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Search results - "Calpurnia"
DenLPisoFrugibis.jpg
31 viewsDenarius - 90 b.C. - Mint of Rome
L. CALPVRNIVS PISO FRVGI - Gens Calpurnia
Ob.: laureate head of Apollo right. Behind H. C below the chin.
Rev.: horseman galloping right holding palm. Λ above, L PISO FRVGI below.
gs. 3,9 mm. 18,3
Cr.340/1, Syd.669a
Maxentius
CalPisoLFFrugi.jpg
46 viewsCal. Piso L. F. Frugi, AR denarius, Ca. 67 BC
Obverse: Apollo facing right
Reverse: Horseman
Crawford 408 1a; Sydenham 850a; RSC Calpurnia 24g

Ex: Apollo Numismatics; NAC Auction 18 (3/29/2000), lot 302
2 commentspaul1888
LPisoFrugiDenarius_S235.jpg
(502a) Roman Republic, L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi, 90 B.C.143 viewsSilver denarius, S 235, Calpurnia 11, Crawford 340/1, Syd 663a, VF, rainbow toning, Rome mint, 3.772g, 18.5mm, 180o, 90 B.C. obverse: laureate head of Apollo right, scorpion behind; Reverse naked horseman galloping right holding palm, L PISO FRVGI and control number CXI below; ex-CNA XV 6/5/91, #443. Ex FORVM.


A portion of the following text is a passage taken from the excellent article “The Calpurnii and Roman Family History: An Analysis of the Piso Frugi Coin in the Joel Handshu Collection at the College of Charleston,” by Chance W. Cook:

In the Roman world, particularly prior to the inception of the principate, moneyers were allotted a high degree of latitude to mint their coins as they saw fit. The tres viri monetales, the three men in charge of minting coins, who served one-year terms, often emblazoned their coins with an incredible variety of images and inscriptions reflecting the grandeur, history, and religion of Rome. Yet also prominent are references to personal or familial accomplishments; in this manner coins were also a means by which the tres viri monetales could honor their forbearers. Most obvious from an analysis of the Piso Frugi denarius is the respect and admiration that Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi, who minted the coin, had for his ancestors. For the images he selected for his dies relate directly to the lofty deeds performed by his Calpurnii forbearers in the century prior to his term as moneyer. The Calpurnii were present at many of the watershed events in the late Republic and had long distinguished themselves in serving the state, becoming an influential and well-respected family whose defense of traditional Roman values cannot be doubted.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi, who was moneyer in 90 B.C., depicted Apollo on the obverse and the galloping horseman on the reverse, as does his son Gaius. However, all of L. Piso Frugi’s coins have lettering similar to “L-PISO-FRVGI” on the reverse, quite disparate from his son Gaius’ derivations of “C-PISO-L-F-FRV.”

Moreover, C. Piso Frugi coins are noted as possessing “superior workmanship” to those produced by L. Piso Frugi.

The Frugi cognomen, which became hereditary, was first given to L. Calpurnius Piso, consul in 133 B.C., for his integrity and overall moral virtue. Cicero is noted as saying that frugal men possessed the three cardinal Stoic virtues of bravery, justice, and wisdom; indeed in the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae, a synonym of frugalitas is bonus, generically meaning “good” but also implying virtuous behavior. Gary Forsythe notes that Cicero would sometimes invoke L. Calpurnius Piso’s name at the beginning of speeches as “a paragon of moral rectitude” for his audience.

L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi’s inclusion of the laureled head of Apollo, essentially the same obverse die used by his son Gaius (c. 67 B.C.), was due to his family’s important role in the establishment of the Ludi Apollinares, the Games of Apollo, which were first instituted in 212 B.C. at the height of Hannibal’s invasion of Italy during the Second Punic War. By that time, Hannibal had crushed Roman armies at Cannae, seized Tarentum and was invading Campania.

Games had been used throughout Roman history as a means of allaying the fears
of the populace and distracting them from issues at hand; the Ludi Apollinares were no different. Forsythe follows the traditional interpretation that in 211 B.C., when C. Calpurnius Piso was praetor, he became the chief magistrate in Rome while both consuls were absent and the three other praetors were sent on military expeditions against Hannibal.

At this juncture, he put forth a motion in the Senate to make the Ludi Apollinares a yearly event, which was passed; the Ludi Apollinares did indeed become an important festival, eventually spanning eight days in the later Republic. However, this interpretation is debatable; H.H. Scullard suggests that the games were not made permanent until 208 B.C. after a severe plague prompted the Senate to make them a fixture on the calendar. The Senators believed Apollo would serve as a “healing god” for the people of Rome.

Nonetheless, the Calpurnii obviously believed their ancestor had played an integral role in the establishment of the Ludi Apollinares and thus prominently displayed
the head or bust of Apollo on the obverse of the coins they minted.

The meaning of the galloping horseman found on the reverse of the L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi coin is more complicated. It is possible that this is yet another reference to the Ludi Apollinares. Chariot races in the Circus Maximus were a major component of the games, along with animal hunts and theatrical performances.

A more intriguing possibility is that the horseman is a reference to C. Calpurnius Piso, son of the Calpurnius Piso who is said to have founded the Ludi Apollinares. This C. Calpurnius Piso was given a military command in 186 B.C. to quell a revolt in Spain. He was victorious, restoring order to the province and also gaining significant wealth in the process.

Upon his return to Rome in 184, he was granted a triumph by the Senate and eventually erected an arch on the Capitoline Hill celebrating his victory. Of course
the arch prominently displayed the Calpurnius name. Piso, however, was not an infantry commander; he led the cavalry.

The difficulty in accepting C. Calpurnius Piso’s victory in Spain as the impetus for the galloping horseman image is that not all of C. Piso Frugi’s coins depict the horseman or cavalryman carrying the palm, which is a symbol of victory. One is inclined to believe that the victory palm would be prominent in all of the coins minted by C. Piso Frugi (the son of L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi) if it indeed signified the great triumph of C. Calpurnius Piso in 186 B.C. Yet the palm’s appearance is clearly not a direct reference to military feats of C. Piso Frugi’s day. As noted, it is accepted that his coins were minted in 67 B.C.; in that year, the major victory by Roman forces was Pompey’s swift defeat of the pirates throughout the Mediterranean.

Chrestomathy: Annual Review of Undergraduate Research at the College of Charleston. Volume 1, 2002: pp. 1-10© 2002 by the College of Charleston, Charleston SC 29424, USA.All rights to be retained by the author.
http://www.cofc.edu/chrestomathy/vol1/cook.pdf


There are six (debatably seven) prominent Romans who have been known to posterity as Lucius Calpurnius Piso:

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi: (d. 261 A.D.) a Roman usurper, whose existence is
questionable, based on the unreliable Historia Augusta.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Licinianus: deputy Roman Emperor, 10 January 69 to15 January
69, appointed by Galba.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso: Consul in 27 A.D.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso: Consul in 1 B.C., augur

Lucius Calpurnius Piso: Consul in 15 B.C., pontifex

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus: Consul in 58 B.C. (the uncle of Julius Caesar)

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi: Moneyer in 90 B.C. (our man)


All but one (or two--if you believe in the existence of "Frugi the usurper" ca. 261 A.D.) of these gentlemen lack the Frugi cognomen, indicating they are not from the same direct lineage as our moneyer, though all are Calpurnii.

Calpurnius Piso Frugi's massive issue was intended to support the war against the Marsic Confederation. The type has numerous variations and control marks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucius_Calpurnius_Piso
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/indexfrm.asp?vpar=55&pos=0

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


2 commentsCleisthenes
0084.jpg
0084 - Denarius Calpurnia 67 BC74 viewsObv/Head of Apollo r., hair tied with band; behind, monogram.
Rev/Horseman r., holding palm; above, E retrograde and pellet; below, C PISO L F FRV.

Ag, 18.6mm, 3.45g
Moneyer: C. Calpurnius Piso Frugi.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 408/1b (o: 43 var./r: 47) [dies o/r: 144/175 (all var.)] - Syd. 850
ex-Baldwin's, NY Sale XXV, lot 149
2 commentsdafnis
Craw_340_1_Denario_L_Calpurnius_Piso_L_f__L_n__Frugi.jpg
13-01 - L. CALPURNIUS PISO L.f. L.n. FRUGI (90 A.C.)14 viewsAR Denarius 18 mm 2.8 gr

Anv: Cabeza de Apolo laureado viendo a derecha - "A" letra de control detrás de la cabeza.
Rev: "L.PISO FRVGI" Jinete cabalgando a der. y portando una hoja de palma. Número de control en Exergo.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #235 Pag.117 - Craw RRC #340/1 - Syd CRR #663-670 - BMCRR #1938-2129 - RSC Vol.1 Calpurnia 11 Pag.24
mdelvalle
Bruti.jpg
48 BC D. Junius Brutus Albinus109 viewsPIETAS
Head of Pietas right

ALBINVS BRVTI F
Clasped hands holding winged caduceus

3.1g

Rome
48 BC

Sear 427,

Decimus Junius Brutus was a distant relative of Marcus Brutus. He was known as one of Caesar's "most intamate associates" and a friend of Mark Antony. Albinus had served under Caesar in both the Gallic Wars and the Civil War. He participated in the siege of Massilia (Marseilles) that held out against Caesar for months. He also commanded a Caesarian fleet.

Plutarch considered Albinus "of no great courage," but Albinus was a faithful and loyal supporter of Caesar. He was to be Consul in 42 BC along with Lucius Plancus. While awaiting the consulship Albinus was to become Governor of Cisalpine Gaul when the post became available in the spring of 44BC

Albinus was approached by Cassius and Labeo to involve him in the conspiracy to murder Caesar. Albinus wanted to make sure Marcus Brutus was involved before agreeing to the plot. After meeting with Brutus he agreed. Both Brutus and Albinus received notification of a meeting of the Senate on March 15th and Albinus agreed to use an exhibition of his Gladiators after the meeting as protection in case things got out of hand after the murder had taken place. Caesar's retired legionaries were all around the city and none of the conspirators knew how they would react at Caesar's death.

At a dinner at the house of Marcus Lepidus on the night of March 14, 44BC Caesar was in attendence along with Decimus Brutus. Towards the end of the night Caesar's secretary approached for him to sign some letters. As he was signing Albinus posed a philosophical question to him: "What sort of death is best?" Caesar answered "A sudden one"

The next morning the Senate awaited Caesar to arrive. Caesr's wife Calpurnia and the auspeces warned Caesar not to attend the meeting. When Caesar delayed the conspirator's sent Albinus to Caesar's house. Albinus convinced Caesar to at least postpone the meeting in person. Antony was against this idea. Caesar was then murered by the conspirators in the Theater of Pompey in the Campus Martius, Albinus being a key player in the conspiracy.
3 commentsJay GT4
Calpurnia_1b_img.jpg
C Piso L. F. Frugi Denarius, Calpurnia 1115 viewsDenarius
Obv:– Laureate head of Apollo right, Fractional mark (two vertical pellets) behind bust and (four pellets) in front?
Rev:– Horseman galloping right, holding palm; L PISO FRVGI below, N Pellet above
Minted in Rome 90-89 B.C.
Reference(s) – Crawford 340/1, RSC I Calpurnia 11
1 commentsmaridvnvm
C_Piso_Frugi.jpg
C. Calpurnius Piso Frugi - AR denarius8 viewsRome
61 BC
laureate head of Apollo right
=
naked horseman galloping right, holding palm branch and reins
dagger? in exergue
C·PISO FRVGI
Crawford 408/1b, RSC I Calpurnia 24, Sydenham 851, SRCV I 348
ex Lanz
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
L_CALPURNIUS_PISO_FRUGI.jpg
L CALPURNIUS PISO FRUGI AR Denarius Calpurnia 11, Horseman44 viewsOBV: Laureate head of Apollo r., behind, point control, front, check letter
REV: Horseman galloping towards r., holding a palm branch, above, symbol, and below Piso Frvgi / check letter
3.93g, 19mm

Minted at Rome, 90 BC
Legatus
L_CALPURNIUS_PISO_FRUGI_2.jpg
L CALPURNIUS PISO FRUGI AR Denarius Calpurnia 12, Horseman 33 viewsOBV: Laureate head of Apollo right, number LV behind
REV: Horseman galloping right, holding palm L PISO FRVGI below, ROMA monogram, number LXXII above
3.75g, 18.4mm

Minted at Rome, 90 BC
Legatus
Piso_caepio.jpg
L PISO and Q CAEPIO44 viewsAR-Denarius.
Rome. c. 100.
Obv.: PISO CAEPIO Q
Laureate head of Jupiter r., harpa.
Rev.: AD FRV EMV EX S C
Piso (et) Caepio q(uaestores) AD FRU(mentum) EMU(ndum) EX S(enatus) C(onsulto) :( Piso and Caepio, quaestors responsible for purchasing wheat (the people) by decree of the Senate) . Pison et Caepion seated on subsellium, corn-ears.

Cr. 330/1a; RSC Calpurnia 5; BMC 1125.
1 commentsTanit
Piso_Frugi.jpg
L. Calpurnius L.f. L.n. Piso Frugi - AR denarius3 viewsRome
90 BC
laureate head of Apollo right
E / A
Horseman holding palm branch galloping right
L·PISO FRVGI
A
RSC I Calpurnia 11, Crawford 340/1, SRCV I 235
3,70g

Issue commemorates Ludi Apollinares which was held by moneyer's ancestor L. Calpurnius Piso in 212 BC for the first time. It's the most extensive republican issue. There is more than 300 variant of this coin.
Johny SYSEL
L__Calpurnius_Piso_Caesoninus___Q__Servilius_Caepio.jpg
L. Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus & Q. Servilius Caepio - Calpurnia-5a68 viewsRoman Republic. L. Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus & Q. Servilius Caepio. 100 B.C. AR Denarius. (3.922 grams 17mm). Obverse: Laureate head of Saturn r.; behind, harpa; around, PISO. CAEPIO. Q. Reverse: Two male figures (Quaestors) seated on bench (subsellium) side by side; to l. and r., corn-ear; in exergue, AD. FRV. EMV. EX. S. C. Sydenham 603, Crawford 330/1a, RCV 210, RSC Calpurnia-5a2 commentsBud Stewart
Denar4.jpg
L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi26 viewsL. Calpurnius Piso Frugi.
AR Denarius .
Obv.: laureate head of Apollo right, behind , letters below the chin..
Rev.: horseman galloping right holding palm. symbol above, L PISO FRVGI / C , in two lines below.
cf: Crawford 340/1 ; Sydenham 669a ; Bab. Calpurnia 11 .
Tanit
denar3.jpg
L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi18 viewsL. Calpurnius Piso Frugi.
AR Denarius .
Obv.: laureate head of Apollo right, behind , letters below the chin..
Rev.: horseman galloping right holding palm. symbol above, L PISO FRVGI / C , in two lines below.
cf: Crawford 340/1 ; Sydenham 669a ; Bab. Calpurnia 11 .
Tanit
calpurnia.jpg
L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi32 viewsL. Calpurnius Piso Frugi. 90 BC. AR Denarius
Obverse: Laureate head of Apollo right; H behind, G before.
Reverse: Horseman galloping right, carrying palm; caduceus above; C below.
Crawford 340/1; Sydenham 670d; Calpurnia 11. 19mm - 4.03 g.
b70
L__Calpurnius_Piso_Frugi.jpg
L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi - Calpurnia-1189 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC. L Calpurnius Piso Frugi Denarius. (17 mm 4.0 gm) 90 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right with bow behind/ L PISO FRVGI below horseman galloping right, holding palm XII below. Crawford 340/1, RCV 2352 commentsBud Stewart
Calpurnia_1a_img.jpg
L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi, denarius19 viewsObv:– Laureate head of Apollo right, Arrow downwards behind
Rev:– Horseman galloping right, holding palm; CXV below
Minted in Rome 90-89 B.C.
Reference:– Sydenham 663-670, Crawford 340/1, RSC I Calpurnia 11.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
85000789.jpg
L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi. 90 BC36 viewsL. Calpurnius Piso Frugi. 90 BC. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.88 g, 8h). Rome mint. Laureate head of Apollo right; wreath behind; all within border of dots / Horseman galloping right, holding palm frond and reins; XXVII below. Crawford 340/1; Sydenham 663; Calpurnia 11. Good VF, deeply toned.

From the Collection of a Northern California Gentleman. Ex Edward Gans Collection.

Ex-CNG
1 commentsecoli
IMG_0441.JPG
L. Calpurnius Piso L.f. Frugi. AR Quinarius. 90BC. 15mm. 1.8grm.4 viewsL. Calpurnius Piso L.f. Frugi. AR Quinarius. 90BC.
Obv. Laureate bust of Apollo right. O in bottom right field.
Rev. Victory advancing right, palm over shoulder.
Ref. Calpurnia 13, Sydenham 672
Lee S
AR_-_L__Piso_Frugi-3.jpg
L. Calpurnius Piso L.f. L.n, AR Denarius4 views90 BC
3.69 grams
Obv.: Laureate head of Apollo right; Π before
Rev.: L. PISO. FRVGI ROMA, rider on horse galloping right, holding whip; above left, swan.
NGC XF* - Strike 5/5 - Surface 5/5
I purchased this coin from Heritage Auctions
My total cost was $389
I was totally amazed by the number of different varieties of this basic design that were produced. In a limited search I found two examples of this variety. Wildwinds has an example of a Calpurnia 12b but that bird is much different in appearance and at the Wildwinds site it is called a duck. This exact coin is shown on acsearch website and is the only example of a Calpurnia 12b shown on that site. Here the bird is called a swan. Since all the dies are hand cut these maybe the individual concept each die shrink had for the bird to be included in the design.
Richard M10
57.jpg
L.C.PISO AND Q.S.CAEPIO.15 viewsAR denarius. 100 BC. 3.90 grs. Head of Saturn right. Harpa and PISO behind . CAEPIO and symbol below. Q below chin. / The two quaestors (Piso and Caepio) seated left between two corn ears. AD.FRV.EMV. / EX. S.C in two lines below.
Craw 330/1a. RSC Calpurnia 5.
NAC 40. Lot 441.
benito
00pisocaepio.jpg
L.C.PISO AND Q.S.CAEPIO. 21 viewsAR denarius. 100 BC. 3.90 grs. Head of Saturn right. Harpa and PISO behind . CAEPIO and symbol below. Q below chin. / The two quaestors (Piso and Caepio) seated left between two corn ears. AD.FRV.EMV. / EX. S.C in two lines below.
Craw 330/1a. RSC Calpurnia 5.
NAC 40. Lot 441.
benito
00pisofrugi10.jpg
M.PISO M.f. FRUGI33 viewsAR denarius. 61 BC. 3,96 grs. Terminal bust of Mercury or Terminus right. Wreath and star behind.Two handled cup before. / M.PISO M.F.FRVGI above sacrificial knife and patera, all in wreath.
Craw 418/2b. RSC Calpurnia 23. Smyth III/39.
EX Roma Numismatics. I.& L. Goldberg 59, lot 2330. Superior. Moreira sale part 1,lot 1679.
benito
00pisofrugi10~0.jpg
M.PISO M.f. FRUGI38 viewsAR denarius. 61 BC. 3,96 grs. Terminal bust of Mercury or Terminus right. Wreath and star behind.Two handled cup before. / M.PISO M.F.FRVGI above sacrificial knife and patera, all in wreath.
Craw 418/2b. RSC Calpurnia 23. Smyth III/39.
I.& L. Goldberg 59, lot 2330. Superior. Moreira sale part 1,lot 1679.
1 commentsbenito
ben15~0.jpg
POMPEY THE GREAT178 viewsAR denarius. (4.51 gr). 49-48 BC. Uncertain mint in Greece. Diademed head of Numa Pompilius right. CN PISO PRO Q. / Prow right, MAGN above, PRO COS below. Crawford 446/1; RSC 4. Smyth XII/35.
The obverse representes the head of Numa,second King of Rome,from whose son Calpus, the gens Calpurnia claimed descent.CN Piso was pro questor of Pompey 's army in Spain. The reverse,prow of a galley, conmemorates Pompey's victory over the Mediterranean pirates in
67 BC.
2 commentsbenito
rrepde29-2.jpg
Roman Republic, 90 BC, Calpurnia10 viewsAR Denarius (3.8g, 20mm, 11h) Rome mint. Struck 90 BC.
FRVGI behind laureate head of Apollo facing right, symbol below chin.
L·PISO·L·F below horseman galloping holding torch, symbol above, *
Seaby (RSC I.) Calpurnia 10. Monneyer: L.Calpurnius Piso L.f. Frugi. The head of Apollo and horseman refer to the Ludi Apollinares which were established by an ancestor of the monneyer.
Charles S
calp.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Calpurnia, AR Denarius82 viewsMint:Roma
100 BC
Dimensions:19mm/4.5grms.
Overse:PISO./CAEPIO./Q
"Piso Caepio Quaestores"
Reverse:AD.FRV.EM(V.)/EX.S.C."Ad frumentum emundum/Ex Senatus consulto"
Réf:B.5(Calpurnia)-BMC/RR1128-CRR.603a-RRC.330/1a-RSC.5-RCV210
4 commentsmoneta romana
Rome_PisoFrugi~0.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Calpurnia. C. Piso Frugi, 67 BC, AR Denarius - BMC 381177 viewsLaureate head off Apollo facing right; arrow behind. / Naked horseman holding palm branch and lit torch galloping right; C PISO L FRVG below
Crawford 408/1; Sear (Millennium) 348/1; Seaby, Calpurnia 24k (Vol 1, p 27); BMC 3811; Syd 868a.
Spink & Son Ltd (London)
2 commentsLloyd T
RRC235-1.jpg
RRC340/1 (L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi)31 viewsObv. Laureate head of Apollo right, control number XXXII behind,; no mark of value;
Rev. L. PISO FRVGI below horseman galloping right, holding palm, control number XXXXII above, monogram of beneath legend
Rome, 90 B.C.
17 mm, 3.89 gr.
References: RRC340/1, Sear 235/1, SC Calpurnia 12

L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi was the grandson of the consul of 133 B.C., and the father of a moneyer of the same name. He rose to become praetor in 74 B.C., together with Verres.

It has been assumed that the rider, together with the head of Apollo on the obverse, refers to the Ludi Apollinares, created by the praetor L. Calpurnius Piso in 212 B.C. This, at least, is Livy’s suggestion: “The Games of Apollo had been exhibited the previous year, and when the question of their repetition the next year was moved by the praetor Calpurnius, the Senate passed a decree that they should be observed for all time (...) such is the origin of the Apollinarian Games, which were instituted for the cause of victory and not, as it is generally thought, in the interest of public health” (Livy, Per. 25.3). The ‘public health’ issue mentioned by Livy may have been a plague in 208 B.C.; Apollo as a healer-god would have been a natural choice to appeal to. The date of the creation of the games falls into the Punic Wars, and may have served as a distraction from the war. The Ludi started on July 13th and lasted 9 days.

The largest issue of coinage known from the Republic, the denarii of Piso come in over 300 varieties. In 91. B.C. the Italian allies rebelled against Rome, forming a separate and independent nation. The massive issue of coinage minted by L. Calpurnius was required to pay Rome’s soldiers, as she was suddenly confronted by the uprising of her allies. In 90 B.C., with L. Iulius Caesar and P. Rutilius Lupus as consuls, the war remained undecided. Pompeius Strabo managed to capture Asculum, but Caepio was defeated, and Rutilius lost a battle and his life at the river Liris, attempting to attack the Marsi with an untrained army (Appian, B. Civ. 43). By 88 B.C., the war was over, and only the Samnites continued to offer a token resistance. Many of the allies had however acquired Roman citizenship.
Syltorian
   
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