7gm

DOC lists 1 example with weight of 3.38gm and 19mm

This example matches the weights of my other example, the only difference between the two is this is slightly smaller but a slightly thicker flan.
Simon
n6~0.jpg
2015 ALEXIUS III ANGELUS-COMNENUS AE TETARTERON S-2015 DOC 5 CLBC 8.4.3 26 views
OBV Bust of St. George , beardless and nimbate , wearing tunic, breastplate wearing tunic, breastplate, and sagion; holds spear in r. hand resting on l. shoulder and in l. scroll or hilt of sword.

REV Full length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins but all tetartera from Alexius III are difficult to obtain.

Size 19.52mm

Weight 4.0gm

DOC lists 22 examples with weights from 1.91gm to 4.55gm and sizes from 17mm to 22mm
Simon
Alexiusiiib.jpg
2015A ALEXIUS III ANGELUS-COMNENUS AE TETARTERON S-2015 DOC 5 CLBC 8.4.3 43 viewsOBV Bust of St. George , beardless and nimbate , wearing tunic, breastplate wearing tunic, breastplate, and sagion; holds spear in r. hand resting on l. shoulder and in l. scroll or hilt of sword.

REV Full length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins but all examples of Alexius tetartera are difficult to obtain.

Size 17/18.5mm

Weight 4.0gm

DOC lists 22 examples with weights from 1.91gm to 4.55gm and sizes from 17mm to 22mm
Simon
alexuisiiic.jpg
2015B ALEXIUS III ANGELUS-COMNENUS AE TETARTERON S-2015 DOC 5 CLBC 8.4.3 51 viewsOBV Bust of St. George , beardless and nimbate , wearing tunic, breastplate wearing tunic, breastplate, and sagion; holds spear in r. hand resting on l. shoulder and in l. scroll or hilt of sword.

REV Full length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger.

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. This coins are much more common than Metropolitan coins but all examples of Alexius tetartera are difficult to obtain.

Size 19mm

Weight 3.4gm

DOC lists 22 examples with weights from 1.91gm to 4.55gm and sizes from 17mm to 22mm
Simon
q6~1.jpg
2016 ALEXIUS III ANGELUS-COMNENUS AE HALF TETARTERON S-2016 DOC 7 CLBC 8.4.4 27 views
OBV Bust of St. George , beardless and nimbate , wearing tunic, breastplate wearing tunic, breastplate, and sagion; holds spear in r. hand resting on l. shoulder and in l. hand. Scroll or hilt of sword

REV Full length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger cr. Manus Dei ( Hands of God) in upper right field.

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron

Size 16mm

Weight 1.7gm

DOC lists 6 examples with weights from 1.2 to 1.9 gm and sizes 15x11 to 17mm
Simon
h3~0.jpg
2016 ALEXIUS III ANGELUS-COMNENUS AE HALF TETARTERON S-2016 DOC 7 CLBC 8.4.4 42 viewsOBV Bust of St. George , beardless and nimbate , wearing tunic, breastplate wearing tunic, breastplate, and sagion; holds spear in r. hand resting on l. shoulder and in l. hand. Scroll or hilt of sword

REV Full length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger cr. Manus Dei ( Hands of God) in upper right field.

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron

Size 19x14mm

Weight 1.9gm

DOC lists 6 examples with weights from 1.2 to 1.9 gm and sizes 15x11 to 17mm

Not a great example but the only one I have seen outside the books. Both of my Alexius III half tetartera are very odd shaped flans.
Simon
Alexunlistedsep.jpg
2016AV ALEXIUS III ANGELUS-COMNENUS AE HALF TETARTERON S-2016 DOC 7 CLBC 8.4.4 Unlisted Variation50 viewsOBV Bust of St. George , beardless and nimbate , wearing tunic, breastplate wearing tunic, breastplate, and sagion; holds spear in r. hand resting on RIGHT shoulder and in l. hand. Scroll or hilt of sword ( This one with such an exceptional Obv makes it clear it is a hilt of sword, also no others mention spear resting on right shoulder.))

REV Full length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger cr. Manus Dei ( Hands of God) in upper right field.

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron

Size 16/14mm

Weight 2.3gm

DOC lists 6 examples with weights from 1.2 to 1.9 gm and sizes 15x11 to 17mm

Half tetartera are rare for Alexius III, this example has and excellent obv and the reverse is attributable in hand but does not photograph well.

Both of my Alexius III half tetartera are very odd shaped flans.
Simon
c2.jpg
2017 ALEXIUS III ANGELUS-COMNENUS AE HALF TETARTERON S-2017 DOC 8 CLBC 8.4.5.A 31 views
OBV Bust of St. George , beardless and nimbate , wearing tunic, breastplate wearing tunic, breastplate, and sagion; holds spear in r. hand resting on r. shoulder and in l. hand shield.

REV Full length figure of emperor wearing stemma, divitision, and chlamys; holds in r. hand labarum on long shaft and in l. Globus cruciger with patriarchal cross.

This is a Thessalonica minted coin, it contains no silver. It is believed to be valued at 1/864 Hyperpyron and the Metropolitan (Constantinople) issues at 1/288 Hyperpyron. The half tetartera at 1/1728 Hyperpyron.

Size 14/17.5 mm

Weight 1.7gm

Very Rare Coin.

DOC lists 7 examples weights 1.18gm to 2.47gm and sizes from 13mm to 17mm ( DOC com bines S-2017 and S-2018 as one coin.)
Simon
LarryW1931.jpg
210 Basil II Bulgaroktonos, AD 976-102567 viewsGold histamenon nomisma, 25mm, 4.40g, aEF
Struck at Constantinople c. AD 1005-1025
+ IhS CIS REX REGNANTIhM, bust of Christ facing, wears pallium, colobium, and nimbus cruciger with crescents; raised right hand, Gospels in left; triple border / + bASIL C CONSTANT b R, facing crowned busts of Basil wearing loros of square pattern (left) and Constantine wearing jeweled chlamys; holding between them with right hands a long plain cross; manus Dei above Basil's head; triple border
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
DOC 6a; Sear 1800; Wroth 12-13
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW1937.jpg
215 Constantine VIII, AD 1025-102858 viewsGold histamenon nomisma, 25mm, 4.37g, gVF
Struck at Constantinople
+IhS XIS REX REGNANThM, bust of Christ Pantocrator facing, wears tunic, himation, and nimbus cruciger with crescents; right hand raised, Gospels in left; triple border / + CWhSTAhTIh BASILEUS ROM, crowned bust facing with long beard; wears loros, holds labarum with pellet on shaft with right, akakia in left; triple border. Scarce.
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
DOC 2; Sear 1815
1 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
LarryW1938.jpg
220 Romanus III Argyrus, AD 1028-103462 viewsGold histamenon nomisma, 26mm, 4.37g, VF
Struck at Constantinople AD 1028-1029
+IhS REX REGNANTINM, Christ enthroned facing, wears nimbus cruciger and colobium, raises right hand and holds Gospels with left; double border / ΘCE bOHΘ RWMANW MΘ, the figures of Romanus (left) and the Virgin standing facing; bearded Romanus wears saccos and loros, and holds globus cruciger; the nimbate Virgin wears pallium and maphorum, and with right hand crowns the emperor; double border
Ex: Harlan Berk
DOC 1d; Sear 1819; Berk 296
Lawrence Woolslayer
22027~2.jpg
22027 Constantius II/GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS11 viewsConstantius II/GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
Obv: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C
laureate, draped, cuirassed.
REV: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
two soldiers, each holding spear and
shield, standing to left and right of two standards.
o on banners
CONSS in Exergue
RIC VII Constantinople 61; Sear 17693
Mint: Constantinople 18.2mm 2.4g
Blayne W
22041.jpg
22041 Constantius II/ Soldiers w Standards12 viewsConstantius II/ Soldiers w Standards
Obv: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C
laureated and cuirassed bust right
Rev: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
Two soldiers either side of two standards
o on banners
CONSS in Exergue
Mint: Constantinople 17.6mm 2.6g
RIC VII Constantinople 61; Sear 17693
1 commentsBlayne W
24e-Constantine-Her-092.jpg
24e. Constantine: Heraclea.18 viewsAE3, 327 - 329, Heraclea mint.
Obverse: CONSANTINVS AVG / Diademed bust of Constantine, "Eyes to God."
Reverse: D N CONSTANTINI MAX AVG / Laurel wreath enclosing VOT XXX.
Mint mark: .SMHB
3.42 gm., 18.5 mm.
RIC #92; LRBC #887; Sear #16231.

Eusebius stated that Constantine had himself depicted in the attitude of prayer on his coins. Since early Christians prayed looking up to Heaven, this obverse portrait is the one which Eusebius saw. Thus the phrase "Eyes to God" became associated with this portrait. We have no proof that Eusebius' statement is true; indeed the portrait could have been based on the way various Hellenistic kings portrayed themselves on their own coins. However, Eusebius' statement likely reflected the popular opinion of his time.

The "Eyes to God" portrait was used intermittently on gold and silver coinages from 324 to 337. It's use on the bronze coinage is limited to just three mints: Constantinople (Daphne coinage, 328), Cyzicus (Campgate coinage 328-29), and Heraclea (VOT XXX coinage, 325-26, 327-329).
Callimachus
24i-Constantine-Con-038.jpg
24i. Constantine: Constantinople.20 viewsAE3, 328 - 329, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG / Diademed bust of Constantine.
Reverse: CONSTANTINIANA DAFNE / Victory seated, holding palm branch, in each hand, trophy and kneeling captive in front. B in left field.
Mint mark: CONS*
3.39 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #38; LRBC #1002; Sear #16192.

The traditional interpretation of this reverse type is that it commemorates the building of a fortress and bridge over the River Danube at Dafne (now called Oltenita, Romania). A different interpretation is more allegorical. Since this is the first coinage from the mint of a new Christian city, it is appropriate that it shows Constantine (represented by Victory/Dafne) turning away from the old gods (the captive and standard) to Christianity (palm branches).
Callimachus
IMG_2690.JPG
3 Constans58 viewsCoin Type: Billon centenionalis of Constans, Caesar 333-337 CE, Augustus 337-350 CE
Mint and Date: Constantinople, officina 1; 348-351 CE
Size and Weight: 20mm x 21mm, 4.30g
Obverse: D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG
Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand.
Reverse: FEL TEMP REPA-RATIO
Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points downwards, between the soldier's legs.
Exergue: CONSA

Ref: RIC VIII Constantinople 86; LRBC 2012
BW Ref: 115 024 080

Ex Moonmoth
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
a42.jpg
3. Justin II, follis37 viewsConstantinople Mint - delta officina
Year 6 - AD 571 (G)
DN IVSTINVS PP AVG
Justin II and Sophia on the throne
follis (M)
Zam
a40.jpg
3.5 Maurice Tiberius Follis42 viewsMaurice Tiberius
AE Follis
Constantinople Mint
ANNO XIIII - 596 AD
Zam
ConVIIIConst52.jpg
307-337 AD - Constantine I Posthumous - RIC VIII Constantinople 052 - Quadriga Reverse37 viewsEmperor: Constantine I (r. 307-337 AD)
Date: 337-340 AD
Condition: Fair
Size: AE4

Obverse: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
Posthumous issue
Bust right; veiled

Reverse: (no legend)
Emperor, veiled, to left in quadriga; the hand of God reaches down to him.
in field.
Exergue: CONS(?) (Constantinople mint, third officina?)

RIC VIII Constantinople 52; VM 95
1.27g; 14.8mm; 165°
Pep
30o-Constantinopoli-Cyz-108.jpg
30o. Constantinopoli commemorative: Cyzicus.34 viewsAE3, 330 - 335, Cyzicus mint.
Obverse: CONSTANTINOPOLI / Helmeted bust of Constantinople, facing left, and holding a sceptre.
Reverse: Victory standing on prow of galley, holding sceptre and leaning on shield.
Mint mark: . SMKΔ
2.35 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #108; LRBC # 1250; Sear #16478.
1 commentsCallimachus
ConIIVIIConst138.jpg
316-337 AD - Constantine II as Caesar - RIC VII Constantinople 138 - GLORIA EXERCITVS30 viewsCaesar: Constantine II (Caes. 316-337 AD)
Date: 336-337 AD
Condition: Fair/Fine
Size: AE4

Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
Constantine Junior Noble Caesar
Bust right; laureate and cuirassed

Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
Glory of the Army.
Two soldiers standing and facing one another, spear in outer hand, inner hand on shield resting on ground, one standard between them.
Exergue: CONS? (Constantinople mint, unknown officina)

RIC VII Constantinople 138; VM 46
1.13g; 15.8mm; 15°
Pep
33-Constantius-II-Con-93.jpg
33. Constantius II / Phoenix.16 viewsHalf Maiorina (AE 3), 348-350, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: DN CONSTANTIVS P F AVG / Diademed bust of Constantius.
Reverse: FEL TEMP REPARATIO / Phoenix standing on globe, holding wreath in its beak.
Mint mark: CONSB*
2.29 gm., 18 mm.
RIC #93; LRBC #2019; Sear #18253.
Callimachus
rjb_anon_03_06.jpg
33069 viewsAnon, time of Constantine I, c.330 AD
AR third siliqua
Helmeted bust of Roma right
P
Constantinople mint?
Cohen 3

This series is interesting and comprises of several issues of both fractional silver and bronze dating between the 4th and 6th centuries AD (according to Bendall, RN 2002, pp 139-59).

This piece (type 2a) belongs to his early series from c.330 AD. Although no mintmarks are present it is believed the coin was struck in Constantinople due to the provenance of most of the recorded specimens and was probably issued around the time of the dedication of the "new Rome" in the east.
mauseus
ConstplsVIIThes188.jpg
330-333 AD - Constantinopolis Issue - RIC VII Thessalonica 188 - Victory on Prow Reverse25 viewsConstantinopolis Issue
Date: 330-333 AD
Condition: Fair/aFine
Size: AE3

Obverse: CONSTAN-TINOPOLIS
Constantinople
Bust left; laureated helmet, wearing imperial cloak, reversed spear

Reverse: no legend
Victory standing left on prow with spear, shield.
Exergue: SMTSΔ (Thessalonica mint, fourth officina)

RIC VII Thessalonica 188; VM 1
2.08g; 18.7mm; 0°
Pep
ConstplsVIIThes188or230.jpg
330-337 AD - Constantinopolis Issue - RIC VII Thessalonica 188 or 230 - Victory on Prow Reverse30 viewsConstantinopolis Issue
Date: 330-337 AD
Condition: Fair
Size: AE4

Obverse: CONSTAN-TINOPOLIS
Constantinople
Bust left; laureated helmet, wearing imperial cloak, reversed spear

Reverse: no legend
Victory standing left on prow with spear, shield.
Exergue: SMTSE (Thessalonica mint, fifth officina)

RIC VII Thessalonica 188 or 230; VM 3
1.44g; 16.0mm; 330°
Pep
ConstplsVIISis241.jpg
334-335 AD - Constantinopolis Issue - RIC VII Siscia 241 - Victory on Prow Reverse27 viewsConstantinopolis Issue
Date: 334-335 AD
Condition: Fine/Fair
Size: AE3

Obverse: CONSTAN-TINOPOLIS
Constantinople
Bust left; laureated helmet, wearing imperial cloak, reversed spear

Reverse: no legend
Victory left on prow.
Exergue: ●BSIS● (Siscia mint, second officina)

RIC VII Siscia 241; VM 1
2.12g; 17.9mm; 150°
Pep
ConIIVIIIConst25.jpg
337-340 AD - Constantine II - RIC VIII Constantinople 025 - GLORIA EXERCITVS43 viewsEmperor: Constantine II (r. 337-340 AD)
Date: 337-340 AD
Condition: Fine/VF
Size: AE4

Obverse: DN CONSTAN-TINVS P F AVG
Our Lord Constantine Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Bust right; laurel and rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS●
Glory of the Army.
Two helmeted soldiers facing, heads turned towards each other; each holds an inverted spear and rests on a shield; between them, a standard.
Exergue: CONSΓ (Constantinople mint, third officina)

RIC VIII Constantinople 25; VM 47
1.47g; 15.1mm; 0°
Pep
ConstplsVIIIAnt38.jpg
337-347 AD - Constantinoplois Issue - RIC VIII Antioch 038 - Victory on Prow Reverse34 viewsConstantinopolis Issue
Date: 337-347 AD
Condition: Fine
Size: AE4

Obverse: CONSTAN-TINOPOLIS
Constantinople
Bust left; laureate and crested helmet, necklace and ornamental mantle over left shoulder, sceptre

Reverse: no legend
Victory standing left, right foot on prow, holding transverse sceptre in right hand and resting left on shield.
Exergue: SMANI (Antioch mint, tenth officina)

RIC VIII Antioch 38; VM 3
1.82g; 15.4mm; 150°
Pep
CsIIVIIIConst121.jpg
337-361 AD - Constantius II - RIC VIII Constantinople 121 - FEL TEMP REPARATIO41 viewsEmperor: Constantius II (r. 337-361 AD)
Date: 351-355 AD
Condition: aEF
Size: AE3

Obverse: DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG
Our Lord Constantius Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Bust right; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: FEL TEMP R-EPARATIO
The restoration of happy times.
Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling bearded and bare-headed horseman, his shield on ground at right, he turns to face soldier and extends left arm.
"●" in left field
Exergue: CONSA (Constantinople mint, first officina)

RIC VIII Constantinople 121; VM 100
2.32g; 17.9mm; 0°
Pep
JulIIVIIIConst150.jpg
355-360 AD - Julian II as Caesar - RIC VIII Constantinople 150 - SPES REIPVBLICE23 viewsCaesar: Julian II (Caes. 355-360 AD)
Date: 355-361 AD
Condition: Fair
Size: AE4

Obverse: DN CL IVLIANVS NOB CAES
Our Lord Claudius Julian Noble Caesar
Bust right; bare-headed, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: SPES REI-PVBLICE
Hope of the Republic.
Emperor, helmeted and in military dress, standing left, holding globe and spear.
Exergue: CONSS (Constantinople mint, sixth officina)

RIC VIII Constantinople 150
2.22g; 15.9mm; 180°
Pep
35g-Constans-Con-152.jpg
35g. Constans: Constantinople.31 viewsAE 3/4, 336 - 337, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: FL CONSTANS NOB CAES / Laureate bust of Constans, facing left.
Reverse: GLORIA EXERCITVS / Two soldiers, each holding spear and shield, one standard between them.
Mint mark: CONSI
1.58 gm., 15.5 mm.
RIC #152; LRBC #1031; Sear #18374.
Callimachus
35k-Hanniballianus-Con-147.jpg
35k. Hanniballianus: Constantinople.24 viewsAE 3/4, 336 - 337, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: FL HANNIBALLIANO REGI / Bust of Hanniballianus.
Reverse: SECVRITAS PVBLICA / The river god Euphrates reclining.
Mint mark: CONSS
1.31 gm., 16.5 mm.
RIC #147; LRBC #1034; Sear #16905.
Callimachus
35o-Constantinopoli-Ant-114.jpg
35o. Constaninopolis commemorative: Antioch.26 viewsAE3/4, 335 - 337, Antioch mint.
Obverse: CONSTANTINOPOLIS / Helmeted bust of Constantinopolis, facing left.
Reverse: Victory standing on prow of ship, olding sceptre, leaning on shield.
Mint mark: SMANI
1.49 gm., 15 mm.
RIC #114; LRBC #1369; Sear #16478
Callimachus
ValIIXConst16(a)2.jpg
364-375 AD - Valentinian I - RIC IX Constantinople 16(a)2 - GLORIA ROMANORVM32 viewsEmperor: Valentinian I (r. 364-375 AD)
Date: 364-367 AD
Condition: VF/Fine
Size: AE3

Obverse: DN VALENTINI-ANVS PF AVG
Our Lord Valentinian Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Bust right; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: GLORIA RO-MANORVM
Glory of the Romans.
Emperor advancing right, with right hand dragging captive and holding labarum in left.
Exergue: CONSPB (Constantinople mint, second officina)

RIC IX Constantinople 16(a)2; VM 42
2.13g; 18.0mm; 330°
Pep
ArcIXConst86c.jpg
383-408 AD - Arcadius - RIC IX Constantinople 86(c) - SALVS REIPVBLICAE25 viewsEmperor: Arcadius (r. 383-408 AD)
Date: 388-392 AD
Condition: Fine
Size: AE4

Obverse: DN ARCADIVS PF AVG
Our Lord Arcadius Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Bust right; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE
The Republic is safe.
Victory advancing left, with right hand carrying trophy over shoulder and dragging captive with left. in left field.
Exergue: CONS? (Constantinople mint, unknown officina)

RIC IX Constantinople 86(c); VM 39
0.91g; 13.1mm; 0°
Pep
ArcIXConst86(c)3.jpg
383-408 AD - Arcadius - RIC IX Constantinople 86(c)3 - SALVS REIPVBLICAE34 viewsEmperor: Arcadius (r. 383-408 AD)
Date: 388-392 AD
Condition: Fine
Size: AE4

Obverse: DN ARCADIVS PF AVG
Our Lord Arcadius Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Bust right; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE
The Republic is safe.
Victory advancing left, with right hand carrying trophy over shoulder and dragging captive with left. in left field.
Exergue: CONS (Constantinople mint, third officina)

RIC IX Constantinople 86(c)3; VM 39
0.96g; 13.3mm; 210°
Pep
IMG_2529.JPG
4 Constantius II50 viewsConstantius II, AE 3, Constantinople, 348-50 AD, 2.04g. DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP REPARATIO, radiate phoenix standing right on globe. Mintmark CONSI star. RIC VIII Constantinople 93 var (unlisted officina)?4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_2707.JPG
4 Constantius II27 viewsConstantius II, AE 3, Constantinople, 348-50 AD. DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP REPARATIO, radiate phoenix standing right on globe, star right.

RIC VIII Cyzicus 89
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_2801.JPG
4 Constantius II14 viewsConstantius II, AE 3, Constantinople, 348-50 AD, 2.04g. DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP REPARATIO, radiate phoenix standing right on globe. Mintmark SLG
RIC VIII Lyons 92, R
Randygeki(h2)
17796q00.jpg
4.0 Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine AV Solidus47 viewsHeraclius
610-641
and his son Heraclius Constantine
613-641
Constantinople Mint
21.1 mm, 4.449 g
Sear 743. DO 20.
EF, with light flat areas

AU Solidus, minted between 626 and 629 CE at Constantinople
obv. dd NN hERACLIVS ET hERA CONST PP AV/. facing busts of Heraclius and his son Heraclius Constantine, cross above
rev. VICTORIA AVGU Q. cross potent on three steps, CoNoB in ex.
scarce officina
1 commentsEcgþeow
helena.JPG
405a. Helena106 viewsFlavia Iulia Helena, also known as Saint Helena, Saint Helen, Helena Augusta, and Helena of Constantinople, (c.248 - c.329) was the first wife of Constantius Chlorus, and the mother of Emperor Constantine I. She is traditionally credited with finding the relics of the True Cross.

Many legends surround her. She was allegedly the daughter of an innkeeper. Her son Constantine renamed the city of Drepanum on the Gulf of Nicomedia as 'Helenopolis' in her honor, which led to later interpretions that Drepanum was her birthplace.

Constantius Chlorus divorced her (c.292) to marry the step-daughter of Maximian, Flavia Maximiana Theodora. Helena's son, Constantine, became emperor of the Roman Empire, and following his elevation she became a presence at the imperial court, and received the title Augusta.

She is considered by the Orthodox and Catholic churches as a saint, famed for her piety. Eusebius records the details of her pilgrimage to Palestine and other eastern provinces. She is traditionally credited (but not by Eusebius) with the finding of relics of the True Cross (q.v.), and finding the remains of the Three Wise Men, which currently reside in the Shrine of the Three Kings at Cologne Cathedral. Her feast day as a saint of the Orthodox Christian Church is celebrated with her son on May 21, the Feast of the Holy Great Sovereigns Constantine and Helen, Equal to the Apostles. Her feast day in the Roman Catholic Church falls on August 18.

At least 25 sacred wells currently exist in Britain that were dedicated to her. She is also the patron saint of Colchester.

Helena Follis. FL HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right / SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE, Securitas standing left, holding branch in right hand; PTR(crescent) in ex.
1 commentsecoli
coin409.JPG
405b. Theodora23 viewsFlavia Maximiana Theodora (known as Theodora) was the step-daughter of Maximian. Her parents were Afanius Hannibalianus and Eutropia, later wife of Maximian. Theodora's father was consul in 292, and praetorian prefect under Diocletian. In 293, Theodora married Flavius Valerius Julius Constantius (later known as Constantius Chlorus), after he had divorced from his first wife, Helena, to strengthen his political position.

Copper AE4, RIC 36, S 3911, VM 1, VF, 1.4g, 15.2mm, 180o, Constantinople mint, 337-340 A.D.; obverse FL MAX THEODORAE AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse PIETAS ROMANA, Pietas standing right holding child in her arms;Ex Forum
ecoli
rjb_2012_08_22.jpg
45046 viewsMarcian
AE4
Obv: DN MARCIANVS PF AVG
Pearl diademed, draped bust right
Rev: Monogram within wreath
Constantinople mint
RIC X Constantinople 545
3 commentsmauseus
rjb_2013_10_03.jpg
45720 viewsLeo I
Tremesis
Obv: DN LEO PERPET AVG
Diademed draped bust right
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM
Victory standing left holding wreath and globus cruciger, star in right fied
Constantinople mint
RIC 611
mauseus
rjb_2014_03_03.jpg
45715 viewsLeo I
AE4
Obv: DN LEO PF AVG
Diademed draped bust right
Rev: No legend
Lion crouching left with head turned right, all within wreath
Constantinople or Cyzicus mint
mauseus
rjb_2017_10_01.jpg
4576 viewsLeo I
AE4
Obv: DN LEO
Diademed draped bust right
Rev: No legend apart from CN in exergue
Emperor standing right holding cross and raising captive
Constantinople mint
RIC X 703-4
mauseus
1AnastasiusI491AD.jpg
491-518 AD, Anastasius I16 viewsAe; 22mm; 7.55g

DN ANASTASIVS PP AVG
pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right

Large M, star to left, cross above, star to right, A below.
CON in exergue

(countermarked in left field at top of star, circle with star?)

SB16; Doc 20a
Robin Ayers
Anastase.jpg
498-518 Anastasius - follis from Constantinople72 viewsGinolerhino
Const-Gallus-Con-107.jpg
50. Constantius Gallus.21 viewsMaiorina (AE 2), 351 - 354, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES / Bust of Constantius Gallus.
Reverse: FEL TEMP REPARATIO / Soldier spearing horseman, who has already dropped his shield and is falling off his horse. Γ and dot in field.
Mint mark: CONSI
5.65 gm., 22 mm.
RIC #107; LRBC #2029; Sear #18983.
Callimachus
coin449.JPG
501. Constantine I Constantinian Dafne Constantinople 19 viewsConstantinian Dafne
A.D. 328-9
Obv. CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG rosette diademed, dr., cuir. bust
Rev. CONSTANTINIANA DAFNE [Constantinian Dafne] Victory seated l. on cippus, palm branch in each hand, looking r.; trophy at front, at the foot is a kneeling captive with head turned being spurned by Victory
A in left, in ex. CONS RIC VII Constantinople 35 r3
ecoli
coins370.JPG
501. Constantine I Constantinople CONSTANTINIANA DAFNE25 viewsConstantiniana Dafne
35 views
Constantine I (AD 307-337)
AE-3 (AD 328)
Constantiniana Dafne, CONS
OB: Rosette-diademed head, right
CONSTANTINVS MAX.AVG.
REV: Victory seated left, with a captive and trophy before her, A in left field
CONSTANTINIANA DAFNE
CONS in exergue
Constantinople mint

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coins193.JPG
501. Constantine I Constantinople GLORIA EXERCITVS6 viewsRIC VII Constantinople 59 R2 for CONS delta

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501. Constantine I Constantinople GLORIA EXERCITVS14 viewsCONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS dot
CONSH

RIC VII Constantinople 149 R2
ecoli
coins223.JPG
501. Constantine I Constantinople GLORIA EXERCITVS13 viewsCONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
CONSH

RIC VII Constantinople 59 r2

Ex-Varangian

ecoli
coin578.JPG
501. Constantine I Constantinople GLORIA EXERCITVS17 viewsConstantine the Great AE3. 327-328 AD. CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, diademed head right / GLORIA EXERCITVS, soldier standing front, head turned right holding inverted spear, leaning on shield to right, S left, CONS in ex.
Constantinople RIC VII 22

Ex-Varangian
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coins84.JPG
501. Constantine I Constantinople GLORIA EXERCITVS 12 viewsRIC VII Constantinople 73 R2

Check
ecoli
coins207.JPG
501. Constantine I Constantinople GLORIA EXERCITVS8 viewsCONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS

RIC VII Constantinople 59 r1
ecoli
coin532.JPG
501. Constantine I Constantinople GLORIA EXERCITVS19 viewsConstantine I Constantinople

Constantine the Great AE3. 327-328 AD. CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, diademed head right / GLORIA EXERCITVS, soldier standing front, head turned right holding inverted spear, leaning on shield to right, S left, CONS in ex.
Constantinople RIC VII 22

Ex-Varangian
ecoli
coin561.JPG
501. Constantine I Constantinople LIBERTAS PVBLICA20 viewsConstantine the Great AE3. 327 AD. CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, laureate head right / LIBERTAS PVBLICA, Victory standing left on galley, wreath in both hands, B left, CONS in ex. Constantinople RIC VII 18
ecoli
coin416.JPG
501. Constantine I GLORIA EXERCITVS Constantinople22 viewsGLORIA EXERCITVS

Constantine I the Great A.D. 307-337, AE 3, mint of Constantinople. Obv.: CONSTANTINVS MAX.AVG. His diademed head to right. Rev.: GLORIA EXERCITVS. Constantine standing right, holding spear and leaning on shield; in ex.CONS.

Ex-Varangian
ecoli
coin15.JPG
501. Constantine I GLORIA EXERCITVS Constantinople11 viewsCONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS dot
CONS gamma
RIC VII Constantinople 149 r3

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60140LG.jpg
501d. Hanniballianus92 viewsHanniballianus. A.D. 335-337.

Dalmatius's second son, Hannibalianus, was appointed Governor of Pontus, as well as Cappadocia and Lesser or Roman Armenia. Hannibalianus also received the title Rex Regum, which some scholars believe suggests that Constantine intended to install him as a client king over Persia once his contemplated campaign against Rome’s eastern enemy was brought to a successful conclusion. In a further gesture of reconciliation between the two branches of the imperial family, Hannibalianus was married to Constantia, one of Constantine's daughters.

Æ 15 mm (1.20 g). Constantinople, as Rex Regum, A.D. 336-337. FL HANNIBALLIANO REG[I], bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right / [SE]CVRITAS PVBLIC[A], river-god Euphrates reclining right, beside urn and reed; [CONSS]. RIC 147; LRBC 1034. Near VF/VF, attractive dark green patina with earthen highlights.
1 commentsecoli
coins174.JPG
502. CONSTANTINE II Campgate Constantinople15 viewsRic Vii 20 R3

Ex-Varangian
ecoli
coins284.JPG
502. Constantine II Constantinople GLORIA EXERCITVS7 viewsCONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
CONSB

RIC VII Constantinople 138 r1

ecoli
coin782.JPG
502. Constantine II Constantinople GLORIA EXERCITVS4 viewsCONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
RIC VII Constantinople 60 S

ecoli
coins374.JPG
504. Constantius II Constantinople Fel Temp12 viewsConstantinople 112 C

1 commentsecoli
coins354.JPG
504. Constantius II Constantinople Fel Temp5 viewsDN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG
FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO

CONSZ

Constantinople 109 C2
ecoli
coin675.JPG
504. Constantius II Constantinople GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS7 viewsFL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
dot CONSS dot
RIC VII Constantinople 82 R4
ecoli
coin364.JPG
504. Constantius II Fel Temp Constantinople6 viewsDN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG
FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO

Constantinople 79 S

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coin249~0.JPG
504. Constantius II Fel Temp Constantinople9 viewsConstantinople 116 ?

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coin227~0.JPG
504. Constantius II GLORIA EXERCITVS Constantinople10 viewsFL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS

CONSS

RIC VII Constantinople 61
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coin274.JPG
509. Jovian21 views09. Jovian39 viewsJovian was born at Singidunum in A.D. 330, the son of the commander of Constantius II's imperial bodyguards. He also joined the guards and by A.D. 363 had risen to the post that his father had once held. He accompanied the Roman Emperor Julian on the disastrous Mesopotamian campain of the same year against Shapur II, the Sassanid king. After a small but decisive engagement the Roman army was forced to retreat from the numerically superior Persian force. Julian had been mortally wounded during the retreat and Jovian seized his chance. Some accounts have it that on Julian's death Jovian's soldiers called out "Jovianus!" The cry was mistaken for "Julianus", and the army cheered Jovian, briefly under the illusion that the slain Emperor had recovered from his wound.

Shapur pressed his advantage and Jovian, deep inside Sassanid territory, was forced to sue for peace on very unfavourable terms. In exchange for safety he agreed to withdraw from the provinces east of the Tigris that Diocletian had annexed and allow the Persians to occupy the fortresses of Nisbis, Castra Maurorum and Singara. the King of Armenia, Arsaces, was to stay neutral in future conflicts between the two empires, and was forced to cede some of his kingdom to Shapur. The treaty was seen as a disgrace and Jovian rapidly lost popularity.

After arriving at Antioch Jovian decided to hurry to Constantinople to consolidate his position.

Jovian was a Christian, in contrast to his predecessor Julian the Apostate, who had attempted a revival of paganism. He died on February 17, 364 after a reign of eight months.

Jovian AE3. D N IOVIA NVS P F AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right / VOT V MVLT X inside wreath
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512. Procopius151 viewsProcopius (326 - May 27, 366), was a Roman usurper against Valentinian I, and member of the Constantinian dynasty.

According to Ammianus Marcellinus, Procopius was a native of Cilicia. On his mother's side, Procopius was cousin of Emperor Julian.

Procopius took part in the emperor Julian's campaign against the Persian Empire in 363. He was entrusted of leading 30,000 men towards Armenia, joining King Arsaces, and later return to Julian camp. At the time of Julian's death, there were rumors that he had intended Procopius to be his successor, but when Jovian was elected emperor by the Roman army, Procopius went into hiding to preserve his life. The ancient historians differ on the exact details of Procopius' life in hiding, but agree that he returned to public knowledge at Chalcedon before the house of the senator Strategius suffering from starvation and ignorant of current affairs.

By that time, Jovianus was dead, and Valentinian I shared the purple with his brother Valens. Procopius immediately moved to declare himself emperor. He bribed two legions that were resting at Constantinople to support his efforts, and took control of the imperial city. Shortly after this he proclaimed himself Emperor on September 28, 365, and quickly took control of the provinces of Thrace, and later Bithynia.

Valens was left with the task of dealing with this rebel, and over the next months struggled with both cities and units that wavered in their allegiance. Eventually their armies met at the Battle of Thyatira, and Procopius' forces were defeated. He fled the battlefield, but was betrayed to Valens by two of his remaining followers. Valens had all three executed May 27, 366.


Procopius - Usurper in the east, 365-6 , AE-3, Nicomedia mint


2.90g

Obv: Bust of Procopius, beared left "DN PROCOPIVS PF AVG"

Rev: Procopius standing head right, foot resting on a prow and leaning on a shield. "REPARATIO FEL TEMP" "SMNG" in the exergue.

RIC 10
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514. Valentinian II34 viewsValentinian II (371 - 392) was elevated as Western Roman Emperor at the age of four in 375, along with his half-brother Gratian.

Valentinian and his family lived in Milan, and the empire was nominally divided between them. Gratian took the trans- Alpine provinces, while Italy, Illyricum in part, and Africa were to be under the rule of Valentinian, or rather of his mother, Justina. Justina was an Arian, and the imperial court at Milan struggled against the Catholics of that city, led by their bishop Ambrose. The popularity of Ambrose was so great that the emperors' authority was materially shaken. In 387, Magnus Maximus, a Roman consul who had commanded an army in Briton, and in 383 (the year of Gratian's death) had declared himself emperor of Western Rome, crossed the Alps into the valley of the Po and threatened Milan.

The emperor Valentinian II and his mother fled to Theodosius I, the Eastern Roman Emperor and Valentinian's brother in law. Valentinian was restored in 388 by Theodosius, following the death of Magnus Maximus.

On May 15, 392, Valentinian was found hanged in his residence in the town of Vienne in Gaul. The Frankish soldier Arbogast, Valentinian's protector and magister militum, maintained that it was suicide. Arbogast and Valentinian had frequently disputed rulership over the Western Roman Empire, and Valentinian was also noted to have complained of Arbogast's control over him to Theodosius. Thus when word of his death reached Constantinople Theodosius believed, or at least suspected, that Arbogast was lying and that he had engineered Valentinian's demise. These suspicions were further fueled by Arbogast's elevation of a Eugenius, pagan official to the position of Western Emperor, and the veiled accusations which Ambrose, the Bishop of Milan, spoke during his funeral oration for Valentinian.

Valentinian II's death sparked a civil war between Eugenius and Theodosius over the rulership of the West in the Battle of the Frigidus. The resultant Eastern victory there led to the final brief unification of the Roman Empire under Theodosius, and the ultimate irreparable division of the Empire after his death.

Bronze AE3, RIC 22, VF, 2.19g, 17.7mm, 0o, Arelate mint, 378-383 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIAE AVGGG, Victory advancing left holding wreath in right and palm frond in left, [S]CON in ex;Ex Aiello;Ex Forum
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515. Theodosius I37 viewsSon of a senior military officer, Theodosius the Elder, Theodosius accompanied his father to Britannia to help quell the Great Conspiracy in 368. He was military commander (dux) of Moesia, a Roman province on the lower Danube, in 374. However, shortly thereafter, and at about the same time as the sudden disgrace and execution of his father, Theodosius retired to Cauca. The reason for his retirement, and the relationship (if any) between it and his father's death is unclear. It is possible that he was dismissed of his command by the emperor Valentinian I, after the loss of two of Theodosius' legions by the Sarmatians in late 374.

In 378, after the death of the emperor Valens at the Battle of Adrianople, the emperor Gratian appointed Theodosius co-augustus for the East. After 392, following the death of Valentinian II, whom he had supported against a variety of usurpations, Theodosius ruled as sole emperor, defeating the usurper Eugenius on September 6, 394, at the Battle of the Frigidus.


RIC IX Constantinople 88a C
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515a. Aelia Flacilla33 viewsEmpress, wife of Theodosius the Great, died c. A. D. 385 or 386. Like Theodosius himself, his first wife, Ælia Flaccilla, was of Spanish descent. She may have been the daughter of Claudius Antonius, Prefect of Gaul, who was consul in 382. Her marriage with Theodosius probably took place in the year 376, when his father, the comes Theodosius, fell into disfavour and he himself withdrew to Cauca in Gallæcia, for her eldest son, afterwards Emperor Arcadius, was born towards the end of the following year. In the succeeding years she presented two more children to her husband Honorius (384), who later became emperor, and Pulcheria, who died in early childhood, shortly before her mother. Gregory of Nyssa states expressly that she had three children; consequently the Gratian mentioned by St. Ambrose, together with Pulcheria, was probably not her son. Flaccilla was, like her husband, a zealous supporter of the Nicene Creed and prevented the conference between the emperor and the Arian Eunomius (Sozomen, Hist. eccl., VII, vi). On the throne she was a shining example of Christian virtue and ardent charity. St. Ambrose describes her as "a soul true to God" (Fidelis anima Deo. — "De obitu Theodosii", n. 40, in P. L., XVI, 1462). In his panegyric St. Gregory of Nyssa bestowed the highest praise on her virtuous life and pictured her as the helpmate of the emperor in all good works, an ornament of the empire, a leader of justice, an image of beneficence. He praises her as filled with zeal for the Faith, as a pillar of the Church, as a mother of the indigent. Theodoret in particular exalts her charity and benevolence (Hist. eccles., V, xix, ed. Valesius, III, 192 sq.). He tells us how she personally tended cripples, and quotes a saying of hers: "To distribute money belongs to the imperial dignity, but I offer up for the imperial dignity itself personal service to the Giver." Her humility also attracts a special meed of praise from the church historian. Flaccilla was buried in Constantinople, St. Gregory of Nyssa delivering her funeral oration. She is venerated in the Greek Church as a saint, and her feast is kept on 14 September. The Bollandists (Acta SS., Sept., IV, 142) are of the opinion that she is not regarded as a saint but only as venerable, but her name stands in the Greek Menæa and Synaxaria followed by words of eulogy, as is the case with the other saints

Wife of Theodosius. The reverse of the coin is very interesting; a nice bit of Pagan-Christian syncretism with winged victory inscribing a chi-rho on a shield.
1 commentsecoli
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516a Johannes42 viewsAfter the death of Honorius on August 15, 423, his closest male relative was Valentinian, son of Galla Placidia. Valentinian was currently at Constantinople. This power vacuum allowed Ioannes, the primicerius notariorum (chief notary) to seize power in the west. Virtually nothing is known of Ioannes himself, though he was said to have had a mild character. He was supported by the magister militum Castinus and by Aetius, son of the magister militum Gaudentius. After his acclamation at Rome, Ioannes transferred his capital to Ravenna. Ioannes' rule was accepted in Gaul, Spain and Italy, but not in Africa. Ioannes' attempts to negotiate with the eastern emperor Theodosius II were unsuccessful. He seems not to have had a firm grasp of power and this encouraged eastern intervention. In 425, Theodosius II sent an expedition under the command of Ardabur the Elder to install Valentinian as emperor in the west. Ardabur was captured, but treated well, as Ioannes still hoped to be able to negotiate with Theodosius. Ardabur, however, persuaded some of Ioannes' officials to betray him. After his capture, Ioannes was taken to Aquileia where he was mutilated, then executed. Three days after Ioannes's execution, one of his generals, Aetius, arrived in Italy with a large force of Huns. Rather than continue the war, Valentinian bought off the Huns with gold and Aetius with the office of comes.
1 commentsecoli
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517. Arcadius32 viewsFlavius Arcadius (377/378–May 1, 408) was Roman Emperor in the Eastern half of the Roman Empire from 395 until his death.

Arcadius was the elder son of Theodosius I and Aelia Flaccilla, and brother of Honorius, who would become a Western Roman Emperor. His father declared him an Augustus in January, 383. His younger brother was also declared an Augustus in 393.

As Emperors, Honorius was under the control of the Romanized Vandal magister militum Flavius Stilicho while Arcadius was dominated by one of his ministers, Rufinus. Stilicho is alleged by some to have wanted control of both emperors, and is supposed to have had Rufinus assassinated by Gothic mercenaries in 395, but definite proof of these allegations is lacking. In any case, Arcadius' new advisor Eutropius simply took Rufinus' place as the power behind the Eastern imperial throne. Arcadius was also dominated by his wife Aelia Eudoxia, who convinced her husband to dismiss Eutropius in 399. Eudoxia was strongly opposed by John Chrysostom, the Patriarch of Constantinople, who felt that she had used her family's wealth to gain control over the emperor. Eudoxia used her influence to have Chrysostom deposed in 404, but she died later that year.

Arcadius was dominated for the rest of his rule by Anthemius, the Praetorian Prefect, who made peace with Stilicho in the West. Arcadius himself was more concerned with appearing to be a pious Christian than he was with political or military matters, and he died, only nominally in control of his empire, in 408.

Bronze AE 4, RIC 67d and 70a, choice aEF, 1.14g, 13.8mm, 180o, Antioch mint, 383-395 A.D.; obverse D N ARCADIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICE, Victory advancing left holding trophy over right shoulder, dragging captive with left, staurogram left, ANTG in ex; Ex Aiello; Ex Forum
ecoli
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565-578 AD, Justin II & Sophia23 viewsAe Follis; 30mm; 15.06g

DN IVSTINVS PP AVG
Justin on left holding cross on globe and Sophia on right, holding sceptre topped by cross, both nimbate, seated facing on double-throne

Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year to right II over II, officina A below
CON in exergue

SB 360; MIB 43; DO 25a
Constantinople, 568/9 AD
1 commentsRobin Ayers
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60. Alexius I Comnenus17 viewsAlexius I Comnenus
Pre-reform AR Miliaresion Constantinople mint. Struck 1081-1092.

The Theotokos (Virgin Mary) standing facing, orans / Alexius standing facing, holding long cross and sheathed sword, pellet in field.

DOC 10; SB 1897; aF/F, very rare
Sosius
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601. Eudoxia24 viewsAelia Eudoxia (d. 6 October 404) was the wife of the Eastern Roman emperor Arcadius.

The daughter of a certain Bauto, a Frankish magister militum serving in the Western Roman army during the 380s, Eudoxia owed her marriage to the youthful Emperor Arcadius on 27 April 395 to the intrigues of the eunuch of the palace, Eutropius. She had very considerable influence over her husband, who was of rather weak character and who was more interested in Christian piety than imperial politics.

In 399 she succeeded, with help from the leader of the Empire's Gothic mercenaries, in deposing her erstwhile benefactor Eutropius, who was later executed over the protests of John Chrysostom, the Patriarch of Constantinople.

John Chrysostom was already becoming unpopular at court due to his efforts at reforming the Church, and in 403 Eudoxia and Theophilus, Patriarch of Alexandria, succeeded in having the outspoken Patriarch condemned by a synod and then deposed. He was exiled to Armenia the next year after a brief return to power resulting from popular disgust at his fall and an earthquake which reinforced those feelings.

Eudoxia had a total of seven pregnancies, five of which were successful. Her final pregnancy ended in a miscarriage which led to her death on October 6, 404. One of her children was the future emperor Theodosius II.

In 403, Simplicius, Prefect of Constantinople, erected a statue dedicated to her on a column of porphyry. Arcadius renamed the town of Selymbria (Silivri) Eudoxiopolis after her, though this name did not survive.

Bronze AE 4, RIC 102, S 4241, VM 6, VF, 2.14g, 17.0mm, 180o, Nikomedia mint, 401-403 A.D.; obverse AEL EVDOXIA AVG, diademed and draped bust right with hand of God holding wreath over her head; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated on cuirass inscribing Christogram on shield, SMNA in ex; softly struck reverse; rare
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602. Theodosius II30 viewsFlavius Theodosius II (April, 401 - July 28, 450 ). The eldest son of Eudoxia and Arcadius who at the age of 7 became the Roman Emperor of the East.

He was heavily influenced by his eldest sister Pulcheria who pushed him towards Eastern Christianity. Pulcheria was the primary driving power behind the emperor and many of her views became official policy. These included her anti-Semitic view which resulted in the destruction of synagogues.

On the death of his father Arcadius in 408, he became Emperor. In June 421 Theodosius married the poet Aelia Eudocia. They had a daughter, Licinia Eudoxia, whose marriage with the Western Roman Emperor Valentinian III marked the re-unification of the two halves of the Empire, even if for a short time. Theodosius created the University of Constantinople, and died in 450 as the result of a riding accident.

Bronze AE4, S 4297, VG, .96g, 12.3mm, 0o, uncertain mint, 408-450 A.D.; obverse D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse no legend, cross in wreath, obscure mintmark in exergue; ex Forum
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603. Marcian26 viewsMarcian was born in Thrace or Illyria. He spent his early life as an obscure soldier. He subsequently served for nineteen years under Ardaburius and Aspar, and took part in the wars against the Persians and Vandals. In 431, Marcian was taken prisoner by the Vandals in the fighting near Hippo Regius; brought before the Vandal king Geiseric, he was released on his oath never to take up arms against the Vandals.

Through the influence of these generals he became a captain of the guards, and was later raised to the rank of tribune and senator. On the death of Theodosius II he was chosen as consort by the latter's sister and successor, Pulcheria, and called upon to govern an empire greatly humbled and impoverished by the ravages of the Huns.

Upon becoming Emperor, Marcian repudiated the embarrassing payments of tribute to Attila the Hun, which the latter had been accustomed to receiving from Theodosius in order to refrain from attacks on the eastern empire. Aware that he could never capture the eastern capital of Constantinople, Attila turned to the west and waged his famous campaigns in Gaul 451 and Italy (452) while leaving Marcian's dominions alone.

He reformed the finances, checked extravagance, and repopulated the devastated districts. He repelled attacks upon Syria and Egypt (452), and quelled disturbances on the Armenian frontier (456). The other notable event of his reign is the Council of Chalcedon (451), in which Marcian endeavoured to mediate between the rival schools of theology.

Marcian generally ignored the affairs of the western Roman Empire, leaving that tottering half of the empire to its fate. He did nothing to aid the west during Attila's campaigns, and, living up to his promise, ignored the depredations of Geiseric even when the Vandals sacked Rome in 455. It has recently been argued, however, that Marcian was more actively involved in aiding the western Empire than historians had previously believed and that Marcian's fingerprints can be discerned in the events leading up to, and including, Attila's death. (See Michael A. Babcock, "The Night Attila Died: Solving the Murder of Attila the Hun," Berkley Books, 2005.)

Shortly before Attila's death in 453, conflict had begun again between him and Marcian. However, the powerful Hun king died before all-out war broke out. In a dream, Marcian claimed he saw Attila's bow broken before him, and a few days later, he got word that his great enemy was dead.

Marcian died in 457 of disease, possibly gangrene contracted during a long religious journey.

Despite his short reign and his writing off of the west Marcian is considered one of the best of the early "Byzantine" emperors. The Eastern Orthodox Church recognizes him and his wife Pulcheria as saints, with their feast day on February 17.

Marcian AE4.9mm (1.30 grams) D N MARCIANVS P F AV, diademed & draped bust right / Monogram of Marcian inside wreath, * above
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604. Leo I388 viewsImperator Caesar Flavius Valerius Leo Augustus or Leo I of the Byzantine Empire (401–474), reigned from 457 to 474, also known as Leo the Thracian, was the last of a series of emperors placed on the throne by Aspar, the Alan serving as commander-in-chief of the army. His coronation as emperor on February 7, 457, was the first known to involve the Patriarch of Constantinople. Leo I made an alliance with the Isaurians and was thus able to eliminate Aspar. The price of the alliance was the marriage of Leo's daughter to Tarasicodissa, leader of the Isaurians who, as Zeno, became emperor in 474.

During Leo's reign, the Balkans were ravaged time and again by the West Goths and the Huns. However, these attackers were unable to take Constantinople thanks to the walls which had been rebuilt and reinforced in the reign of Theodosius II and against which they possessed no suitable siege engines.

Leo's reign was also noteworthy for his influence in the Western Roman Empire, marked by his appointment of Anthemius as Western Roman Emperor in 467. He attempted to build on this political achievement with an expedition against the Vandals in 468, which was defeated due to the treachery and incompetence of Leo's brother-in-law Basiliscus. This disaster drained the Empire of men and money.

Leo's greatest influence in the West was largely inadvertent and at second-hand: the great Goth king Theodoric the Great was raised at the Leo's court in Constantinople, where he was steeped in Roman government and military tactics, which served him well when he returned after Leo's death to become the Goth ruler of a mixed but largely Romanized people.

Leo also published a New Constitutions or compilation of Law Code[1], Constitution LV concerned Judaism: "JEWS SHALL LIVE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE RITES OF CHRISTIANITY. Those who formerly were invested with Imperial authority promulgated various laws with reference to the Hebrew people, who, once nourished by Divine protection, became renowned, but are now remarkable for the calamities inflicted upon them because of their contumacy towards Christ and God; and these laws, while regulating their mode of life, compelled them to read the Holy Scriptures, and ordered them not to depart from the ceremonies of their worship. They also provided that their children should adhere to their religion, being obliged to do so as well by the ties of blood, as on account of the institution of circumcision. These are the laws which I have already stated were formerly enforced throughout the Empire. But the Most Holy Sovereign from whom We are descended, more concerned than his predecessors for the salvation of the Jews, instead of allowing them (as they did) to obey only their ancient laws, attempted, by the interpretation of prophesies and the conclusions which he drew from them, to convert them to the Christian religion, by means of the vivifying water of baptism. He fully succeeded in his attempts to transform them into new men, according to the doctrine of Christ, and induced them to denounce their ancient doctrines and abandon their religious ceremonies, such as circumcision, the observance of the Sabbath, and all their other rites. But although he, to a certain extent, overcame the obstinacy of the Jews, he was unable to force them to abolish the laws which permitted them to live in accordance with their ancient customs. Therefore We, desiring to accomplish what Our Father failed to effect, do hereby annul all the old laws enacted with reference to the Hebrews, and We order that they shall not dare to live in any other manner than in accordance with the rules established by the pure and salutary Christian Faith. And if anyone of them should be proved to, have neglected to observe the ceremonies of the Christian religion, and to have returned to his former practices, he shall pay the penalty prescribed by the law for apostates."

Leo died of dysentery at the age of 73 on January 18, 474.

Bronze AE4, RIC 671, S 4340 var, VG, 1.17g, 10.3mm, 180o, Alexandria mint, obverse D N LEO P F AVG (or similar), pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Lion standing left, head right, cross above, ALEA in ex; very rare (R3); ex Forum
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604a. Leo I and Verina328 viewsAelia Verina (died 484) was the wife of Byzantine emperor Leo I, and the mother-in-law of Zeno, who was married to her daughter Ariadne.

Her origins are unknown. She originally supported Zeno while the young emperor Leo II was still alive, but after Leo II's death in 474 she turned against her son-in-law. She conspired against him with her lover Patricius, her brother Basiliscus, the Isaurian general Illus, and general Theodoric Strabo, forcing Zeno to flee Constantinople in 475. Basiliscus then briefly became the rival emperor, until 476 when Verina reconciled with Zeno.

Verina then conspired against Illus, who discovered the plot, and with Zeno's consent had her imprisoned. This led to another conspiracy led by Verina's son Marcian (a grandson of the emperor Marcian), but Marcian was defeated and exiled.

In 483 Zeno asked Illus to release Verina, but by now Illus was opposed to Zeno's Monophysite sympathies. Illus allied with Verina and declared a general named Leontius emperor, but Zeno defeated them as well. Illus and Verina fled to Isauria, where Verina died in 484.

Bronze AE4, RIC 713-718, obverse D N LE-O (or similar), Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Empress Verina standing facing holding cross on globe and transverse scepter, b - E across fields, From uncleaned pile

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64. Procopius.17 viewsAE 3, Sept. 365 - May 355, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: DN PROCOPIVS P F AVG / Diademed bust of Procopius, facing left.
Reverse: REPARATIO FEL TEMP / The emperor standing, holding labarum and shield, a small indeterminate object at foot. Christogram at upper right, palm branch at left.
Mint mark: CONSS
3.88 gm., 17 mm.
RIC #17 var.; Sear #19882/83.

This coin is not listed in RIC. The description of the types would indicate RIC 17a. However the branch at left indicates RIC 17b. But RIC 17b does not have the "indeterminate object" at the emperor's feet. Also, the officina number (S) is not listed for RIC 17a or 17b.
Callimachus
641-668 Constans II S1013-14.jpg
641-668 Constans II - follis from Constantinole37 viewsBust of Constans II facing, holding cross on globe
Busts of Constantine IV, Heraclius and Tiberius around M

Sear 1013-1014
1 commentsGinolerhino
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641-668 Constans II - follis from Constantinople53 viewsMinted in Constantinople in 641-2. Obverse legend should read "EN TOYTO NIKA" but appears blundered. Ginolerhino
Constans II.jpg
641-668 Constans II - follis from Constantinople37 viewsProbably minted in Constantinople. Circular countermark with christogram on reverse.Ginolerhino
Constans II 665.jpg
665-666 Constans II - follis from Constantinople33 viewsMinted in Constantinople in 665-6.
Obverse : Left : Constans II standing in military attire, right : Constantine IV his son wearing crown and chlamys.
Reverse : M between Heraclius and Tiberius, each wearing crown and chlamys and holding a globe cruciger.
According to Sear (1012) this follis was minted only in the year 25.
Ginolerhino
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68. Valentinian II.32 viewsAE 2, 383 - 388, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: DN VALENTINIANVS P F AVG / Helmeted bust of Valentinian, spear over right shoulder.
Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM / Valentinian standing on ship, raising right hand. Victory seated at helm.
Mint mark: CONΔ
6.73 gm., 22.5 mm.
RIC #79a; LRBC #2168; Sear #20261.
Callimachus
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7. Manuel Comnenus AE Trachy45 viewsManuel Comnenus
1143 - 1180
Constantinople Mint
AE Trachy

obv. IC - XC Jesus enthroned
rev. Manuel standing on left, being crowned by Mary
Zam
Arcadius-Con-53b.jpg
74. Arcadius.43 viewsAE 2, 383, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: D N ARCADIVS P F AVG / Diademed bust of Arcadius, holding spear and shield. Hand of God above, holding wreath.
Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM / Arcadius standing, holding standard and shield. Captive seated at left.
Mint mark: CONΓ*
5.44 gm., 24 mm.
RIC #53b; LRBC #2154; Sear #20783.

Edward Gibbon writes of Arcadius: "He received a princely education in the palace of Constantinople, and his inglorious life was spent in that peaceful and splendid seat of royalty, from whence he appeared to reign . . ."
1 commentsCallimachus
Eudoxia-Con-101.jpg
76. Eudoxia.24 viewsAE 3, 401 - 403, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: AEL EVDOXIA AVG / Diademed bust of Eudoxia, hand of God above, holding a wreath.
Reverse: SALVS REIPVBLICAE / Victory pointing to shield inscribed with a Christogram.
Mint mark: CONSA
2.46 gm., 17.5 mm.
RIC #101; LRBC #2213; Sear #20892.

RIC vol. X says (p. 71) that "this is the last bronze coinage in the Roman series to maintain the generally high standard of design and engraving characteristic of the fourth century."
Callimachus
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82. Andronicus II and Michael IX, AE assarion, Constantinople.8 viewsAndronicus II and Michael IX
AE assarion, Constantinople.

O: AVTOKPATOPEC RWMAIWN, Andronicus, on left and Michael, on right, both standing facing, holding labarum between them

R: B and retrograde B to left and right of patriarchal cross.

SB 2451.

Thanks to FORVM member glebe for helping to ID!
Sosius
829-842 Theophilus S1667.jpg
829-842 Theophilus - follis fromConstantinople54 viewsΘEOFIL' bASIL' , 3/4 length emperor facing holding cross on globe and labarum
ΘEO / FILE AVS / OVStE SV / NICAS

Sear 1667
Ginolerhino
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88. Marcian.17 viewsAE 4, 450 - 457, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: DN MARCIANVS P F AVG / Diademed, bust of Marcian.
Reverse: monogram.
Mint mark: CON
1.49 gm., 10.5 mm.
RIC #541/542; LRBC #2247; Sear #21395.
Callimachus
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886-912 AD, Leo VI6 viewsLeo VI,
AE Follis;9.61g; 26-27mm
Constantinople

LEON bASILEVS ROM,
crowned bust facing with short beard, wearing chlamys, holding akakia

LEON EN QEO BA SILEVS R OMEON
legend in four lines

SB 1729, DOC 8
Robin Ayers
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89. John VIII Palaeologus. 21 viewsJohn VIII Palaeologus.

1425-1448.
AR Stavraton (25mm, 4.78 g, 6h).
Constantinople mint.

O: Facing bust of Christ Pantokrator; lis in right field

R: Crowned facing bust of John; pellets flanking.

DOC 1647-8; PCPC 348.9; LBC 1051-2; SB 2563. VF, area of weak strike, deposits.

Ex-CNG
1 commentsSosius
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96. Justinian I.19 viewsFollis (40 nummia), 541, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: DN IVSTINIANVS P P AVG / Helmeted and cuirassed bust, facing; holding globe and cruciger. Cross at right.
Reverse: Large M, cross above, ANNO XIIII at sides, Γ between legs of M.
Mint mark: CON
22.82 gm., 38 mm.
Sear #163.

The large M is the Greek numeral 40 -- i.e. 40 nummia is the coin's denomination. The smaller Γ is the Greek numeral 3 -- i.e. the 3'rd officina of the mint at Constantinople. ANNO XIIII is Latin for Year 14 -- the 14'th year of Justinian's reign (541 AD).
In 541, things were going bad for the Empire -- trouble with the Goths in Italy, the Bulgars ravaging the Balkans, and the Persians invading from the east. Bubonic plague swept across the eastern Mediterranean in 541, reaching Constantinople in May 542, before going on to Italy and Gaul.
Callimachus
Centenional Constantino I RIC VII Constantinople 32A.jpg
A121-30 - Constantino I "El Grande" (307 - 337 D.C.)58 viewsAE3 Centenional 19 mm 3.0 gr.

Anv: "CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG" - Cabeza con diadema rosetada, viendo el cielo a derecha.
Rev: "CONSTANTINI-ANA DAFNE" - Victoria sentada a izquierda, portando hoja de palma en ambas manos, apoya su pié derecho sobre un prisionero arrodillado frente a ella. Victoria gira su cabeza a derecha para no verlo. Frente a ella un trofeo y un escudo al lado del cautivo. "CONS'" en exergo y "A" en campo izquierdo.
La serie refiere a la creación, por parte de Constantino, del complejo fortificado de Dafne en el limes danubiano.

Acuñada 328 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: R1

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Constantinople) #32 Pag.574 - Cohen Vol.VII #91 Pag.238 - DVM #73 var Pag.291 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8275.b. Pag.169
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Centenional Constantino I RIC VII Constantinople 38D.jpg
A121-31 - Constantino I "El Grande" (307 - 337 D.C.)57 viewsAE3 Centenional 19 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG" - Busto con diadema rosetada, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONSTANTINI-ANA DAFNE" - Victoria sentada a izquierda, portando hoja de palma en ambas manos, apoya su pié derecho sobre un prisionero arrodillado frente a ella. Victoria gira su cabeza a derecha para no verlo. Frente a ella un trofeo y un escudo al lado del cautivo. "CONS' " en exergo y "Δ" en campo izquierdo.
La serie refiere a la creación, por parte de Constantino, del complejo fortificado de Dafne en el limes danubiano.

Acuñada 328 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.3ra.)
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Constantinople) #35 Pag.574 - Cohen Vol.VII #92 Pag.238 - DVM #73 Pag.291 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8275.a. Pag.169
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Centenional Constantino I RIC VII Constantinople 59.jpg
A121-60 - Constantino I "El Grande" (307 - 337 D.C.)64 viewsAE3 Centenional 20 x 17 mm 2.2 gr.

Anv: "CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG" - Busto con diadema rosetada, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS" - Dos Soldados de pié enfrentados, sosteniendo un escudo y una lanza vertical invertida cada uno. Entre ellos DOS estandartes. "CONSA" en exergo.

Acuñada 330 - 333 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: C2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Constantinople) #59Pag.579 - Cohen Vol.VII #254 Pag.258 - DVM #93 Pag.292 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8276.i. Pag.169 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3886
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Centenional Constantino I RIC VII Constantinople 137.jpg
A121-70 - Constantino I "El Grande" (307 - 337 D.C.)68 viewsAE3/4 Centenional 16 mm 1.4 gr.

Anv: "CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG" - Busto con diadema rosetada, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS" - Dos Soldados de pié enfrentados, sosteniendo un escudo y una lanza vertical invertida cada uno. Entre ellos UN estandarte. "CONSA" en exergo.

Acuñada 336 - 337 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: R1

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Constantinople) #137 Pag.589 - Cohen Vol.VII #243 Pag.257 - DVM #94 Pag.292 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8277.i. Pag.170 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3887
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Centenional Conmemorativa RIC VII Constantinople 78E.jpg
A121B-02 - Acuñaciones Conmemorativas Roma - Constantinopla53 viewsAE3/4 Centenional 18 x 17 mm 2.0 gr.

Anv: "VRBS ROMA" - Busto de Roma vistiendo yelmo coronado y con penacho de pluma y manto imperial, viendo a Izquierda.
Rev: "ANEPIGRAFA" (Sin Leyenda) - Loba madre parada a izquierda dando de mamar a Romulo y Remo, a quienes mira. Dos estrellas sobre la loba. "CONSε ·" en exergo.

Acuñada 333 - 335 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.5ta.)
Rareza: R1

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Constantinople) #78 Pag.582 - Cohen Vol.VII #17 Pag.330 - DVM #2 Pag.292 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8305.i. Pag.174 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3894
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Centenional Conmemorativa RIC VIII Constantinople 21Z.jpg
A121B-40 - Acuñaciones Conmemorativas Roma - Constantinopla56 viewsAE4 Fracción = 1/2 ó 1/3 Centenional? 14 mm 1.5 gr.

Anv: "POP ROMANVS" - Busto de joven laureado (quizás Genio del Pueblo Romano), vistiendo toga y con una cornucopia detrás, viendo a Izquierda.
Rev: "ANEPIGRAFA" (Sin Leyenda) - Puente sobre un Rio, se cree que es el puente de Milvian. "CONS/Z" en el campo centro

Acuñada 330 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.7ma.)
Rareza: C3 ?

Referencias: RIC Vol.VIII (Constantinople) #21 Pag.448 - Cohen Vol.VII #1 Pag.332 - DVM #4 Pag.292 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8315.a. Pag.175 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3900
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Centenional Conmemorativa RIC VIII Constantinople 22E.jpg
A121B-42 - Acuñaciones Conmemorativas Roma - Constantinopla43 viewsAE4 Fracción = 1/2 ó 1/3 Centenional? 13 mm 1.0 gr.

Anv: "POP ROMANVS" - Busto de joven laureado (quizás Genio del Pueblo Romano), vistiendo toga y con una cornucopia detrás, viendo a Izquierda.
Rev: "ANEPIGRAFA" (Sin Leyenda) - Estrella dentro de una corona de laureles. "CONSε" en el campo centro

Acuñada 330 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.5ta.)
Rareza: C3 ?

Referencias: RIC Vol.VIII (Constantinople) #22 Pag.448 - Cohen Vol.VII #2 Pag.332 - DVM #5 Pag.292 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8315.b. Pag.175 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3901
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Centenional reducido Helena RIC VIII Constantinopolis 49Theta.jpg
A123-12 - Helena (318 - 328 D.C.)43 viewsAE4 Centenional reducido 16 x 15 mm 1.2 gr.
Esposa/Concubina de Constancio I Cloro y madre de Constantino I.
Emisión póstuma realizada en este caso por Constancio II, también realizaron emisiones similares Constantino II en Treveri y Constante en Roma.

Anv: "FL IVL HELENA AVG" - Busto con diadema laureada, vistiendo túnica ornamentada y collar formado por dos hiladas de perlas, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PAX PVBLICA" – Pax (La Paz) de pié a izquierda, portando una rama de olivo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y bajo, y cetro transversal en la izquierda. "CONSΘ" en exergo.

Acuñada 337 - 340 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.9na.)
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.VIII (Constantinople) #49 Pag.450 - Cohen Vol.VII #4 Pag.95 - DVM #4 Pag.293 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8531.c. Pag.201 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3910
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Centenional Hanibaliano RIC VII Constantinople 148.jpg
A127-05 - Hanibaliano Rey de Armenia, el Ponto y Capadocia (335 - 337 D.C.) 55 viewsAE4 Centenional reducido 16 mm 1.6 gr.
Sobrino de Constantino I.

Anv: "FL HANNIBALLIANO REGI" - Busto a cabeza desnuda, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SEC-VRITAS PVBLICA" - El Dios del río Eufrates recostado en el suelo a derecha, sosteniendo un cetro con ambas manos a su derecha. A su derecha un ánfora volcada de la que fluye agua y detrás cañas. "CONSS" en exergo.

Acuñada 336/7 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.3ra.)
Rareza: R5

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Constantinople) #148 Pag.590 - Cohen Vol.VII #68 Pag.345 - DVM #2 Pag.294 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8498 Pag.196 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3935 - LRBC #1034
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Centenional Constantino II RIC VII Constantinople 81.jpg
A128-20 - Constantino II Como Cesar de Constantino I (316/7 - 337 D.C.)45 viewsAE3/4 Centenional 18 x 17 mm 2.1 gr.

Anv: "CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C" - Busto laureado y con coraza, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS" - Dos Soldados de pié enfrentados, sosteniendo un escudo y una lanza vertical invertida cada uno. Entre ellos DOS estandartes. "· CONSΓ ·" en exergo.

Acuñada 333/5 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.3ra.)
Rareza: R2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Constantinople) #81 Pag.582 - Cohen Vol.VII #122 Pag.378 - DVM #45 Pag.296 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8444.i. Pag.189 - Sear RCTV (1988)#3951
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Centenional Constantino II RIC VII Constantinople 138.jpg
A128-30 - Constantino II Como Cesar de Constantino I (316/7 - 337 D.C.)46 viewsAE3/4 Centenional 16 x 15 mm 2.0 gr.

Anv: "CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C" - Busto laureado y con coraza, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS · " - Dos Soldados de pié enfrentados, sosteniendo un escudo y una lanza vertical invertida cada uno. Entre ellos UN estandarte. "CONSB" en exergo.

Acuñada 336/7 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.2da.)
Rareza: R4

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Constantinople) #150 Pag.590 - Cohen Vol.VII #114 Pag.377 - DVM #46 Pag.296 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8445.h. Pag.189 - Sear RCTV (1988)#3952
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Centenional Constancio II RIC VII Constantinople 61I.jpg
A130-04 - Constancio II Como Cesar de Constantino I (324 - 337 D.C.)40 viewsAE3/4 Centenional 17 mm 2.0 gr.

Anv: "FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C" - Busto laureado, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS" - Dos Soldados de pié enfrentados, sosteniendo un escudo y una lanza vertical invertida cada uno. Entre ellos DOS estandartes. "CONSI" en exergo.

Acuñada 330 - 333 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.10ma.)
Rareza: R4

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Constantinople) #61 Pag.579 - Cohen Vol.VII #104 Pag.456 - DVM #72 Pag.299 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8475.i. Pag.193 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3986
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Centenional Constancio II RIC VII Constantinople 75.jpg
A130-05 - Constancio II Como Cesar de Constantino I (324 - 337 D.C.)37 viewsAE3/4 Centenional 17 mm 2.3 gr.

Anv: "FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C" - Busto laureado, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS" - Dos Soldados de pié enfrentados, sosteniendo un escudo y una lanza vertical invertida cada uno. Entre ellos DOS estandartes. "CONSS ·" en exergo.

Acuñada 333 - 335 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.6ta.)
Rareza: R2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Constantinople) #75 Pag.581 - Cohen Vol.VII #104 Pag.456 - DVM #72 Pag.299 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8475.i. Pag.193 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3986
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Centenional Constancio II RIC VIII Constantinople 26S.jpg
A130-36 - Constancio II (337 - 361 D.C.)42 viewsAE4 Centenional Reducido 16 x 15 mm 1.3 gr.

Anv: "DN CONSTAN - [TI]VS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GLOR- IA EXERC -ITVS · " - Dos Soldados de pié enfrentados, sosteniendo un escudo y una lanza vertical invertida cada uno. Entre ellos UN estandarte. "CONSS" en exergo.

Acuñada 337 - 340 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.2da.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VIII (Constantinople) #26 Pag.449 - Cohen Vol.VII #101 Pag.455 - DVM #76 Pag.299 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8651.i. Pag.189 - Sear RCTV (1988)#3998
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Centenional Constancio II RIC VIII Constantinople 27E.jpg
A130-37 - Constancio II (337 - 361 D.C.)47 viewsAE4 Centenional Reducido 15 mm 1.3 gr.

Anv: "DN CONSTAN - TIVS P F AVG" - Cabeza con diadema rosetada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GLOR- IA EXERC -ITVS · " - Dos Soldados de pié enfrentados, sosteniendo un escudo y una lanza vertical invertida cada uno. Entre ellos UN estandarte. "CONSε" en exergo.

Acuñada 337 - 340 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.4ta.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VIII (Constantinople) #27 Pag.449 - Cohen Vol.VII #101 Pag.455 - DVM #76 Pag.299 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8651.i. Pag.189 - Sear RCTV (1988)#3998
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Centenional Constancio II RIC VIII Constantinople 93A.jpg
A130-80 - Constancio II (337 - 361 D.C.)41 viewsAE3 1/4 Maiorina ó 1/2 Centenional 18 x 17 mm 2.4 gr.

Anv: "DN CONSTAN- TIVS P F AVG" - Busto con diadema de perlas, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "FEL TEMP REPARATIO" - Fenix con corona radiada parado a derecha sobre un Orbe/Globo. "CONSA * " en exergo.

Acuñada 348 - 350 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.VIII (Constantinople) #93 Pag.454 - Cohen Vol.VII #57 Pag.448 - DVM #99 Pag.300 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8664.e. Pag.214 - Sear RCTV (1988) #4008 - LRBC #2019
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Nummus Juliano II RIC VIII Constantinople 154I.jpg
A135-10 - Juliano II Como Cesar de Constancio II (355 - 360 D.C.)41 viewsAE4 Nummus 16 x 15 mm 2.3 gr.

Anv: "[D]N CL IVLIANVS NOB CAES" - Busto a cabeza desnuda, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[SPES REIPVBLI]CE" - Emperador con yelmo y vestido militarmente, de pié a izquierda, portando Orbe/globo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y lanza en izquierda. "CONSI" en exergo y " C " en campo izquierdo.

Acuñada 358 - 361 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.10ma.)
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC Vol.VIII (Constantinople) #154 Pag.461 - Cohen Vol.VIII #45 Pag.49 - DVM #29 Pag.305 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8834.i. Pag.229 - LRBC #2055
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Nummus Valentiniano II RIC IX Constantinople 86aB2.jpg
A141-09 - Valentiniano II (375 - 392 D.C.)47 viewsAE4 Nummus 13 x 12 mm 1.3 gr.
Hijo de Valentiniano I, Augusto jr. de Occidente con su Padre y Graciano su medio hermano hasta 383 D.C. y luego Augusto Sr. hasta 392 D.C.

Anv: "DN VALENTINIANVS P [F AVG]" - Busto con diadema de perlas, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SALVS REI-PVBLICAE" - Victoria avanzando a izquierda, portando trofeo apoyado en su hombro con mano derecha y arrastrando por los pelos a un cautivo con su mano izquierda. "CONSB" en exergo y " Chi-Ro " en campo izquierdo.

Acuñada 388 - 392 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.3ra.)
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.IX (Constantinople) #86a Pag.234 - Cohen Vol.VIII #30 Pag.143 - DVM #47 Pag.312 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #9185.e. Pag.284 - Sear RCTV (1988) #4167
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