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Search results - "Basil"
coin620.jpg
17 viewsAntiochos VIII AE19. Diademed & radiate head right
/ BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EPIFANOUS, eagle
standing left on thunderbolt, scepter behind shoulder.
SNGIs 2501. Coin #620
cars100
coin619.jpg
20 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI, Æ29, Cyprus Mint.
Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
/ RTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS Two eagles standing
left on thunderbolt, cornucopia before. S7900; SNG
Cop. 341. VF, brown patina. Coin #619
cars100
coin618.jpg
27 views Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI, Æ29, Cyprus Mint.
Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
/ RTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS Two eagles standing
left on thunderbolt, cornucopia before. S7900; SNG
Cop. 341. VF Coin #618
cars100
coin617.jpg
21 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI, Æ29, Cyprus Mint.
Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
/ RTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS Two eagles standing
left on thunderbolt, cornucopia before. S7900; SNG
Cop. 341. VF, brown patina. Coin #617

cars100
Byzantine_follis.JPG
224 views
An Anonymous Follis Class A 2 coin, type 21
Obverse: Christ facing, holding book of gospels IC to left XC to rightEmmanovha IC XC (God with us)
Reverse: +IhSYS XRISTYS bASILEY bASILE (Jesus Christ, King of Kings)
Sear attributes it to the joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII 1020-1028 AD
Grierson in DOC says Romanus III and into Michael IV's
1 commentsJon the Lecturer
Trajan.jpg
65 viewsTrajan AR Denarius. Rome, AD 113-114. IMP TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, laureate and draped bust right / COS VI P P SPQR, Trajan's column surmounted by statue of the emperor; at base, two eagles. RIC 307; BMCRE 522; RSC 115. 3.53g, 20mm, 6h.
Of all of the truly monumental buildings and commemorative structures which the emperor Trajan built, only one, the Columna Traiani, has survived in a reasonable state of completeness. Indeed, it appears almost identical in person as it does on coins, except that the statue of Trajan that originally surmounted it was replaced in 1588 with a statue of St. Paul. When completed, the column occupied a prominent place between two libraries, the Basilica Ulpia and the Temple of Trajan and Plotina. The column was massive: it was over 12 feet in diameter at its base, and rose to a height of nearly 130 feet. Its core was comprised of 34 blocks of Carrara white marble that were made hollow so as to accommodate a circular staircase of 185 steps. The most remarkable feature of the column, however, was its ornamentation, for the friezes on its exterior are some of the most inspiring works of art ever produced. Monumental in scope and execution, they record Trajan’s two Dacian campaigns, from 101-3 and 104-6. All told, there are more than 2,500 individually sculpted figures distributed among more than 150 scenes. The emperor himself is represented no less than fifty times – not a surprise considering his penchant for commemorative architecture and his pride in having added Dacia to the provinces of the empire. “ Source: NAC”

Ex Michael Kelly Collection of Roman Silver Coins
4 commentspaul1888
anixk.jpg
Antiochus IX Kyzikenos14 viewsSeleukid Kings of Syria. Antiochos IX Eusebes Philopator (Kyzikenos) Æ18. Uncertain mint, probably in Phoenicia. Struck 112-101 BCE.
Obverse Winged bust of Eros right
Reverse: BASILEOS ANTIOCOU FILOPATOROS Nike advancing left, holding wreath; no controls or date visible. SC 2388; HGC 9, 1254; cf. DCA 300. 5.5g, 20.2mm,
sold 2-2018
NORMAN K
00-antiochosIII.jpg
Antiochus III AE109 viewsSNGIs 615v
Seleucid Kingdom,
Antiochus III AE10.
Diademed head right /
BASILEWS ANTIOXOY, elephant standing left.
xokleng
john.jpg
Basil II & Constantine VIII, (976-1028 A.D.)54 viewsÆ “Anonymous” Follis
Class A2
O: EMMANOVHΛ, Nimbate bust of Christ facing, wearing pallium and colobium and holding book of Gospels; IC – XC in fields to left and right.
R: + IhSЧS / [X]RISTЧ[S] / bASILЄЧ / bASILЄ / ·, legend in four lines.
8.68g
26mm
SBCV 1793
5 commentsMat
Italy- Pompeii- The Basilaca.jpg
Italy- Pompeii- The Basilaca315 viewsBASILICA
Forum of Pompeii c. 120 B.C. These more massive columns are from the basilica, the most important public building in Pompeii. Constructed prior to the Roman period, the basilica had three aisles and five entrance doors onto the forum. In the rear we see a two-tiered colonnade which has columns in the Doric style on the bottom and slender Ionic columns on top of a cross beam. In Pompeii many columns were made of brick and covered with stucco.

BASILICA (VIII,1,1)
Built in the second half of the 2nd cent. BC, as part of the plan to create monuments throughout the city. It has a rectangular layout, with three naves, with a ceiling sloping straight down in both directions from the central columns and half columns at the top of the walls, where there are still remains of decorations in ‘first style’: at the back is the tribunal, where the magistrates sat, reached by a wooden staircase. The building was dedicated to administering justice and for business negotiations.




John Schou
leowi.jpg
Leo VI the Wise (870 - 912 A.D.)60 viewsÆ Follis
O: + LEOn bASILVS ROm, bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown with cross and chlamys, holding akakia in left hand.
R: + LEOn/En ΘEO bA/SILEVS R/OMEOn, inscription in four lines.
Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint
8.58g
26mm
SBCV 1729
1 commentsMat
Lysimachos_Alexander_the_Great_Portrait_Coin~0.JPG
Lysimachos Alexander the Great Portrait Coin126 viewsLysimachos, Portrait of Alexander the Great, Kingdon of Thrace, Silver tetradrachm, (Posthumous issue c. 280 - 200 BC), 16.675g, 30.6mm, die axis 0o, Müller 460, Thompson -, SNG Cop -, SNG UK -, uncertain mint,
OBV: Diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon
REV: BASILEWS LUSIMACOU, Athena enthroned left, holding Nike crowning name with wreath in right,
resting left arm on shield at side, transverse spear behind, bow case inner left

EX: Heritage Long Beach Signature Sale (18 Sep 2008), lot 20015; EX: Forum Ancient Coins
3 commentsRomanorvm
greek5.jpg
Parthian empire. AR drachm35 viewsSellwood 28.3 Ekbatana mint. 122-91 BC
obv:Mithradates II dia. bust l. wearing tiara
rev: BASILEWS BASI-LEWN MEGALOU ARSAKOU EPIFANDS
Arsakes seated R.on throne holding bow
1 commentshill132
phraatesIV.jpg
Phraates IV (38 -2 BC) AR Tetradrachm 286 SE /26 BC52 viewsObv: Phraates diademed and cuirassed bust left with long pointed beard - no royal wart on forehead.
Rev: The king enthroned r. being presented with a palm branch by Tyche, standing l. before him holding cornucopiae with pellet above arm. Seleucid date 286 (C Pi Sigma) above palm. Greek inscription in 7 lines BASILEOS/BASILEON; on r. ARSAKOY/EUERGETOY' below [DIKAOY]; on l. EPIPHANOUS/PHILELLANOS; month off flan below
Wt 14.1 gm, 26.3 mm, Sellwood type 55

The coin could be that of Tiridates I who also ruled for a few months in 26 BC. The features of the king on this coin are much closer to that of Phraates than of much rarer Tiridates I according to a reclassification of Sellwood types by deCallatay and this is the most believable. The lower lines of the inscription would also settle the issue but are lost on this coin.
Early coins of the Parthian empire showed strong Greek empahasis on classical Greek forms and humanism which is gradually lost as the empire matured and finally decayed. The coins become schematic and emphasize suface ornament rather than sculptural quality. One senses from the portrait of Phraates that brutality was a prerequisite for Parthian kings who routinely bumped off fathers and brothers in their rise to power. Like the Spartans, they had a powerful empire in their time but its contribution to civilization was limited in the long term.
1 commentsdaverino
ptolemyxiiTD.jpg
Ptolemy XII Auletes AR Tetradrachm, 72 BC75 viewsOBV: Diademed head right in aegis
REV: Eagle standing left on Thunderbolt; PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS, [Pi A] in right field; Dated L.Theta (Year 9)

This coin was minted in the ninth year of Ptolemy XII Auletes. Svoronos originally ascribed this coin type to year 9 of Cleopatra VII (43 BC) but was reattributed by Regling to her father. This re-attribution is generally accepted. The coin is of relatively low-grade silver (ca 30%) and flat-struck on the obverse.
Svoronos 1856, Ref. Svoronos on-line
wt 13.8 gm
1 commentsdaverino
wid.JPG
יהונתן YHONATHAN H MALEK BASILEWS ALEXANDROU54 viewsפרוטה
Lake Gennesaret Galilea Holy Land
Bohemian
DSC_0257.jpg
42 viewsBYZANTINE. Basileos. Circa 1080-1180
PB Seal (16mm, 5.15 g, 12h)
CΦPA/ ΓIC ΠЄ/ ΦVKA
TωN/ ΛOΓωN/ RACIΛ
Münz Zentrum 161 (11 January 2012), lot 841, otherwise unpublished

Ex Classical Numismatic Group E267, lot 685 (part of)
Ardatirion
CONSTANTINE_VII.jpg
(0945) CONSTANTINE VII AND ROMANUS II30 viewsApr 945 - Nov 959 AD
AE FOLLIS 26 mm 5.77 g
(double strike on rev.)
O: +COnST bASIL ROM
CONSTINE VII FACING, BEARDED, WEARING MODIFIED LOROS AND CROWN WITH CROSS, GLOBUS CRUCIGER IN L HAND, AKAKIA IN R HAND
R: + COnSt/EnThEO bA/SILEVS R/OmEOn
DOC 26; SEAR 1761
laney
Byzantine1.jpg
001 - Anonymus follis class A2 - Sear 181346 viewsObv: +EMMANOVHA, Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with two pellets in each limb of cross, pallium and colobium, and holding book of Gospels, the cover ornamented with central pellet in border of dots. To left IC and to right XC.
Rev: IhSYS / XRISTYS / bASILEY / bASILE in foyr lines. Dot above and below.
This type is attributed to the joint regin of Basil II and Constantine VIII 976-1025 AD.
30.0 mm. diameter.
pierre_p77
002_Rhoemetalkes-I_AE-17_BASILEWS-ROIMHTALKOY_KAISAROS-SEBASTOY_SNGCop-1192_BMC-7-9_Moushmov-5782_Jurukova-200_11-BC-12-AD_Q-003_7h_16,7-17,6mm_3,67g-s~0.jpg
002p Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), Thrace, Kings, Rhoemetalkes I., RPC I-1718, SNGCop-1192, BMC-7-9, AE-17, #3126 views002p Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), Thrace, Kings, Rhoemetalkes I., RPC I-1718, SNGCop-1192, BMC-7-9, AE-17, #3
avers: BAΣIΛEΩΣ-ΡOIMHTAΛKOY, Bare head of Augustus right.
revers: KAIΣAΡOΣ-ΣEBAΣTOY, Diademed head of Rhoemetalkes-II right.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 16,7-17,6mm, weight: 3,67g, axes: 7h,
mint: Thrace, Kings, date: 11 B.C-12 A.D., ref: RPC I-1718, SNGCop-1192, BMC-7-9, Moushmov-5782, Jurukova-200,
Q-003
quadrans
Byzag.jpg
003 - John I Tzimisces (969-976 AD), Millaresion - Sear 179241 viewsObv: +IhSyS XRISTyS NICA*, Cross crosslet on globus above two steps. at centre, circular medallion containing facing bust of John with short beard, wearing crown and loros and dividing the inscription I/W - A/N. Triple border ornamented with eight equally spaced glbules.
Rev: IWANN / EN XW AVTO / CRAT´EVESb´/ bASILEVS / RWMAIW´in five lines, -:- above and beneath, triple bordet as on obv.
1 commentspierre_p77
TheopSB1667.jpg
0829-0842 AD - Theophilus - Sear 1667 - Follis39 viewsEmperor: Theophilus (r. 829-842 AD)
Date: 829-842 AD
Condition: VF
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: ΘEOFIL' bASIL'
Three-quarter length figure facing, wearing loros and crown surmounted by tufa (which is ornamented with pellets); he holds labarum in right hand and globus cruciger in left hand.

Reverse: +ΘEO / FILE AV / OVSE SV/ ICAS in four lines.

Constantinople mint
Sear 1667
6.49g; 27.0mm; 195°
Pep
BasIISear1813.jpg
0976-1025 AD - Basil II (Bulgaroktonos) - Anonymous Follis, Class A213 viewsEmperor: Basil II (Bulgaroktonos) (r. 976-1025 AD)
Date: 976-1025 AD
Condition: Fair
Denomination: Anonymous Follis, Class A2

Obverse: -
Bust of Christ facing, bearded, with nimbus cross having in each arm, wearing tunic and himation; right hand raised in blessing in sling of cloak, left holds book with probable in jeweled border. In field, - .

Reverse: ///
above and beneath.

Sear 1813; probable DO A2.25
15.47g; 35.3mm; 30°
Pep
BasIIDOA2_24.jpg
0976-1025 AD - Basil II (Bulgaroktonos) - Anonymous Follis, Class A2.2420 viewsEmperor: Basil II (Bulgaroktonos) (r. 976-1025 AD)
Date: 976-1025 AD
Condition: aVF
Denomination: Anonymous Follis, Class A2

Obverse: -
Bust of Christ facing, bearded, with nimbus cross having in each arm, wearing tunic and himation; right hand raised in blessing in sling of cloak, left holds book with in jeweled border. In field, - .

Reverse: ///
above and beneath.

DO A2.24; Sear 1813
13.40g; 29.0mm; 180°
Pep
IMG_0172.JPG
1.4 Egypt - Ptolemy II58 viewsPtolemy II - 248 BC
Egyptian bronze. 15 mm
obv. deified Alexander in Elephant headress
rev. eagle with spread wings, shield in front, H - lambda - year 38 PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS
Zam
IMG_0176.JPG
1.5 Egypt - Ptolemy II64 viewsPtolemy II - 248 BC
Egyptian Bronze, 15 mm
obv. deified Alexander in elephant headress
rev. eagle with spread wings, shild in front, H Lambda - year 38, PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS
Zam
1042-1055 Anon D S1836.jpg
1042-1055 - follis (anonymous class D)41 viewsChrist facing seated on throne, holding gospels ; in field IC / XC
- + - / IS XC / bASILE / bASIL

Sear 1836
Ginolerhino
antpius_RIC143d.jpg
138-161 AD - ANTONINUS PIUS AR denarius - struck 158-159 AD64 viewsobv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP (laureate head right)
rev: TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST COS IIII (octastyle temple [8 columns] in which the statues of Augustus and Livia reside)
ref: RIC III 143D (R), Cohen 809 (8frcs)
3.01 gms, 18mm,
Rare

History: The Temple of Divus Augustus was built between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia. It is known from Roman coinage that the temple was originally built to an Ionic hexastyle design (see my Caligula sestertius). During the reign of Domitian the Temple of Divus Augustus was destroyed by fire but was rebuilt and rededicated in 89/90 with a shrine to his favourite deity, Minerva. The temple was redesigned as a memorial to four deified emperors, including Vespasian and Titus.
It was restored again in the late 150s by Antoninus Pius, who was perhaps motivated by a desire to be publicly associated with the first emperor. The exact date of the restoration is not known, but the restored temple was an octostyle design with Corinthian capitals and two statues - presumably of Augustus and Livia - in the cella. The pediment displayed a relief featuring Augustus and was topped by a quadriga. Two figures stood on the eaves of the roof, that on the left representing Romulus and the one on the right depicting Aeneas leading his family out of Troy, alluding to Rome's origin-myth. The steps of the temple were flanked by two statues of Victory.
1 commentsberserker
Julian2VotXConstantinople.jpg
1409a, Julian II "the Philosopher," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.143 viewsJulian II, A.D. 360-363; RIC 167; VF; 2.7g, 20mm; Constantinople mint; Obverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted & cuirassed bust right, holding spear & shield; Reverse: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath; CONSPB in exergue; Attractive green patina. Ex Nemesis.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Julian the Apostate (360-363 A.D.)

Walter E. Roberts, Emory University
Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University

Introduction

The emperor Flavius Claudius Julianus reigned from 360 to 26 June 363, when he was killed fighting against the Persians. Despite his short rule, his emperorship was pivotal in the development of the history of the later Roman empire. This essay is not meant to be a comprehensive look at the various issues central to the reign of Julian and the history of the later empire. Rather, this short work is meant to be a brief history and introduction for the general reader. Julian was the last direct descendent of the Constantinian line to ascend to the purple, and it is one of history's great ironies that he was the last non-Christian emperor. As such, he has been vilified by most Christian sources, beginning with John Chrysostom and Gregory Nazianzus in the later fourth century. This tradition was picked up by the fifth century Eusebian continuators Sozomen, Socrates Scholasticus, and Theodoret and passed on to scholars down through the 20th century. Most contemporary sources, however, paint a much more balanced picture of Julian and his reign. The adoption of Christianity by emperors and society, while still a vital concern, was but one of several issues that concerned Julian.

It is fortunate that extensive writings from Julian himself exist, which help interpret his reign in the light of contemporary evidence. Still extant are some letters, several panegyrics, and a few satires. Other contemporary sources include the soldier Ammianus Marcellinus' history, correspondence between Julian and Libanius of Antioch, several panegyrics, laws from the Theodosian Code, inscriptions, and coinage. These sources show Julian's emphasis on restoration. He saw himself as the restorer of the traditional values of Roman society. Of course much of this was rhetoric, meant to defend Julian against charges that he was a usurper. At the same time this theme of restoration was central to all emperors of the fourth century. Julian thought that he was the one emperor who could regain what was viewed as the lost glory of the Roman empire. To achieve this goal he courted select groups of social elites to get across his message of restoration. This was the way that emperors functioned in the fourth century. By choosing whom to include in the sharing of power, they sought to shape society.

Early Life

Julian was born at Constantinople in 331. His father was Julius Constantius, half-brother of the emperor Constantine through Constantius Chlorus, and his mother was Basilina, Julius' second wife. Julian had two half-brothers via Julius' first marriage. One of these was Gallus, who played a major role in Julian's life. Julian appeared destined for a bright future via his father's connection to the Constantinian house. After many years of tense relations with his three half-brothers, Constantine seemed to have welcomed them into the fold of the imperial family. From 333 to 335, Constantine conferred a series of honors upon his three half-siblings, including appointing Julius Constantius as one of the consuls for 335. Julian's mother was equally distinguished. Ammianus related that she was from a noble family. This is supported by Libanius, who claimed that she was the daughter of Julius Julianus, a Praetorian Prefect under Licinius, who was such a model of administrative virtue that he was pardoned and honored by Constantine.

Despite the fact that his mother died shortly after giving birth to him, Julian experienced an idyllic early childhood. This ended when Constantius II conducted a purge of many of his relatives shortly after Constantine's death in 337, particularly targeting the families of Constantine's half-brothers. ulian and Gallus were spared, probably due to their young age. Julian was put under the care of Mardonius, a Scythian eunuch who had tutored his mother, in 339, and was raised in the Greek philosophical tradition, and probably lived in Nicomedia. Ammianus also supplied the fact that while in Nicomedia, Julian was cared for by the local bishop Eusebius, of whom the future emperor was a distant relation. Julian was educated by some of the most famous names in grammar and rhetoric in the Greek world at that time, including Nicocles and Hecebolius. In 344 Constantius II sent Julian and Gallus to Macellum in Cappadocia, where they remained for six years. In 351, Gallus was made Caesar by Constantius II and Julian was allowed to return to Nicomedia, where he studied under Aedesius, Eusebius, and Chrysanthius, all famed philosophers, and was exposed to the Neo-Platonism that would become such a prominent part of his life. But Julian was most proud of the time he spent studying under Maximus of Ephesus, a noted Neo-Platonic philospher and theurgist. It was Maximus who completed Julian's full-scale conversion to Neo-Platonism. Later, when he was Caesar, Julian told of how he put letters from this philosopher under his pillows so that he would continue to absorb wisdom while he slept, and while campaigning on the Rhine, he sent his speeches to Maximus for approval before letting others hear them. When Gallus was executed in 354 for treason by Constantius II, Julian was summoned to Italy and essentially kept under house arrest at Comum, near Milan, for seven months before Constantius' wife Eusebia convinced the emperor that Julian posed no threat. This allowed Julian to return to Greece and continue his life as a scholar where he studied under the Neo-Platonist Priscus. Julian's life of scholarly pursuit, however, ended abruptly when he was summoned to the imperial court and made Caesar by Constantius II on 6 November 355.

Julian as Caesar

Constantius II realized an essential truth of the empire that had been evident since the time of the Tetrarchy--the empire was too big to be ruled effectively by one man. Julian was pressed into service as Caesar, or subordinate emperor, because an imperial presence was needed in the west, in particular in the Gallic provinces. Julian, due to the emperor's earlier purges, was the only viable candidate of the imperial family left who could act as Caesar. Constantius enjoined Julian with the task of restoring order along the Rhine frontier. A few days after he was made Caesar, Julian was married to Constantius' sister Helena in order to cement the alliance between the two men. On 1 December 355, Julian journeyed north, and in Augusta Taurinorum he learned that Alamannic raiders had destroyed Colonia Agrippina. He then proceeded to Vienne where he spent the winter. At Vienne, he learned that Augustudunum was also under siege, but was being held by a veteran garrison. He made this his first priority, and arrived there on 24 June 356. When he had assured himself that the city was in no immediate danger, he journeyed to Augusta Treverorum via Autessioduram, and from there to Durocortorum where he rendezvoused with his army. Julian had the army stage a series of punitive strikes around the Dieuse region, and then he moved them towards the Argentoratum/Mongontiacum region when word of barbarian incursions reached him.

From there, Julian moved on to Colonia Agrippina, and negotiated a peace with the local barbarian leaders who had assaulted the city. He then wintered at Senonae. He spent the early part of the campaigning season of 357 fighting off besiegers at Senonae, and then conducting operations around Lugdunum and Tres Tabernae. Later that summer, he encountered his watershed moment as a military general. Ammianus went into great detail about Julian's victory over seven rogue Alamannic chieftains near Argentoratum, and Julian himself bragged about it in his later writing. After this battle, the soldiers acclaimed Julian Augustus, but he rejected this title. After mounting a series of follow-up raids into Alamannic territory, he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia, and on the way defeated some Frankish raiders in the Mosa region. Julian considered this campaign one of the major events of his time as Caesar.

Julian began his 358 military campaigns early, hoping to catch the barbarians by surprise. His first target was the Franks in the northern Rhine region. He then proceeded to restore some forts in the Mosa region, but his soldiers threatened to mutiny because they were on short rations and had not been paid their donative since Julian had become Caesar. After he soothed his soldiers, Julian spent the rest of the summer negotiating a peace with various Alamannic leaders in the mid and lower Rhine areas, and retired to winter quarters at Lutetia. In 359, he prepared once again to carry out a series of punitive expeditions against the Alamanni in the Rhine region who were still hostile to the Roman presence. In preparation, the Caesar repopulated seven previously destroyed cities and set them up as supply bases and staging areas. This was done with the help of the people with whom Julian had negotiated a peace the year before. Julian then had a detachment of lightly armed soldiers cross the Rhine near Mogontiacum and conduct a guerilla strike against several chieftains. As a result of these campaigns, Julian was able to negotiate a peace with all but a handful of the Alamannic leaders, and he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia.

Of course, Julian did more than act as a general during his time as Caesar. According to Ammianus, Julian was an able administrator who took steps to correct the injustices of Constantius' appointees. Ammianus related the story of how Julian prevented Florentius, the Praetorian Prefect of Gaul, from raising taxes, and also how Julian actually took over as governor for the province of Belgica Secunda. Hilary, bishop of Poitiers, supported Ammianus' basic assessment of Julian in this regard when he reported that Julian was an able representative of the emperor to the Gallic provincials. There is also epigraphic evidence to support Julian's popularity amongst the provincial elites. An inscription found near Beneventum in Apulia reads:
"To Flavius Claudius Julianus, most noble and sanctified Caesar, from the caring Tocius Maximus, vir clarissimus, for the care of the res publica from Beneventum".

Tocius Maximus, as a vir clarissimus, was at the highest point in the social spectrum and was a leader in his local community. This inscription shows that Julian was successful in establishing a positive image amongst provincial elites while he was Caesar.

Julian Augustus

In early 360, Constantius, driven by jealousy of Julian's success, stripped Julian of many troops and officers, ostensibly because the emperor needed them for his upcoming campaign against the Persians. One of the legions ordered east, the Petulantes, did not want to leave Gaul because the majority of the soldiers in the unit were from this region. As a result they mutinied and hailed Julian as Augustus at Lutetia. Julian refused this acclamation as he had done at Argentoratum earlier, but the soldiers would have none of his denial. They raised him on a shield and adorned him with a neck chain, which had formerly been the possession of the standard-bearer of the Petulantes and symbolized a royal diadem. Julian appeared reluctantly to acquiesce to their wishes, and promised a generous donative. The exact date of his acclamation is unknown, but most scholars put it in February or March. Julian himself supported Ammianus' picture of a jealous Constantius. In his Letter to the Athenians, a document constructed to answer charges that he was a usurper, Julian stated that from the start he, as Caesar, had been meant as a figurehead to the soldiers and provincials. The real power he claimed lay with the generals and officials already present in Gaul. In fact, according to Julian, the generals were charged with watching him as much as the enemy. His account of the actual acclamation closely followed what Ammianus told us, but he stressed even more his reluctance to take power. Julian claimed that he did so only after praying to Zeus for guidance.

Fearing the reaction of Constantius, Julian sent a letter to his fellow emperor justifying the events at Lutetia and trying to arrange a peaceful solution. This letter berated Constantius for forcing the troops in Gaul into an untenable situation. Ammianus stated that Julian's letter blamed Constantius' decision to transfer Gallic legions east as the reason for the soldiers' rebellion. Julian once again asserted that he was an unwilling participant who was only following the desire of the soldiers. In both of these basic accounts Ammianus and Julian are playing upon the theme of restoration. Implicit in their version of Julian's acclamation is the argument that Constantius was unfit to rule. The soldiers were the vehicle of the gods' will. The Letter to the Athenians is full of references to the fact that Julian was assuming the mantle of Augustus at the instigation of the gods. Ammianus summed up this position nicely when he related the story of how, when Julian was agonizing over whether to accept the soldiers' acclamation, he had a dream in which he was visited by the Genius (guardian spirit) of the Roman state. The Genius told Julian that it had often tried to bestow high honors upon Julian but had been rebuffed. Now, the Genius went on to say, was Julian's final chance to take the power that was rightfully his. If the Caesar refused this chance, the Genius would depart forever, and both Julian and the state would rue Julian's rejection. Julian himself wrote a letter to his friend Maximus of Ephesus in November of 361 detailing his thoughts on his proclamation. In this letter, Julian stated that the soldiers proclaimed him Augustus against his will. Julian, however, defended his accession, saying that the gods willed it and that he had treated his enemies with clemency and justice. He went on to say that he led the troops in propitiating the traditional deities, because the gods commanded him to return to the traditional rites, and would reward him if he fulfilled this duty.

During 360 an uneasy peace simmered between the two emperors. Julian spent the 360 campaigning season continuing his efforts to restore order along the Rhine, while Constantius continued operations against the Persians. Julian wintered in Vienne, and celebrated his Quinquennalia. It was at this time that his wife Helena died, and he sent her remains to Rome for a proper burial at his family villa on the Via Nomentana where the body of her sister was entombed. The uneasy peace held through the summer of 361, but Julian concentrated his military operations around harassing the Alamannic chieftain Vadomarius and his allies, who had concluded a peace treaty with Constantius some years earlier. By the end of the summer, Julian decided to put an end to the waiting and gathered his army to march east against Constantius. The empire teetered on the brink of another civil war. Constantius had spent the summer negotiating with the Persians and making preparations for possible military action against his cousin. When he was assured that the Persians would not attack, he summoned his army and sallied forth to meet Julian. As the armies drew inexorably closer to one another, the empire was saved from another bloody civil war when Constantius died unexpectedly of natural causes on 3 November near the town of Mopsucrenae in Cilicia, naming Julian -- the sources say-- as his legitimate successor.

Julian was in Dacia when he learned of his cousin's death. He made his way through Thrace and came to Constantinople on 11 December 361 where Julian honored the emperor with the funeral rites appropriate for a man of his station. Julian immediately set about putting his supporters in positions of power and trimming the imperial bureaucracy, which had become extremely overstaffed during Constantius' reign. Cooks and barbers had increased during the late emperor's reign and Julian expelled them from his court. Ammianus gave a mixed assessment of how the new emperor handled the followers of Constantius. Traditionally, emperors were supposed to show clemency to the supporters of a defeated enemy. Julian, however, gave some men over to death to appease the army. Ammianus used the case of Ursulus, Constantius' comes sacrum largitionum, to illustrate his point. Ursulus had actually tried to acquire money for the Gallic troops when Julian had first been appointed Caesar, but he had also made a disparaging remark about the ineffectiveness of the army after the battle of Amida. The soldiers remembered this, and when Julian became sole Augustus, they demanded Ursulus' head. Julian obliged, much to the disapproval of Ammianus. This seems to be a case of Julian courting the favor of the military leadership, and is indicative of a pattern in which Julian courted the goodwill of various societal elites to legitimize his position as emperor.

Another case in point is the officials who made up the imperial bureaucracy. Many of them were subjected to trial and punishment. To achieve this goal, during the last weeks of December 361 Julian assembled a military tribunal at Chalcedon, empanelling six judges to try the cases. The president of the tribunal was Salutius, just promoted to the rank of Praetorian Prefect; the five other members were Mamertinus, the orator, and four general officers: Jovinus, Agilo, Nevitta, and Arbetio. Relative to the proceedings of the tribunal, Ammianus noted that the judges, " . . . oversaw the cases more vehemently than was right or fair, with the exception of a few . . .." Ammianus' account of Julian's attempt at reform of the imperial bureaucracy is supported by legal evidence from the Theodosian Code. A series of laws sent to Mamertinus, Julian's appointee as Praetorian Prefect in Italy, Illyricum, and Africa, illustrate this point nicely. On 6 June 362, Mamertinus received a law that prohibited provincial governors from bypassing the Vicars when giving their reports to the Prefect. Traditionally, Vicars were given civil authority over a group of provinces, and were in theory meant to serve as a middle step between governors and Prefects. This law suggests that the Vicars were being left out, at least in Illyricum. Julian issued another edict to Mamertinus on 22 February 362 to stop abuse of the public post by governors. According to this law, only Mamertinus could issue post warrants, but the Vicars were given twelve blank warrants to be used as they saw fit, and each governor was given two. Continuing the trend of bureaucratic reform, Julian also imposed penalties on governors who purposefully delayed appeals in court cases they had heard. The emperor also established a new official to weigh solidi used in official government transactions to combat coin clipping.

For Julian, reigning in the abuses of imperial bureaucrats was one step in restoring the prestige of the office of emperor. Because he could not affect all elements of society personally, Julian, like other Neo-Flavian emperors, decided to concentrate on select groups of societal elites as intercessors between himself and the general populace. One of these groups was the imperial bureaucracy. Julian made it very clear that imperial officials were intercessors in a very real sense in a letter to Alypius, Vicar of Britain. In this letter, sent from Gaul sometime before 361, the emperor praises Alypius for his use of "mildness and moderation with courage and force" in his rule of the provincials. Such virtues were characteristic of the emperors, and it was good that Alypius is representing Julian in this way. Julian courted the army because it put him in power. Another group he sought to include in his rule was the traditional Senatorial aristocracy. One of his first appointments as consul was Claudius Mamertinus, a Gallic Senator and rhetorician. Mamertinus' speech in praise of Julian delivered at Constantinople in January of 362 is preserved. In this speech, Claudius presented his consular selection as inaugurating a new golden age and Julian as the restorer of the empire founded by Augustus. The image Mamertinus gave of his own consulate inaugurating a new golden age is not merely formulaic. The comparison of Julian to Augustus has very real, if implicit, relevance to Claudius' situation. Claudius emphasized the imperial period as the true age of renewal. Augustus ushered in a new era with his formation of a partnership between the emperor and the Senate based upon a series of honors and offices bestowed upon the Senate in return for their role as intercessor between emperor and populace. It was this system that Julian was restoring, and the consulate was one concrete example of this bond. To be chosen as a consul by the emperor, who himself had been divinely mandated, was a divine honor. In addition to being named consul, Mamertinus went on to hold several offices under Julian, including the Prefecture of Italy, Illyricum, and Africa. Similarly, inscriptional evidence illustrates a link between municipal elites and Julian during his time as Caesar, something which continued after he became emperor. One concrete example comes from the municipal senate of Aceruntia in Apulia, which established a monument on which Julian is styled as "Repairer of the World."

Julian seems to have given up actual Christian belief before his acclamation as emperor and was a practitioner of more traditional Greco-Roman religious beliefs, in particular, a follower of certain late antique Platonist philosophers who were especially adept at theurgy as was noted earlier. In fact Julian himself spoke of his conversion to Neo-Platonism in a letter to the Alexandrians written in 363. He stated that he had abandoned Christianity when he was twenty years old and been an adherent of the traditional Greco-Roman deities for the twelve years prior to writing this letter.

(For the complete text of this article see: http://www.roman-emperors.org/julian.htm)

Julian’s Persian Campaign

The exact goals Julian had for his ill-fated Persian campaign were never clear. The Sassanid Persians, and before them the Parthians, had been a traditional enemy from the time of the Late Republic, and indeed Constantius had been conducting a war against them before Julian's accession forced the former to forge an uneasy peace. Julian, however, had no concrete reason to reopen hostilities in the east. Socrates Scholasticus attributed Julian's motives to imitation of Alexander the Great, but perhaps the real reason lay in his need to gather the support of the army. Despite his acclamation by the Gallic legions, relations between Julian and the top military officers was uneasy at best. A war against the Persians would have brought prestige and power both to Julian and the army.

Julian set out on his fateful campaign on 5 March 363. Using his trademark strategy of striking quickly and where least expected, he moved his army through Heirapolis and from there speedily across the Euphrates and into the province of Mesopotamia, where he stopped at the town of Batnae. His plan was to eventually return through Armenia and winter in Tarsus. Once in Mesopotamia, Julian was faced with the decision of whether to travel south through the province of Babylonia or cross the Tigris into Assyria, and he eventually decided to move south through Babylonia and turn west into Assyria at a later date. By 27 March, he had the bulk of his army across the Euphrates, and had also arranged a flotilla to guard his supply line along the mighty river. He then left his generals Procopius and Sebastianus to help Arsacius, the king of Armenia and a Roman client, to guard the northern Tigris line. It was also during this time that he received the surrender of many prominent local leaders who had nominally supported the Persians. These men supplied Julian with money and troops for further military action against their former masters. Julian decided to turn south into Babylonia and proceeded along the Euphrates, coming to the fortress of Cercusium at the junction of the Abora and Euphrates Rivers around the first of April, and from there he took his army west to a region called Zaitha near the abandoned town of Dura where they visited the tomb of the emperor Gordian which was in the area. On April 7 he set out from there into the heart of Babylonia and towards Assyria.

Ammianus then stated that Julian and his army crossed into Assyria, which on the face of things appears very confusing. Julian still seems to be operating within the province of Babylonia between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. The confusion is alleviated when one realizes that,for Ammianus, the region of Assyria encompassed the provinces of Babylonia and Assyria. On their march, Julian's forces took the fortress of Anatha, received the surrender and support of several more local princes, and ravaged the countryside of Assyria between the rivers. As the army continued south, they came across the fortresses Thilutha and Achaiachala, but these places were too well defended and Julian decided to leave them alone. Further south were the cities Diacira and Ozogardana, which the Roman forces sacked and burned. Soon, Julian came to Pirisabora and a brief siege ensued, but the city fell and was also looted and destroyed. It was also at this time that the Roman army met its first systematic resistance from the Persians. As the Romans penetrated further south and west, the local inhabitants began to flood their route. Nevertheless, the Roman forces pressed on and came to Maiozamalcha, a sizable city not far from Ctesiphon. After a short siege, this city too fell to Julian. Inexorably, Julian's forces zeroed in on Ctesiphon, but as they drew closer, the Persian resistance grew fiercer, with guerilla raids whittling at Julian's men and supplies. A sizable force of the army was lost and the emperor himself was almost killed taking a fort a few miles from the target city.
Finally, the army approached Ctesiphon following a canal that linked the Tigris and Euphrates. It soon became apparent after a few preliminary skirmishes that a protracted siege would be necessary to take this important city. Many of his generals, however, thought that pursuing this course of action would be foolish. Julian reluctantly agreed, but became enraged by this failure and ordered his fleet to be burned as he decided to march through the province of Assyria. Julian had planned for his army to live off the land, but the Persians employed a scorched-earth policy. When it became apparent that his army would perish (because his supplies were beginning to dwindle) from starvation and the heat if he continued his campaign, and also in the face of superior numbers of the enemy, Julian ordered a retreat on 16 June. As the Roman army retreated, they were constantly harassed by guerilla strikes. It was during one of these raids that Julian got caught up in the fighting and took a spear to his abdomen. Mortally wounded he was carried to his tent, where, after conferring with some of his officers, he died. The date was 26 June 363.

Conclusion

Thus an ignominious end for a man came about who had hoped to restore the glory of the Roman empire during his reign as emperor. Due to his intense hatred of Christianity, the opinion of posterity has not been kind to Julian. The contemporary opinion, however, was overall positive. The evidence shows that Julian was a complex ruler with a definite agenda to use traditional social institutions in order to revive what he saw as a collapsing empire. In the final assessment, he was not so different from any of the other emperors of the fourth century. He was a man grasping desperately to hang on to a Greco-Roman conception of leadership that was undergoing a subtle yet profound change.
Copyright (C) 2002, Walter E. Roberts and Michael DiMaio, Jr. Used by permission.

In reality, Julian worked to promote culture and philosophy in any manifestation. He tried to reduce taxes and the public debts of municipalities; he augmented administrative decentralisation; he promoted a campaign of austerity to reduce public expenditure (setting himself as the example). He reformed the postal service and eliminated the powerful secret police.
by Federico Morando; JULIAN II, The Apostate, http://www.forumancientcoins.com/NumisWiki/view.asp?key=Julian%20II

Flavius Claudius Iulianus was born in 331 or maybe 332 A.D. in Constantinople. He ruled the Western Empire as Caesar from 355 to 360 and was hailed Augustus by his legions in Lutetia (Paris) in 360. Julian was a gifted administrator and military strategist. Famed as the last pagan emperor, his reinstatement of the pagan religion earned him the moniker "the Apostate." As evidenced by his brilliant writing, some of which has survived to the present day, the title "the Philosopher" may have been more appropriate. He died from wounds suffered during the Persian campaign of 363 A.D. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.




2 commentsCleisthenes
Follis Anonimo Clase A2 SB01813.jpg
15-02 - Follis Anónimo Clase A2 (976 - 1025 D.C.)28 viewsAtribuida al reinado conjunto de Basilio II y Constantino VIII.
AE Follis 30 x 27 mm 9.6 gr.

Anv: "EMMA - NOVHΛ", "IX - XC" (en campos izq. y derecho) - Busto de Cristo de frente nimbado (Forma rectangular en la cruz del limbo), sosteniendo el Libro de los Evangelios (5 puntos en el libro).
Rev: " IhSUS / XRISTUS / bASILEU / bASILE " (Jesús Cristo Rey de Reyes), leyenda en 4 líneas, debajo y arriba ornamentos tipo 47 (Forma rectangular).

Acuñada 976 - 1025 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla

Referencias: Sear BCTV #1813 Pag. 376 - Bellinger D.O. pp.651 - B.M.C. (Basil II and Constantine VII) #21-40 - Ratto M.B.(Basil II and Constantine VII) #1951-65 - Morrisson C.M.b.B.N. pp.596/8 #1-66
mdelvalle
Follis Anonimo Clase D SB01836.jpg
15-04 - Follis Anónimo Clase D (1042 - 1055 D.C.) 25 viewsAtribuida al reinado de Constantino IX.
AE Follis 28 x 26 mm 10.9 gr.

Anv: "IX - XC" (en campos izq. y derecho) - Cristo sentado en trono con respaldo de frente, vistiendo nimbus cruciger (Halo redondo con cruz que rodea su busto), Pallium (Tipo de capa o manto) y Collobium (Túnica especial sin mangas), sosteniendo el Libro de los Evangelios con ambas manos.
Rev: " IhSUS / bASILEU / bASILE " (Jesús Rey de Reyes), leyenda en 3 líneas, ornamentado debajo con "- u -" y arriba con "- + -".

Acuñada 1042 - 1055 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla

Referencias: Sear BCTV #1836 Pag. 378 - Bellinger D.O. pp.685/7 - B.M.C. (Constantine X) #10-17 - Ratto M.B.(Constantine X) #2015/7 - Morrisson C.M.b.B.N. pp.601 #107/19
mdelvalle
159.jpg
159 Basiliscus. AV solidus 4.4gm18 viewsobv: DN BASILIS_CV PP AVG pearl dia. helm. three quarter facing bust. r., holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman
rev: VICTORI_A AVGGG victory std. l. holding long cross, star in r. field
ex: CONOB
hill132
a_088.JPG
162-150 BC51 viewsDemetrios I Soter
Tetradrachm

Obverse:His diademed head right within laurel-wreath
Reverse:BASILEWS DHMHTPIOY;Tyche seated left on throne ,supported by tritoness;monogram at left field

29.80mm 16.37gm

Sear 7014
2 commentsmaik
Cleopatra80DrachEagle.jpg
1ad Cleopatra VII55 views51-29 BC

Alexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871

Plutarch wrote: [Cleopatra] was to meet Antony in the time of life when women's beauty is most splendid, and their intellects are in full maturity. . . . She received several letters, both from Antony and from his friends, to summon her, but she took no account of these orders; and at last, as if in mockery of them, she came sailing up the river Cydnus, in a barge with gilded stern and outspread sails of purple, while oars of silver beat time to the music of flutes and fifes and harps. She herself lay all along under a canopy of cloth of gold, dressed as Venus in a picture, and beautiful young boys, like painted Cupids, stood on each side to fan her. Her maids were dressed like sea nymphs and graces, some steering at the rudder, some working at the ropes. The perfumes diffused themselves from the vessel to the shore, which was covered with multitudes, part following the galley up the river on either bank, part running out of the city to see the sight. The market-place was quite emptied, and Antony at last was left alone sitting upon the tribunal; while the word went through all the multitude, that Venus was come to feast with Bacchus, for the common good of Asia. On her arrival, Antony sent to invite her to supper. She thought it fitter he should come to her; so, willing to show his good-humour and courtesy, he complied, and went. . . . For her actual beauty, it is said, was not in itself so remarkable that none could be compared with her, or that no one could see her without being struck by it, but the contact of her presence, if you lived with her, was irresistible; the attraction of her person, joining with the charm of her conversation, and the character that attended all she said or did, was something bewitching. It was a pleasure merely to hear the sound of her voice, with which, like an instrument of many strings, she could pass from one language to another; so that there were few of the barbarian nations that she answered by an interpreter. . . .
Blindado
BOTLAUREL_2019.JPG
201939 viewsTHIS YEAR'S WINNERS
CLICK ON A COIN FOR ITS DETAILS

*Alex
junlia_domna.JPG
201a. Julia Domna70 viewsIn Rome, when the worship of Cybele, as Magna Mater, was formally initiated in 203 BC, Rome was embroiled in the Second Punic War. The previous year, an inspection had been made of the Sibylline Books, and some oracular verses had been discovered that announced that if a foreign foe should carry war into Italy, he could be driven out and conquered if the Mater Magna were brought from Pessinos to Rome. Publius Cornelius Scipio Nasica was ordered to go to the port of Ostia, accompanied by all the matrons, to meet the goddess. He was to receive her as she left the vessel, and when brought to land he was to place her in the hands of the matrons who were to bear her to her destination, the Temple of Victory on the Palatine Hill. The day on which this event took place, 12 April, was observed afterwards as a festival, the Megalesian. (Livy, History of Rome, circa AD 10)

In Rome, her Phrygian origins were recalled by Catullus, whose famous poem on the theme of Attis includes a vivid description of Cybele's worship: "Together come and follow to the Phrygian home of Cybele, to the Phrygian forests of the goddess, where the clash of cymbals ring, where tambourines resound, where the Phrygian flute-player blows deeply on his curved reed, where ivy-crowned maenads toss their heads wildly."

Roman devotion to Cybele ran deep. Not coincidentally, when a Christian basilica was built over the site of a temple to Cybele, to occupy the site, it was dedicated as the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore.

The worship of Cybele penetrated as far as Mauretania, where, just outside Setif, the ceremonial "tree-bearers" and the faithful (religiosi) restored the temple of Cybele and Attis after a disastrous fire in AD 288. Lavish new fittings paid for by the private group included the silver statue of Cybele and the chariot that carried her in procession received a new canopy, with tassels in the form of fir cones. (Robin Lane Fox, Pagans and Christians, p 581.)

Today, a monumental statue of Cybele can be found in one of the principal traffic circles of Madrid, the Plaza de Cibeles (illustration, upper right).

In Roman mythology, Magna Mater deorum Idaea ("great Idaean mother of the gods") was the name for the originally Phrygian goddess Cybele, as well as Rhea.

Her cult moved from Phrygia to Greece from the 6th century to the 4th. In 205 BC, Rome adopted her cult.

Julia Domna Denarius. 212 AD. IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right / MATRI DEVM, Cybele standing left, leaning on column, holding drum & scepter, lion at foot. RSC 137. RIC 382
1 commentsecoli
LarryW1931.jpg
210 Basil II Bulgaroktonos, AD 976-102567 viewsGold histamenon nomisma, 25mm, 4.40g, aEF
Struck at Constantinople c. AD 1005-1025
+ IhS CIS REX REGNANTIhM, bust of Christ facing, wears pallium, colobium, and nimbus cruciger with crescents; raised right hand, Gospels in left; triple border / + bASIL C CONSTANT b R, facing crowned busts of Basil wearing loros of square pattern (left) and Constantine wearing jeweled chlamys; holding between them with right hands a long plain cross; manus Dei above Basil's head; triple border
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
DOC 6a; Sear 1800; Wroth 12-13
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW1937.jpg
215 Constantine VIII, AD 1025-102858 viewsGold histamenon nomisma, 25mm, 4.37g, gVF
Struck at Constantinople
+IhS XIS REX REGNANThM, bust of Christ Pantocrator facing, wears tunic, himation, and nimbus cruciger with crescents; right hand raised, Gospels in left; triple border / + CWhSTAhTIh BASILEUS ROM, crowned bust facing with long beard; wears loros, holds labarum with pellet on shaft with right, akakia in left; triple border. Scarce.
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
DOC 2; Sear 1815
1 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
Philip007.jpg
221-179 BC Philip V 35 viewsPhilip V
AE 14

Obverse:Macedonian shield with head of Perseus at center
Reverse:FILIPPOY BASILEOS either side of Macedonian helmet;star at the top

14.33mm 2.41gm

SEAR 6800 , SNG UK7 -744
maik
a_042.JPG
323-317 BC Philip III 37 viewsPhilip III Arrhidaeus
Tetradrachm Babylon

Obverse:Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
Reverse:FILIPPOY BASILEOS;Zeus on throne;M left throne, LY under throne

25.24mm 17.12gm

Price P181b
maik
Basil_I_fouree_solidus.jpg
36. Basil I Fouree Solidus13 viewsByzantine Empire
Basil I, the Macedonian.
867 - 886 AD.
Plated Solidus. 19.86mm, 2.00g.

O: Christ seated facing.

R: Busts of Basil and Constantine facing.

S.1704. Fine.

Ex Ancient Treasures
Sosius
caligula_RIC36-R.jpg
37-41 AD - CALIGULA AE sestertius - struck 37-38 AD79 viewsobv: C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS P M TR POT (Pietas, veiled, seated left and holding patera, left elbow resting on small statue of Spes), PIETAS in exergue
rev: DIVO-AVG (Gaius sacrificing before garlanded hexastyle temple; one attendant leading bull to altar, the other holding a patera), S-C across field
ref: RIC I 36 (R), BMCRE 41, Cohen 9 (15frcs)
27.38gms, 33mm
Very rare

This issue commemorates Gaius Caligula's dedication of the Temple of the Divus Augustus and the young emperor's sense of pietas. The PIETAS beneath the figure of the emperor drives home the point that he is fulfilling his duty by dedicating the temple to his great-grandfather. Construction of the Temple of the Divus Augustus began under Tiberius and, perhaps, under the direction of Livia herself, in the general area behind the Basilica Julia (though the actual site remains unknown), and was subsequently dedicated by Caligula.
2 commentsberserker
60661q00.jpg
4) Cleopatra Tetradrachm of Alexandria62 viewsThis coin was issued in the first year of Cleopatra's reign, which would place it around 50 B.C. while she was was still in a relationship with Julius Caesar. Twenty years later, she and Antony would commit suicide after their defeat at Actium, ending the reign of the Pharaohs of Egypt.

Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 1817 (Ptolemaios XIII); SNG Cop 398; Cohen DCA 70; BMC Ptolemies p. 1817, 2 (Ptolemaios XIII); Noeske 363; Hosking 129; SNG Milan -, gVF, toned, Paphos mint, weight 9.476g, maximum diameter 25.6mm, die axis 0o, 51 - 50; obverse diademed bust right (feminized bust of Ptolemy I or Cleopatra?), wearing aegis; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, palm behind over right wing, LB (year 2) over crown of Isis left, PA right

Purchased from FORVM
RM0010
1 commentsSosius
25385q00.jpg
4) Cleopatra VII17 viewsCleopatra VII (maybe)
Bronze dichalkon, 1.491g, 11.5mm, 0o, Paphos mint

Diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure / PTOLEMAIOU - BASILEWS, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons

Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); SNG Cop 649; Weiser -, Fine.

Caption per FORVM catalog:
Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus, assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references.

Purchased from FORVM
RM0004
Sosius
Longus.jpg
42 BC L. Mussidius Longus132 viewsCONCORDIA
Veiled and diad. head of Concordia right star below chin

L. MVSSIDIVS LONGVS
Shrine of Venus Cloacina consisting of circular platform, inscribed CLOACIN, surmounted by two statues of the goddess

Rome
42 BC

3.42g
Sear 494, RRC 494/42

ex-Canadian Coin

In Roman mythology, Cloacina (Latin, cloaca: "sewer" or "drain") was the goddess who presided over the Cloaca Maxima the main sewer drain in Rome. The Cloaca Maxima is traditionally said to have beeen started by one of Rome's Etruscan kings, Tarquinius Priscus. Despite her Etruscan origins, she later became identified with Venus.

Titus Tatius, who reigned with Romulus, erected a statue to Cloacina as the spirit of the "Great Drain". As well as controlling sewers, she was also a protector of sexual intercourse in marriage. The Romans believed that a good sewage system was important for the success of Rome, as a good sewer system was necessary for the physical health of Roman citizens. Additionally, Romans worshipped Cloacina as the goddess of purity. Cloacina was worshipped as an aspect of Venus at the small Shrine of Venus Cloacina, located in front of the Basilica Aemilia in the Roman Forum and directly above the Cloaca Maxima. The depiction on the reverse of this coin is that shrine.

The image of Concordia could be interpreted to convey the thought of Unity between the triumvirs to defeat Brutus and Cassius. Venus Cloacina on the reverse conveys the thought of purification for the treacherous murder of the dictator Julius Caesar by men who claimed to be his friends.
4 commentsJay GT4
coin555.JPG
501. CONSTANTINE I Siscia SOLI INVICTO COMIT14 viewsSol Invictus ("the undefeated Sun") or, more fully, Deus Sol Invictus ("the undefeated sun god") was a religious title applied to three distinct divinities during the later Roman Empire, El Gabal, Mithras, and Sol.

Unlike the earlier, agrarian cult of Sol Indiges ("the native sun" or "the invoked sun" - the etymology and meaning of the word "indiges" is disputed), the title Deus Sol Invictus was formed by analogy with the imperial titulature pius felix invictus ("dutiful, fortunate, unconquered").

A festival of the birth of the Unconquered Sun (or Dies Natalis Solis Invicti) was celebrated when the duration of daylight first begins to increase after the winter solstice,—the "rebirth" of the sun.

Christianity adopted some of the attributes of the Sol Invictus religion, as apparent in the first examples of Christian iconography, depicting Christ with solar attributes such as the radiated crown or, in a few instances, a solar chariot.

Sol Invictus had been adopted by the Church of Rome as evidenced by Christ as Apollo-Helios in a mausoleum discovered under St. Peter's Basilica and dated to 250[1], and, from the beginning of the third century, "Sun of Justice" was used as a title of Christ[2].

The date for Christmas may also bear a relation to the sun worship. According to the Syriac bishop Jacob Bar-Salibi, writing in the twelth century:

"It was a custom of the Pagans to celebrate on the same 25 December the birthday of the Sun, at which they kindled lights in token of festivity. In these solemnities and revelries the Christians also took part. Accordingly when the doctors of the Church perceived that the Christians had a leaning to this festival, they took counsel and resolved that the true Nativity should be solemnised on that day." (cited in "Christianity and Paganism in the Fourth to Eighth Centuries", Ramsay MacMullen. Yale:1997, p155])
Christianity designated Sunday as the "Lord's Day" and the day of rest, rather than Saturday, the Jewish Sabbath.


CONSTANTINE I

RIC VII Siscia 32 R3

ecoli
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502. Constantine II Siscia GLORIA EXERCITVS24 viewsSiscia

All that remains from prehistoric inhabitants on this area are small statues of idols and tools. Indigenous Illyrian tribes were conquered in the 4th century by the Celts. Celts ethically and culturally mixed with Illyric tribes and established on the right bank of the river Kupa a settlement called Segestica. Illyric and Celtic tribes succeeded in withstanding Roman pressures until the year 35 BC when Emperor Octavian with 12,000 soldiers conquered Segestica after a thirty - day siege.

After Romans had conquered Segestica, they built Siscia on the left bank of the river Kupa (right below the centre of today's Sisak). Siscia was the capital town of the Province of Pannonia Savia, where 40,000 inhabitants resided. The town had the forum, basilicas, temples, an empire mint, a theatre and two ports.
Christianity was spreading unstoppably and encompassed the town of Sisak. The first known Bishop of Sisak was Kvirin from 284 AD until his martyr's death, probably in the year 303 AD.
With gradual collapse of the Roman Empire, the importance of Sisak declined and the great migration brought to Sisak Huns, Gauls, Avars and Slavs. Slav tribes remained in this area and eventually the Slav language became dominant.

RIC VII Siscia 253 R3
ecoli
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6.1 Constantine X, Class E anonymous follis40 viewsConstantine X
1059 - 1067
Class E anonymous follis

rev. - ISXS - bASILE - bASIL in three lines
Zam
01860q00.jpg
604. Leo I387 viewsImperator Caesar Flavius Valerius Leo Augustus or Leo I of the Byzantine Empire (401–474), reigned from 457 to 474, also known as Leo the Thracian, was the last of a series of emperors placed on the throne by Aspar, the Alan serving as commander-in-chief of the army. His coronation as emperor on February 7, 457, was the first known to involve the Patriarch of Constantinople. Leo I made an alliance with the Isaurians and was thus able to eliminate Aspar. The price of the alliance was the marriage of Leo's daughter to Tarasicodissa, leader of the Isaurians who, as Zeno, became emperor in 474.

During Leo's reign, the Balkans were ravaged time and again by the West Goths and the Huns. However, these attackers were unable to take Constantinople thanks to the walls which had been rebuilt and reinforced in the reign of Theodosius II and against which they possessed no suitable siege engines.

Leo's reign was also noteworthy for his influence in the Western Roman Empire, marked by his appointment of Anthemius as Western Roman Emperor in 467. He attempted to build on this political achievement with an expedition against the Vandals in 468, which was defeated due to the treachery and incompetence of Leo's brother-in-law Basiliscus. This disaster drained the Empire of men and money.

Leo's greatest influence in the West was largely inadvertent and at second-hand: the great Goth king Theodoric the Great was raised at the Leo's court in Constantinople, where he was steeped in Roman government and military tactics, which served him well when he returned after Leo's death to become the Goth ruler of a mixed but largely Romanized people.

Leo also published a New Constitutions or compilation of Law Code[1], Constitution LV concerned Judaism: "JEWS SHALL LIVE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE RITES OF CHRISTIANITY. Those who formerly were invested with Imperial authority promulgated various laws with reference to the Hebrew people, who, once nourished by Divine protection, became renowned, but are now remarkable for the calamities inflicted upon them because of their contumacy towards Christ and God; and these laws, while regulating their mode of life, compelled them to read the Holy Scriptures, and ordered them not to depart from the ceremonies of their worship. They also provided that their children should adhere to their religion, being obliged to do so as well by the ties of blood, as on account of the institution of circumcision. These are the laws which I have already stated were formerly enforced throughout the Empire. But the Most Holy Sovereign from whom We are descended, more concerned than his predecessors for the salvation of the Jews, instead of allowing them (as they did) to obey only their ancient laws, attempted, by the interpretation of prophesies and the conclusions which he drew from them, to convert them to the Christian religion, by means of the vivifying water of baptism. He fully succeeded in his attempts to transform them into new men, according to the doctrine of Christ, and induced them to denounce their ancient doctrines and abandon their religious ceremonies, such as circumcision, the observance of the Sabbath, and all their other rites. But although he, to a certain extent, overcame the obstinacy of the Jews, he was unable to force them to abolish the laws which permitted them to live in accordance with their ancient customs. Therefore We, desiring to accomplish what Our Father failed to effect, do hereby annul all the old laws enacted with reference to the Hebrews, and We order that they shall not dare to live in any other manner than in accordance with the rules established by the pure and salutary Christian Faith. And if anyone of them should be proved to, have neglected to observe the ceremonies of the Christian religion, and to have returned to his former practices, he shall pay the penalty prescribed by the law for apostates."

Leo died of dysentery at the age of 73 on January 18, 474.

Bronze AE4, RIC 671, S 4340 var, VG, 1.17g, 10.3mm, 180o, Alexandria mint, obverse D N LEO P F AVG (or similar), pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Lion standing left, head right, cross above, ALEA in ex; very rare (R3); ex Forum
ecoli73
coin566.JPG
604a. Leo I and Verina327 viewsAelia Verina (died 484) was the wife of Byzantine emperor Leo I, and the mother-in-law of Zeno, who was married to her daughter Ariadne.

Her origins are unknown. She originally supported Zeno while the young emperor Leo II was still alive, but after Leo II's death in 474 she turned against her son-in-law. She conspired against him with her lover Patricius, her brother Basiliscus, the Isaurian general Illus, and general Theodoric Strabo, forcing Zeno to flee Constantinople in 475. Basiliscus then briefly became the rival emperor, until 476 when Verina reconciled with Zeno.

Verina then conspired against Illus, who discovered the plot, and with Zeno's consent had her imprisoned. This led to another conspiracy led by Verina's son Marcian (a grandson of the emperor Marcian), but Marcian was defeated and exiled.

In 483 Zeno asked Illus to release Verina, but by now Illus was opposed to Zeno's Monophysite sympathies. Illus allied with Verina and declared a general named Leontius emperor, but Zeno defeated them as well. Illus and Verina fled to Isauria, where Verina died in 484.

Bronze AE4, RIC 713-718, obverse D N LE-O (or similar), Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Empress Verina standing facing holding cross on globe and transverse scepter, b - E across fields, From uncleaned pile

ecoli
1019_P_Hadrian_RPC6390.jpg
6390 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Nome Obol 126-27 AD Isis standing22 viewsReference.
RPC 6390.22; Dattari-Savio Pl. 304, 6299 (this coin). Dattari 6299 and Pl XXXV (this rev. Illustrated) Emmett 1246

Issue Memphite

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑ СΕΒ
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., drapery on l. shoulder

Rev. ΜΕΜΦΙ, L ΙΑ
Isis standing, facing, head l., wearing basileion upon vulture headdress, holding in l. hand figure of Ptah, standing, r., wearing sun disk and was-sceptre in hands, and raised uraeus, l., wearing pschent, in r. hand

5.75 gr
19.5 mm
12h

Note.
From the Dattari collection. Illustrated in Dattari.

Figure of Ptah, God of Creation
The Pschent was the name of the Double Crown worn by rulers in ancient Egypt
1 commentsokidoki
17426040_10155118077272232_7099926095038162661_n.jpg
7. Seleukos IV Philopator11 viewsSeleucid Empire, Seleukos IV Philopator, AE serrate unit, 187-175 BC
Obverse: Head of young Dionysos right in ivy wreath, monogram behind
Reverse: BASILEWS - SELEY[KOY] above and below prow of galley left, monogram in upper field
ecoli
coins285.JPG
8. Seleukid Kingdom. Antiochos IV Epiphanes22 viewsSeleukid Kingdom. Antiochos IV Epiphanes. 175-165/4 B.C. Ake-Ptolemais. Diademed, radiate head right / BASILEW[S] ANTIOCOU, Nike in biga galloping left; monogram below horses. SNG Spaer 1141; Spaer, Ake p. 139, type 2. g43

Ex- CNG sale 143, Lot: 340

ecoli
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8. Seleukid Kingdom. Antiochos IV Epiphanes25 viewsSeleukid Kingdom. Antiochos IV Epiphanes. 175-165/4 B.C. Ake-Ptolemais. Diademed, radiate head right / BASILEW[S] ANTIOCOU, Nike in biga galloping left; monogram below horses. SNG Spaer 1141; Spaer, Ake p. 139, type 2. g45

Ex- CNG sale 143, Lot: 340
ecoli
coin807.JPG
8. Seleukid Kingdom. Antiochos IV Epiphanes25 viewsSeleukid Kingdom. Antiochos IV Epiphanes. 175-165/4 B.C. Ake-Ptolemais. Diademed, radiate head right / BASILEW[S] ANTIOCOU, Nike in biga galloping left; monogram below horses. SNG Spaer 1141; Spaer, Ake p. 139, type 2. g45

Ex- CNG sale 143, Lot: 340

ecoli
829-842 Theophilus S1667.jpg
829-842 Theophilus - follis fromConstantinople54 viewsΘEOFIL' bASIL' , 3/4 length emperor facing holding cross on globe and labarum
ΘEO / FILE AVS / OVStE SV / NICAS

Sear 1667
Ginolerhino
EA830A0F-E959-4991-BBC6-1E18F365FE51.jpeg
886-912 AD, Leo VI6 viewsLeo VI,
AE Follis;9.61g; 26-27mm
Constantinople

LEON bASILEVS ROM,
crowned bust facing with short beard, wearing chlamys, holding akakia

LEON EN QEO BA SILEVS R OMEON
legend in four lines

SB 1729, DOC 8
Robin Ayers
976-1025 Anon A2 S1813.jpg
976-1025 - follis (Anonymous class A2)60 views+ EMMANOVHΛ , bust of Christ facing, holding gospels ; in field IC / XC
+ IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE

Sear 1813
Ginolerhino
Strange Byzantine Obverse and Reverse.jpg
976-1025 A.D. - follis (Anonymous class A2)22 viewsThis coin has Christ on the obverse and the reverse contains the inscription +IhSUS, XRISTUS, bASILEU, bASILE. This would mean Jesus Christ, King of Kings. Thanks for all the I.D. help I received.cwonsidler
P3028729.jpg
A2 Anonymous Follis. 976 - 1025 AD. AE 25-30mm11 viewsA2 Anonymous Follis. 976 - 1025 AD..
Basil II + Constantine VIII
Obv. facing bust of Christ, wearing nimbus cruciger,
Rev. + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings)
Lee S
DSCN5002.jpg
A2 Anonymous Follis. 976 - 1025 AD. AE 27-30mm 8 viewsA2 Anonymous Follis. 976 - 1025 AD.
Basil II + Constantine VIII
Obv. facing bust of Christ, wearing nimbus cruciger,
Rev. + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings)
Lee S
DSCN4999.jpg
A3 Anonymouse Follis , 1023-1028 AD . AE 26-28mm9 viewsA3 Anonymouse Follis , 1023-1028 AD .
Basil II & Constantine VIII
Obv. facing bust of Christ, wearing nimbus cruciger
Rev. + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings)
Lee S
sb176123mm791g.jpg
AE follis Constantine VII SB 176129 viewsObverse: CONST bASIL ROM, crowned bust of Constantine facing, with short beard and wearing vertical loros, holding akakia and cross on globe.
Reverse: CONST / EN QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON, legend in four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 913-959 CE
23mm, 7.91g
SB 1761, DOC 26
wileyc
sb176121mm445g.jpg
AE follis Constantine VII SB 176120 viewsObverse: CONST bASIL ROM, crowned bust of Constantine facing, with short beard and wearing vertical loros, holding akakia and cross on globe.
Reverse: CONST / EN QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON, legend in four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 913-959 CE
21mm, 4.45g
SB 1761, DOC 26
wileyc
sb176125mm550g.jpg
AE follis Constantine VII SB 176131 viewsObverse: CONST bASIL ROM, crowned bust of Constantine facing, with short beard and wearing vertical loros, holding akakia and cross on globe.
Reverse: CONST / EN QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON, legend in four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 913-959 CE
25mm, 5.50g
SB 1761, DOC 26
wileyc
sb176124mm502g.jpg
AE follis Constantine VII SB 176129 viewsObverse: CONST bASIL ROM, crowned bust of Constantine facing, with short beard and wearing vertical loros, holding akakia and cross on globe.
Reverse: CONST / EN QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON, legend in four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 913-959 CE
24mm, 5.02g
SB 1761, DOC 26
1 commentswileyc
sb176126mm670g.jpg
AE follis Constantine VII SB 176127 viewsObverse: CONST bASIL ROM, crowned bust of Constantine facing, with short beard and wearing vertical loros, holding akakia and cross on globe.
Reverse: CONST / EN QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON, legend in four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 913-959 CE
26mm, 6.70g
SB 1761, DOC 26
wileyc
sb1761_21mm501g.jpg
AE follis Constantine VII SB 176141 viewsObverse: CONST bASIL ROM, crowned bust of Constantine facing, with short beard and wearing vertical loros, holding akakia and cross on globe.
Reverse: CONST / EN QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON, legend in four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 913-959 CE
21mm, 5.01g
SB 1761, DOC 26
1 commentswileyc
sb161721mm513g.jpg
AE follis Michael I, SB 161715 viewsObverse: MIXAHL bASILE', bust facing with short beard, wearing crown and loros, holding gl cr. and cruciform sceptre
Reverse: Large M, between XXX and NNN, cross above A beneath
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 811-813 CE
SB 1617, DO michael II 7
21mm, 5.13
wileyc
sb176026mm531g.jpg
AE follis Romanus I, SB 176038 viewsObverse: bASILEVS RWM, crowned, bearded, facing bust of Romanus, wearing chlamys, holding labarum and cross on globe
Reverse: RWMA - N EN QEW bA - SILEVS RW - MAIWN, legend in four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 913-959 CE
26mm, 5.31g
SB 1760, DO 25
DHC
wileyc
sb176025mm348g.jpg
AE follis Romanus I, SB 176042 viewsObverse: bASILEVS RWM, crowned, bearded, facing bust of Romanus, wearing chlamys, holding labarum and cross on globe
Reverse: RWMA - N EN QEW bA - SILEVS RW - MAIWN, legend in four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 913-959 CE
25mm, 3.48g
SB 1760, DO 25
DHC
wileyc
sb176021mm482.jpg
AE follis Romanus I, SB 176027 viewsObverse: bASILEVS RWM, crowned, bearded, facing bust of Romanus, wearing chlamys, holding labarum and cross on globe
Reverse: RWMA - N EN QEW bA - SILEVS RW - MAIWN, legend in four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 913-959 CE
21mm, 4.82g
SB 1760, DO 25
DHC
wileyc
sb176025mm513g.jpg
AE follis Romanus I, SB 176035 viewsObverse: bASILEVS RWM, crowned, bearded, facing bust of Romanus, wearing chlamys, holding labarum and cross on globe
Reverse: RWMA - N EN QEW bA - SILEVS RW - MAIWN, legend in four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 913-959 CE
25mm, 5.13g
SB 1760, DO 25
DHC
wileyc
sb166725mm623g.jpg
AE follis Theophilus SB 166715 viewsObv: Theta,EOFIL' bASIL', three quarter length figure facing, wearing loros and crown surmounted by tufa, holds labarum in r. hand and gl. cuir. in l.
Rev: +thetaEO/FILE AVG/OVSTE SV/NICAS four lines
Mint: Constantinople
Date:829-842 CE
25mm, 6.23g
SB 1667
wileyc
AE-Weight_with_Gold-Chi-Rho_AD-Q-051_27x25x4mm_17,83g-s.jpg
AE weight (4 nomismata), marked with Golden color Chi-Rho #51,205 viewsAE weight (4 nomismata), marked with Golden color Chi-Rho #51,
type: AE four-cornered weight, engraved square inside Christogram (Chi-Rho, marked with golden color), both side unredable symbols (hope Α-Ω ). In addition to the ich lines outside the 4 points (mean 4 nomismata ?).
size: 27x25x4mm,
weight: 17,83g, (4 nomismata, exactly 17.84g; 4x4,46 = 17.84g).
date: 6th-8th cent. A.D.,
ref: Not official, may be hommade,
distribution: Byzatine ?,
Q-051
"This is really a beautiful and rare weight. Congratulations!
From my point of view it is a nominal to 4 nomismata, exactly 17.83 g (4x4,46 = 17.84 g). Each side of the weight is separately punched with 4 points which means lettering for 4 nomismata.
Within the Christogram the letters Α-Ω are to be read. These were engraved faulty. No official weight, but a homemade version (see Simon Bendall). The Christogam was marked with golden color no gold inlay!
dated approx. 6th-8th cent. AD
similar weights were found in Bulgaria. by Basil, Thanks "

3 commentsquadrans
salama-.jpg
Agathokles, Æ 21; Artemis / thunderbolt15 viewsSicily, Syracuse. Agathokles, 317-289 B.C., 21 mm, 7.25 g.
Obverse: draped bust of Artemis Soteira right, quiver over shoulder. Reverse: AGATHOKLEOS BASILEOS; thunderbolt, ex areich

Podiceps
Agathokles.jpg
Agathokles, SNG ANS 708, 295 BC, Sicily, Syracuse13 viewsHead of Artemis right, in triple-pendant earring & necklace, quiver over shoulder. Winged thunderbolt

Remnants of SWTEIRA on front.
AGAQOKLEOS BASILEOS
Saving/Savior Artemis
of King Agathokles
Jonathan N
Alexander I Balas.JPG
Alexander I Balas21 viewsAE 18, 150-145BC
Obverse: Head of Alexander right in crested helmet
Reverse: BASILEWS ALEXAND: Nike standing lfet with wreath and palm.
Sear Greek 7040
18mm, 5.5gm
Jerome Holderman
00-balas.jpg
Alexander I Balas - Hoover 90018 viewsAlexander I Balas. AE22 Serrate,
Seleukid kings, Syria. 152-145 BC. Antioch mint.
Diademed head of Alexander right /
BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Athena standing left,
holding Nike in right hand,
left hand resting on shield set on ground; two monograms before.
xokleng
Alexander_II_Zebina.JPG
Alexander II Zabinas63 viewsAlexander II Zebina, Antioch, 128-123 BC, Houghton CSE 307, Sear 7127, SNGIs 2341, 21.14mm, 7g
OBV: Radiate head right
REV: BAΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ (BASILEOS ALEXANDROU), double cornucopiae bound with a fillet, club in left field

Zabinas, the "bought one", the pretender king who spent most of his
pathetic reign fighting Demetrius II and Antiochus VII. He failed to ward
off Antiochus and was forced to plunder the temples of Antioch in order to
come up with getaway money. Unfortunately he was captured and forced to
commit suicide.
1 commentsRomanorvm
IMG_4664.JPG
Alexander II Zabinas. 128-122 BC. AE18mm.14 viewsAlexander II Zabinas. 128-122 BC
Obv. Head of young Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy.
Rev. BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Tyche, winged, standing left, wearing kalathos, holding rudder and cornucopia.
Ref. SC 2242; HGC. V9 1166
Lee S
Alexander_II_Zebina_SC_2242.png
Alexander II Zebina SC 224216 viewsAlexander II Zebinas, BC 128 - 122, AE18 Serrate, Seleukid kings, Syria, 6.72g, 20mm, Apameia ad Axios mint (?), Hoover 1166, SC 2242
OBV: Head of young Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy.
REV: BASILEWS ALEXANDROY, Tyche, winged, standing left, wearing
kalathos, holding rudder and cornucopiae.
SRukke
13.jpg
Alexander III 89 viewsAlexander the Great 328-320 b.c
Tetradrachm
ARADOS

Obverse:Head of Alexander as Herakles wearing lions skin
Reverse:Zeus Aetophoros on throne;ALEXANDROU BASILEOS;caduceus left throne,AP under

26.95mm 16.81g
PRICE:3332

Why it is here?I don't like it

I bought it (2005) as original 300euro from not blacklisted seller.
1 commentsmaik
217.jpg
Alexander III38 viewsAlexander the Great
Cast fake Tetradrachm

Obverse:Head of Alexander the Great as Herakles wearing lions skin
Reverse:Zeus on throne holding eagle; ALEXANDROY BASILEOS;symbol under and left throne

26.03mm 13.80gm (Under weight) and very soft metal

MODERN CAST FAKE

I bought it as is 24$ at ebay from fake listed seller
maik
Alexander_III.jpg
Alexander III 'The Great', Price 2800, 323-310 BC, Western Asia Minor7 viewsHead of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion skin headdress. Quiver, bow, and club, torch below.

BASILEWS
King
Jonathan N
albabylon.jpg
Alexander III of Macedon Babylon Mint, 315-311 BC47 viewsTetradrachm minted in Babylon, probably under Peithon.
Head of Herakles in Lionskin Headdress/ Zeus Aetophoros on Reverse, MTP in wreath in left field, PiDT monogram in circle below throne. BASILEUW below, ALEXANDROY to right.

Price 3733 (ref.Wildwinds), 16.6 grms
1 commentsdaverino
Alexander_III_Silver_Drachm.jpg
Alexander III Silver Drachm56 viewsAlexander III King of Macedon
Silver drachm 4.3 gram
Obverse: Bust Right
Reverse: Zeus on throne _7500 sold

Alexander III AR Tetradrachm. 328-320 BC, Arados Mint. Head of Herakles right in lionskin headdress / BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus seated left, legs uncrossed, holding eagle, S in left field, AR monogram beneath throne. SOLD
1 commentsAntonivs Protti
AlexanderTheGreate.jpg
Alexander III The Great15 viewsArgead Dynasty

Kingdom of Macedon (336 - 323 BC)

Obverse: Herakle's head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp, headdress tied at neck.

Reverse: Bow, quiver and club, Basilews written between.
Pericles J2
ATGlifetimeDrachmLydiaSardes.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C. Lifetime Issue109 viewsSilver drachm, Price 2553, VF, 4.297g, 16.4mm, 0o, Lydia, Sardes mint, c. 334 - 323 B.C. Lifetime Issue; Obverse: Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; Reverse: BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, scepter in left, EYE monogram left, rose under throne. Ex FORVM.

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC)

"Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.

Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the 13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr. Joann Fletcher
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml

"When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."--attributed to Plutarch, The Moralia.
http://www.pothos.org/alexander.asp?paraID=96

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Alexander_Athena_Tet_Master_01b.jpg
Alexander III | Athena, Lysimachos * Thrace, AR Tetradrachm, Lampsakos, ca. 323-281 BC.208 views
Alexander III | Athena, Lysimachos * Silver Tetradrachm

Obv: Diademed head of Alexander III with horn of Ammon.
Rev: Helmeted Athena enthroned left holding Nike in outstretched right hand, left arm resting on shield, ΒAΣIΛEΩΣ in right field, LYΣIMAXOY in left field. Monogram inner left, below Nike.; crescent below exergual line.

Exergue: Crescent

Mint: Lampsakos
Struck: 301-299 BC.

Size: 30.055 mm.
Weight: 15.07 gms.
Die axis: 0°

Condition: In very fine condition, bright, clear, sharp images on each side, superb relief, well centered and nicely struck.

Holed and plugged.

Refs:*
Sear Greek Coins and their Values, (SG) Number, 6814

Status: TCJH, Private Collection.
4 commentsTiathena
Alexander_the_Great_AR_tetradrachm__Messembria_.jpg
Alexander III, The Great; AR Tetradrachm. Mesembria, Thrace. 250-175 BC.95 viewsHead of Herakles, right, wearing lionskin headdress
Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre; BASILEWS to right, ALEXANDROY to left; Corinthian helmet in left field, L-A beneath throne.
14,90g.,33mm.
Antonivs Protti
Alexander Jannaeus H467.jpg
Alexander Jannaeus (103-76BC) Hendin 46786 viewsPrutah, 15mm, 2.14g.

Obverse: ALEXANDROU BASILEWS, anchor within diadem.

Reverse: Aramaic inscription, HMLK YHNTN (Yehonatan the king) , Lily flower.

Hendin 467

TJC N1
2 commentsRobert_Brenchley
Alexander Jannaeus TJC K17.jpg
Alexander Jannaeus (103-76BC) Hendin 470, TJC K17108 viewsPrutah, 15mm, 1.26g.

Obverse: ALEXANDROU BASILEWS around anchor.

Reverse: 8-pointed star within diadem, HMLK CHN followed by a symbol, between rays.

Hendin 470

Treasury of Jewish Coins K17

A rare variant known from a single die. The significance of the reverse inscription, 'The King [and] Priest' isn't known.
3 commentsRobert_Brenchley
Alexander Jannaeus H471.jpg
Alexander Jannaeus (103-76BC) Hendin 47191 viewsPrutah, 15mm, 1.27g.

Obverse: BASILEWS ALEXANDROY around anchor within circle.

Reverse: Star in circle of dots.

Year 25 (78 BC)

Hendin 471
3 commentsRobert_Brenchley
DSC01678.JPG
Alexander Jannaeus (widows mite) 103-76 B.C.66 viewsObverse: Star with eight rays surrounded by diadem
Reverse: BASILEW ALEXANDROU, around anchor
1 commentsDk0311USMC
hendin_469.jpg
Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Bronze prutah, Hendin 4699 viewsJudean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Bronze prutah, Hendin 469, F, Jerusalem mint, 1.365g, 14.5mm, 95 - 76 B.C.; obverse “BASILEWS ALEXANDROU” (of King Alexander), around anchor; reverse , eight ray star surrounded by diadem (or wheel), Hebrew inscription 'Yehonatan the king' between rays. Jannaeus' anchor coins were probably struck after the conquest of the coastal cities (with the exception of Ashkelon) in 95 B.C. The anchor probably publicized the annexation of these areas. -- Ancient Jewish Coinage by Yaakov Meshorer. Ex FORVMPodiceps
h471.jpg
Alexander Janneus21 viewsLepton
BASILEOS ALEXANDROY
103-76 BC
Hendin 471
1 commentsfrederic
jannaeus8.jpg
Alexander Janneus33 viewsLepton
BASILEOS ALEXANDROY LKE
103-76 BC
Hendin 471
1 commentsfrederic
DSCN7075.JPG
Alexander Janneus, AE Prutah, 103-76 BC, Judea. AE 15mm.8 viewsAlexander Janneus, AE Prutah, 103-76 BC. Judea.

Double reversed strike.

Obv. BASILEWS ALEXANDROU Legend around anchor (Hebrew inscription for Yehonatan the King)

Rev. Wheel with eight ray-like spokes, legend between rays
Lee S
fullsizeoutput_2464.jpeg
Alexander Price 3836 Obverse8 viewsPrice 3836 Alexander the Great tetradrachm: Susa mint, circa 320-325 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus Aëtophoros left, holding eagle and sceptre; monogram under throne. Very Rare. Both have similar style.Luis R
fullsizeoutput_2462.jpeg
Alexander Price 3836 Obverse16 viewsPrice 3836 Alexander the Great tetradrachm: Susa mint, circa 320-325 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus Aëtophoros left, holding eagle and sceptre; monogram under throne. Very Rare. Both have similar style.1 commentsLuis R
fullsizeoutput_2469.jpeg
Alexander Price 3836 Reverse11 viewsPrice 3836 Alexander the Great tetradrachm: Susa mint, circa 320-325 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus Aëtophoros left, holding eagle and sceptre; monogram under throne. Very Rare. Both have similar style.Luis R
fullsizeoutput_2463.jpeg
Alexander Price 3836 Reverse9 viewsPrice 3836 Alexander the Great tetradrachm: Susa mint, circa 320-325 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus Aëtophoros left, holding eagle and sceptre; monogram under throne. Very Rare. Both have similar style.Luis R
Macedonian_Kingdom_1e_img.jpg
Alexander the Great, Alexander III, silver tetradrachm, Marathus 80 viewsObv:– Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:– BASILEOS ALEXANDPOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, Anchor, EP monogram in left field, HD monogram beneath throne
Minted in Marathus mint.c. 323-300 BC
Reference:– Price 3438.

ex Coincraft, London
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Alexander Zabinas - SG 7128.JPG
Alexander Zabinas - SG 712838 viewsSeleukid Kingdom
AE21, 128-123 BC
Obverse: Head right, clad in lion skin headdress.
Reverse:BASILEWS ALEXANDPOY, Nike advancing left with wreath and palm. Monogram left.
21mm, 9.0 gm.
Sear Greek 7128; BMC, Seleucid Kings of Syria, pg 83 and plate XXII, #10
Jerome Holderman
tetradrachme_alexandre-16,96g-27mm.JPG
Alexandre III de Macédoine (de 336 à 323 av. J.-C.)12 viewsTétradrachme d'Alexandre III de Macédoine
(Alexandre le Grand)
frappé à Sidé en Pamphylie
non daté (approximativement entre 325-320 avant JC)
16,96g
27mm
PRICE 2951
MUELLER 217 Dium en Pieriae

Avers anépigraphe, tête d'Héraklès (Hercule) à droite, coiffée de la léonté.
Revers, Zeus (Jupiter) aétophore (porteur d'aigle) assis à gauche sur un trône avec dossier, les jambes parallèles, nu jusqu'à la ceinture, tenant un aigle posé sur sa main droite et un long sceptre bouleté de la gauche. ΔI dans le champ gauche. Un monogramme sous le siège.
AΛEΞANΔPOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ
ALEXANDROU BASILEWS
Alexandre roi
PYL
w1565.jpg
Anchor190 viewsCilicia, Kings, Tarkondimotos I, 39-31 B.C. AE-21 mm, 7.61 grs. AV: Head of the King with diadem to right, dotted border, oval CM. RV: BASILEWS / TARKONDIMO / TOY either side of enthroned Zeus to left, holding Nike and Scepter. CM: Anchor. Collection: Mueller.Automan
w0382.jpg
Anchor168 viewsCilicia, Kings, Tarkondimotos I, 39-31 B.C.AE-21 mm, 4.78 grs. AV: Head of the King with diadem to right, dotted border, oval CM. RV: BASILEWS / TARKONDIMO / TOY either side of enthroned Zeus to left, holding Nike and Scepter. CM: Anchor. Collection: Mueller.Automan
Andronicus_II_and_Michael_IX_SBCV_2402_DOC.JPG
Andronicus II and Michael IX, SBCV 2402, DOC Cl. VII21 viewsBOHΘEI K[VPIE]
Christ seated on backless throne, hand raised in benediction, IC XC about nimbate head
POMAION [AVTOKPATOIE]
Andronicus and Michael holding labarum between
AR basilicon, 21mm, 2.13g

Specimen is weakly struck
novacystis
U3141F1OAZMMBUO.JPG
Anonymous AE Follis12 viewsAttributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)

Obverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings."
Mint: Constantinople

SB 1813 Class A2. AE 32, 14.12g
Belisarius
class-a2-basil-constantine-viii.jpg
Anonymous AE Follis Class A216 viewsByzantine Empire, Anonymous AE Follis Class A2, Basil II and Constantine VIII (976-1028 AD)


Attributed to Basil II and Constantine VIII (976-1028 AD)

Obverse: IC-XC, Bust of Christ holding book of gospels. EMMA NOVHL

Reverse: IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE on four lines, ornament below.

Reference: SB 1813

Ex: Kayser-i Rum Numismatics +photo
Gil-galad
lg_anonA.jpg
Anonymous Class A2, time of Basil II34 viewsAnonymous Class A2, time of Basil II and Constanti
AE Follis
+ EMMANOVHL, facing bust of Christ, wears nimbus cruciger ornamented in each limb of cross with squares, pallium and colobium, Gospels in both hands with five pellets in center, to left IC, to right XC
+ IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings), ornamentation (square) above legend (Type 47)
Mint: (976 - 1025 AD)
References: Sear 1813
Class A2 Ornament type 47
1 commentsScotvs Capitis
Christ_Follis.jpg
Anonymous Folles, temp. Basil II & Constantine VIII, circa 1020-102811 viewsÆ Follis 30 mm, 11.4 gm. Class A3. Uncertain (Thessalonica?) mint.
Obv.: Facing bust of Christ Pantokrator.
Rev.: + IҺSЧS/XRISTЧS/ЬASILЄЧ/ЬASILЄ in four lines; ornament above and below.
Reference: DOC A2.24; SB 1818.
Notes: sold to CN, 10/15.
John Anthony
anaon_follis.jpg
Anonymous Follis Class A244 viewsClass A2 Sear No. 1813
minted during the joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII
976 - 1025 A.D.
Ornament variation No. 5 in DOC
Scotvs Capitis
combined~0.jpg
ANONYMOUS Follis of Christ, time of Basil II / Constantine VIII, Byzantine Empire43 viewsANONYMOUS. Issues attributed to the period of
Constantine VIII, circa 1020-1030 AD. Æ Follis

OBV -Facing bust of nimbate Christ,
pellets in the arms of nimbus, wearing pallium and
colobium, holding the Gospels in both hands.

REV - + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE
-A- below.

32mm, 9,85g.
Flamur H
Weird Byzantine Obverse and Reverse.jpg
Anonymous Follis, c1025AD22 viewsThe obverse is a bust of Christ, haloed, the reverse is 4 lines of letters, approximating (cross)ihsys/xristys/basiley/basile or Jesus/Christ/King/Of Kings. Thanks for the attribution help irish.

cwonsidler
anon_A_3.jpg
ANONYMOUS FOLLIS, CLASS A28 viewsAE FOLLIS 31.5 mm 10.65 g
O: FACING BUST OF CHRIST PANTOCRATOR
R: + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings)
(attributed to Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 1028 AD)
(no longer in collection)
laney
anon_a_2b.jpg
ANONYMOUS FOLLIS, CLASS A22 viewsAE FOLLIS 35 mm max. 11.69 g
O: FACING BUST OF CHRIST PANTOCRATOR
R: + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings)
(attributed to Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 1028 AD)
laney
anon_A_1.jpg
ANONYMOUS FOLLIS, CLASS A30 viewsAE FOLLIS 24X27 mm 6.56 g
O: FACING BUST OF CHRIST PANTOCRATOR
R: + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings)
(attributed to Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 1028 AD)
laney
2_class_a_a_8L.jpg
ANONYMOUS FOLLIS, CLASS A21 viewsAE FOLLIS 28 mm max. 9.68 g
O: FACING BUST OF CHRIST PANTOCRATOR
R: + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings)
(attributed to Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 1028 AD)
laney
class_A_anon.jpg
ANONYMOUS FOLLIS, CLASS A15 viewsAE FOLLIS 30.5mm max. 11.2 g
O: FACING BUST OF CHRIST PANTOCRATOR
R: + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings)
(attributed to Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 1028 AD)
laney
sear_1823.jpg
Anonymous Follis, Class B; Sear 182315 viewsAnonymous Follis, Æ Follis, Class B, 11.3g, 30mm. Obv. ΕΜΜΑΝΟΥΗΛ Bust of Christ facing. IC/XC in field. Rev. IhSuS / bASILEu / bASILE about cross on three steps. Sear BCV 1823Podiceps
anon_d_3.jpg
ANONYMOUS FOLLIS, CLASS D26 viewsAE FOLLIS 25 mm 5.70 g
O: IC-XC, Christ enthroned facing holding book of gospels
R: IS XS / bASILE / bASIL, Cross above, ornamentation below
(Time of Constantine IX, 1042 - 1055 AD)
laney
anon_d_2_2.jpg
ANONYMOUS FOLLIS, CLASS D25 viewsAE FOLLIS 25 mm 5.95 g
O: IC-XC, Christ enthroned facing holding book of gospels
R: IS XS / bASILE / bASIL, Cross above, ornamentation below
(Time of Constantine IX, 1042 - 1055 AD)
laney
anon_d_1.jpg
ANONYMOUS FOLLIS, CLASS D23 viewsAE FOLLIS 28 mm 5.27 g
O: IC-XC, Christ enthroned facing holding book of gospels
R: IS XS / bASILE / bASIL, Cross above, ornamentation below
(Time of Constantine IX, 1042 - 1055 AD)
laney
anon_d_7.jpg
ANONYMOUS FOLLIS, CLASS D18 viewsANONYMOUS FOLLIS, CLASS D
AE FOLLIS 32 mm 8.91 g
O: IC-XC, Christ enthroned facing holding book of gospels
R: IS XS / bASILE / bASIL, Cross above, ornamentation below
(Time of Constantine IX, 1042 - 1055 AD)
laney
anon_d_5.jpg
ANONYMOUS FOLLIS, CLASS D20 viewsAE FOLLIS 27 mm max. 6.29 g
O: IC-XC, Christ enthroned facing holding book of gospels
R: IS XS / bASILE / bASIL, Cross above, ornamentation below
(Time of Constantine IX, 1042 - 1055 AD)
laney
normal_21-byz_2.jpg
ANONYMOUS FOLLIS, CLASS D21 viewsAE FOLLIS 28 mm 7.62 g
O: IC-XC, Christ enthroned facing holding book of gospels
R: IS XS / bASILE / bASIL, Cross above, ornamentation below
(Time of Constantine IX, 1042 - 1055 AD)
no longer in collection
laney
anon_E.jpg
ANONYMOUS FOLLIS, CLASS E22 viewsAE FOLLIS 29 mm 6.76 g
O: Bust of Christ facing, holding book of gospels.
R: ISXS / BASILE / BASIL; Oranamentation around border.
(Time of Constantine X, 1059-1067)
laney
sear_1855.jpg
Anonymous Follis, Class E; Sear 185521 viewsAnonymous Follis, Æ Follis, Class E, 7.1g, 27mm. Obv. Bust of Christ facing. Rev. IS XS BASILE BASIL. Sear BCV 1855. Podiceps
anon_F1.jpg
ANONYMOUS FOLLIS, CLASS F22 viewsAE FOLLIS 27 mm 8.91 g
O: IC-XC, Christ seated on backless throne, facing
R: IS XS / bASILE / bASIL, Cross above, ornamentation below
(Time of Constantine X, 1059 - 1067 AD)
laney
anonimus-biz.jpg
Anonymous Follis- SB 181313 viewsanonymous,
Issued under both Basil II and Constantine VIII
from 976 until 1028.
Class 2, SB 1813.
xokleng
Capture~6.PNG
ANONYMOUS FOLLIS. Class A3. Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VIII (976-1025).29 viewsObv: + ЄMMANOVHΛ / IC XC. Facing bust of Christ Emmanuel.
Rev: + IҺSЧS / XRISTЧS / ЬASILЄЧ / ЬASILЄ. Legend in four lines; above and below, lozenge between dashes.
References: SBCV 1818. Grierson ornaments 24.
Weight: 11.38 g.
Diameter: 29 mm.
1 commentsCanaan
anonfollis.jpg
Anonymous, Class D. Circa1050-1060 AD. Æ Follis66 viewsobv: Christ seated facing on throne, holding Gospels
rev: IS XS bASILE bASILE
Constantinople mint.
(31mm, 9.27 gm).
DOC III Class D; SB 1836.

(Given to my brother October 2009)
CGPCGP
26.jpg
Anonymous, Constantinople2 viewsAnonymous, Constantinople Byzantine 969-976 A.D

AE 30 mm Follis

Obverse: + εMMA-NOVHA Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cruciger with two pellets in each limb of the cross, pallium and colobium, holding ornamented book of Gospels in both hands; IC and XC in left and right fields

Reverse: +IhSyS / XRISTyS / bASILEy / bASILΕ in four lines.
discwizard
Antioches_VII_Euergetes_BM_52.jpg
Antioches VII Euergetes BMC 5225 viewsAntiochos VII Euergetes, Antioch on the Orontes, 138-129 BC, 17.77mm, 5.1g, BMC 52, SNG UK 1301.617-620, SC 2067.15; SGC 7098
OBV: Winged bust of Eros, right
REV: BASILEWS ANTIOXOY EUERGETOU, Headdress of Isis, Seleucid date ΠΡ = 180 SE = 133/2 BC
Son of Demetrius I. Reign 138 - 129 BC. Married Cleopatra Thea (may as well; everyone else had).
Hunted down Tryphon and made him commit suicide.
Romanorvm
sardes_antiochus_hierax.jpg
Antiochos Hierax; Sardes, Apollo/ Apollo standing l. AE14.216 viewsAntiochus Hierax 241 - 228 B.C. AE 3.32g. 14.2mm. Struck at Sardes, Lydia. Head of Apollo r. BASILEWS ANTIOCOU/ Apollo standing l. Newell WSM 1435. Ex Gerhard RohdePodiceps
AAJ_copy.jpg
Antiochos I Soter23 viewsAntiochos I Soter. 280-261 BC. Æ 14mm. Sardes mint. Facing bust of Athena in triple-crested helmet / BASILEWS ANTIOCOU, Nike walking left, holding wreath and palm; counter mark (anchor) to right. SNG Spaer 233; Newell, WSM 1369; cf. Houghton 626. Molinari
Seleukid4_copy.jpg
Antiochos II, Theos27 viewsAE 18, Antiochos II, ca. 261-246 BC, Obv: Apollo right; Rev: BASILEWS SELEUKOU around Apollo seated on omphalos, lyre below, gF. Lindgren III, 997; Hoover HGC 9, 266 (C-S).Molinari
IMG_0061.JPG
Antiochos III Megas, Seleukid Kingdom, 222–187 BC. AE15mm, Sardeis mint.21 viewsAntiochos III Megas, Seleukid Kingdom, 222–187 BC.
Obv. Laureate head of Apollo right.
Rev. BASILEWS ANTIOCOU to left and right of Apollo standing left, examining arrow and resting left elbow on tripod. Monogram in left field.
Ref. SC 983; HGC. V9. 518.
Lee S
Antiochus_III.jpg
Antiochos III, SNGIs 561, 223 – 208 BC, Antioch, Syria2 viewsLaureate head of Antiochos right. Nude Apollo seated left on omphalos with arrow & bow; monogram outer left.

BASILEWS ANTIOCOU
Of King Antiochos
Jonathan N
22864_Antiochos_III,_223_-_187_B_C_,_Sardes,_Lydia.jpg
Antiochos III; AE11; Head of Apollo/ Elephant left12 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochos III, 223 - 187 B.C., Sardes, Lydia. Bronze AE 11, Houghton and Lorber 979, cf. SNG Spaer 613 ff., Newell WSM 1114, 1.468g, 10.8mm, 0o, obverse Apollo head right; reverse “BASILEWS ANTIOCOU”, Elephant left, anchor flukes up in left field. Newell attributed this type to Antioch. Houghton and Lorber assign it to Sardes based on control links. This coin was purchased in a group that appeared to be part of a hoard that included coins mostly from Ionia and Lydia, supporting the re-attribution to Sardes. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
IMG_4553.JPG
Antiochos IV 175-164 BC. AE1452 viewsAntiochos IV 175-164 BC.
Obv. Radiate head right .
Rev. BASILEWS ANTIOCOU, Hera standing facing holding sceptre.
Ref. Sear 6994.
2 commentsLee S
greekR.JPG
Antiochos IV Epiphanes25 viewsAE 15, Antiochos IV Epiphanes, 175-164 BC, Antioch on the Orontes. Obv: Veiled bust of Laodike IV. Rev: BASILEWS ANTIOXOY, elephant head. VF, SC 1407, Hoover HGC 9, 684 (R1)Molinari
valjakko.jpg
Antiochos IV Epiphanes; Nike in Biga, AE2033 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochos IV, Epiphanes, 175 - 168 B.C.
Bronze AE 20, SNG Spaer 1141, VF, Galilee, Ake Ptolemais mint, 5.2184g, 19.5mm, 0o; obverse radiate head of Antiochos IV right; reverse BASILEWS ANTIOHOI, Nike in galloping biga left, monogram below horses. ex FORVM
2 commentskaitsuburi
coinJ_copy.jpg
Antiochos IX, Kyzikenos38 viewsAE 19, Syria, Antiochos IX, ca, 116-95 B.C., Antioch on the Orontes. Obv: Head of King, lightly bearded, diademed, within dotted border. Rev: BASILEWS ANTIOXOY PHILOPATOPOY around winged thunderbolt, Θ Ρ in field, monogram in outer field. Dark brown patina with red earthen highlights, die break on obverse, VF. Lindgren I, 1866, SC 2364, Hoover HGC 9, 1248 (C-S).Molinari
s5.JPG
Antiochos VI, Dionysos, 145-142 BC. AE16 mm11 viewsAntiochos VI, Dionysos, 145-142 BC.
Obv. Radiate head of the child-king right
Rev. BASILEWS / ANTIOXOU | EPIFANOUS / DIONUSOU, Amphora, Monogram in left field, palm in right field.
Ref. Sear GCV 7079.
Lee S
Antiochos_VII_(posthumous_Cappadocian_issue,_reigned_138–129_BCE)_tetradrachm_(AR).png
Antiochos VII (posthumous Cappadocian issue, reigned 138-129 BCE) tetradrachm (AR)143 viewsObv.: Diademed head of king Rev.: BASILEWS ANTIOXOY EYEPGETOY (Athena Nikephoros std. within laurel wreath) Field: Monogram above A, phi in right side of field Diameter: 28 mm Weight: 16,43 g SC 2143.2; HGC 9, 1068

These tetradrachms were probably issued in the Kingdom of Cappadocia to fund the usage of Syrian mercenaries. Antiochos VII could be called the last great Seleucid king. He undertook several successful campaigns in the East to reclaim territory lost to the Parthian advance. After his death, however, the Seleucid Empire was rapidly confined to Syria.
1 commentsNick.vdw
g164.jpg
Antiochos VII --AR Tetradrachm.144 viewsAntiochos VII --AR Tetradrachm. d(30mm, 16.63 gm). Antioch mint. Diademed head right / BASILEWS ANTIOXOY EYEP-GETOY, Athena standing left, holding Nike and spear, left hand resting on shield; monogram above A to outer left, O-L flanking Athena; all within wreath. SNG Spaer 1872; SMA 298; Houghton -.2 commentsfeatherz
DSCN5449.JPG
Antiochos VII 138-129 BC, AE15mm16 viewsAntiochos VII 138-129 BC
Obv: Bust of a lion roaring right
Rev: Club "BASILEWS ANTIOXOU EUEPGETOU"
Ref. SG 7100
Lee S
IMG_0447.JPG
Antiochos VII 138-129 BC, AE15mm. 2.6grm.12 viewsAntiochos VII 138-129 BC.
Obv: Bust of a lion roaring right
Rev: Club "BASILEWS ANTIOXOU EUEPGETOU"
Ref. SG 7100
Lee S
AntiochosVII H451.jpg
Antiochos VII AE15 Hendin 45157 viewsAe15, 15mm, 2.70g.

Obverse: BASILEWS ANTIOXOS EUERGETOI, Upside-down anchot.

Reverse: Lily in dotted circle.

BPR (131-130 BC)

Hendin 451.

Despite being struck in Antiochos' name, this is dated to the time when Hyrcanus I had actually gained control of Jerusalem, where they seem to have been struck. There is thus a good case for the claim that they were minted by Hyrcanus, and in a very real sense, constitute the first clearly 'Jewish' coins, since they inaugurate the tradition of coins without images. The earlier Yehud coins are probably better seen as 'Israelite' rather than 'Jewish'; they use images, and it's uncertain how far the term 'Judaioi' was in use at the time, or to whom it applied.
Robert_Brenchley
Df5Lt2G8S6yPcT9Pw7eQzB4gWao3sk.jpg
Antiochos VII AE18, Bust of Eros / Head dress of Isis 19 viewsBust of Eros right wreathed in myrtle. / Head dress of Isis BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU.
BMC 4.73.49. 138-129 BC. _1920
Antonivs Protti
Antiochos VII AR Drachm.JPG
Antiochos VII AR Drachm29 viewsSyria, 138-129 BC
Obverse: Laureate head of Antiochos right
Reverse: BASILEWS ANTIOXOY EY-ERGETOY, Nike walking left with wreath and palm. Monogram left.
17mm , 4.0gm.
SNG Spaer 1994
Jerome Holderman
Antiochos_VII_Euergetes.jpg
Antiochos VII Euergetes65 viewsFRONT/ Bust of Eros right. BACK / BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU, Headdress of Isis, scepter as monogram to left; aplustre and date EOP below. Minted in the Selukid Kingdom. Struck 138-129 BC. Ref: SNG UK 1301.617-620; BMC 52 (British Museum Catalog #52).

EX ; Andreas Reich


From the Sam Mansourati Collection
2 commentsSam
P1018813.JPG
ANTIOCHOS VII EUERGETES. 138-129 BC. AR Drachm. 18mm.22 viewsANTIOCHOS VII EUERGETES. 138-129 BC. AR Drachm.

Obv. Diademed head right.

Rev. BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU. Nike advancing left.
Lee S
antiochos_VII_leo.jpg
Antiochos VII, Euergetes; Lion/ club13 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochos VII, Euergetes (Sidetes), 138 - 129 B.C. Bronze AE 15, SNG Spaer 1906 ff. (various dates and symbols), F, 3.171g, 13.6mm, obverse lion head right; reverse “BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU”, club. Ex FORVMPodiceps
IMG_9254.JPG
Antiochos VIII7 viewsSeleucid Kingdom, Antiochos VIII 121-96 BC, Tetradrachm, 15.64g: Obv: Diademed head of Antiochos VIII right Rev: Zeus standing left holding a star and leaning on a staff, two monograms to left, "Eqp" in exergue "BASILEWS ANTIOXOY EPIFANOYS" all within a wreath. Porous, EQP = year 195 = 118/7 BC, Damascus mint, SC 2322.5ecoli
Antiochos_VIII_(125-96_BCE)_tetradrachm_(AR).png
Antiochos VIII (125-96 BCE) tetradrachm (AR)104 viewsObv.: Diademed head of king right Rev.: BASILEWS ANTIOXOY EPIFANOYS (Zeus Ouranios stg. left within laurel wreath, holding sceptre and star, crescent above head) Field: IE over A Exergue: P Diameter: 28,5 mm. Weight: 16,75 gr. Babelon 1417

Antiochos VIII was known as Antiochos 'Grypos' (hook-nose). This facial feature is indeed quite recognisable on most of his coins.
Nick.vdw
coin614.jpg
Antiochos VIII. CSE323. Seleukid26 viewsAntiochos VIII. CSE323. Seleukid coin of about
120BC. Obv. diademed, radiate head of Antiochus right
Rev. right of eagle, BASILEOS ANTIOXOY,left of
eagle EPIPHANOY.Scepter or 'kerykeion' through the
eagle diagonally in two lines Coin #614
cars100
Antiochus_2b.jpg
Antiochus I (Soter) * Apollo, 280-261 BC68 views
Antiochus I * Apollo,* 280-261 BC
Æ hemidrachm (?)

Obv: Diademed head of Antiochus right
Rev: Apollo seated on omphalos (Delphi), holding arrow in right hand, leaning on strung bow with his left hand, left-facing.
BASILEOS to the right, [A]NTIOXOY to the left. Monograms to left and right, omitted by strike from the right, effaced by wear from the left.

Weight: ca. 4.0 grams
Die axis: 190 degs.

Patina: Quite lovely 'desert-patina.'

Sear, GCATV * (SG) Number 6866v (This example appears to be bronze, not silver: I have been unable to date to find any reference to an Æ variant of SG #6866).
BMC, 4.9, 10


This coin bears portrait of the middle-aged Antiochus I 'Soter,' from the time of his sole reign (280-261 BC.), following the death of his father, Seleukos I.
The reverse depicts Delphian Apollo holding a single arrow, as opposed to the two arrows as seen on the coins dating from his joint-reign with his father.

* Olympian

Tiathena
Antiochus I Soter-2.JPG
Antiochus I Soter25 viewsAE14, 280-261 BC, Syria
Obverse: Facing head of Athena in triple-crested helmet.
Reverse: BASILEWS-ANTIOXOU , Nike Facing Left with wreath and palm., Monogram in circle to the left.
SG6883v(monogram r.), BMC 58 pl.IV.13
14mm, 2.3 gm.
Jerome Holderman
AntiochII_4drachm.jpg
Antiochus II - tetradrachm42 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Newell ESM 189, SNG Spaer 390, Houghton 963 (or similar to refs, monograms obscured), 16.69g; Seleucia on Tigris mint, ca. 255-246 B.C.; obverse: diademed head of Antiochus I right; reverse: BASILEWC / ANTI-OXOY, Apollo seated left on omphalos, examining arrow with right, resting left hand on grounded bow, monogram outer left, monogram outer right.

Notes: from FORVM ANCIENT COINS
2 commentsPriscian
Antiochus_III_Apollo_Resting_on_Bow~0.JPG
Antiochus III Apollo Resting on Bow24 viewsAntiochus III, King of Syria, 223 - 187 BC, mint of Sardes,
OBV: Laureate head of Apollo right
REV: BASILEWS ANTIOXOY, Apollo standing left, holds arrow and leans on bow
Houghton 70, Spear 583, SC 983v

SCARCE
Romanorvm
Antiochus_IV_Epiphanes.jpg
Antiochus IV "Epiphanes"14 viewsOBV: Diademed head of Antiochus IV, right.
REV: BASILEWS ANTIOXOU
Apolo seated left on omphalos holding
arrow and resting on bow. Aplustre at left.
Serrated Bronze AE 14

Lindgren #1031
175 B.C. - 164 B.C.
14mm 2.4gm
goldenancients
seleukosIVlaodike.jpg
Antiochus IV Epiphanes. AE16. Queen Laodice147 viewsSELEUKID KINGS of SYRIA. Antiochus IV Epiphanes serrated AE16. 175 - 164 B.C. Seleucia-in-Pieria mint. Veiled bust of Laodice IV r. Border of dots / BASILEWS ANTIOCOU, North African Elephant (Extinct) head left, prow of galley right. Houghton 113

The North African elephant was a possible subspecies of the African bush elephant, or possibly a separate elephant species, that existed in North Africa until becoming extinct in Ancient Roman times.
1 commentsancientone
collage4~4.jpg
Antiochus VI, Dionysos41 viewsAntiochus VI, Dionysos
145-142 BC

O: Radiate bust of Antiochus to right
R: Elephant to left
BASILEWS
ANTIOCOU
STA
*
EPIFANOU
DIONUSOU

SNG Spaer 1774, Houghton Coll. 249
Ae serrated bronze; 22-23mm; 6.
arizonarobin
antiochos_VI_panther.jpg
Antiochus VI, Panther, AE1722 viewsAntiochus VI, 145-142 B.C. 17mm, 3.1g. Obverse: Radiate bust of Antiochos VI right. Reverse: Panther advancing left holding a palm branch "BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EPIFANOU. Spaer SNG 1784. 1 commentsPodiceps
antiochus.jpg
Antiochus VII (138-129 BC) AR Tetradrachm, Tyre Mint21 viewsObverse: His diademed and draped bust right;
Reverse: BASILEWS ANTIOXOY to right and left of eagle standing left on prow; IE at upper left above Tyre monogram and club; A vC over AOP in right field. Monogram between eagle legs.
Weight 13.0 grams. Diameter 27 mm

I love the beautiful atmospheric style of these Seleukid Tetradrachms. I wish I could afford more of them!
daverino
antiochos_VII_lion.jpg
Antiochus VII, Lion/ Club, AE1515 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochos VII, Euergetes (Sidetes), 138 - 129 B.C. Bronze AE 15, SNG Spaer 1906 ff. (various dates and symbols), 3.2g, 15mm, obverse lion head right; reverse “BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU”, club. Podiceps
cleopatra.jpg
Antiochus VIII and Cleopatra Thea 125-121 B.C.21 viewsObv. Radiate head of Antiochos right
Rev. BASILISSHS KLEOPATRAS KAI BASILEWS ANTIOXOY, owl standing facing on amphora
Skyler
Augustus_temple_(800x387).jpg
Antoninus Pius 7 viewsAntoninus Pius Sestertius temple of Augustus and Livia
Catalog: Temple of Divus Augustus
weight 28,6gr. | bronze Ø 32mm.
obv. Laureate head right ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TR P XXII
rev. Octastyle temple of Divus Augustus, containing cult-statues of Augustus
and Livia TEMPLVM DIVI AVG REST COS IIII S C

The Temple of Divus Augustus was a major temple originally built to commemorate the deified first Roman emperor, Augustus. It was built between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia, on the site of the house that Augustus had inhabited before he entered public life in the mid-1st century BC. The temple′s construction took place during the 1st century AD, having been vowed by the Roman Senate shortly after the death of the emperor in AD 14. It is known from Roman coinage that the temple was originally built to an Ionic hexastyle design. However, its size, physical proportions and exact site are unknown. During the reign of Domitian the Temple of Divus Augustus was destroyed by fire but was rebuilt and rededicated in 89/90 with a shrine to his favourite deity, Minerva. The temple was redesigned as a memorial to four deified emperors, including Vespasian and Titus. It was restored again in the mid 150s by Antonius Pius, and that was the reason for this coinage. The last known reference to the temple was on 27 May 218 | at some point thereafter it was completely destroyed and its stones were presumably quarried for later buildings. Its remains are not visible and the area in which it lay has never been excavated.

Cohen 805 | RIC 1004 | BMC 2063 | Sear 4235 R
vf
1 commentsAncient Aussie
AntoSe29-4.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 1003A, Sestertius of AD 158-159 (Temple of Divus Augustus) 17 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.4g, Ø32mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 158-159.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, laureate head of Antoninus Pius right.
Rev.: TEMPL DIVI AVG REST (around) COS IIII (ex.) S C (field), Octastyle temple of with statues of Divus Augustus and Livia. Both statues in the centre, standing on a base, have the right arms raised. There are statues to the left near the foot of the steps and other statues of soldiers on pedestals at each side of the top step. In the roof is a quadriga in the centre, and statues at each corner; further statues in the pediment.
RIC 1003A (S); BMCRE 2063 var. (rev. legend TEMPLVM DIV); Cohen 797; Strack 1168; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 404 (2 specimens); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4235 var. (different rev. legend); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 132:88a
ex D. Ruskin, Oxford, 1995 ("found in Reigate (Surrey), 1864")

Coin issued on the occasion of the restoration of the temple of Divus Ausustus and Diva Augusta (Livia) in AD 158. he temple was probably situated in the valley between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia. No trace has survived.
Charles S
Ptolemy2Phil.jpg
AP Monogram262 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.
10785. Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 714, SNG Cop 506-507, aVF, 14.08g, 26.5mm, 0o, Phoenicia, Sidon mint, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis, small D behind ear; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, SI left, AP countermark right; slightly frosty; $125.00
whitetd49
w1585.jpg
Apollo (head of), Lyre and Tripod226 viewsBythinia, Kings Prousias I., 228-185 BC. AE-27 mm, 10.14 grs. AV: Laur. head of Apollo to left. Round CM: Head of Apollo; oval CM: Lyre: rectangular CM: Tripod. RV: BASILEWS / PROUSIOU either side of Nike, left hand on a shield, the right crowning the Kings name. Collection: Mueller.Automan
w0802.jpg
Apollo (head of), Lyre and Tripod216 viewsBythinia, Kings, Prousias I., 228-185 BC. AE-27 mm, 9.82 grs. AV: Laur. head of Apollo to left. Round CM: Head of Apollo; oval CM: Lyre: rectangular CM: Tripod. RV: BASILEWS / PROUSIOU either side of Nike, left hand on a shield, the right crowning the Kings name. Collection: Mueller.Automan
apollodot.jpg
Apollodotus I 174-165 BC AE Quadruple unit21 viewsBASILEWS APOLLODOTOY SWTHROS legend, Apollo, radiate, standing facing, holding arrow and resting bow on ground / Kharosthi legend, Tripod, monogram at lower right.

22 mm, 10.5 grams
daverino
mithra.jpg
AR Drachm of Mithradates I (171-138 BC)16 viewsObverse: Bearded bust left wearing diadem with circular reel and pellet border.
Reverse: Beardless archer sitting right on omphalos wearing cloak and bashlyk, 3 line Greek inscription BASILEWS MEGALOY ARSAKOY

A nice portrait of the king done in realistic style probably near the end of his long reign

Sellwood 11.1
daverino
philsyria.jpg
AR Tetradrachm of Antioch, Roman Syria 46/45 BC28 viewsOBVERSE: Diademed head of Philip Philadelphos right
REVERSE: BASILEUS PHILIPPOY EPIPHOYS PHILADELPHOY, Zeus seated left holding Nike and Sceptre, Antioch monogram to inner left. D (date) in Exergue off flan - year 4 of Caesarian era.
RPC_4128, Prieur 5. McAlee 5(b)/1 same dies
Diameter ~26 mm, wt 14.3 gms, some porosity.
This coin is particularly interesting because it shows the change in style that came about as Roman cultural influence followed conquest of the Hellenic world. The flabby and self-indulgent features of the real Philip as portrayed in his lifetime have become idealized as a warrior-hero which he never was.
daverino
Ariobarzanes.jpg
Ariobarzanes I Drachm32 viewsAR drachm. Asia Minor, Cappadocia. Ariobarzanes I Philorhomaios (95-63 BC). Rev. Athena; Basileos Ariobarzonou Philorhomaiou (in exergue) and regnal year, which seems to be 31.
Cf. Sear GCV 7302.
Tanit
DSCN7800.JPG
Ariobarzanes I of Cappadocia, 95-62 BC. AR 16mm.13 viewsAriobarzanes I of Cappadocia, 95-62 BC.

Obv. Diademed, middle-aged head of Ariobarzanes I right

Rev. BASILEWS ARIBARZANOU FILORWMAU, to left, right and beneath Athena, wearing helmet and chiton, standing left holding spear and shield in left hand and Nike with wreath in right.
Lee S
tigranes_ii_res.jpg
ARMENIAN KINGDOM--TIGRANES II (THE GREAT)42 viewsKings of Armenia
95 - 58 BC
AE 13 mm, 2.25 g
O: Draped bust of Tigranes, right, wearing tiara
R: BASILEWS-BASILEWN/TIGRANO[Y] Grain ear
ref. Bedoukian 107
laney
arsinoe_II.jpg
Arsinoe II; Head of Arsinoe right/ Eagle; Svoronos 35118 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Arsinoe II, c. 273 - 268 B.C. Bronze AE 16, 1/16th drachm?, Svoronos 351; Weiser -; SNG Copenhagen 100, Fair, edge broken, uncertain mint, 2.772g, 15.9mm, 0o, c. 264 BC; obverse veiled and diademed head of Arsinoë II right; reverse PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; wings open, “DI” above monogram before; rare. Arsinoe II (316 B.C. - July 270 B.C.) was the daughter of king Ptolemy I Soter, the founder of the Hellenistic state of Egypt, and his second wife Berenice I., As the wife of King Lysimachus, she was queen of Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. Later she was co-ruler of Egypt with her brother and husband Ptolemy II. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Athena_Greek_Goddess_of_War.jpg
Athena Greek Goddess of War269 viewsSilver tetradrachm, references: SNG Cop 1130; condition: VF, mint: uncertain, weight: 16.590g, maximum diameter: 30.5mm, die axis: 270o, date struck: after 297 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BASILEWS LUSIMACOU, Athena enthroned left, rests arm on shield, transverse spear against right side, holds Nike crowning name, monogram under arm, lion's head in exergue;
Sam Mansourati Collection
An absolute beauty EX FORVM auction
Sam
Augustus.jpg
Augustus32 viewsAugustus, AE24, Kingdom of Thrace. BASILEWS ROIMHTALKOU, jugate heads of King Rhoemetalkes & Queen Pythodoris right / KAISAROS SEBASTOU, bare head of Augustus right.Britanikus
Augustus_.jpg
Augustus29 viewsAugustus, AE24, Kingdom of Thrace. BASILEWS ROIMHTALKOU, jugate heads of King Rhoemetalkes & Queen Pythodoris right / KAISAROS SEBASTOU, bare head of Augustus rightBritanikus
AUG-1.jpg
Augustus ,THRACE RPC 171522 viewsRhoemetalkes I., Thrace
11 B C - 12 A D.
under Augustus
BASILEWS ROIMHTALKOU
Head of king r.
KAISAROS SEBASTOU
Head of Augustus r.; capricorn with globe r.
24mm 8gm
OWL365
0030-420np_noir.jpg
Augustus and Rhoemetalkes, Bronze86 viewsSemi autonomous coinage of Thracia, c11BC-12AD
KAISAROS SEBASTOU, Bust of Augustus right
BASILEWS ROIMHTALKOU, Busts of Rhoemetalkes and his wife right
9.82 gr
Ref : Sear #5396
1 commentsPotator II
604_RR_RPC_1_1711.JPG
Augustus, AE24, Kingdom of Thrace Jugate heads10 viewsReference.
SNG Cop 1190, SGI 5396. RPC 1, 1711

Obv. KAISAROS SEBASTOU
Bare head of Augustus right.

BASILEWS ROIMHTALKOU,
Jugate heads of King Rhoemetalkes & Queen Pythodoris right

6.87 gr
24 mm
h
okidoki
Azez.jpg
Azes I, Indo-Scythians, AE Tetradrachm. 57-12 BC40 views Obv. BASLIEWS BASILEWN MEGALOU AZOU, zebu (humped bull) standing right, Kh monogram to right
Rev. MAHARAJASA RAJARAJASA MAHATASA AYASA, in Karosthi, lion or leopard standing right (B in square) above
Skyler
B_033_Theophilus_830-842-AD_AE-Follis__ThEOFIL___bASIL___ThEO-FILE_AVG-OVStE_SV-nICAS_SB-1667-p-320_Constantinopolis_Q-001_6h_25-27,5mm_8,42g-s.jpg
B 033 Theophilus (830-842 A.D.), SB 1667, AE Follis, Constantinopolis, +ThEO/FILE AVG/OVStE SV/nICAS in four lines, #164 viewsB 033 Theophilus (830-842 A.D.), SB 1667, AE Follis, Constantinopolis, +ThEO/FILE AVG/OVStE SV/nICAS in four lines, #1
avers: ThEOFIL' bASIL', Crowned, three-quarter length figure of Theophilus facing, pellets on the crown, wearing loros, holding labarum and cross on globe.
reverse: +ThEO/FILE AVG/OVStE SV/nICAS in four lines.
exergue:-/-//--, diameter: 25-27,5mm, weight: 8,42g, axis: 6h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: SB 1667, p-320,
Q-001
quadrans
B_033_Theophilus_830-842-AD,_AE-Follis,_ThEOFIL___bASIL__,_ThEO-FILE_AVG-OVStE_SV-nICAS,_SB-1667,_p-320,_Constantinopolis,_Q-002,_6h,_24,5-25,5mm,_3,75g-s.jpg
B 033 Theophilus (830-842 A.D.), SB 1667, AE Follis, Constantinopolis, +ThEO/FILE AVG/OVStE SV/nICAS in four lines, #255 viewsB 033 Theophilus (830-842 A.D.), SB 1667, AE Follis, Constantinopolis, +ThEO/FILE AVG/OVStE SV/nICAS in four lines, #2
avers: ThEOFIL' bASIL', Crowned, three-quarter length figure of Theophilus facing, pellets on the crown, wearing loros, holding labarum and cross on globe.
reverse: +ThEO/FILE AVG/OVStE SV/nICAS in four lines.
exergue:-/-//--, diameter: 24,5-25,5mm, weight: 3,75g, axis: 6h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: SB 1667, p-320,
Q-002
quadrans
byz-xx7aa-s.jpg
B 035 Basil I. the Macedonian (867-886 A.D.), SB 1719, AE-18, Cherson,78 viewsB 035 Basil I. the Macedonian (867-886 A.D.), SB 1719, AE-18, Cherson,
avers:- Large B on exergual line.
revers:- Cross floriate on two steps, great pellet on each side.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Cherson, date: A.D., ref: SB 1719, p-329,
Q-001
quadrans
B_036_Leo_VI__(the_Wise)_(886-912_A_D_),_AE-Follis,_LEON_bASILEVS_ROM_LEON_EN_QEO_BA_SILEVS_R_OMEON_SB_1729,_Constantinopolis_DOC-8_AD_Q-001_6h_25,5-26mm_6,08gx-s~0.jpg
B 036 Leo VI. the Wise (886-912 A.D.), SB 1729, AE-Follis, Constantinopolis, #1115 viewsB 036 Leo VI. the Wise (886-912 A.D.), SB 1729, AE-Follis, Constantinopolis, #1
avers: LEON bAS ILEVS ROM, Leo, crowned bust facing with short beard, wearing chlamys, holding akakia.
reverse: + / LEOn/ En QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON, legend in four lines.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 25,5-26mm, weight: 6,08g, axis: 6h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: SB 1729,
Q-001
quadrans
B_036_Leo_VI__(the_Wise)_(886-912_A_D_),_AE-Follis,_LEON_bASILEVS_ROM_LEON_EN_QEO_BA_SILEVS_R_OMEON_SB_1729,_Constantinopolis_DOC-8_AD_Q-002_7h_26mm_7,45gx-s.jpg
B 036 Leo VI. the Wise (886-912 A.D.), SB 1729, AE-Follis, Constantinopolis, #299 viewsB 036 Leo VI. the Wise (886-912 A.D.), SB 1729, AE-Follis, Constantinopolis, #2
avers: LEON bAS ILEVS ROM, Leo, crowned bust facing with short beard, wearing chlamys, holding akakia.
revers: + / LEOn/ En QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON, legend in four lines.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 26mm, weight: 7,45g, axis: 7h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: SB 1729,
Q-002
quadrans
B_036_Leo_VI__(the_Wise)_(886-912_A_D_),_AE-Follis,_LEON_bASILEVS_ROM_LEON_EN_QEO_BA_SILEVS_R_OMEON_SB_1729,_Constantinopolis_DOC-8_AD_Q-003_5h_23,5-26,5mm_6,67g-s.jpg
B 036 Leo VI. the Wise (886-912 A.D.), SB 1729, AE-Follis, Constantinopolis, #392 viewsB 036 Leo VI. the Wise (886-912 A.D.), SB 1729, AE-Follis, Constantinopolis, #3
avers: LEON bAS ILEVS ROM, Leo, crowned bust facing with short beard, wearing chlamys, holding akakia.
revers: + / LEOn/ En QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON, legend in four lines.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 23,5-26,5mm, weight: 6,67g, axis: 5h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: SB 1729,
Q-003
quadrans
B_038_Constantine-VII__Porphyrogenitus_(913-959_A_D_),_SB_1761,_AE-Follis,_Constantinopolis,-Q-001_h_mm_ga-s.jpg
B 038 Constantine VII. Porphyrogenitus (913-959 A.D.), SB 1761, AE-Follis, Constantinopolis, #183 viewsB 038 Constantine VII. Porphyrogenitus (913-959 A.D.), SB 1761, AE-Follis, Constantinopolis, #1
avers: CONST bASIL ROM, crowned bust of Constantine facing, with short beard and wearing vertical loros, holding akakia and cross on globe.
revers: + / CONST / EN QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON, legend in four lines.
exe: , diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: SB 1761,
Q-001
quadrans
B_038_Constantine-VII__Porphyrogenitus_(913-959_A_D_),_SB_1761,_AE-Follis,_Constantinopolis,-Q-002_6h_24-25mm_6,15g-s~0.jpg
B 038 Constantine VII. Porphyrogenitus (913-959 A.D.), SB 1761, AE-Follis, Constantinopolis, #2, double or over struck!115 viewsB 038 Constantine VII. Porphyrogenitus (913-959 A.D.), SB 1761, AE-Follis, Constantinopolis, #2, double or over struck!
avers: CONST bASIL ROM, crowned bust of Constantine facing, with short beard and wearing vertical loros, holding akakia and cross on globe.
reverse: + / CONST / EN QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON, legend in four lines.
exergue: , diameter: 24-25mm, weight: 6,15g, axis: 6h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: SB 1761,
Q-002
quadrans
B_059_Anonim_Follis,_SB_1812var,_(Basil_II__and_Constantine_VIII__cc989_AD),_A2,_F41,_SB-1812var_,_Q-001,_6h,_25-26,5mm,11,31g-s.jpg
B 059 Anonymous Follis, SB 1812var., AE-Follis, Class A2/F41type, (Basil II. and Constantine VIII. (976-1025 A.D.)), #1103 viewsB 059 Anonymous Follis, SB 1812var., AE-Follis, Class A2/F41type, (Basil II. and Constantine VIII. (976-1025 A.D.)), #1
Class A2, attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII.
averse: +EMMA NOVHΛ, IC-XC, ust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
reverse: +IhSyS / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings".
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 27,5mm, weight: 10,30g, axis: h,
mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences., date: cc989 A.D., ref:SB 1813, Class A2/F41type,
Q-001
quadrans
B_059_Anonim-Follis,_SB_1813,_AE-Follis,_Class_A2,_(Constantine_VIII__(976-1025_A_D_)),SB-1818-p-350_Q-001,_0h,_28mm,_10_30g-s.jpg
B 059 Anonymous Follis, SB 1813, AE-Follis, Class A2/F39type, (Constantine VIII. (976-1025 A.D.)), #1128 viewsB 059 Anonymous Follis, SB 1813, AE-Follis, Class A2/F39type, (Constantine VIII. (976-1025 A.D.)), #1
Class A2, attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII.
averse: +ЄMMA NOVHΛ, IC-XC, Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
reverse: +IhSyS / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings".
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 27,5mm, weight: 10,30g, axis: h,
mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences., date: 976-1025 CE, ref:SB 1813, Class A2/F39type,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Constantine-IX-1042-1055_Anonim-Follis_Class-D_IC-XC_IS-XS_BASILE_BASIL_SB-1836-p-378_Q-001_6h_29-30mm_12,81g-s.jpg
B 059 Anonymous Follis, SB 1836, AE-Follis, Class D, (Constantine IX. (1042-1055 A.D.)),94 viewsB 059 Anonymous Follis, SB 1836, AE-Follis, Class D, (Constantine IX. (1042-1055 A.D.)),
Class D, attributed to joint reign of Constantine IX.
averse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
reverse: -+-IS-XS / bASILE/bASIL- in 3 lines, - crescent -.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 29-30mm, weight: 12,81g, axis: 6h,
mint: , date:, ref: SB-1836, p-378,
Q-001
quadrans
B_059_Imitation-Barbar_Anonim-Follis_SB--p-_Q-001,_6h,_24,5-26,5mm,_9,04g-s.jpg
B 059 Anonymous Follis, SB ????, AE-Follis, Class A2 (?), (Ancient (Barbar) Imitation), 113 viewsB 059 Anonymous Follis, SB ????, AE-Follis, Class A2 (?), (Ancient (Barbar) Imitation),
(Class A2, attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII.)
averse: +ЄMMΔ VOHΛI instead of +ЄMMA NOVHΛ, IC-XC, Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
reverse: +IhSyS / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings", all S are "revers" !!!
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 24,5-26,6mm, weight: 9,04g, axis: 6h,
mint: Ancient (Barbar) Imitation., date: ??? A.D., ref: SB ???,
Q-001
quadrans
seleukia_antiochosI_SC379_6a.jpg
Babylonia, Seleukeia ad Tigris, Antiochos I, SC 379, 6a48 viewsAntiochos I. Soter, 281-261 BC
AR - tetradrachm, 16.92g, 29.04mm, 315°
struck 264-263 BC
obv. Head of Antiochos I., diademed, r.
rev. BASILEWS - ANTIOXOV
Apollo Delphios, nude, std. r. on omphalos, holding with l. hand bow set on ground behind and checking
arrow in extended r. hand; chlamys over omphalos covered with agrenon and r. thigh
in outer l. and r. field monogram
ref. Newell ESM 166, pl. XV, 2; SC 379, 6a
VF
1 commentsJochen
Screen_Shot_2017-05-11_at_12_35_44_PM.png
Bactria32 viewsBactria, Menander 165-130 BC, Drachm
Bactria, Menander 165-130 BC, Drachm, 2.46g: Obv: Helmeted head of Menander right "BASILEWS SWTHPOS MENANDPOY" Rev: Athena left brandishing a spear and shield. Monogram to left.. Bop 16E.
Ex Aegean Numismatics auction, 5/11/17
2 commentsSosius
eukratides_obol.jpg
Bactria, Eukratides, Obol. 170-145 B.C. Eukratides/ Caps of the Dioskouroi28 viewsBactria, Eucratides, Obol. 170-145 B.C. 0.45g. Obv: Diademed bust of Eucratides r. Rev: Caps of the Dioskouroi. Fine or a bit better; rough and corroded. Bop-3. Ex H.J.Berk
-The rev legend is a bit of a mystery as all the other specimens online have from top down on the left side EYKRATIDOY and on the right side BASILEWS and this coin clearly has from down top BASIL(EWS) on the left side and the rest of legend mostly off flan.
Podiceps
antialkidas.jpg
Bactria; Antialkidas Drachm; Zeus Nikephoros seated, elephant forepart27 viewsAntialkidas, ca.130-120 B.C. Indo-Greeks of Bactria. AR Drachm. 17mm,2.00g. BASILEWS NIKHFOROU ATIALKIDOU, Diademed and draped bust right, wearing kausia / Kharoshti inscription: Maharajasa jayadharasa Amtialkidasaeus, Zeus Nikephoros seated facing slightly left; to left, forepart of elephant left; monogram below throne. Bopearachchi Série 13B; SNG ANS 1098-103.Podiceps
Menander_Soter_I.jpg
Bactrian/Indo Greek - Menander Soter (155-130 BCE)13 viewsSize/Metal: AR16; Weight: 2.29 grams; Mint: Unknown; Denomination: Drachm; Date: 155-130 BCE; Obverse: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, wearing crested helmet covered with pelt of scales and adorned with head of wing. Legend surrounds: (Greek: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ ΜΕΝΑΝΔΡΟΥ (BASILEOS SOTEROS MENANDROU). Reverse: Athena Alkidemos advancing left; shield decorated with aegis over left arm, hurling thunderbolt; monogram to right. Kharoshthi legend: MAHARAJA TRATARASA MENADRASA. References: Bopearachchi 16E; HGC #12, 193; SNG ANS 868-73; Sear GC #7597 (different monogram); Mitchiner #217f.museumguy
Mendander_Soter.jpg
Bactrian/Indo Greek - Menander Soter (155-130 BCE)21 viewsSize/Metal: AR17; Weight: 2.48 grams; Mint: Taxila; Denomination: Drachm; Date: 155-130 BCE; Obverse: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, wearing crested helmet covered with pelt of scales and adorned with head of wing. Legend surrounds: (Greek: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ ΜΕΝΑΝΔΡΟΥ (BASILEOS SOTEROS MENANDROU). Reverse: Athena Alkidemos advancing left; shield decorated with aegis over left arm, hurling thunderbolt; monogram to right. Kharoshthi legend: MAHARAJA TRATARASA MENADRASA. References: Bopearachchi 161; HGC #12, 193; SNG ANS 879-92; Sear GC #7597 (different monogram).museumguy
a~5.jpg
Baktria, Indo-Greeks, Antialkidas. Square AE19. 10 viewsPushkalavati mint, 145-135 BC. BASILEWS NIKHFOROU ANTIALKIDOU, draped bust of Zeus right, thunderbolt on shoulder / Karosthi legend: Maharajasa jayadhrasa Antialkidasa, Palms and pilei of the Dioscuri; Pushkalavati monogram below. ancientone
Baktria,_Menander_Drachm.JPG
Baktria. Menander. Circa 155-130 BC. AR Drachm. 46 views2.46 gr. BASILEWS SWTHROS MENANDOU, bust right in crested helmet / Karosthi legend, Athena Alkidemos advancing left with thunderbolt & shield; monogram right. MIG 218c. Bop 145ff
1 commentsAntonivs Protti
menander_with_helmet.jpg
Baktria; Menander I. AR Drachm. Helmeted bust right/ Athena Alkidemos left13 viewsBaktria. Menander I. Circa 155-130 B.C. AR Drachm. BASILEWS SWTHROS MENANDOU, bust right in crested helmet / Karosthi legend, Athena Alkidemos advancing left with thunderbolt & shield; monogram right. Bop 145ff, MIG 218c. Podiceps
Antimachosdrachm.JPG
Baktrian Kingdom, Antimachos, AR Drachm62 viewsKaroshi legend around king on horseback.
BASILEWS NIKHFOROU ANTIMACOU
Nike advancing left with wreath and palm, mongram in left field.
SG 7546, 171-160 BC.
Early bilingual coin, with different languages on obverse and reverse.

whitetd49
Basal_I,_SBCV_1712.JPG
Basal I, SBCV 171220 views+LEOn bASIL S COnSt AVgg
Facing half length figure of Basil wearing loros and holding mappa, flanked by Leo and Constantine each wearing chlamys
+bASIL / COnStAn / t S LEOn En / ΘO bASILs / ROmEOn
Star below
AE folis, 27mm, 5.27g
novacystis
Basil_I_and_Constantine_VII.jpg
Basil I and Constantine VII7 viewsBasil I & Constantine VII, 868 - 879 AD, 26mm, 4.5g, SB 1721, DOC 8, BMC 11-16, Ratto 1861
OBV: BASILOS S CONST AVGG, Crowned busts of Basil I wearing chlamys and with short beard on left,
Constantine VII wearing Chlamys, no beard, on right, holding labarum between them
REV: bASIL-S CONSTAN-TINOS EN QO-bASILEIS R-OMAION in five lines
SRukke
sb171026mm512g.jpg
Basil I and Constantine VII, AE Follis SB 171022 viewsObverse: bASILIO S CONST BASILIS (or ..CONSTAN..), Basil, crowned, bearded and wearing loros on left and Constantine (much shorter), crowned and wearing loros, on right, seated facing on double throne, holding labarum between them
Reverse: bASILIO-S CONSTAN-TINOS EN OO-bASILEIS R-OMAION in five lines (first line can be bASILO).
Date: 867-876 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 1710, DOC 9A
26mm, 5.12g
wileyc
sb172124mm391g.jpg
Basil I and Constantine VII, AE Follis SB172120 viewsObverse: BASILIOS S CONST AVGG, crowned facing busts of Basil I, wearing chlamys and with short beard, on left and Constantine VII, wearing chlamys, no beard, on right, holding labarum between them.
Reverse: bASIL-S CONSTAN-TINOS EN QO-bASILEIS R-OMAION in five lines.
Date: 868-879 CE
Mint: unknown provincial mint
Sear 1721, DOC 18
29mm, 8.15g
wileyc
BYZ-Basil_I-3.jpg
Basil I the Macedonian with Constantine (AD 867-886)9 viewsAR Miliaresion Constantinople, AD 868-879. Sear 1708
Grade Ch AU: Strike: 5/5: Surface:5/5
Obv.: IhSUS XRISTUS NICA, cross potent on three steps, globe beneath, triple border
Rev.: +bASI/ LIOS CE/ CONSTAN/ TIN' PISTV/ bASILIS/ ROMEO' in six lines, triple border
Richard M10
sb171329mm815g.jpg
Basil I, Leo VI and Constantine VII, AE Follis SB 171314 viewsObverse: LEON bASIL S CONST AVGG, Basil I, crowned and with short beard, in centre; Leo VI, crowned, no beard, on left and Constantine VII, crowned on right, all wearing chlamys, all half-length figures facing.
Reverse: bASIL-CONSTAN-T S LEON EN-ThO bASILS-ROMEON in five lines, with star or cross or nothing below
Date: 870-879 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 1713 DOC 10
29mm, 8.15g
wileyc
Basil_I_SBCV_1719.JPG
Basil I, SBCV 171915 viewsLarge B standing on exergual line
Floriate Cross on three steps with pellets to each side
Cherson mint
AE 17mm, 3.12g
novacystis
0_011.JPG
Basil II & Consantine VIII22 viewsClass A2 anonymous follis. +EMMANOVHA IX-XC, Nimbate bust of Christ holding book of gospels / +IhSUS / XRISTUS / bASILEU / bASILE in four lines, adornments above & below.

1023 - 1028 A.D ex Forvm
Randygeki(h2)
basilII_constantin_VIII,_SBCV1818.jpg
Basil II & Constantin VIII, SBCV 181811 viewsBasil II & Constantin VIII, AD 1023-1028
AE 30, 8.94g, 30.1mm, 180°
so-called anonymous follis, type A3
struck in a provincial mint(?)
obv. EMMA - NOVHL
in l. and r. field IC - XC
Bust of Christus, with nimbus, in pallium and colobium, holding in both hand New
Testament
nimbus and New Testament decorated with crosses
rev. IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASIEu / bASILE
legend in 4 lines, above and below a cross
ref. SBCV 1818; Grierson - NumisWiki Ornaments 32
about VF, rev. a bit excentric
From Foruma Ancient Coins, thanks!

Emmanuel = God with us (Matthew 1:2, Isaiah 7:14)
IC - XC = Iesous Xristos
IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASIEu / bASILE = Iesus Xristus King of kings
Pallium: Mantle of emperors and kings
Colobium: Sleeveless long tunic worn by Christus on the cross
Jochen
11_Basil-II.jpg
Basil II (A.D. 976 - 1025)6 viewsAE Follis, A.D. 976 - 1025, Constantinople, 26mm, 9.34g, 180°, SB 1813.
Obv: Facing bust of Christ, raising hand and holding gospels.
Rev: +IhSUS XRISTUS BASILЄU BASILЄ.
Marti Vltori
Christ_follis_1_k.jpg
Basil II and Constantine VIII, AD 976 - 102512 viewsÆ anonymous follis, class A2, 32mm, 12.6g, 6h; Constantinople mint
Obv.: + EMMANOVHL, facing bust of Christ, wears nimbus cruciger ornamented in each limb of cross, pallium and colobium, Gospels in both hands, to left IC, to right XC
Rev.: + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings), ornamentation above and below
Reference: SBCV 1813
John Anthony
Basil-SBCV2622.JPG
Basil of Trebizond, SBCV 262226 viewsAEVΓ retrograde N
St. Eugenius stated on horse walking right
BA M
Basil stated on horse walking right
AR asper, 23mm, 1.98g
novacystis
10250.jpg
Basileios, diakonos, chartoularios and protekdikos. Byzantine lead seal 11th century AD273 viewsBasileios, diakonos, chartoularios and protekdikos. Byzantine lead seal 11th century AD
The Virgin Hodegetria, wearing nimbus, chiton and maphorion, pointing with her right hand to Infant Christ, who she is holding on her left arm. Christ is wearing a nimbus cruciger decorated with pearls, chiton and himation. He is holding a scroll in his left hand, his right hand resting in the fold of his mother’s maphorion below the chin. In left and right fields, MP–ΘV; Circular inscription +ΘKE ROHΘEI-[TW CW ΔOVΛW] within two concentric circles
+RACI|ΛEIW ΔIA|KON,XTU|KAI ΠPO|TEKΔI|KW in six lines
35mm, 22.26g; extremely fine but for some areas of striking weakness, and of the finest style.

As protekdikos, Basileios was the presiding cleric of the tribunal of priests of Hagia Sophia, known as the ekdikoi. As chartoularios he was assistant to the patriarch of Constantinopolis.
1 commentsGert
00710-Basiliscus_.JPG
Basiliscus 31 viewsBasiliscus Tremissis
15 mm 1.47 gm
O: D N bASILIS—CUS P P AVG
Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Basiliscus right.
R: VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM
Victory walking to front, head left, holding crown with depending ties and globus cruciger, star in lower right field, CONOB in exergue.
Koffy
basiliscus_tremisse_Ric_3310_Milano.jpg
Basiliscus91 viewstremissis
Milano Ric 3310
1 commentsantvwala
basili D.jpg
Basiliscus - Solidus94 viewsBasiliscus & Marcus AV Solidus. Constantinople mint, 475-476 AD. D N BASILISCI ET MARC P AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, & cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear & shield / VICTORIA AVGGG I, Victory standing left, holding long jeweled cross; star in right field, CONOB in ex.
RIC 1024 . Rare.
1 commentsTanit
115.jpg
Basiliscus AE467 viewsRIC X 1014 Constantinople
0.94 g, 10 mm
D N bASIL........AVG Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust r.
Basiliscus monogram within wreath
KOC in exergue
R2
2 commentsMark Z2
1700.jpg
BASILISCUS and MARC.90 viewsAV solidus. Constantinople 475-476 AD. 4,49 grs. Pearl-diademed, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear and shield . D N bASILISCI ET MARC P AVC / Victory standing left, holding long jewelled cross. Star in right field. VICTORI-A AVGGG. CONOB in exergue.
Officina delta.

benito
Basiliscus_and_Marcus_nummus_RIC_X_1032-1033.jpg
Basiliscus and Marcus (RIC X 1032-1033)20 viewsBasiliscus (-476/7) Eastern Roman Emperor (475-476), joint rule with his son Marcus. Æ Nummus. Constantinople or Nicomedia mint. Obverse: diademed bust right, (D N bASIL) ET MAR (P AVG). Reverse: Two emperors nimbate enthroned facing, holding globe in right hand. RIC X 1032-3 (R3, R4).Jan
Basiliscus_and_Marcus_ab.jpg
Basiliscus and Marcus (RIC X 1034)81 viewsBasiliscus (-476/7) Eastern Roman Emperor (475-476), joint rule with his son Marcus. Æ (9 mm, 1.04 g), Cyzicus. Obverse: bust right, (D N bASIL) ET MAR (P AVG). Reverse: monogram of Basiliscus and Marcus. RIC X 1034 (R4).
Jan (jbc)
Basiliscus_MarcusRIC1034.jpg
Basiliscus and Marcus, RIC 103416 viewsDiademed head right, DN[ bASL ET MAR P] AV
Monogram of Basiliscus and Marcus
AE4, 13.5mm, 2.12g
Constantinople Mint

Light encrustations on the obverse. Circular scratch in field to right on monogram.
Found in a lot of uncleaned byzantine coins!
novacystis
Basiliscus-RIC1034.JPG
Basiliscus, RIC 103425 viewsDiademed head right, [DN] bASL E[T MAR P AV]
Monogram of Basiliscus and Marcus
AE4, 10mm, 0.93g
Constantinople Mint

Although somewhat off center, parts of - bASL E - are clear on the obverse. The face is complete but the bust is off flan. The monogram of Basiliscus and Marcus is also clear with the top of the S off flan and the loop of the b weakly struck.

Found in a lot of uncleaned coins.
1 commentsnovacystis
basilisco_tremisse.jpg
Basiliscus, tremissis, Constantinople50 viewsantvwala
w2019.jpg
Bow222 viewsSyria, Seleucid Kings, Seleucos II., 246-226 B.C. AE-17 mm, 3.98 grs. AV: Head of Herakles in a lionskin to right. Round CM: Bow. RV: BASILEWS / SELEUKOY either side of Apollo sitting on Omphalos to left, holding bow and arrow. Collection: Mueller.Automan
Venta Silurum remains - Forum.jpg
Britain, Caerwent, Venta Silurum, 10, Forum42 viewsVenta Silurum (modern village of Caerwent, Wales, UK) was a Roman city founded sometime after A.D. 75.
The site is open to the public to walk round.

At the central area of the Roman town was the forum with a surrounding marketplace, civic hall and large basilica (80m x 56m).
maridvnvm
Basil_II___Constantine_VIII.jpg
Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A3, Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 11 November 1028 A.D.134 viewsBronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, class A3; SBCV 1818; Grierson ornaments 24a, gVF, well centered, excellent portrait detail but nose a bit flat, attractive toned bare metal, a few scratches, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, weight 9.833g, maximum diameter 27.5mm, die axis 180o, c. 1023 - 11 Nov 1028 A.D.; obverse + EMMANOVHL, facing nimbate bust of Christ, two pellets in each arm of the cross, pallium and colobium, holding gospels with both hands, to left IC, to right XC; reverse + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings), ornaments above and below legend;

The emperor's name and portrait are not part of the design on the Byzantine types referred to as anonymous folles. Instead of the earthly king, these coins depict Jesus Christ, King of Kings.

FORVM Ancient Coins.

*A spectacular artistic portrait of Christ.
The Sam Mansourati Collection.
2 commentsSam
IMG_20180527_103151.jpg
Byzantine Empire16 viewsAE1 969 - 976 CE

Obverse: Christ facing with book of Gospels, + EMMANOVHA IX-XC.

Reverse: +IhSvS
XRISTvS
bASILEv
bASILE
(Jesus Christ king of kings)
Pericles J2
CHERSONESE_AB.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE - Basil I 27 viewsBYZANTINE EMPIRE -- Basil I (867-886 AD) AE 19 mm Cherson Mint. Large B on exergual line / Cross floriate on three steps, dot on each side. SB 1717; DO 20.dpaul7
CHERSONESE_B.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE - Basil I 27 viewsBYZANTINE EMPIRE -- Basil I (867-886 AD) AE 17 mm Cherson Mint. Large B on exergual line / Cross floriate on two steps, dot on each side. SB 1719; DO 20.dpaul7
constantine viii.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE - BASIL II & CONSTANTINE VIII184 viewsAnonymous follis class A2 Christ & 4 lines legend Attributed to the reign of Basil II & Constantine VIII. Obv.: Bust of Christ, facing, Wearing nimbus and holding book with Gospels. Rev.: Legend in four lines. Ref.: D. Sear. Byzantine coins and their values. p. 376 1813. 29 mm, 12.78 g. dpaul7
BASIL II & CONST 8.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE - Basil II & Constantine VIII85 viewsBASIL II & CONSTANTINE VIII Join Reign (1023-1028) Class A2 anonymous follis. +EMMANOVHA IX-XC, Nimbate bust of Christ holding book of gospels / +IhSUS / XRISTUS / bASILEU / bASILE in four lines, adornments above & below. Ornamentation #40.dpaul7
CONST VII & ROMANUS II.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE - Constantine VII & Romanus II125 viewsJoint Reign of Constantine VII (913-959) & Romanus II (945-963) -- AE Follis minted between 945 and 959. Obv: Constantine VII facing, bearded, wearing modified loros and crown with cross, globus cruciger in left, akakia in right "+ COnST bASIL ROM". Rev: Legend in four lines - "+ COnSt / EnQEO bA / SILEVS R / OmEOn" (Constantine King of the Romans);. Constantinople min Ref: D. Sear Byzantine coins and their value, p. 339, 1761, 6.01 g. Berk 930. dpaul7
leo_vi_const.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE - Leo VI94 viewsBYZANTINE EMPIRE - Leo VI (28 August AD 886 to 11 May AD 912) AE Follis. Obv: LEON bASILEVS ROMI - Facing bust wearing crown and robes. Rev: + LEON/ EheEObA/ SILEVS-R/ OMEOn. Constantinople mint. Sear Byzantine coins and their value, p. 331, 1729 , 6.78 g. 1 commentsdpaul7
LEO VI.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE - LEO VI (THE WISE)80 viewsAE Follis - Leo VI (886-912). Constantinople Mint. Legend: LEON BASILEVS ROMI/LEON EhthEObA SILEVS ROMEON1 commentsdpaul7
byz_BASIL_I_SEAR_1720.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE -- Basil I 13 viewsBYZANTINE EMPIRE -- Basil I (867-886 AD) AE 13 - Large B standing on exergual line; cross to right. Rev.: Large Π, crosses left & right. Reference: Sear #1720.dpaul7
BYZ_BASIL_I_SEAR_1719_2.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE -- Basil I30 viewsBYZANTINE EMPIRE -- Basil I (867-886 AD) AE 17 mm Cherson Mint. Large B on exergual line / Cross floriate on two steps, dot on each side. SB 1719; DO 20.1 commentsdpaul7
Christ_,_Basil_II_and_Constantine_VIII.png
Byzantine Empire / Basil II. And Constantine VIII.62 viewsAnonymous AE of Christ 976 - 1025 AD , uncertain mint.
Obverse : + Emma NOVHL / IC - XC, Christ bust.

Reverse : + IhSVS / XRISTVS / BASILEV / BASILE, top & Below vegetal ornament.

Ch VF ,10.14 gr 28.5 mm

Sear 1813
4 commentsSam
Screenshot_2016-05-24_10_06_45.png
Byzantine Empire, Basil II, AE Follis. Added to the Coinproject site.14 viewsConstantinople 976-1028 A.D. 16.85g - 33mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: IC-XC to left and right of bust of Christ, facing, with nimbate cross behind head, holding book of gospels, dots in centre of book's border, o in each limb of the cross.

Rev: IhSUS XRISTUS bASILEU bASILE - Legend in four lines.

SB 1813.
scarli
Screenshot_2019-07-29_13_17_08.png
Byzantine Empire, John I Tzimisces, AR Miliaresion. Provenance: Dr. Serop Simonian.12 viewsConstantinople 969-976 A.D. 2.71g - 23.2mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: + IhSUS XRIStUS nICA* / Iw - AN - Cross crosslet on globus above two steps, circular medallion at center containing facing bust of John with short beard, wearing crown and loros, Iw AN across fields, triple border with eight equally spaced dots.

Rev: + IwANN' - En Xw AVtO - CRAT' EVSEb - bASILEVS - RwmAIw' - Legend in five lines, -+- above and beneath, triple border with eight equally spaced dots.

DO 7; SB 1792.
scarli
leo_follis_k.jpg
Byzantine Empire, Leo VI, AD 886-9127 viewsAE follis, 7.1g, 26mm, 6h; Constantinople mint.
Obv.: +LEON bASILEVS ROM; crowned bust facing with short beard, wearing chlamys, holding akakia.
Rev.: +LEON / EN QEO bA / SILEVS R / OMEON
Reference: SB 1729.
Notes: eBay, 10/18/15, wu
John Anthony
Basilikon_k.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE. Andronicus II and Michael IX, AD 1295-132010 viewsAR Basilikon, 22mm, 2.1g, 6h; Mint of Constantinople.
Obv.: IC XC KVREI BOHΘH, Christ enthroned, right hand raised in benediction, large dot either side.
Rev.: ΑVΤΩΚΡΑΤΟ - PΕC PWΜΑION; Andronicus standing left and Michael standing right; holding between them a labarum.
Reference: DOC V part 1.Class VIII.(f) 528-534
From the H8Modern Collection / 17-142-115
John Anthony
Sear-2402.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Andronicus II Palaeologus with Michael IX (1295-1320) AR Basilikon (Sear-2402)37 viewsObv: Christ, bearded and nimbate, seated upon throne without back; right hand raised in benediction; left hand resting on Gospel.
Rev: Full-length figure of Andrionicus II, bearded on left, and Michael IX, beardless on right; between them labarum with circle beneath the plaque, on long shaft ending to base. Andronicus wears stemma, divisition, and jeweled loros of simple type. Michael similarly dressed. Both emperors place free hands upon chest.
SpongeBob
Sear-1708.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Basil I the Macedonian (867-886) AR Miliaresion, Constantinople (Sear-1708)57 viewsObv: IhSЧS XRISτЧS hICA.
Cross potent set on three steps on globe.
Rev: + bASI/ LIOS CЄ/ COnSTAn/TIn PISTV/ bASILIS/ ROMEO.
Legend in 6 lines.
1 commentsSpongeBob
Sear-1709.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Basil I the Macedonian (867-886) Follis, Constantinople (Sear-1709)38 viewsObv: bASILIOS bASILEVS.
Emperor seated facing, wearing crown and loros, holding labarum and akakia.
Rev: bASIL / IOS Eh ΘΕΟ / bASILEVS / ROmEOn.
Legend in 4 lines.
SpongeBob
Sear-1709(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Basil I the Macedonian (867-886) Follis, Constantinople (Sear-1709)14 views Obv: bASILIOS bASILEVS; Emperor seated facing, wearing crown and loros, holding labarum and akakia.
Rev: bASIL / IOS Eh ΘΕΟ / bASILEVS / ROmEOn; Legend in 4 lines.

ex Prue Morgan Fitts Collection; ex Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 355, 15 July 2015, Lot 699
Quant.Geek
Sear-1719.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Basil I the Macedonian (867-886) Æ Follis, Cherson (Sear-1719)29 viewsObv: Large B
Rev: Cross crosslet on two steps; • to either side.
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Sear-1719(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Basil I the Macedonian (867-886) Æ Follis, Cherson (Sear-1719)10 viewsObv: Large B
Rev: Cross crosslet on two steps; • to either side
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Sear-1721.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Basil I the Macedonian (867-886) Æ Follis, Constantinople (Sear 1721; DOC III 8b)21 viewsObv: + ЬASILIOSSCOҺST' AЧGG; Two busts facing, Basil to left, bearded, Constantine to right, smaller, beardless, each wearing chlamys and crown with cross, holding between them by their right hands a labarum ornamented with ⁛ and streamers
Rev: + ЬASIL / SCOҺSTAҺ / TIҺOSЄҺΘO / ЬASILSЄISR / OMAOҺ in five lines
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Sear-1712.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Basil I the Macedonian (867-886) Æ Follis, Constantinople (Sear-1712; DOC-11)24 viewsObv: Crowned facing half-length figures of Basil, wearing loros and holding akakia, flanked by Leo and Constantine, each wearing chlamys
Rev: + ЬASIL / COҺSTAҺ / T S LЄOҺ ЄҺ / ΘO ЬASILS / ROMЄOҺ in five lines; ✷ below
SpongeBob
Sear-1810.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Basil II Bulgaroktonos with Constantine VIII (977-989 CE) AR Miliaresion, Constantinople (Sear-1810; DOC 17)38 viewsObv: Cross crosslet, with X at intersection, on base, globus, and four steps. In field left, facing bust of Basil, bearded, wearing loros and crown with cross and pendilia. In field right, facing bust of Constantine, beardless, wearing chlamys and crown with cross and pendilia. Triple linear border
Rev: with ornament above and beneath. Triple linear border
2 commentsSpongeBob
Sear-1760.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus (913-959) Æ Follis, Constantinople (Sear 1760; DOC 25)50 viewsObv: RWMAN bASILEVS RWM; Crowned, bearded, facing bust of Romanus, wearing chlamys, holding labarum and cross on globe
Rev: RWMA - N EN QEW bA - SILEVS RW-MAIWN; Legend in four lines
1 commentsSpongeBob
Sear-1730.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Leo VI the Wise (886-912) Follis, Constantinople (Sear-1730)55 viewsObv: Leo VI and Alexander, each crowned and wearing loros, seated facing on double throne, holding labarum between them. Legend around - + LEOn S ALEXAnGROS.
Rev: Legend in four lines - + LEOn S ALEXAnGROS bASIL' ROmEOn
1 commentsSpongeBob
Sear-1730(2).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Leo VI the Wise (886-912) Follis, Constantinople (Sear-1730)8 viewsObv: Leo VI and Alexander, each crowned and wearing loros, seated facing on double throne, holding labarum between them. Legend around - + LEOn S ALEXAnGROS.
Rev: Legend in four lines - + LEOn S ALEXAnGROS bASIL' ROmEOn
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Sear-1730(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Leo VI the Wise (886-912) Follis, Constantinople (Sear-1730; DOC 6)11 viewsObv: Leo VI and Alexander, each crowned and wearing loros, seated facing on double throne, holding labarum between them. Legend around - + LEOn S ALEXAnGROS.
Rev: Legend in four lines - + LEOn S ALEXAnGROS bASIL' ROmEOn

ex Prue Morgan Fitts Collection; ex Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 355, 15 July 2015, Lot 701
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Sear-1616.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Michael I Rhangabe (811-813) AR Miliaresion, Constantinople (Sear 1616; DOC 3)20 viewsObv: IhSЧS XRIS-tЧS ҺICA; Cross potent on three steps; triple border
Rev: +MIXA/HL S ΘЄOFV/LACtЄ ЄC Θ'/ bASILIS RO/mAIOҺ legend in five lines; triple border
Dim: 2.16 g
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Sear-1617.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Michael I Rhangabe (811-813) Æ Follis, Constantinople (Sear 1617; DOC 7, attributed to Michael II)22 viewsObv: mIXAHL bASILЄ; Crowned facing bust, wearing loros, holding globus cruciger and scepter
Rev: Large M between X/X/X and N/N/N; cross above; A below
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Sear-1641.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Michael II the Amorian (820-829) AR Miliaresion, Constantinople (Sear 1641; DOC 6)5 viewsObv: IhSЧS XRIS-tЧS ҺICA; Cross potent on three steps; triple border
Rev: +MIXA/HL S ΘЄOFI/LЄ ЄC ΘЄЧ/ bASILIS RO/mAIOҺ legend in five lines; triple border
Dim: 2.07 g
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Sear-1693.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Michael III "the Drunkard" (842-867) Æ Follis, Constantinople (Sear 1693; DOC 8)17 viewsObv: +miҺAЄL IMPЄRAT'; Crowned facing bust of Michael, holding patriarchal cross on globus and akakia
Rev: +ЬASIL-IЧS REX ✳; Crowned facing bust of Basil, holding patriarchal cross on globus and akakia
Dim: 25mm, 6.06g
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Sear-1781.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Nicephorus II Phocas (963-969), Miliaresion, Constantinople (Sear-1781)66 viewsObv: + IhSVS XRI-STVS nICA *.
Cross crosslet set on globus above two steps; in central medallion, crowned bust of Nicephorus facing.
Rev: + nICHF´ / En X·W AVTO/CRAT´ EVSEb´ / bASILEVS / RWmAIW´.
Legend in five lines.
4 commentsSpongeBob
Sear-1667.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Theophilus (829-842) Æ Follis, Constantinople (Sear-1667)44 viewsObv: ΘEOFIL bASIL Three-quarter length figure facing, wearing loros and crown surmounted by tufa, holding labarum and globus cruciger.
Rev: + ΘEOFILE AVGOVSTE SV hICAS. Legend in 4 lines.
1 commentsSpongeBob
Sear-1667(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Theophilus (829-842) Æ Follis, Constantinople (Sear-1667; DOC 15a)21 viewsObv: ΘEOFIL bASIL Three-quarter length figure facing, wearing loros and crown surmounted by tufa, holding labarum and globus cruciger.
Rev: + ΘEOFILE AVGOVSTE SV hICAS. Legend in 4 lines.
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Sear-1667(3).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Theophilus (829-842) Æ Follis, Constantinople (Sear-1667; DOC 15a)9 viewsObv: ΘEOFIL bASIL Three-quarter length figure facing, wearing loros and crown surmounted by tufa, holding labarum and globus cruciger.
Rev: + ΘEOFILE AVGOVSTE SV hICAS. Legend in 4 lines.
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Sear-1667(2).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Theophilus (829-842) Æ Follis, Constantinople (Sear-1667; DOC 15a)11 viewsObv: ΘEOFIL bASIL Three-quarter length figure facing, wearing loros and crown surmounted by tufa, holding labarum and globus cruciger.
Rev: + ΘEOFILE AVGOVSTE SV hICAS. Legend in 4 lines.
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Sear-1813(2).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Æ Anonymous Class A2-31 Follis, Constantinople (Sear 1813) - Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025)17 viewsObv: +ЄMMA-NOVHΛ; IC-XC to right and left of bust of Christ facing, holding book of gospels, with nimbus
Rev: +IҺSЧS / XRISTЧS / ЬASILЄЧ / ЬASILЄ in four lines
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Sear-1813(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Æ Anonymous Class A2-32 Follis, Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025), Constantinople (Sear 1813; Sommer-40.2.7)17 viewsObv: +ЄMMA-NOVHΛ; IC-XC to right and left of bust of Christ facing with nimbate cross behind head, 🞢 in each limb of nimbus cross, holding book of gospels, a 🞢 on the center of book
Rev: + IҺSЧS / XRISTЧS / ЬASILЄЧ / ЬASILЄ in four lines; above and below, 🞢 between two pellets
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Sear-1813a.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Æ Anonymous Class A2-40b Follis, Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025), Constantinople Mint (Sear-1813, Sommer-40.2.7)79 viewsObv: + EMMA NOVHΛ IC - XC.
Bust of Christ facing, holding book of gospels, with nimbus. Cross on book of gospels; cross in each arm of gospel.

Rev: + IhSYS/ XRISTYS/ bASILEY/ bASILE.
Legend in four lines.
2 commentsSpongeBob
Sear-1813(5).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Æ Anonymous Class A2-41 Follis, Constantinople (Sear 1813) - Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025)15 viewsObv: +ЄMMA-NOVHΛ; IC-XC to right and left of bust of Christ facing, holding book of gospels, with nimbus
Rev: +IҺSЧS / XRISTЧS / ЬASILЄЧ / ЬASILЄ in four lines
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Sear-1818.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Æ Anonymous Class A3 Follis, Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VIII (ca. 1020-1028) Constantinople Mint (Sear-1818; DOC A2.16)31 viewsObv: Facing bust of Christ Pantokrator
Rev: + IҺSЧS / XRISTЧS / ЬASILЄЧ / ЬASILЄ in four lines; above and below, Λ between two pellets
SpongeBob
Sear-1836.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Æ Anonymous Class D Follis, Attributed to Constantine IX (1042-1055), (Sear-1836)94 viewsObv: IC - XC.
Christ seated facing on throne with back, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium and colobium, and holding book of Gospels with both hands.
Rev: IS XS / bASILE / bASIL.
Legend in 3 lines.
2 commentsSpongeBob
Sear-1855.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Æ Anonymous Class E Follis, Attributed to Constantine X (1059-1067) (Sear-1855)39 viewsObv: IC - XC.
Facing bust of Christ with beard and nimbus cruciger, wearing pallium and colobium, raising hand in benediction and holding Book of Gospels.
Rev: IS XS / bASILE / bASIL'.
Legend in 3 lines.
SpongeBob
133.JPG
BYZANTINE, Andronicus II and Michael IX 1295-1320 Constantinople53 viewsSilver Basilikon
Obv: Christ Enthroned
Rev: Emperors Standing with Labarum Between Them
1.94g
Sear 2402
Laetvs
Picture_1~5.png
BYZANTINE, ANONYMOUS FOLLIS27 viewsANONYMOUS COINAGE-OBV-Æ Follis, Class B, Obv. ΕΜΜΑΝΟΥΗΛ Bust of Christ facing. IC/XC in field. Rev. IhSuS / bASILEu / bASILE about cross on three steps. Struck over class A2 follis. 7.3gm, 28mm. BCV 1823.jessvc1
Anonim-Follis_AE-28_SB-1818_Q-001_10_30g.jpg
Byzantine, Anonymous Follis, SB 1813, AE-Follis, Class A2/F39type, (Constantine VIII. (976-1025 A.D.)), 405 viewsAnonymous Follis, SB 1813, AE-Follis, Class A2/F39type, (Constantine VIII. (976-1025 A.D.)), #1
Class A2, attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII.
averse: +ЄMMA NOVHΛ, IC-XC, Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
reverse: +IhSyS / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings".
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 27,5mm, weight: 10,30g, axis: h,
mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences., date: 976-1025 CE, ref:SB 1813, Class A2/F39type,
Q-001
5 commentsquadrans
Imitation-Barbar_Anonim-Follis_SB--p-_Q-001_6h_24,5-26,5mm_9,04g-s.jpg
Byzantine, Anonymous Follis, SB ????, AE-Follis, Class A2 (?), (Ancient (Barbar) Imitation), 188 viewsAnonymous Follis, SB ????, AE-Follis, Class A2 (?), (Ancient (Barbar) Imitation),
(Class A2, attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII.)
averse: +ЄMMΔ VOHΛI instead of +ЄMMA NOVHΛ, IC-XC, Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
reverse: +IhSyS / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings", all S are "revers" !!!
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 24,5-26,6mm, weight: 9,04g, axis: 6h,
mint: Ancient (Barbar) Imitation., date: ??? A.D., ref: SB ???,
Q-001
quadrans
BYZ-Basil_I-3~0.jpg
BYZANTINE, Basil I the Macedonian with Constantine (AD 867-886)96 viewsAR Miliaresion Constantinople
AD 868-879
3.01 grams
Sear 1708
Obv.: IhSUS XRISTUS NICA, cross potent on three steps, globe beneath, triple border
Rev.: +bASI/ LIOS CE/ CONSTAN/ TIN' PISTV/ bASILIS/ ROMEO' in six lines, triple border
1 commentsRichard M10
Sear-1813.jpg
BYZANTINE, Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025). Æ Anonymous Class A2 Follis, (Sear-1813, Sommer-40.2.7)309 viewsObv: + EMMA NOVHΛ IC - XC.
Bust of Christ facing, holding book of gospels, with nimbus. Cross on book of gospels; cross in each arm of gospel.

Rev: + IhSYS/ XRISTYS/ bASILEY/ bASILE.
Legend in four lines.

Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025).

Classified as Class A2-32 using Ornamentation Classification Table.
1 commentsSpongeBob
A2.JPG
BYZANTINE, Basil II 976-1026 Class A2 Anonymous Follis333 viewsObv: Bust of Christ
Rev: +IhSUS / XRISTUS / bASILEU / bASILE, Ornament Above and Below
Sear 1813
2 commentsLaetvs
Basil II the Bulgarslayer.jpg
BYZANTINE, Basil II the Bulgarslayer, AV Histamenon, Constantinopolis170 views548. Basile II le Bulgarochtone (976-1025), AV histamenon, 1001-1005 (?), Constantinople.
Obv : B. du Christ nimbé de face, bénissant et tenant les Evangiles. Trois groupes de sept globules dans les bras de la croix.
Rev : B. de Basile et de Constantin de face, tenant entre eux une croix patriarcale. Manus Dei au-dessus de la tête de Basile.
Ref.: S., 1798; R., 1941; B.N. 13; D.O. 4a.
4,23gm, Rare.

Under Basil, the empire expanded in all directions. He conquered Bulgaria, as his name suggests, and recovered Antioch from the Arabs.
goldcoin
Basil_II___Constantine_VIII_-_Christ-.jpg
Byzantine, Christ, Anonymous Folles. temp. Basil II & Constantine VIII, circa 976-1025. 481 viewsÆ Follis (28mm, 12.04 g, 6h). Class A2. Constantinople mint. Nimbate half-length bust of Christ facing, holding Gospels / [+] IhSЧ[S]/[X]PISTЧS/[Ь]ASILЄЧ/ЬASILЄ in four lines ( Jesus Christ King of Kings ); rectangular ornament below. DOC A2.47; SB 1813. VF, dark green patina with earthen highlights/deposits, a few cleaning scratches. EX ; The Prue Morgan Fitts Collection.

EX The Sam Mansourati Collection.

*A fine masterpiece of one of the very early portraits of Christ according to Saint Veronica 's Veil.
**The emperor's name and portrait are not part of the design on the Byzantine types referred to as anonymous folles. Instead of the earthly king, these coins depict Jesus Christ, King of Kings.

Given as a Christmas Present to Dear friend , brother and great dentist , Dr. Manuel M. Cunanan .
Sam
Basil_Nomisma.jpg
BYZANTINE, Constantine IX Monomachus, AV Histamenon Nomisma, Struck at Constantinople. A.D.1042 - 105584 viewsObv: +IhS XIS REX REGNANTInm. Christ enthroned facing, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium and colobium, and raising right hand in benediction, in left hand, book of gospels, the whole surrounded by a triple border.
Rev: +cwnstAntn bASILeus Rm. Bust of Constantine IX facing, bearded, wearing crown, loros and sacros, and holding labarum and plain globus cruciger. The whole surrounded by a triple border.
Sear: 1829

These coins are of a thin, spread fabric; usually, but not always, scyphate.
Optimus
B_038_Constantine-VII__Porphyrogenitus_(913-959_A_D_),_SB_1761,_AE-Follis,_Constantinopolis,-Q-002_6h_24-25mm_6,15g-s.jpg
Byzantine, Constantine VII. Porphyrogenitus (913-959 A.D.), SB 1761, AE-Follis, Constantinopolis, #2, double or over struck!150 viewsB 038 Constantine VII. Porphyrogenitus (913-959 A.D.), SB 1761, AE-Follis, Constantinopolis, #2, double or over struck!
avers: CONST bASIL ROM, crowned bust of Constantine facing, with short beard and wearing vertical loros, holding akakia and cross on globe.
reverse: + / CONST / EN QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON, legend in four lines.
exergue: , diameter: 24-25mm, weight: 6,15g, axis: 6h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: SB 1761,
Q-002
quadrans
Byzanz_3.jpg
BYZANTINE, Constantine VIII, Anonymous Follis Class A3, 1025-1028 AD27 viewsConstantine VIII, AE Class 2 anonymous follis. 1025-1028 AD. IC-XC to left and right of bust of Christ, facing, with nimbate cross behind head, holding book of gospels, dotted square in each limb of the cross / IhSUS XRISTUS bASILEU bASILE in four lines. SB 1813.Franz-Josef M
1025_leo_gesamt.jpg
BYZANTINE, Leo VI, AE Follis, AD 886 - 91294 viewsLeo VI, AE Follis, Constantinople.
Obv: LEON bASILEVS ROM, crowned bust facing with short beard, wearing chlamys, holding akakia
Rev: LEON EN QEO BA SILEVS R OMEON legend in four lines.
Sear 1729, DOC 8
Franz-Josef M
B_036_Leo_VI__(the_Wise)_(886-912_A_D_),_AE-Follis,_LEON_bASILEVS_ROM_LEON_EN_QEO_BA_SILEVS_R_OMEON_SB_1729,_Constantinopolis_DOC-8_AD_Q-001_6h_25,5-26mm_6,08gx-s.jpg
Byzantine, Leo VI. the Wise (886-912 A.D.), SB 1729, AE-Follis, Constantinopolis, #1201 viewsB 036 Leo VI. the Wise (886-912 A.D.), SB 1729, AE-Follis, Constantinopolis, #1
avers: LEON bAS ILEVS ROM, Leo, crowned bust facing with short beard, wearing chlamys, holding akakia.
reverse: + / LEOn/ En QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON, legend in four lines.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 25,5-26mm, weight: 6,08g, axis: 6h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: SB 1729,
Q-001
quadrans
romI14.jpg
BYZANTINE, Romanus I Lecapenus A.D.920-944, AE Follis, struck at Constantinople98 viewsObv: +RWmAn bASILEVS RWM. Facing bearded bust of Romanus I, wearing crown and jewelled chlamys, holding labarum and globus cruciger.
Rev: +RWMA/n En θEW bA/SILEVS RW/MAIWn in four lines.
Sear: 1760

Romanus I Lecapenus (A.D.920-944), co-ruled with Constantine VII. Porphyrogenitus (A.D.913-959)
Large quantities of folles of this type appear to have been issued, and are often overstruck on folles of Leo VI.
1 commentsW. Kutschenko
AriarathesV_Kappad_drachm_33.jpg
Cappadocia, Ariarathes V, AR drachm48 viewsAriarathes V. (ca. 163-130 BC), AR drachm, year GL = 33 (= 130 BC); 4.18 g; obverse: Diademed head of Ariarathes V right; reverse: BASILEWS ARIARAQOU EUSEBOUS, Athena standing left, holding Nike & resting hand on grounded shield, PAFI monogram in inner left field, PAR monogram in outer right field, date GL in exergue.

Ex F. R. Künker Auktion 136
1 commentsBartosz A
coin118.JPG
Cappadocia, Caesarea; Gordian III24 viewsCappadocia, Caesarea, Gordian III 238-244 Æ26

The city has been continuously inhabited since perhaps c. 3000 BCE[citation needed] with the establishment of the ancient trading colony at Kultepe (Ash Mountain) which is associated with the Hittites. The city has always been a vital trade centre as it is located on major trade routes, particularly along what was called the Great Silk Road. Kültepe, one of the oldest cities in Asia Minor, lies nearby.

As Mazaca, the city served as the residence of the kings of Cappadocia. In ancient times, it was on the crossroads of the trade routes from Sinope to the Euphrates and from the Persian Royal Road that extended from Sardis to Susa. In Roman times, a similar route from Ephesus to the East also crossed the city.

The city stood on a low spur on the north side of Mount Erciyes (Mount Argaeus in ancient times). Only a few traces of the ancient site survive in the old town. The city was the centre of a satrapy under Persian rule until it was conquered by Perdikkas, one of the generals of Alexander the Great when it became the seat of a transient satrapy by another of Alexander's former generals, Eumenes of Cardia. The city was subsequently passed to the Seleucid empire after the battle of Ipsus but became once again the centre of an autonomous Greater Cappadocian kingdom under Ariarathes III of Cappadocia in around 250 BC. In the ensuing period, the city came under the sway of Hellenistic influence, and was given the Greek name of Eusebia in honor of the Cappadocian king Ariarathes V Eusebes Philopator of Cappadocia (163–130 BCE). Under the new name of Caesarea, by which it has since been known, given to it by the last Cappadocian King Archelaus[5] or perhaps by Tiberius,[6] the city passed under formal Roman rule in 17 BCE.
Walls of the Seljuk era Sahabiye Medresesi, built in 1267 by the Seljuk vizier Sahip Ata Fahreddin Ali.

Caesarea was destroyed by the Sassanid king Shapur I after his victory over the Emperor Valerian I in AD 260. At the time it was recorded to have around 400,000 inhabitants. The city gradually recovered, and became home to several early Christian saints: saints Dorothea and Theophilus the martyrs, Gregory of Nazianzus, Gregory of Nyssa and Basil of Caesarea.

Obv: Laureate bust of Gordian, right.
Rev: Agalma of Mount Argaeus set on altar. Year 243 AD
ecoli
Antiochus.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII70 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Houghton II 655 (same dies), SNG Spaer -, Newell SMA -, gVF, weight 16.157g, maximum diameter 28.8mm, die axis 0o, posthumous, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; obverse diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border; reverse BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU, Athena standing left, Nike in right, spear and shield in left, ligate DI / A left, A inner left, G inner right, Nike crowns epithet, laurel wreath border; scarce;

Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian King Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII.

Ex Houghton collection
Ex Forum
1 commentsPhiloromaos
Cappadocian_Kingdom_1c_img.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom, Drachm, Ariarathes VIII 21 viewsSilver Drachm
Obv:– Diademed head of Ariarathes VIII right
Rev:– BASILEWS ARIARAQOU EPIFANES, Athena standing left, holding Nike and leaning on shield, T to left
Kingdom of Cappadocia. 101-100 B.C.
Reference:– BMC 2
maridvnvm
Cappadocian_Kingdom_1b_img.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom, Drachm, Ariobarzanes I 25 viewsSilver Drachm
Obv:– Diademed head of the Ariobarzanes I right
Rev:– BASILEWS ARIOBARZANOY FOLORWMAIOY, Athena standing left holding Nike, spear & shield resting on ground to right, GA monogram to left
Kingdom of Cappadocia. 95-63 B.C.
Reference:– BMC 3
maridvnvm
Cappadocian Kingdom 1a img.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom, Tetradrachm, In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII59 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:– Diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border.
Rev:– BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU, Athena standing left, Nike in right, spear and shield in left, ligate DI / A left, Nike extends wreath into laurel wreath border
c. 130 - 80 B.C.; In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII, 138 - 129 B.C.
Ref:– Houghton II 642 (same dies), SNG Spaer 1855, Newell SMA 282

Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian king Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII.

Grey tone.

Ex-Forvm
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Cappadocian_Kingdom_1a_img.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom, Tetradrachm, In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII18 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:– Diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border.
Rev:– BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU, Athena standing left, Nike in right, spear and shield in left, ligate DI / A left, Nike extends wreath into laurel wreath border
c. 130 - 80 B.C.; In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII, 138 - 129 B.C.
Ref:– Houghton II 642 (same dies), SNG Spaer 1855, Newell SMA 282

Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian king Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII.

Grey tone.

Ex-Forvm

Updated image using new photography setup.
maridvnvm
antiochos_VII_tetra.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom/ In the name of Antiochos VII; tetradrachm; Nike20 viewsCappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII, 138 - 129 B.C. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton II 651 ff. (different dies), SNG Spaer -, Newell SMA -, VF, grainy, 15.919g, 29.4mm, 0o, posthumous, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; obverse diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border; reverse “BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU”, Athena standing left, Nike in right, spear and shield in left, ligate “DI” / A left, ligate “OD” inner left, K inner right, Nike crowns epithet, laurel wreath border. Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian King Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII. Ex FORVMPodiceps
23712_cappadocia__antiochos_VII_tetratetradrachm,_Houghton_II_644.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom/ In the name of Antiochos VII; tetradrachm; Nike15 viewsCappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII, 138 - 129 B.C. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton II 644 (same dies), SNG Spaer 1855, Newell SMA 282, VF, toned, 16.302g, 29.6mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border; reverse “BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU”, Athena standing left holding Nike, spear and shield, “DI” monogram above A left, Nike extends wreath into laurel wreath border. Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian King Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Cappodocian_Kingdom_AR_Drachm__18mm__3_71g__under_Ariarathes_IX_Eusebes__101-87.jpg
Cappodocian Kingdom AR Drachm 18mm 3.71g under Ariarathes IX Eusebes 101-87 BC. 40 viewsO: His young diademed hd r.
R: Athena stg l. holding Nike in r. hand, spear + shield in l., BASILEWS/ARIARATHOY to r./l., EVSEBOVS below.
SG7297v(date). _2050
Antonivs Protti
A2-001.jpg
Class = A2 [001]67 views16.01 grams
35.65 mm
Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025)
DOC: 6
1 commentscmcdon0923
A2-003.JPG
Class = A2 [003]29 views19.26 grams
33.0 mm
Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025)
DOC: 14
flip over double strike; traces of reverse legend obscure Christ's face
cmcdon0923
A3_002.JPG
Class = A3 [001]50 views8.88 grams
26.48 mm
Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025)
DOC: 24a
"Manus Dei" die break above head
cmcdon0923
A3_003.JPG
Class = A3 [002]30 views8.88 grams
24.9 mm
Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025)
DOC: 24
cmcdon0923
A3_004.JPG
Class = A3 [003]38 views8.46 grams
27.48 mm
Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025)
DOC: 24
cmcdon0923
A3_001.JPG
Class = A3 [004]26 views16.0 grams
26.87 mm
Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025)
DOC: 41
cmcdon0923
A3_005.JPG
Class = A3 [005]25 views11.53 grams
29.0 mm
Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025)
DOC: 41 (?)
cmcdon0923
A3_006.JPG
Class = A3 [006]22 views9.16 grams
28 x 25 mm
Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025)
DOC: 32
cmcdon0923
A3_008.JPG
Class = A3 [008]22 views14.42 grams
30.73 mm
Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025)
DOC: 40
cmcdon0923
A3_009.JPG
Class = A3 [009]26 views10.34 grams
29.5 mm
Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025)
DOC: 45
cmcdon0923
A3_010.jpg
Class = A3 [010]19 views6.57 grams
24.9 mm
Attributed to Basil II & Constantine VII (976-1025)
DOC: poss. 22 or 29 (ornamentation on Bible indistinct)
cmcdon0923
Class_A1_Anonymous_follis,_SBCV.JPG
Class A1 Anonymous follis, SBCV 179317 views+EMMANOVHΛ
Facing, nimbate bust of Christ with two pellets in limbs of Cross, IC XC to sides in fields
+IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE in four lines
AE follis, 29mm, 3.94g


Struck on ragged square flan
novacystis
s1793.jpg
Class A1 follis, Sear 179310 viewsClass A1 Anonymous Follis. 9,6g, 29mm. EMMANOVHA, IC-XC in field, Christ facing with book of Gospels / IHSUS / XRISTYS / BASILEY / BASILE in four lines, no adornments above or below. Sear 1793.Podiceps
sb1793classA125mm599gdh.jpg
Class A1, sb1793 attributed to the reign of John I (969- 976 CE)109 viewsOBVERSE: +EMMANOVHA. Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cr. (two pellets in each limb of cross), pallium and colobium, and holding book of Gospels (cover ornamented with pellet in border of dots) with both hands. IC; to r., XC barred.
Reverse: +IhSUS/XRISTUS/bASILEU/bASILE four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 969-976 CE
SB 1793 Class A1
25mm, 5.99g
-
These have smaller thin flans and are frequently overstruck on folles of Nicephorus II or Constantine VII, They lack the ornaments above and below the reverse inscription which characterize the succeeding class.
wileyc
sb1793classA125mm530g.jpg
Class A1, sb1793 attributed to the reign of John I (969- 976 CE)17 viewsOBVERSE: +EMMANOVHA. Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cr. (two pellets in each limb of cross), pallium and colobium, and holding book of Gospels (cover ornamented with pellet in border of dots) with both hands. IC; to r., XC barred.
Reverse: +IhSUS/XRISTUS/bASILEU/bASILE four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 969-976 CE
SB 1793 Class A1
25mm, 5.30g
-
These have smaller thin flans and are frequently overstruck on folles of Nicephorus II or Constantine VII, They lack the ornaments above and below the reverse inscription which characterize the succeeding class.
wileyc
sb1793classA124mm505.jpg
Class A1, sb1793 attributed to the reign of John I (969- 976 CE)24 viewsOBVERSE: +EMMANOVHA. Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cr. (two pellets in each limb of cross), pallium and colobium, and holding book of Gospels (cover ornamented with pellet in border of dots) with both hands. IC; to r., XC barred.
Reverse: +IhSUS/XRISTUS/bASILEU/bASILE four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 969-976 CE
SB 1793 Class A1
24mm, 5.05g
-
These have smaller thin flans and are frequently overstruck on folles of Nicephorus II or Constantine VII, They lack the ornaments above and below the reverse inscription which characterize the succeeding class.
wileyc
sb1793_classA1_26mm_500g.jpg
Class A1, sb1793 attributed to the reign of John I (969- 976 CE)10 viewsOBVERSE: +EMMANOVHA. Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cr. (two pellets in each limb of cross), pallium and colobium, and holding book of Gospels (cover ornamented with pellet in border of dots) with both hands. IC; to r., XC barred.
Reverse: +IhSUS/XRISTUS/bASILEU/bASILE four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 969-976 CE
SB 1793 Class A1
26mm, 5.00g
-
These have smaller thin flans and are frequently overstruck on folles of Nicephorus II or Constantine VII, They lack the ornaments above and below the reverse inscription which characterize the succeeding class.
wileyc
coins300.JPG
Class A2 anonymous follis14 viewsClass A2 anonymous follis. +EMMANOVHA IX-XC, Nimbate bust of Christ holding book of gospels / +IhSUS / XRISTUS / bASILEU / bASILE in four lines, adornments above & below.

Check
ecoli
coin311.JPG
Class A2 anonymous follis26 viewsClass A2 anonymous follis. +EMMANOVHA IX-XC, Nimbate bust of Christ holding book of gospels / +IhSUS / XRISTUS / bASILEU / bASILE in four lines, adornments above & below.

Check
ecoli
sb1813classA234mm1246g.jpg
Class A2, sb1813 attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII, 976-1025 CE15 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1813 Class A2
34mm, 12.46g
wileyc
sb1813classA233mm1566gjpg.jpg
Class A2, sb1813 attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII, 976-1025 CE14 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1813 Class A2
33mm, 15.66g
wileyc
sb1813classA230mm1456g.jpg
Class A2, sb1813 attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII, 976-1025 CE18 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1813 Class A2
30mm, 14.56g
wileyc
sb1813classA228mm1480g.jpg
Class A2, sb1813 attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII, 976-1025 CE22 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1813 Class A2
28mm, 14.80g
wileyc
ab1813classA228mm1207g.jpg
Class A2, sb1813 attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII, 976-1025 CE19 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1823 Class A2
28mm, 12.07g
wileyc
sb1813classA2.jpg
Class A2, sb1813 attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII, 976-1025 CE12 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1813 Class A2
30mm, 14.48g
wileyc
sb1813classA224mm1509g.jpg
Class A2, sb1813 attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII, 976-1025 CE19 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1813 Class A2
34mm, mm, 15.09g
g
wileyc
sb1818_40b_32mm_13_96g.jpg
Class A2, sb1813 attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII, 976-1025 CE15 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1813 Class A2
32mm, 13.96g
wileyc
sb1813_orn_47_28mm8_81g.jpg
Class A2, sb1813 attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII, 976-1025 CE12 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Ornamentation #47
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1813 Class A2
28mm, 8.81g
Clipped
wileyc
sb1813_40b_30mm_14_59gjpg.jpg
Class A2, sb1813 attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII, 976-1025 CE24 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1813 Class A2
orn-40b
30mm, 14.59g
wileyc
sb1813_29mm_1342g_.jpg
Class A2, sb1813 attributed to joint reign of Basil II and Constantine VIII, 976-1025 CE19 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1813 Class A2
29mm, 13.42gg
wileyc
ANONB-1-BYZANT.jpg
Class A3 Anonymous12 views(Attributed to Basil II and Const. VIII)
AE Follis
Constantinople mint, 1023-1028 A.D.
26mm, 8.99g
BCV- 1818

Obverse:
+EMMANOVHA
IC XC
Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium and colobium, and holding book of gospels.

Reverse:
+IhSuS
XRISTuS
bASILEu
bASILE
rubadub
Class_A3_Anonymous_follis,_SBCV.JPG
Class A3 Anonymous follis, SBCV 181812 views+EMMANOVHΛ
Facing, nimbate bust of Christ with four pellets around globule in limbs of Cross, IC XC to sides in fields
+IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE in four lines
AE follis, 29mm, 12.54g
novacystis
coin403.jpg
Class A3 Anonymous follis. c1020-1030. 51 viewsClass A3 Anonymous follis. c1020-1030.
+EMMANOVHA IX-XC, facing bust of nimbate
Christ, holding the Gospels in both hands /
+IhSUS XRISTUS bASILEU IASILE,
in four lines. Coin #403
cars100
sb1818classA334mm914g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)15 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
34mm, 9.14g

Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
wileyc
sb1818classA327mm1043g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)16 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
27mm, 10.43g

Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
wileyc
sb1818classA330mm1013g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)7 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
30mm, 10.13g

Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
wileyc
sb1818classA330mm1097g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)10 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
30mm, 10.97g

Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
wileyc
sb1818classA36mm961g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)23 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
36mm, 9.61gg

Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
1 commentswileyc
sb1818classA328mm1126gjpg.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)27 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
28mm, 11.26g

Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
1 commentswileyc
sb1818classA329mm1017g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)27 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
29mm, 10.17g

Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
1 commentswileyc
sb1818classA330mm776g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)27 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
30mm, 7.76g

Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
1 commentswileyc
sb1818classA329mm1035g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)16 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
29mm, 10.35g

Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
wileyc
sb1818classA3f3230mm965g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)16 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
ornament cross, cross, cross, Ornamentation style F32
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
30mm, 9.65gg


Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
wileyc
sb1818classA3f4530mm1042g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)11 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
ornament type 45 forum
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
30mm, 10.42g
Ornamentation style F45

Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
wileyc
sb1818classA#f14b28mm1079g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)6 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
28mm, 10.79g

Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
wileyc
sb1818classAf4130mm930g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)9 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
30mm, 9.30g
Ornamentation style F41

Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
wileyc
sb1818classA328mm894g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)18 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
28mm, 8.94gg

Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
wileyc
sb1818_29mm8_41g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)15 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
29mm, 8.41g
Ornamentation style unclear

Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
wileyc
sb1818_30mm984g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)14 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
30mm, 9.84gg
Ornamentation style unclear
wileyc
sb1813_24a_28mm10_09g.jpg
Class A3, sb1818 attributed to Constantine VIII (1025-1028 CE)18 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyB / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines, Greek legend, "Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
Mint: Constantinople though Metclaf states several provincial mints within this group. some with rev legend differences.
Date: 976-1025 CE
SB 1818 Class A3
28mm, 10.09g

Class A3 in this case is presented a a group intermediate in weight between Classes A1 and A3 generally considered around 9-10g. Originally classed by D. M. Metcalf he feels that the weight reduction from Class A2 may have been around 1020 CE. Phillip Grierson with Dumbarton Oaks Catalogue does not separate Class A3 from class A2.
wileyc
ANONB-2-BYZANT.jpg
Class B Anonymous12 views(Attributed to Romanus III)
AE Follis
Constantinople mint, 1028-1034 A.D.
26mm, 4.85g
BCV- 1823

Obverse:
+EMMANOVHA
IC XC
Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium and colobium, and holding book of gospels.

Reverse:
IS XS
bASILE
bASILE
(overstrike on class A2 follis)
+IhSuS
XRISTuS
bASILEu
bASILE
Cross with pellet at each extremity, standing on three steps.
rubadub
ANONB-1-BYZANT~0.jpg
Class B Anonymous12 views(Attributed to Romanus III)
AE Follis
Constantinople mint, 1028-1034 A.D.
26mm, 8.58g
BCV- 1823

Obverse:
+EMMANOVHA
IC XC
Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium and colobium, and holding book of gospels.

Reverse:
IS XS
bASILE
bASILE
Cross with pellet at each extremity, standing on three steps.
rubadub
coin404.jpg
Class B Anonymous follis. 1028-1034 AD. 23 viewsClass B Anonymous follis. 1028-1034 AD. Christ /
Cross with IS \ XS above limbs, bAS-ILE \ bASILE
below limbs. Coin #404
cars100
Class_D_Anonymous_follis_SBCV_1836.JPG
Class D Anonymous follis, SBCV 183636 viewsNo Legend
Christ seated on throne with high back, IC XC to sides in fields
IS XS / bASILE / bASIL in three lines, -+- above, -crescent- below
AE follis, 30mm, 9.70g
Struck under Constantine IX

Well struck on roughly cut flan
novacystis
sb1836classd28mm675g.jpg
Class D follis, sb1836, attributed to Constantine IX (1041-1055 CE)17 viewsObverse: Christ seated facing on throne with back, wearing nimbus cr., pallium and colobium, and holding book of gospels with hands; in field to l., IC and to r., XC both barred..
Reverse: IS XS/bASILE/bASIL in three lines; above -+-
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1042-1055 CE
28mm, 6.75g
SB1836, Class D
wileyc
sb1836classd29mm929g.jpg
Class D follis, sb1836, attributed to Constantine IX (1041-1055 CE)15 viewsObverse: Christ seated facing on throne with back, wearing nimbus cr., pallium and colobium, and holding book of gospels with hands; in field to l., IC and to r., XC both barred..
Reverse: IS XS/bASILE/bASIL in three lines; above -+-
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1042-1055 CE
29mm, 9.29g
SB1836, Class D
wileyc
sb1836classD30mm878g.jpg
Class D follis, sb1836, attributed to Constantine IX (1041-1055 CE)18 viewsObverse: Christ seated facing on throne with back, wearing nimbus cr., pallium and colobium, and holding book of gospels with hands; in field to l., IC and to r., XC both barred..
Reverse: IS XS/bASILE/bASIL in three lines; above -+-
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1042-1055 CE
30mm, 8.78g
SB1836, Class D
wileyc
sb1836classd25mm526g.jpg
Class D follis, sb1836, attributed to Constantine IX (1042-1055 CE)16 viewsObverse: Christ seated facing on throne with back, wearing nimbus cr., pallium and colobium, and holding book of gospels with hands; in field to l., IC and to r., XC both barred..
Reverse: IS XS/bASILE/bASIL in three lines; above -+-
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1042-1055 CE
25mm, 5.26g
SB1836, Class D
wileyc
s1836.jpg
Class D follis, Sear 183616 viewsClass D anonymous follis. ca. 1050/1060 A.D. 10,5g, 27mm. Christ on throne / ISHS / BASILE / BASIL in three lines. Sear 1836.1 commentsPodiceps
Class_E_Anonymous_follis,_SBCV_1855.JPG
Class E Anonymous follis, SBCV 185514 viewsacing bust of Christ wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium and colobium, and holding book of Gospels, IC XC in fields to sides
IS XS / bASILE / bASIL in three lines -+- above -u- below
Strongly overstruck on older issue
AE follis, 29mm, 8.39g
novacystis
sb1855classE25mm822g.jpg
Class E, sb1855, attributed to Constantine X, 1059-1067 CE10 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cr., pallium and colobium, and holding book of Gospels with both hands; to L., IC to r., XC, barred.
Reverse: IS XS/bASILE/basil in three lines
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1059-1067 CE
25mm, 8.22g
SB 1855 Class E follis
wileyc
sb1855classE25mm754g.jpg
Class E, sb1855, attributed to Constantine X, 1059-1067 CE13 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cr., pallium and colobium, and holding book of Gospels with both hands; to L., IC to r., XC, barred.
Reverse: IS XS/bASILE/basil in three lines
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1059-1067 CE
25mm, 7.54g
SB 1855 Class E follis
wileyc
sb1855_25mm_816g.jpg
Class E, sb1855, attributed to Constantine X, 1059-1067 CE15 viewsObverse: Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cr., pallium and colobium, and holding book of Gospels with both hands; to L., IC to r., XC, barred.
Reverse: IS XS/bASILE/basil in three lines
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1059-1067 CE
25mm, 8.16g
SB 1855 Class E follis
wileyc
Class_F_Anonymous_follis,_SBCV_1856.JPG
Class F Anonymous follis, SBCV 185624 viewsChrist seated on throne without back, hand raised in benediction, IC XC to sides in field
IS XS / bASILE / bASIL in three lines
AE follis, 27mm, 6.50g
Struck under Constantine X
novacystis
sb1856classf.jpg
Class F follis, sb1856 attributed to Constantine X 1059-1067 CE17 viewsObverse: Christ seated facing on throne without back, wearing nimbus cr., pallium and colobium and raising r. hand in benediction; in l. hand, book of gospels; in field to l., IC to r. XC both barred.
Reverse: IS XS/bASILE/bASIL in three lines -+- above, + below.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1059-1067 CE
SB 1856 class F
25mm, 4.00g
wileyc
sb1856classf27mm922g.jpg
Class F follis, sb1856 attributed to Constantine X 1059-1067 CE24 viewsObverse: Christ seated facing on throne without back, wearing nimbus cr., pallium and colobium and raising r. hand in benediction; in l. hand, book of gospels; in field to l., IC to r. XC both barred.
Reverse: IS XS/bASILE/bASIL in three lines -+- above, + below.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1059-1067 CE
SB 1856 class F
27mm, 9.22g
wileyc
sb1856classf27mm652g.jpg
Class F follis, sb1856 attributed to Constantine X 1059-1067 CE17 viewsObverse: Christ seated facing on throne without back, wearing nimbus cr., pallium and colobium and raising r. hand in benediction; in l. hand, book of gospels; in field to l., IC to r. XC both barred.
Reverse: IS XS/bASILE/bASIL in three lines -+- above, + below.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1059-1067 CE
SB 1856 class F
27mm, 6.52g
wileyc
sb1856_28mm1004g.jpg
Class F follis, sb1856 attributed to Constantine X 1059-1067 CE18 viewsObverse: Christ seated facing on throne without back, wearing nimbus cr., pallium and colobium and raising r. hand in benediction; in l. hand, book of gospels; in field to l., IC to r. XC both barred.
Reverse: IS XS/bASILE/bASIL in three lines -+- above, + below.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1059-1067 CE
SB 1856 class F
28mm, 10.04g
wileyc
cleo_diobol_3_obv.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (1) Obv11 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
cleo_diobol_3_rev.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (1) Rev10 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
cleo_diobol_2_obv.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (2) Obv12 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
cleo_diobol_2_rev.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (2) Rev10 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
cleo_diobol_1_obv.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (3) Obv8 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
cleo_diobol_1_rev.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (3) Rev10 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
cleo_4_obv.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (4) Obv9 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
cleo_4_rev.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (4) Rev9 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
CLEO I.jpg
Cleopatra I, wife of Ptolemy V (Epiphanes).306 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Æ (28.4 mm, 18.84 g), before 176 BCE.
Obv: Diademed head of Cleopatra I as Isis, r.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, Eagle standing l. on thunderbolt, wings open.
Svoronos 1235; Sear Greek 7880; BMC 6.94,72; SNG VIII 1175; Forrer 80.
EmpressCollector
Cleo_III.jpg
Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX or X, Alexandria, 19.8 mm, obol21 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, c. 116 - 80 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1426, F, Alexandria mint, 6.557 g, 19.8 mm, 315o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolt, cornucopia left. ex FORVM

Podiceps
cleoIII.jpg
Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX or X, Paphos, 30,7 mm, diobol13 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX or X, c. 116 - 104 B.C. Bronze diobol, Paphos II #315, Svoronos -, Poor/Fair, Paphos mint, 17.088g, 30.7mm, 0o; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU”?, two eagles standing left, star and “S” before; weak strike, rough; very rare. The flan is typical for the Paphos Mint. The two eagles indicates two rulers on the throne. The weight is double the more common c. 8.5 grams obol of this period. ex FORVM

Podiceps
2_kotkaa.jpg
Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, AE 21.653 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, c. 116 - 80 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1426 var (Alexandria), gVF, Paphos mint, 8.369g, 21.6mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolt, cornucopia left. ex FORVM1 commentsPodiceps
cleo_III_ja_pojat.jpg
Cleopatra III with sons, Zeus Ammon, 30.1 mm21 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, c. 116 - 80 B.C. 32188. Bronze triobol, Svoronos 1424, SNG Cop 305 ff., SGCV II 7900 (all Ptolemy VI), VF, dark brown patina, 22.037g, 30.1mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, two eagles standing left on thunderbolts, side by side, double cornucopia left. Among the most common of Ptolemaic coins, struck during the joint reign of Cleopatra III and her sons, Ptolemy IX then Ptolemy X. Svoronos 1424 has two very distinct varieties. The earlier 29 gram variety was found in quantity in the c. 160 B.C. CoinEx Hoard. In that hoard, there were none of this later, common, c. 23-24 gram variety. The two types are separated by about 50 years. ex FORVMPodiceps
cleo.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus20 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, F, Paphos mint, 1.190 g, 10.9 mm, 0o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons. Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus, assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references. ex FORVMPodiceps
CLEOIII_ANTIOCHUSVIII.jpg
Cleopatra Thea, queen of Syria (with son, Antiochos VIII).223 viewsAR Tetradrachm (27 mm). Antioch mint, 125-121 BCE.
Obv: Conj. busts r.
Rev: BASILISSHS/ KLEOPATRAS/ KAI/ BASILEWS/ ANTIOXOU, Zeus Nikephoros seated l., holding lotus-tipped scepter; IE outer left, A under throne. SNG Spaer 2437. Cf. Sear 7135.
1 commentsEmpressCollector
cleo___poika.jpg
Cleopatra VII and Ptolemy XV, Paphos19 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Cleopatra VII and Ptolemy XV, 44 - 30 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1842 (Ptolemy XII), F, Paphos mint, 5.575g, 24.4mm, 0o, 44 - 30 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, headdress of Isis before; rough. The two eagles on the reverse symbolize harmony between the two rulers, in this case the mother and son, Cleopatra VII and Caesarion. ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
6__Drachme_de_Cléopâtre~0.jpg
Cleopatra VII drachm 141 viewsCleopatra VII drachm

Bronze 80 drachmes Cléopâtre VII
- Bronze 80 drachmes, Cléopâtre VII, Alexandrie, 51-29 avant J.-C (Bronze)
Avers : Buste de Cléopâtre
Revers : KLEOPATRAS BASILISAigle debout à gauche sur un foudre, les ailes déployées.
bgaut
sb1836ossb1825.jpg
Constantine IX Class D follis, sb1836, Constantine over struck on a Michael IV Class C follis16 viewsObverse: Christ seated facing on throne with back, wearing nimbus cr., pallium and colobium, and holding book of gospels with hands; in field to l., IC and to r., XC both barred..
Reverse: IS XS/bASILE/bASIL in three lines; above -+-
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1042-1055 CE
29mm, 5.77g



over struck on a Class C follis


Class C follis, sb1825, attributed to Michael IV, 1034-1041 CE
Obverse: EMMANOVHA - Three -quarter length of Christ Antiphonetes standing facing, wearing nimbus cr. pallium and colobium, raising rt hand in benediction in L. hand book of Gospels, in field to L., IC barred, to r., XC barred.
Reverse: IC-XC/ NI-KA - Jewelled cross with pellet at each end divides inscription into four equal parts, IC--XC/NI--KA
Mint: Contantinople
Date: 1034-1041 CE
wileyc
CONTINE7-1-BYZANT.jpg
Constantine VII 14 viewsAE Follis
Comstantinople mint, 913-959 A.D.
23mm, 4.04g
BCV- 1761

Obverse:
+COnST bASIL ROm
Constantine VII facing, bearded, wearing modified loros and crown with cross, globus cruciger left akakia in right.

Reverse:
+COnST
EnΘEO bA
SILEVS R
OmEOn
(overstrike on Romanus I coin BCV- 1760)
rubadub
CONTINE7-2-BYZANT.jpg
Constantine VII 16 viewsAE Follis
Comstantinople mint, 913-959 A.D.
28mm, 6.12g
BCV-1761

Obverse:
+COnST bASIL ROm
Constantine VII facing, bearded, wearing modified loros and crown with cross, globus cruciger left akakia in right.

Reverse:
+COnST
EnΘEO bA
SILEVS R
OmEOn
Will J
CVII___romanus.jpg
CONSTANTINE VII & ROMANUS I, Follis, Sear 17606 viewsCONSTANTINE VII AND ROMANUS I Æ Follis, Obv. Bust of Romanus I facing holding labarum and globus cruciger. Rev. RWmAN En ΘEW BASILEVS ROmAIWn. 5.5gm 24mm Sear BCV 1760Podiceps
36616_Constantine_VII___romanus_II_follis,_SBCV_1761.jpg
Constantine VII and Romanus II, follis, Constantinople, Sear 176112 viewsByzantine Empire, Constantine VII and Romanus II, 6 Apr 945 - 9 Nov 959 A.D. Bronze follis, SBCV 1761; DOC II, part 2, 26, F, Constantinople mint, 6.271g, 25.7mm, 180o, 945 - c. 950 A.D.; obverse + COnST bASIL ROM, Constantine VII facing, bearded, wearing modified loros and crown with cross, globus cruciger in left, akakia in right; reverse , + COnSt/En“Q”EO bA/SILEVS R/OmEOn (Constantine King of the Romans). Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
sb1761_1760_21mm_755g.jpg
Constantine VII SB 1761 overstruck on Romanus, SB176016 viewsObverse: CONST bASIL ROM, crowned bust of Constantine facing, with short beard and wearing vertical loros, holding akakia and cross on globe.
Reverse: CONST / EN QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON, legend in four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 913-959 CE
overstruck on
Obverse: bASILEVS RWM, crowned, bearded, facing bust of Romanus, wearing chlamys, holding labarum and cross on globe
Reverse: RWMA - N EN QEW bA - SILEVS RW - MAIWN, legend in four lines.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 913-959 CE

21mm 7.55g
wileyc
const21212.jpg
Constantine VII, AE Follis. 913-959 AD.9 views
Constantine VII, AE Follis. 913-959 AD. Constantinople mint. CONST bASIL ROM, crowned bust of Constantine facing, with short beard and wearing vertical loros, holding akakia and cross on globe / CONST-EN QEO bA-SILEVS R-OMEON, legend in four lines. SB 1761, DOC 26.
Britanikus
CVII_follis.jpg
CONSTANTINE VII, Follis, Sear 17586 viewsCONSTANTINE VII A.D. 913-959. Æ Follis, Obv. Busts of Constantine and Zoe facing, patriarchal cross between them. Rev. COnStAntEInO CE ZOH BASILIS ROmEOn. 4gm 27mm BCV 1758Podiceps
Constantine_VII,_SBCV_1761.JPG
Constantine VII, SBCV 176115 viewsAE follis, 25mm, 6.23g
+COhST bASIL ROM
Crowned bust facing, wearing loros and holding akakia and globus cruciger
+COnST' / EN ΘEO bA / SILEUS R / OmEOn
Constantinople mint

Strongly overstruck on earlier issue
novacystis
Christ_Anon.JPG
Constantine VIII , Anonymous AE Follis Class AIII , Bust of Christ facing.50 viewsAE Anonymous Follis, Class AIII
Constantinople, 1025 - 1028 A.D.,
10.06 Grams, 31 millimeters
Obverse: "EMMA - NOVHA"
Bust of Christ facing, wearingb nimbus crown, with crescent in each limb of cross, pallium and colobrium, and holding holding book of Gospels, with cover ornamented with five pellets. "IC - XC" to sides
Reverse : "+IHSUS . KRISTUS / BASILEU / BASILE"
In four lines, ornaments above and below.
Sam
Constantine_VIII,_Class_A3_Follis,_rev__legend,_Constantinople,_1025-1028_AD.JPG
Constantine VIII, Class A3 Follis, rev. legend, Constantinople, 1025-1028 AD33 viewsIC to left, XC to right,
Christ, bust facing, nimbus cross,
holding book of gospels,
+IhSUS | XRISTUS | bASILEU | bASILE
SB 1818
10.2g / 27mm _650
Antonivs Protti
w4~0.JPG
Constantinople CONSS66 viewsConstantine had altogether more ambitious plans. Having restored the unity of the empire, now overseeing the progress of major governmental reforms and sponsoring the consolidation of the Christian church, Constantine was well aware that Rome had become an unsatisfactory capital for several reasons. Located in central Italy, Rome lay too far from the eastern imperial frontiers, and hence also from the legions and the Imperial courts. Moreover, Rome offered an undesirable playground for disaffected politicians; it also suffered regularly from flooding and from malaria.

It seemed impossible to many that the capital could be moved. Nevertheless, Constantine identified the site of Byzantium as the correct place: a city where an emperor could sit, readily defended, with easy access to the Danube or the Euphrates frontiers, his court supplied from the rich gardens and sophisticated workshops of Roman Asia, his treasuries filled by the wealthiest provinces of the empire.

Constantine laid out the expanded city, dividing it into 14 regions, and ornamenting it with great public works worthy of a great imperial city. Yet initially Constantinople did not have all the dignities of Rome, possessing a proconsul, rather than a prefect of the city. Furthermore, it had no praetors, tribunes or quaestors. Although Constantinople did have senators, they held the title clarus, not clarissimus, like those of Rome. Constantinople also lacked the panoply of other administrative offices regulating the food supply, police, statues, temples, sewers, aqueducts or other public works. The new program of building was carried out in great haste: columns, marbles, doors and tiles were taken wholesale from the temples of the empire and moved to the new city. Similarly, many of the greatest works of Greek and Roman art were soon to be seen in its squares and streets. The emperor stimulated private building by promising householders gifts of land from the imperial estates in Asiana and Pontica, and on 18 May 332 he announced that, as in Rome, free distributions of food would be made to citizens. At the time the amount is said to have been 80,000 rations a day, doled out from 117 distribution points around the city.

Constantinople was a Greek Orthodox Christian city, lying in the most Christianised part of the Empire. Justinian ordered the pagan temples of Byzantium to be deconstructed, and erected the splendid Church of the Holy Wisdom, Sancta Sophia (also known as Hagia Sophia in Greek), as the centrepiece of his Christian capital. He oversaw also the building of the Church of the Holy Apostles, and that of Hagia Irene.

Constantine laid out anew the square at the middle of old Byzantium, naming it the Augusteum. Sancta Sophia lay on the north side of the Augusteum. The new senate-house (or Curia) was housed in a basilica on the east side. On the south side of the great square was erected the Great Palace of the emperor with its imposing entrance, the Chalke, and its ceremonial suite known as the Palace of Daphne. Located immediately nearby was the vast Hippodrome for chariot-races, seating over 80,000 spectators, and the Baths of Zeuxippus (both originally built in the time of Septimius Severus). At the entrance at the western end of the Augusteum was the Milion, a vaulted monument from which distances were measured across the Eastern Empire.

From the Augusteum a great street, the Mese, led, lined with colonnades. As it descended the First Hill of the city and climbed the Second Hill, it passed on the left the Praetorium or law-court. Then it passed through the oval Forum of Constantine where there was a second senate-house, then on and through the Forum of Taurus and then the Forum of Bous, and finally up the Sixth Hill and through to the Golden Gate on the Propontis. The Mese would be seven Roman miles long to the Golden Gate of the Walls of Theodosius.

Constantine erected a high column in the middle of the Forum, on the Second Hill, with a statue of himself at the top, crowned with a halo of seven rays and looking towards the rising sun.

RIC VII Constantinople 61 C1
ecoli
Croatia_Italy_Vacation_067_opt.jpg
Croatia, Pula - Chapel of St. Maria Formosa376 viewsThree naived basilica from the 6th century ADLegatus
DSCN7957.JPG
Demetrios I Soter. 162-150 BC. AE20mm12 viewsDemetrios I Soter. 162-150 BC.

Obv. Bust of Artemis right, with quiver over shoulder

Rev. BASILEWS DHMHTRIOU, Bow and quiver.
Lee S
Demetrios II- AE16.JPG
Demetrios II- AE1621 viewsSecond Reign, Syria, Antioch 130-125 BC
Obverse: Laureate head of Zeus right
Reverse: BASILEWS DHMHTPIOY NIKATOPOS, Nike standing left with wreath and palm.
16mm , 5.46 gm
Houghton 291; Spaer 2164-2167
Jerome Holderman
Macedonian_Kingdom_1c_img.jpg
Demetrios Poliorketes, Macedonian Kingdom, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C., Silver tetradrachm, Newell p. 97, 9176 viewsObv:– Demetrios diademed head right with horns of a bull, the animal sacred to Demetrios' patron deity
Rev:– BASILEOS DEMETRIOY, Poseidon standing left, right foot on rock, trident in left (apparently inspired by the Lateran Poseidon, a statue by Lysippos, court sculptor of Alexander), monogram left
Minted in Pella, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C.
Reference:– Newell p. 97, 91 and pl. VIII, 12, SNG Cop 1179 var.
17.0192g, 29.3mm, 45o

Ex-Harlan Berk. Ex-Forvm, where it was described as gVF, superb portrait, tight flan.
4 commentsmaridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1c_img~0.jpg
Demetrios Poliorketes, Macedonian Kingdom, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C., Silver tetradrachm, Newell p. 97, 9164 viewsObv:– Demetrios diademed head right with horns of a bull, the animal sacred to Demetrios' patron deity
Rev:– BASILEOS DEMETRIOY, Poseidon standing left, right foot on rock, trident in left (apparently inspired by the Lateran Poseidon, a statue by Lysippos, court sculptor of Alexander), monogram left
Minted in Pella, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C.
Reference:– Newell p. 97, 91 and pl. VIII, 12, SNG Cop 1179 var.
17.0192g, 29.3mm, 45o

Ex-Harlan Berk. Ex-Forvm, where it was described as gVF, superb portrait, tight flan.

Updated image of an old coin from my collection.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1c_img~1.jpg
Demetrios Poliorketes, Macedonian Kingdom, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C., Silver tetradrachm, Newell p. 97, 9156 viewsObv:– Demetrios diademed head right with horns of a bull, the animal sacred to Demetrios' patron deity
Rev:– BASILEOS DEMETRIOY, Poseidon standing left, right foot on rock, trident in left (apparently inspired by the Lateran Poseidon, a statue by Lysippos, court sculptor of Alexander), monogram left
Minted in Pella, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C.
Reference:– Newell p. 97, 91 and pl. VIII, 12, SNG Cop 1179 var.
17.0192g, 29.3mm, 45o

Ex-Harlan Berk. Ex-Forvm, where it was described as gVF, superb portrait, tight flan.

Updated image using new photography setup.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
045.JPG
Demetrius I24 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Demetrius I AE21 Serrate. Bust of Artemis right, wearing stephane, bow and quiver at shoulder / BASILEWS DHMHTPIOY, bow & quiver. BMC 4Randygeki(h2)
31745q00.jpg
Demetrius I Antioch mint.44 views31745. Silver tetradrachm, Newell SMA 97, SNG Spaer 1256 - 62 var (control-mark), F+, cracked, Antioch mint, weight 14.440g, maximum diameter 31.6mm, die axis 0o, 162 - 150 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Demetrios right, fillet border; reverse BASILEWS / DHMHTRIOU, Tyche seated left, short scepter in right, cornucopia in left, seat supported by Nike, monogram in ex; possibly broken in two and glued together; cliff_marsland
demetriusTD.jpg
Demetrius II Nikator AR Tetradrachm 129 BC77 viewsOBV: Diademed Bust Right
REV: BASILEWS [DEMETPIOY] Eagle left on prow, Club with TYP- monogram on top (Tyre mint) to left and date I Pi P (SE 187 = 126/5 BC) in right field, I Pi P below. Other monogram between eagle's legs.
Houghton 467, Newell 156, BMC 11 (ref. Wildwinds)
wt 13.4 gm
Shekels (tetradrachmae) of Tyre were minted in almost pure silver and were the only ones acceptable for the Jerusalem temple tax. This coin has some horn silver (chlorargyrite ) deposits on it.
2 commentsdaverino
EB0242b_scaled.JPG
EB0242 Anchor / Wheel4 viewsJUDAEA, ALEXANDER JANNAEUS, AE Prutah, 103-76 BC.
Obverse: BASILEWS ALEXANDROU around Seleucid anchor.
Reverse: Wheel with 8 ray-like spokes.
References: SG 6087 or 6088.
Diameter: 17.5mm, Weight: 3.254g.
EB
EB0922_scaled.JPG
EB0922 Ptolemy VI, Zeus / Two Eagles7 viewsPtolemy VI 181-146 BC, AE 20 Diobol. Struck 180-176 BC.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae before.
References: Svoronos 1426, SNG Cop 315.
Diameter: 20.5mm, Weight: 8.76g.
EB
EB0923_scaled.JPG
EB0923 Ptolemy III, Zeus / Eagle22 viewsPtolemy III, Euergetes (246 - 221 BC), AE 36, Hemidrachm.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae tied with fillet before, monogram between legs.
References: SNG Cop 173.
Diameter: 36mm, Weight: 30.96g.
1 commentsEB
EB0924_scaled.JPG
EB0924 Ptolemy IV, Zeus / Eagle5 viewsPtolemy IV 221-205 BC, AE 31.
Obverse: Head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae tied with fillet before, monogram between legs.
References:
Diameter: 31mm, Weight: 19.61g.
The coin flip says Ptolemy IV, but I'm not sure.
Note: Sold.
EB
EB0928_scaled.JPG
EB0928 Ptolemy IV / Eagle6 viewsPtolemy, AE 14, 222-204 BC.
Obverse: Helmeted bust of a beardless male right.
Reverse: BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, filleted cornucopiae in front.
References: (cornucopiae at shoulder) Svoronos 1155, SNGCop 235.
Diameter: 14mm, Weight: 2.16g.
EB
EB0931_scaled.JPG
EB0931 Alexander / Eagle2 viewsPtolemy III 246-221 BC, AE 25, Alexandria Mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander right, wearing elephant skin headdress, horn of Ammon and aegis.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right, E between legs.
References: Cf. Svoronos 977 (head left).
Diameter: 25mm, Weight: 11.29g.
EB
EB0932_scaled.JPG
EB0932 Ptolemy III, Zeus / Eagle4 viewsPtolemy III 246-221 BC, AE 37 Hemidrachm, Alexandria mint.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right, cornucopiae at right shoulder, E between legs.
References: Cf. SG 7815.
Diameter: 37.5mm, Weight: 43.52g.
EB
EB0934_scaled.JPG
EB0934 Ptolemy II, Zeus / Eagle5 viewsPtolemy II 285-247 BC, AE 38, Alexandria mint.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right, cornucopiae at right shoulder, E between legs.
References: Cf. Svoronos 974.
Diameter: 38mm, Weight: 45.42g.
Note: The coin flip says Ptolemy II, but this looks very similar to EB0932, where the flip says Ptolemy III.
EB
EB0939_scaled.JPG
EB0939 Ptolemy IV, Zeus / Eagle3 viewsPtolemy IV 221-205 BC, AE 36.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right, star between legs.
References: Cf. Svoronos 1149.
Diameter: 36mm, Weight: 45.13g.
EB
EB0940_scaled.JPG
EB0940 Ptolemy IV, Zeus / Eagle20 viewsPtolemy IV 221-205 BC, AE 42.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia before, DELTA IOTA between legs.
References: Svoronos 1129.
Diameter: 42mm, Weight: 68.34g.
1 commentsEB
EB0941_scaled.JPG
EB0941 Ptolemy IV, Zeus / Eagle20 viewsPtolemy IV 221-205 BC, AE 42 (drachm).
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing right on thunderbolt, cornucopia before, DELTA IOTA between legs.
References: Sear (SG) 7841, Svoronos 1125, SNG Cop 199, BMC 108.
Diameter: 42mm, Weight: 67.21g.
Ex: Superior Stamp & Coin
1 commentsEB
EB0942_scaled.JPG
EB0942 Ptolemy III, Zeus / Eagle4 viewsPtolemy III 246-221 BC, AE 35.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae tied with fillet before, CHI-RHO monogram between legs.
References: Svoronos 965.
Diameter: 35mm, Weight: 34.44g.
EB
EB0943_scaled.JPG
EB0943 Ptolemy III, Zeus / Eagle31 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes 246-221 BC, AE 42.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae tied with fillet before, CHI-RHO monogram between legs.
References: Svoronos 964.
Diameter: 42.5mm, Weight: 70.26g.
Ex: Numismatic Art and Ancient Coins
2 commentsEB
EB0944_scaled.JPG
EB0944 Zeus / Two Eagles5 viewsPtolemy X with Cleopatra III, AE 30.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae before.
References:
Diameter: 30mm, Weight: 25.71g.
Note: Sold.
EB
EB0995_scaled.JPG
EB0995 Leo VI / Legend7 viewsLeo VI, AE Follis, Constantinople.
Obverse: LEON bASILEVS ROM, crowned bust facing with short beard, wearing chlamys, holding akakia.
Reverse: LEON / EN QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON in four lines.
References: SB 1729.
Diameter: 27mm, Weight: 9.38g.
EB
EB0996_scaled.JPG
EB0996 Leo VI / Legend15 viewsLeo VI, AE Follis, Constantinople.
Obverse: LEON bASILEVS ROM, crowned bust facing with short beard, wearing chlamys, holding akakia.
Reverse: LEON / EN QEO BA / SILEVS R / OMEON in four lines.
References: SB 1729.
Diameter: 28.5mm, Weight: 7.052g.
1 commentsEB
EB0997_scaled.JPG
EB0997 Constantine VII / Legend5 viewsConstantine VII, AE Follis. 913-959 AD. Constantinople mint.
Obverse: [CONST bASIL ROM], crowned bust of Constantine facing, with short beard and wearing vertical loros, holding akakia and cross on globe.
Reverse: CONS[T] / EN QEO B[A] / SILEVS ]R] / [O]ME[ON], legend in four lines.
References: SB 1761, DOC 26.
Diameter: 23.5mm, Weight: 5.339g.
EB
EB0998_scaled.JPG
EB0998 Romanus I / Legend21 viewsRomanus I. AE Follis. 913-959 AD. Constantinople.
Obverse: RWMAN bASILEVS RWM, crowned, bearded, facing bust of Romanus, wearing loros (not chlamys), holding labarum and cross on globe.
Reverse: RWMA - N EN QEW bA - SILEVS RW - MAIWN, legend in four lines.
References: SB 1760 overstruck on 1729.
Diameter: 29mm, Weight: 9.37g.
1 commentsEB
EB0999_scaled.JPG
EB0999 Romanus I / Legend6 viewsRomanus I. AE Follis. 913-959 AD. Constantinople.
Obverse: RWMAN bASILEVS RWM, crowned, bearded, facing bust of Romanus, wearing loros (not chlamys), holding labarum and cross on globe.
Reverse: RWMA - N EN QEW bA - SILEVS RW - MAIWN, legend in four lines.
References: SB 1760 overstruck on 1729.
Diameter: 26mm, Weight: 5.841g.
EB
EB1001_scaled.JPG
EB1001 Christ / Legend7 viewsAnonymous attributed to Basil II and Constantine VIII after 989 AD, AE Follis.
Obverse: +EMMA NOVHΛ, IC-XC, Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyS / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines.
References: SB 1812,1813.
Diameter: 33.5mm, Weight: 14.511g.
EB
EB1002_scaled.JPG
EB1002 Christ / Legend5 viewsAnonymous attributed to Basil II and Constantine VIII after 989 AD, AE Follis.
Obverse: +EMMA NOVHΛ, IC-XC, Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyS / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines.
References: SB 1812,1813.
Diameter: 33mm, Weight: 14.249g.
EB
EB1003_scaled.JPG
EB1003 Christ / Legend7 viewsAnonymous attributed to Basil II and Constantine VIII after 989 AD, AE Follis.
Obverse: +EMMA NOVHΛ, IC-XC, Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with various ornaments in each limb.. pallium and colobium, and holding books of Gospels.
Reverse: +IhSyS / XRISTUS/ bASILEy/bASILE - in 4 lines.
References: SB 1812,1813.
Diameter: 32mm, Weight: 10.732g
EB
Cleopatra_VII,__51-30_BC,_AE13.jpg
Egypt, Cleopatra VII 51-30 BC, AE13, 31 viewsDraped and diademmed bust of Cleópatra right.
Filleted cornucopiae "PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS"
1.43gr. SNG Cop 649
Older refences attribute this issue to Ptolemy VI. More recent evidence points to Cleopatra VII
_3809
Antonivs Protti
ptomlemy1_copy.jpg
EGYPT, Ptolemaic Kingdom19 viewsAE 30, Ptolemaic Kingdom, ca. 280 BC, Obv: Zeus right; Rev: Eagle stg. left, BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU around border, nice obverse details on an otherwise rough coin, Average Fine.Molinari
coin607.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy IX, Svoronos 1698 Ptolemy IX AE20. 65 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE210 Ptolemy VI VIII Joint Reign after 169BC AE 29.7-30.0mm : 23.9gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Two Eagles f/L on thunderbolt, double cornucopia in left field, no monograms, BASILEOS PTOLEMAIOY
REF - Svoronos 1383, SNGCop 308-310 Weiser 141-142 Coin #607
1 commentscars100
coin606.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy IX, Svoronos 1698 Ptolemy IX AE20. 41 viewsEgypt, Ptolemy IX, Svoronos 1698 Ptolemy IX AE20.
Paphos, Cyprus, Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
/ BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU, two eagles standing
left, on thunderbolt, cornucopia before.
SNG Cop 674var. Coin #606
cars100
unkptol1OR.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy V Philometer, SNGCOP 270-271 50 viewsAlexandria mint, Ptolemy V Philometer Obol, 205-180 B.C. AE, 23mm 8.45g, Svoronos 1376 (as Ptolemy VI - Commemoration of Kleopatra I Series - Struck 181/174BC) - SNGCOP 270-271 (NOTE (per ptolemae’s site)- Attributed as Ptolemy V by C. Lorber based on modern hoard data
O: Bearded Herakles in lion skin headdress, facing right
R: BASILEOS PTOLEMAIOY, Eagle standing f/L on thunderbolt, kerykeion over right shoulder, KAPPA control symbol between legs

1 commentscasata137ec
Comb22092017082621.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy VIII, 145-116 BC. Alexandria Mint.29 viewsObv. Head of bearded Hercules right, wearing lion scalp.
Rev. PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS, Eagle standing left.
24mm, 11.2 grams.
References: SV. 1494.
1 commentsCanaan
Ptolemy_X_Soter_AE.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy X, Soter II, AE28, 116-80 BC25 viewsPtolemy X, Soter II
AE28 (23.0gm), 116-80 BC

Head of Zeus right wearing the horn of Ammon / BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOY, Two eagles standing left on thunderbolts, Cornucopia in field left

Svoronos 1697
Sosius
PtolemySm.jpg
Egyptian Bronze Ptolemy II9 viewsA Ptolemaic Egyptian bronze coin of Ptolemy II, minted in Alexandria in 282 BC. 20mm, 7.8g.

Obverse: Alexander wearing elephant trunk headdress.

Reverse: an eagle with spread wings facing left, with the inscription BASILEWS [PTOLEMAIOY] = "[Coin] of King [Ptolemy]", and a hard to see oval shield and small monogram at the left. There's also a delta between the eagle's legs,

Attribution: Svoronos 565
chuy1530
PtolemyBig.jpg
Egyptian Bronze Ptolemy III14 viewsA massive Ptolemaic Egyptian bronze coin of Ptolemy III, minted in Alexandria between 246-221 BC. 38mm, 44.4g.

Obverse: horned head of Zeus-Ammon.

Reverse: an eagle standing on a thunderbolt with an E between its legs, with the inscription PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS = "King Ptolemy".

Attribution: Svoronos 974
chuy1530
FH-G-031_(0s).jpg
FH-G-03118 viewsSyria, Seleukid Kingdom; Seleukos III Soter (Keraunos); Antioch 225-223 BC; AE17

- Draped bust of Artemis right, quiver at shoulder; round dot border.

- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ
- BASILEWS / SELEYKOY
– Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos, holding arrow & resting on bow

3.92gm / 17.32mm / Axis: 0

References:
SC 922

Notes:
Very nice bust, well centered on tight flan. Rev control marks off flan. Pairs nicely with my FH-G-032. - compare to coin listed here: https://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=166953 From the J.S. Wagner Collection.
Jonathan P
FH-G-033_(0s).jpg
FH-G-03211 viewsSyria, Seleukid Kingdom; Seleukos III; 225-223 BC; AE16

- Draped bust of Artemis right, quiver at shoulder; round dot border.

- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ
- BASILEWS / SELEYKOY
- Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos, holding arrow & resting on bow; Monogram below.

3.71gm / 16.08mm / Axis: 0

References:
SC 922

Notes: Dec 7, 15 - Ruler- Seleukos III Soter (Keraunos)
Off centered and small flan is very common with this type. Reverse is nicer than most in that it is mostly legible and shows monogram control mark. Pairs nicely with my FH-G-031
- compare to coin listed here: https://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=166953 From the J.S. Wagner Collection.
Jonathan P
FH-G-033_(0s)~0.jpg
FH-G-0336 viewsSyria, Seleukid Kingdom; Seleukos III; 225-223 BC; AE15

- Draped bust of Artemis right, quiver at shoulder; round dot border.

- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ
- BASILEWS / SELEYKOY
- Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos, holding arrow & resting on bow.

3.07gm / 15.52mm / Axis: 0

References:
SC 922

Notes: Dec 7, 15 - Ruler- Seleukos III Soter (Keraunos)
Off centered and small flan is very common with this type.
- compare to coin listed here: https://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=166953 From the J.S. Wagner Collection.
Jonathan P
FH-G-034_(0s).jpg
FH-G-03411 viewsSyria, Seleukid Kingdom; Antiochus (?); AR Drachm

- Draped bust right.

- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ANTIOXOY
- BASILEWS / ANTIOXOY
- Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos, holding arrow & resting on bow.

3.40gm / 15.52mm / Axis: 315

Notes: Dec 8, 15 - The reverse legend of this crude little silver points to any one of the Antiochos', kings of the Seleukid Kingdom. Yet, to date, I can not find an example of such coin with a similar Obv. Bust (which I am assuming to be bust of Apollo or Artemis).
Jonathan P
FH-G-035_(0s).jpg
FH-G-0353 viewsSyria, Seleukid Kingdom; Antiochus I Soter; 281-261 BC; AE15

- Elderly diademed head of Antiochus, right. Round dot border.

- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ANTIOXOY
- BASILEWS / ANTIOXOY
- Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos, holding arrow & resting on bow.

3.41gm / 15.67mm / Axis:135

References:
SC 351
SNG Spaer 209
Houghton 30

Notes: Dec 8, 15 - Although pitted on all surfaces, major features of this coin are recognizable, and the deep, diamond shaped eye-sockets of the elderly Antiochus are unique clues to allow a full attribution.
Jonathan P
FH-G-046_(0s).jpg
FH-G-04612 views
Syria, Seleukid Kingdom; Antiochus IX Philopator Kyzikenos; Antioch 114-96 BC; Bronze AE18

- Laureate head of bearded Herakles right, round dot border

- BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY / ΦIΛOΠATΡOΣ
- BASILEWS / ANTIOXOY / FILOPATOROS
- Athena standing left, holding Nike and resting left hand on shield at her side, spear behind her.

5.30gm / 18.31mm / Axis: 0

References:
Hoover 1250
SC 2368
BMC 24
Sear Greece 7172
CSE 344

Notes: Dec 20, 15 - Obverse is high off center but shows decent detail. Reverse is left off centered on a tight flan. Left control marks (if present) are off flan. There appears to be a date mark in exergue, but it is under corrosion and unidentifiable at this point. – Compare to coin found here: http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album266/17_Ant_IX_AE_19?full=1 from The Ruth and Louise McCollum Memorial Collection of Ancient Coin Images (Link courtesy of Mark Lehman)
Jonathan P
FH-G-047_(0s).jpg
FH-G-04712 views
Syria, Seleukid Kingdom; Antiochus III; 198 BC; bronze AE18

- Head of Athena in crested helmet right.

- BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY
- BASILEWS / ANTIOXOY
- Winged Nike standing right holding wreath and palm, Reversed anchor countermark in inner left field.

8.70gm / 17.96mm / Axis:0

References:
Hoover Seleucid Coins 1095.2
SNG Spaer 245-247

Notes: Dec 20, 15 - Obverse and reverse are worn, but major details are fine. Struck on a tight flan, slightly less weight than other examples I found. This coin contains the reverse anchor countermark that is present on multiple coins within this collection. Compare to coin found here: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=search&cat=0&pos=16
Jonathan P
FH-G-049_(0s).jpg
FH-G-04913 viewsSyria, Seleukid Kingdom; Seleukos I Nikator; Antioch 312-281 BC; bronze AE20

- Winged head of Medusa right, snakes flowing behind.

- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ
- BASILEWS / SELEYKOY
- Bull butting right.

5.60gm / 20.19mm / Axis: 0

References:
Sear 6852
Lindgren 1751
BMC 62
SC 21

Notes: Dec 24, 15 - Examples here: http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/sg/sg6852.t.html
Jonathan P
FH-G-050_(0s).jpg
FH-G-05010 viewsSyria, Seleukid Kingdom; Antiochus VIII; Antioch 121-96 BC; bronze AE17

- Radiate and diademed head of Antiochos VIII right.

- BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY / ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ
- BASILEWS / ANTIOXOY / EPIFANOYS
- Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, sceptre over shoulder.

6.20gm / 17.42mm / Axis: 0

References:
Sear 7154
SNGIs 2501

Notes: Dec 24, 15 - Antiochos VIII Grypos (the hook-nosed), King of the Seleucid Empire of Syria, 121-96 BC. -- Normally contains date in exergue. --More examples here: http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/sg/sg7154.t.html
Jonathan P
Calise04-2.jpg
Gaius ("Caligula"), RIC 44, Sestertius of AD 3920 viewsÆ Sestertius (28.5g, Ø 35.5mm, 6h) Rome mint, struck AD 39.
Obv.: C CAESAR DIVI AVG PRON P M TR P III P P around, PIETAS in ex., Pietas, veiled and draped, seated left, holding patera and resting left arm on small statue on pedestal.
Rev.: DIVO AVG / S C (in two lines in field left & right of the temple), Hexastyle guirlanded temple, surmounted with quadriga and statues, before which Gaius, veiled and togate, standing left, sacrifices with patera over garlanded altar; at left, an attendant leading bull to altar; at right, another attendant holding patera.
RIC 44 (R); Sear (Roman Coins & their Values I) 1802; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 60:2a
ex G.Henzen (1999).

Explanation of the legend: obverse: CAIVS CAESAR DIVI AVGVSTI PRONEPOS AVGVSTVS PONTIFEX MAXIMVS TRIBVNICIA POTESTATE III PATER PATRIAE : Gaius Caesar, great-grandson of Divine Augustus, emperor, High Priest, with tribunician power for the third time, father of the fatherland. reverse: DIVO AVGVSTO SENATVS CONSVLTO: to Divine Augustus by decree of the Senate.
This architectural type commemorates the dedication of the temple to Divus Augustus in August, 37 AD. There were two temples in Rome honoring Augustus, one on the Palatine, the other of uncertain location, possibly behind the Basilica Julia in the depression between the Palatine and the Capitoline Hills. The latter, built under Tiberius, was the one dedicated by Caligula in 37 AD.
Charles S
calise07-2.jpg
Gaius ("Caligula"), RIC 51, Sestertius of AD 40-4132 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.9g, Ø35mm, 6h) Rome mint, struck AD 40-41.
Obv.: C CAESAR DIVI AVG PRON P M TR P IIII P P around edge PIETAS in ex., Pietas, veiled and draped, seated left.
Rev.: DIVO / AVG / S / C. Gaius sacrificing in front of hexastyle temple; attendants with bull and patera.
RIC 51 (R); Cohen 11; Sear (RCV 2K) 1802; Foss (RHC) 60:2a

This architectural type commemorates the dedication of the temple to Divus Augustus in August, 37 AD. There were two temples in Rome honouring Augustus, one on the Palatine, the other of uncertain location, possibly behind the Basilica Julia in the depression between the Palatine and the Capitoline Hills. The latter, built under Tiberius, was the one dedicated by Caligula in 37 AD.
Charles S
05-04-06_1143.jpg
Germany, Trier - Basilika453 viewsLater on, the archbishop used it as his administrative center and it was enlarged by three palace wings after 1614W. Kutschenko
05-04-06_1152.jpg
Germany, Trier - Basilika472 viewsUnbelievable size: 27 m (90 ft) wide, 33 m (108 ft) high, and 67 m (220 ft) long - with an adjoining hall outside even 75 m (250 ft).W. Kutschenko
05-04-06_1147.jpg
Germany, Trier - Basilika521 viewsThe so-called Basilika, Constantine's throne room, is the largest surviving single-room structure from Roman times. The Romans wanted the architecture to express the magnificence and might of the emperor.
It is used as a church now.
W. Kutschenko
i-HgFrKTt-XL.jpg
Greek - Kassander Bronze AE 1847 viewsGreek Bronze AE 18, Pella or Amphipolis mint, 305 - 297 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse "BASILEWS KASSANDROU", horseman riding right, right arm raised, diagonal thunderbolt below horse, "A" right4 commentsNeal A
cassander AE19.jpg
greek - KASSANDER, king of Macedonia AE20 - 319-297 BC28 viewsobv: Head of young Heracles right in lionskin
rev: BASILEWS KASSANDROU above and below, horseman advancing right
ref: SNGCop 1142, SG 6754
5.14g, 18mm
berserker
antioco_I_dracma.jpg
GREEK, ANTIOCHUS I21 viewsDracma de plata
261 – 246 a.C.
ANV: Cabeza de Antioco I con diadema a derecha
REV: Apolo sentado en el omphalos con leyenda:BASILEWS ANTIOXOY
Pedro Jose D
935293~0.jpg
Greek, Ariobarzanes I Philoromaios. Cappadocian Kingdom. AR Drachm.283 viewsCirca 96-63 B.C. AR Drachm (17mm, 3.92g, 1h). Simmoneta 9a. Obverse diademed head of Ariobarzanes to right. Reverse BASILEUS ARIOBARZANOU PHILOROMAIOU Athena standing left, holding Nike and spear and shield; to left monogram; to right, A; in exergue, gamma. Extremely Fine, beautifully toned. Ex Nomos AG 6th Price List Sale, lot 44.
Ariobarzanes I, nicknamed Philoromaios or “Lover of Rome” in the literal sense but should be translated as “Friend of Rome,” was a client king of Cappadocia during Roman expansion and hegemony in Asia Minor. He was elected by his people with the backing of Lucius Cornelius Sulla. He was removed several times by either Mithradates IV of Pontus or Tigranes II of Armenia but reinstated by the Roman Senate each time. He eventually abdicated and was replaced by his son, Ariobarzanes II.

The detail and artistry is surprisingly elegant on this small coin with a diameter of only 17mm. It is a masterpiece of miniature numismatic portraiture: most of Ariobarzanes’ coins are of inferior quality and finding one with fine portraiture of good style, such as this, is rarely encountered.

2 commentsJason T
Ptolemy_XIII_-_XV_and_Cleopatra_VII,_c__51_-_39_B_C_.jpg
GREEK, Cyprus, Paphos mint. Cleopatra and Ptolemy XIII-XV. Mintet c. 51-39 B.C. 83 viewsCyprus, Paphos mint. Cleopatra and Ptolemy XIII-XV. Mintet c. 51-39 B.C. Bronze diobol, 10.340g, 29.5mm. VF. Attributution by Matt Kreuzer, author of "The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus." The two eagles symbolize two rulers on the throne of Cyprus, in this case Cleopatra VII and one of her two successive brother-husbands, Ptolemy XIII or XIV, less likely her son Ptolemy XV. The round, thin flan and weight standard is correct for the very late Ptolemaic Kingdom. The palm branch appears on obols (c. 6 grams) across the eagles, RPC 3903. Obv: diademed head of Zeus right, of Cypriot style, star before? Ref: unstruck Greek legend, presumably PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left, palm branch before. Unpublished in major references: SNG Cop -, BMC -, Svor -, Paphos II -, RPC -, Noeske -. Exstremely rareBard Gram O
Rare_Ptolemy_VIII_145_-_116_BC.jpg
GREEK, Cyprus, Paphos mint. Minted c. 135 B.C. Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, 145 - 116 B.C.24 viewsCyprus, Paphos mint. Minted c. 135 B.C. Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, 145 - 116 B.C. Bronze obol, 7.973 g, 23.2 mm, F. Obv: diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right. Rev: eagle standing right, helmet before, PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS. This coin type is undated but was almost certainly issued at the same time as dated issues with this same helmet symbol, c. 135 B.C. Ref: Cox pp. 15, 106 #119, plate IV. RareBard Gram O
6__Drachme_de_Cléopâtre.jpg
Greek, Egypt, Cleopatra VII drachm133 viewsBronze 80 drachmes Cléopâtre VII
- Bronze 80 drachmes, Cléopâtre VII, Alexandrie, 51-29 avant J.-C (Bronze)
Avers : Buste de Cléopâtre
Revers : KLEOPATRAS BASILISAigle debout à gauche sur un foudre, les ailes déployées.
bgaut
gondophares_tetra_mio1.JPG
Greek, Indo-Parthian, Gondophares, AR Tetradrachm, AD.20-50.62 viewsObverse: BASILEWN BASILEWN MEGA GONDOFERROU. King on horseback right with arm raised, cloak billowing behind, 'Gondopharan' symbol in right field.
Reverse: Kharosthi legend "Maharaja rajaraja mahata dhramia devavrata Gugupharasa", Shiva standing facing holding trident in left hand, right hand raised; Whitehead monograms 7 and 4 to left and right.
9.52gms, 23.77mm.

Whitehead 45/46; Senior ISCH 217.
anthivs
azes_f.JPG
Greek, Indo-Scythian Kings, Azes II, Tetradrachm69 viewsIndo-Scythian Kings. Azes II. Ca. 35 B.C.-A.D. 5. AR Tetradrachm.

Obv: BASILEWS BASILEWN MEGALOU AZOU, Emperor on horse right.
Rev: Athena standing right with spear and shield.
1 commentsanthivs
Late_Ptolemaic,_c__2nd_-_1st_Centuries_B_C_.jpg
Greek, Late Ptolemaic period, c. 2-1 cent. B.C. UNIQUE? 252 viewsBeirut/Bervtus mint? Late Ptolemaic period, c. 2-1 cent. B.C. Bronze quarter-obol, VF, 1.922g, 12.5mm, 90o.Obv: double cornucopia. Rev: BASIL..., eagle standing left. The style of the flan and the eagle is similar to some late Berytus pieces. The flan is not Cyprus, Kyrene or Alexandria. Ref: Svoronos -; BMC -; SNG Cop -; Paphos II -. UNIQUE? 1 commentsBard Gram Okland
amagnonk4.jpg
GREEK, MACEDONIAN KINGDOM, Alexander III, Postumous Tetradrachm98 viewsDate: 311-305 BC
Mint: Babylonia
Obverse: Head of Herakles with lion skin at right.
Reverse: BASILEWS [A]LEXANDROU. Zeus seated at left, with eagle on his right hand. Engraver's mark.
2 commentsXulodue
lysimachos.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Lysimachos, 323-281 BC Thrace1299 viewsAR - Tetradrachm struck in Lampsakos, 286-281 BC
Obv. Head of Alexander the Great, wearing taenia and horn of Ammon
Rev. BASILEWS – LYSIMAXOY Athena, wearing Corinthian helmet, in long robe, seated facing left on throne, left arm resting on shield decorated with lion's-head, spear pointing downwards behind her right shoulder, holding in outstretched right hand winged Nike who is crowning the name with wreath. In left field monogram HP (ligate); in exergue, crescent with cavity left.
28.8mm, 16.85g
Ref. Thompson 47; Müller 401; SNG Paris 2542
23 commentsalexB
PhilipVMacedonor.JPG
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip V, AE2555 viewsAE 23.3x26.2mm
Obv. Head right wearing radiate crown, Helios?
Rev. BASILEWS FILIPOU
Thunderbolt
Delta above
ca 221-179 BC
SNGCop 1258, Sear sg6795
1 commentsgparch
Kyrene,_North_Africa,_Ptolemy_Apion,_c__101_-_96_B_C_.jpg
GREEK, North Africa, Kyrene mint. c. 101 - 96 BC.21 viewsNorth Africa, Kyrene mint. c. 101 - 96 BC. Bronze quarter-obol, Fair, 1.214g, 12.2mm. Obv: diademed head of Ptolemy I as Zeus right, wearing aegis, hole from minting process. Rev: head of Libya or Isis right, PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS. Ref: Buttrey: The Extramural Sanctuary of Demeter and Persephone at Cyrene, Libya, Final Reports, Volume VI, 542 - 603. Rare

Ptolemy Apion was a son of Ptolemy VIII, perhaps by an Egyptian concubine. This makes him a half-brother of Ptolemy IX and X. Ptolemy Apion died in 96 B.C., without an heir, leaving his kingdom to the Roman Republic. According to Butrey, Apion's coinage was nothing but very small change, with a peak about 1.3 grams. Buttrey notes, "the Greek coinage of Cyrenaica, of glorious tradition, ended in the lamentable small bronzes of Apion."
Bard Gram O
Kyrene_North_Africa_Ptolemy_Apion_101-96_BC_Rare.jpg
GREEK, North Africa, Kyrene mint. c. 101 - 96 BC. 17 viewsNorth Africa, Kyrene mint. c. 101 - 96 BC. Bronze quarter-obol, F/VF, 1.141g, 13.6mm. Dark patina, untrimmed flan edges. Obv: diademed head of Ptolemy I as Zeus right, wearing aegis, hole from minting process. Rev: head of Libya or Isis right, [PTOLEMAIOU] BASILEWS. Ref: Buttrey: The Extramural Sanctuary of Demeter and Persephone at Cyrene, Libya, Final Reports, Volume VI, 542 - 603. Rare Bard Gram O
PT1or.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy I, AE2269 viewsObv: Head of Herakles wearing lionskin facing right.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOY BASILIEOS Eagle standing left, wings spread.
gparch
PtolemyIAE26or.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy I, AE2676 views305-285 BC
AE 25.6x26.1mm
Obv. Head of Zeus-Ammon right, laureate
Rev. PTOLEMAIOY BASILIEOS
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings spread, A over X in left field.
Svoronos Pl. 10b no. 16; Sear 7763
gparch
PtolemyIIFORVM.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy II, AE1965 viewsObv. Head of Zeus-Ammon right, diademed.
Rev. PTOLOMEOY BASILEUS
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings spread, oval symbol between legs.
Alexandria mint
285-246 BC
Svoronos 468
gparch
Sv1381_GAE916_AE22_7x114g_12h.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Kleopatra I199 viewsRare middle-size bronze of the series that has unusual name of Queen Kleopatra I (BASILISES KLEOPATRAS) on the *obverse* in addition to the usual BASILEOS PTOLEMAIOY on the reverse. Svoronos 1381. Full sharp inscriptions, centered. Nice.
Portrait of 'Alexandria' on obverse, open-wing eagle on reverse with PI/A monogram to left.

22mm - 7.114 gram - 12h

Kleopatra I was the daughter of Antiochos III, married off to Ptolemy V at the end of the 5th Syrian war ca 195BC, tying up the turnover and permanent loss of all of Phoenician Ptolemaic territory (Tyre, Sidon, Ake-Ptolemais, etc.) to the Seleukid kingdom. Mother of Ptolemy VI who assumed the throne at age 5 upon the death of Ptolemy V, Kleopatra I was his regent until her death in 176 BC. An unusual series of three sizes of bronze coins (Svoronos 1380, 81, 82) bear her name on the obverse where most Ptolemaic bronzes have no inscription at all. When Antiochos IV attacked Egypt ca. 170 BC and captured Ptolemy VI, ruling for a time with him, it was all in the family. Antiochos IV was the young Egyptian king's uncle, through the earlier marriage of Kleopatra I into the Lagid court of Alexandria. Interesting and historic coin type, unusual layout of inscriptions for a Ptolemaic bronze.
5 commentsPtolemAE
Picture_33.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI Philometor769 viewsSilver Tetradrachm
Alexandria mint
Struck c. 170-164 B.C.
27mm 14.2g
Obv: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt.

Svoronos 1489; SNG Copenhagen 265

8 commentsmihali84
PtolomeoIIor.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos AE 2437 viewsAE 22.3x24.1mm
Obv. Head of Zeus-Ammon right
Rev. PTOLOMEUS BASILEUS
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, club at left.
285-246 BC
gparch
AE20PtolemyIIIor.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy III31 viewsAE 20
247-222 BC
OB. Zeus-Ammon R.
REV. Eagle standing L.
wings spread, on thunderbolt,
PTOLOMAEUS BASILICUS,
edge chipped.
gparch
Ptolemy3aOBREV.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes43 views247-222 BC
AE 35
OB. Zeus-Ammon R.
REV. PTOLOMAEUS BASILICUS.
eagle on thunderbolt L.,
chi-rho monogram between legs,
cornucopia in L. field
1 commentsgparch
PtolemyIVOBREVa.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy IV, AE3832 views222-204 BC
OB. Zeus-Ammon R.
REV. PTOLOMAEUS BASILICUS,
Eagle standing L. on thunderbolt,
looking back over shoulder,
cornucopia on shoulder,
E monogram between legs
gparch
Ptolemy_tyre_tet~0.jpg
Greek, Ptolemy II Tetradrachm 203 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Svoronos 626 var (no monogram) or Svoronos 644 var (D behind ear), VF, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, weight 14.076g, maximum diameter 27.4mm, die axis 0o, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, Tyre monogram and club left; rare;

Ex Forvm

Svoronos' description for tetradrachm 626 is the "same as the gold pentadrachm." In the notes for the pentadrachm he notes the type sometimes has a Tyre monogram, but the notes for the tetradrachm 626 discuss only countermarks and not a monogram. The monogram is absent on the plate coin.

Svoronos 644 is be marked with a tiny D behind Ptolemy's ear. On this coin the mark appears to be absent.

Philoromaos
Picture_14.jpg
Greek, Ptolemy VI Philometor304 viewsSilver Tetradrachm
Alexandria mint
Struck c. 170-164 B.C.
27mm 14.2g
Obv: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt.
Svoronos 1489; SNG Copenhagen 265
4 commentsmihali84
06869p00~0.jpe
Greek, Ptolemy VI, 204-181 B.C738 views6869. Silver tetradrachm, BMC-, SNG Cop -, gVF, 13.87g, 26.2mm, 40o, Salamis, Cyprus mint, 177-176 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, owl in left field, LE (regnal year 5) over SA (Salamis mint, Cyprus) in right field; superb portrait, fantastic style, extremely rare, possibly unique;3 commentssalem
ANTIV4or.JPG
Greek, Seleucia in Pieria, Antiochos IV & Laodike IV32 viewsAE 16.6x17.3mm serrate
Obv. Head of Laodike IV right, veiled;
monogram behind neck.
Rev. BASILEWS ANTIOXOU. Head of elephant left with upraised trunk; bow of galley at right. Monogram above trunk. Dotted borders.

Minted at Seleucia in Pieria,
ca. 175-164 BC
Laodike IV was both Antiochos IV' s wife and his sister.
gparch
AntiochusVIIIor copy.JPG
GREEK, Seleucid Kingdom, Antiochos VIII, AE1835 viewsObv. Head of Antiochos right, radiate
Rev. BASILEUS ANTIOCOU EPIFANOUS. Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, sceptre behind shoulder
Antioch mint, first adult reign, c.121 - 114 BC
gparch
217_seleukos.jpg
GREEK, Seleucid Kingdom, Seleukos III Keraunos (The Thunderer)33 viewsAE 16mm 3,7 g
Avers: Artemis head to right
Reverse: Apollo is sitting on the omphalos to the left side , bow on the left and arrow in the right hand. BASILEOS SELEUKOY in greek letters. SNGIs 511?

After a brief reign of three years (225–223 BC), Seleukos was assassinated in Anatolia by members of his army while on campaign against Attalus I of Pergamon.
Franz-Josef M
ANTIV5or.JPG
Greek, Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochos IV; Laodike IV and elephant24 viewsAE 14.2x15.5mm
Obv. Head of Laodike IV right, veiled,
monogram at left, dotted border.
Rev. BASILEWS ANTIOXOU
Head of elephant left, trunk raised;
prow of galley at right, monogram above trunk;
dotted border.
Mint: Seleucia in Pieria
175-164 BC
gparch
ANTIV6or.JPG
Greek, Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochos IV; Laodike IV and elephant19 viewsAE 16.6x17.3mm serrate
Obv. Head of Laodike IV right, veiled.
Monogram at left. Dotted border
Rev. BASILEWS ANTIOXOU
Head of elephant left, trunk raised.
Prow of Galley at right. Delta above trunk.
Mint: Seleucia in Pieria
175-164 BC
gparch
25884q00.jpg
GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Epiphanes Dionysus, 144 - 142 or 141 B.C.230 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Epiphanes Dionysus, 144 - 142 or 141 B.C., SH25884. Silver drachm, SNG Cop 294, SNG Spaer 1760 var, Mint State, Antioch mint, weight 4.232g, maximum diameter 17.9mm, die axis 45o, 144 - 143 B.C.; obverse diademed radiate head of Antiochus VI right; reverse BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EPIFANOUS DIONUSOU, Apollo seated left on omphalos, nude, arrow in right, resting left on bow, monogram between legs, QXR (year 169) STA (magistrate) in ex

Antiochus VI was the son of Alexander Balas and Cleopatra Thea and daughter of Ptolemy VI of Egypt. He was nominated in 145 BC by the general Diodotus Tryphon in opposition to Demetrius II. He did not actually rule and served only as the general's pawn. In 142 BC, Diodotus deposed and succeeded him.
5 commentsJoe Sermarini
ANTIV7or.JPG
GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Antochos IV; Laodike IV and elephant18 viewsAE 15.2x16.4mm serrate
Obv. Head of Laodike IV right,
monogram at left, dotted border.
Rev. BASILEWS ANTIOXOU
Head of elephant left, trunk raised,
prow of galley at right, monogram above trunk.
Mint: Seleucia in Pieria
Houghton, Coins of the Seleucid Empire #113
175-164 BC
gparch
sel162demet.jpg
GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrios I, 19 viewsDemetrios I Seleukid king
serrate AE coin
AV: apollo head right
RV: tripod BASILEOS DIMITROY (king Demetrios) in greek letters
size: 25 mm
Franz-Josef M
AntiochosIVcor.JPG
GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Seleucia in Pieria, Antiochos IV & Laodike IV, AE1647 viewsAE 15.8x16.5mm serrate
Obv. Head of Laodike IV right, veiled, monogram to left, dotted border.
Rev. BASILEWS ANTIOXOU. Head of elephant left, trunk raised; prow of galley at right, monogram above trunk; dotted border.
Mint: Seleucia in Pieria, 175-164 BC.

Laodike IV was both the wife and sister of Antiochus !V.
gparch
019 Hieron II 16 litras.jpg
GREEK, SICILY, SYRACUSE, Hieron II, 16 litras72 viewsDatación: 274-216 aC
Valor: 16 litras
Catálogo: Sear Greek Coins 988. BMC 550. Burnett 41. SNG Cop 824. SNG ANS 876. SNGuk 0300 1013
Conservación: BC+/MBC+
Metal: AG
Peso: 11,72 gr.
Diámetro: 25,70 mm.
Anverso: Cabeza velada y diademada de la reina Philistis (esposa de Hieron II) a izquierda.
Reverso: Cuadriga a derecha conducida por Nike sosteniendo riendas. Encima leyenda greiega BASILISSAS con media luna debajo. Debajo de los caballos espiga y en el campo a derecha KIS. En exergo leyenda griega FILISTIDOS
2 commentsJuan B
Lisymahoy.jpg
GREEK, Thrace, Lysimachus. 297-281 BC. AR tetradrachm. 46 views297-281 BC. Lampsakos mint. Head of the deified Alexander right, wearing horn of Ammon / BASILEWS LYSIMAXOY, Athena seated left, holding Nike in her extended right hand, left arm leaning on her shield; monogram in inner left field, crescent in exergue. Thompson 50 2 commentsseleukoy
GAE404_O.jpg
Greek, Zeus, Syracusan Imitation Ptolemaic Diobol of Hieron II ca. 265BC216 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos - Syracuse Issue of Hieron II - Diobol - 285/246BC
AE 26.9-28.4mm : 14.736gm : 2h
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field, N control letter behind eagle tail at right. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 619
NOTE - This type actually struck in Syracuse by Hieron II ca. 265BC. New research just published on this subject (2007). The paper that presents this new attribution is available online at www.ptolemybronze.com.
1 commentsPtolemAE
coin611.jpg
Head of Seleucus II, Æ17 Like Spaer 471, but 17mm21 viewsHead of Seleucus II, Æ17, Sometimes with
slight whisker. Apollo, naked, standing leaning on bow.
w/arrow in other hand. Monograms left and right.
/ BASILEWS SELEYKOY, Coin #611
cars100
Copy_of_1__Jannaeus_H_467.jpg
Hendin-46723 viewsALEXANDER JANNAEUS (Yehonatan) 103-76 BCE
Mint:Jerusalem;AE Prutah
Obv- ALEXANDROU BASILEWS -of Alexander the King
around upside down Seleucid anchor surrounded by a diadem.
Rev- HA MELEK YEHONATAN -Yehonatan the king
Jerusalem lily flower surrounded by border of dots
Ref: AJC I-group Aa1; TJC-group N1
2 commentsbrian l
1_Jannaeus_H-469.jpg
Hendin-46921 viewsALEXANDER JANNAEUS (Yehonatan) 103-76 BCE
Mint:Jerusalem;AE Prutah
Obv- BASILEWS ALEZANDROY-OF KING ALEXANDER
Anchor surrounded by a boarder of pellets.
Rev- CH L M H N T N W H Y- YEHONATAN the KING,
Inside eight pointed star surrounded by a diadem.
Meshorer: AJC 1-Ca; TJC-group K
2 commentsbrian l
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Hendin-469 var.7 viewsALEXANDER JANNAEUS (Yehonatan) 103-76 BCE
Mint:Jerusalem;AE Prutah
Obv- BASILEWS ALEZANDROY-OF KING ALEXANDER
Anchor surrounded by a boarder of pellets.
Rev-K L M H N T N W H Y- YEHONATAN the KING,
Inside eight pointed star surrounded by a diadem.
Meshorer: AJC 1-Ca; TJC-group K
brian l
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Hermaios (90-70 B.C.)45 viewsIndo-Greek Kingdom
Imitation
AR Drachm
O: BASILEUS SUTHPOS EPMAIOY; Draped and diademed bust of Hermaios right. 
R: 'Maharaja Tratarasa Hermayasa' in Kharosthi script; Zeus enthroned left and holding sceptre, Monogram in left field.
2g
17mm
Bopearachchi Series 15C, 91; Senior issue 36
3 commentsMat
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Hermaios AE tetradrachm (imitation?)21 viewsHermaios. c. 90 - 70 BC.

25mm., 9.17g.

Bare-headed, diademed bust of king right, Greek legend around: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ EPMAIOY (Basileos Soteros Hermaiou ... of King Hermaios, the Saviour)

Zeus enthroned three-quarters left, holding sceptre in left hand and bestowing blessing with right hand, Kharoshthi legend around: maharajasa tratarasa / heramayasa

References:

AAGW
RL
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Hermaios of Bactria AR Drachm30 viewsOBV: BASILEUS SUTHPOS EPMAIOY; Draped and diademed bust of Hermaios right.
REV: 'Maharaja Tratarasa Hermayasa' in Kharosthi script; Zeus enthroned left and holding sceptre, Monogram in left field.
Silver drachm of Hermaios (90-70 BC) last of the Indo-Greek dynasty.
Bop_17B (Ref. W'winds)
17 mm, 1.7 gm
daverino
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Herod Agrippa, bronze prutah, canopy / barley5 viewsHerod Agrippa, 37-44 AD. Size/Weight: 17mm, 2.35g. Obverse: BASILEWS AGRIPPA; umbrella-like canopy with fringes. Reverse: Three ears of barley growing between two leaves, flanked by date (year off-flan). Ex areich, photo credit areich

Podiceps
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Herod I (37-4BC) Hendin 49019 views2 Prutah, 19mm, 3.69g.

Obverse: HRWD BASILEWC, cross in closed diadem.

Reverse: Tripod table between two upright palm branches.

Hendin 490

TJC 48a.

These larger coins are almost unique among Judean issues, and were issued by both sides during the war between Herod and Mattathias Antigonus. As soon as Antigonus was dead, Herod abandoned them, making this one of the very few cases where it's possible to argue that the main purpose of a coin issue was propaganda.
Robert_Brenchley
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Herod I (37-4BC) Hendin 49124 viewsPrutah, 14x17mm, 1.93g.

Obverse: HRWDOU BASILEWS around closed diadem, cross within.

Reverse: Table with three curved legs, nothing upon it.

Hendin 491

TJC 51

Tripod tables are known to have been used in the Temple, and the type probably marks Herod's ambitious rebuilding of it.
Robert_Brenchley
Herod I H495.jpg
Herod I (37-4BC) Hendin 49523 viewsLepton, 12x14m, 0.87g.

Obverse: HRWDOU BASILEWS around tripod table.

Reverse: Crossed palms within circle.

Hendin 495

TJC 55
Robert_Brenchley
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Herod I (37-4BC) Hendin 49941 viewsPrutah, 14mm, 0.90g.

Obverse: HRWDOY BASILEWS in concentric circles.

Reverse: Anchor within circle decorated with stylised lilies.

Hendin 499.
Robert_Brenchley
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Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C. Bronze lepton, Hendin 501; Golden bird8 viewsJudean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C. Bronze lepton, Hendin 501, Meshorer 23, RPC I 4909, aVF, Jerusalem mint, 1.033g, 14.0mm, 180o, obverse “HRWD BASIL”, cornucopia; reverse , eagle standing; scarce. This is the first Jewish coin to feature a graven image, the golden bird at the gate of the temple. Ex FORVMPodiceps
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INDIA, Kushan Empire, Soter Megas (Vima Takto), AE Tetradrachm, c.A.D.80 - 100.117 viewsSoter Megas (Vima Takto) AE Tetradrachm, 80-100 AD.
Obv: No legend, radiate, diademed, and draped bust right, holding scepter, three-pronged tamgha behind.
Rev: BASILEVC BASILEWN CWTHR MEGAC, King riding right on horseback, holding sceptre; three-pronged symbol of Soter Megas to right.
Senior B17.
2 commentsJericho
indogreek.jpg
Indo-Greek Bronze 4-Cholkoi of Menander I Soter20 viewsIndo-Greek Bronze 4-Cholkoi of Menander I Soter minted between 155-130 BC.

Obverse: BASILEWS SWTHROS MENANDROS, helmeted and draped bust right;

Reverse: Kharosthi legend: Maharajasa Tratarasa Menandrasa (Great King Savior Menander), Nike advancing right, wreath in extended right, palm frond over shoulder in left, monogram lower right

Attribution: Bopearachchi Série 32C; Mitchiner IGIS Type 244b; Mitchiner ACW 1821; SNG ANS 945 ff; SNG Cop 306 var (monogram)
chuy1530
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INDO-GREEK KINGDOM, MENANDER I. Ca. 165/55-130 B.C. AE unit 12 x 12 mm10 viewsINDO-GREEK KINGDOM, MENANDER I. Ca. 165/55-130 B.C.
Obv. BASILEWS SWTHPOS MENAND[POY], head of elephant right, wearing bell around neck.
Rev. "Maharajasa tratarasa Menamdrasa" in Kharosthi, club of Herakles upward; in left field, monogram; in right field.
Lee S
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Indo-Greek Kings of Bactria, Menander24 viewsIndo-Greek Kings of Bactria, Menander, 160-145 BC, Square AE16 (2.76gm), Pushkalavati. Rare.

O: BASILEWS SWTEROS MENANDROU. Head of Pallas r., wearing plumed helmet. R: Karosthi legend. Maharajasa tratarasa Menadrasa. Nike adv. r., holding wreath and palm; Pushkalavati monogram below. Cf. MA 1821-1823 (but dichalkon). VF, glossy dark green patina. G22

ecoli
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INDO-SCYTHIANS - Azes I19 viewsINDO-SCYTHIANS - Azes I (c. 60-20 B.C.) AR Drachm. Obv: Azes I in military dress, on a horse, with couched spear. Greek legend: BASILEOS BASILEON MEGALOU AZOU "of the Great King of Kings Azes". Rev.: Zeus or Pallas standing left.dpaul7
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Israel, Nazareth - Rolling Stone Tomb171 viewsA really well-preserved example of a Jewish rolling-stone tomb. This one is part of a small necropolis which was found underneath the Convent of the Sisters of Nazareth, only a stone’s throw away from the Basilica of the Annunciation. Abu Galyon
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Italy, Aquileia - basilica189 viewsBasilica is dedicated to the Virgin Mary and the Saints Hermagora and Fortunatus and was built in the first half of the 11th century by Patriarch Poppo in Romanesque style. Upper parts and roof were built by Markward von Randeck in 14th-15th century in Gothic style.
Mosaics from 4th century were hidden under the floor until 1909.
Johny SYSEL
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Italy, Aquileia - mosaic floor200 viewsJonas swallowed by sea monster
Post-Theodorian South hall (end of 4th century)
Mosaics were originally part of Theodorian complex destroyed by Attila. Basilica was built on its site in 1031 and mosaics remained untouched under the floor.
Johny SYSEL
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Italy, Aquileia - mosaic floor203 viewsPost-Theodorian South hall (end of 4th century)
Mosaics were originally part of Theodorian complex destroyed by Attila. Basilica was built on its site in 1031 and mosaics remained untouched under the floor.
Johny SYSEL
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Italy, Aquileia - mosaic floor199 viewsscene of the Good Shepherd with the Mystic Flock
Christ is portrayed as a beardless young man bearing the lost lamb upon his shoulders. In one hand he holds the syrinx, symbol of the gentless he takes cere of his flock with.
Post-Theodorian South hall (end of 4th century)
Mosaics were originally part of Theodorian complex destroyed by Attila. Basilica was built on its site in 1031 and mosaics remained untouched under the floor.
Johny SYSEL
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Italy, Aquileia - mosaic floor195 viewsFishing scene describes the preaching of the Apostles ("Follow me and I will make you fishers of men":Matthew 4,19). The fishes represent the people listening to the good news, the boat is symbol of the church, the net represents the kingdom of heaven ("The kingdom of heaven is like big net that was cast into the sea...": Matthew 13,47).
Post-Theodorian South hall (end of 4th century)
Mosaics were originally part of Theodorian complex destroyed by Attila. Basilica was built on its site in 1031 and mosaics remained untouched under the floor.
Johny SYSEL
STILICHO_DIPTYCHE.JPG
Italy, Monza, Serpero Museum, Duomo di Monza.47 viewsIvory diptych of Stilicho, Roman General (magister militum), Patrician and Consul of the Western Roman Empire. The diptych depicts Stilicho, on the right and, on the left, his wife Serena standing with his son, Eucherius.

The Duomo di Monza is the main religious building of Monza. Although known in English as Monza Cathedral, the building is not in fact a cathedral, as Monza is part of the Diocese of Milan. The church is also known as the Basilica of San Giovanni Battista from its dedication to John the Baptist. In the right transept is the entrance to the Serpero Museum which houses the treasury.
*Alex
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Italy, Pompeii - Column in the Basilica9 viewsA column in the Basilica

From my visit to Pompeii in August 2015
maridvnvm
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Italy, Pompeii - The Basilica14 viewsA view of the Basilica

From my visit to Pompeii in August 2015
maridvnvm
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Italy, Pompeii - The Forum end of the Basilica11 viewsThe Forum end of the Basilica

From my visit to Pompeii in August 2015
maridvnvm
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Italy, Pompeii - The Forum end of the Basilica18 viewsThe Forum end of the Basilica

From my visit to Pompeii in August 2015
1 commentsmaridvnvm
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Italy, Rome, Aqua Claudia, Part of the aquaduct near Basilica of St. John Lateran112 viewsJohny SYSEL
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Italy, Rome, Basilica of Santi Cosma e Damiano, Roman bronze doors40 viewsThe original bronze doors of the Temple of Divus Romulus still survive and are pictured above. They are set between two porphyry columns that support a reused marble architrave and open into a rotunda fifty Roman feet in diameter covered by a cupola which is accessible from the rear through the Basilica of Santi Cosma e Damiano. The temple was converted into a vestibule for the church early in the 6th century.*Alex
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Italy, Rome, Basilica Ulpia and Trajan's column277 viewsChurch of the Most Holy Name of Mary at the Trajan Forum in the background.1 commentsJohny SYSEL
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Italy, Rome, Curia Iulia, Forum Romanum124 viewsCuria Julia (Latin: Curia Iulia, Italian: Curia Iulia) is the third named Curia, or Senate House, in the ancient city of Rome. It was built in 44 BC when Julius Caesar replaced Faustus Cornelius Sulla’s reconstructed Curia Cornelia, which itself had replaced the Curia Hostilia. Caesar did this in order to redesign both spaces within the Comitium and Forum Romanum. The alterations within the Comitium reduced the prominence of the senate and cleared the original space. The work, however, was interrupted by Caesar's assassination at the Theatre of Pompey where the Senate had been meeting temporarily while the work was completed. The project was eventually finished by Caesar’s successor Augustus in 29 BC. The Curia Julia is one of only a handful of Roman structures to survive to the modern day mostly intact, due to its conversion into the basilica of Sant'Adriano al Foro in the 7th century and several later restorations. However the roof, together with the upper elevations of the side walls and rear façade, are modern. These parts date from the remodeling of the deconsecrated church in the 1930s.Joe Sermarini
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Italy, Rome, Original ancient door from Curia205 viewsnow it is in Basilica of St. John Lateran ... seat of Pope until he moved to Vatican1 commentsJohny SYSEL
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Italy, Rome, Pantheon158 viewsbuilt by Agrippa 27 BC
rebuilt by Hadrian into present shape in 123 AD

remains of Neptune's basilica
Johny SYSEL
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Italy, Rome, View from the Colosseum501 viewsOn the left the Palatine Hill, the Via Sacra and Titus' Arch.
On the right Maxentius' Basilica
Posted by Strength And Honour.
Photo taken by my friend Hebe.
Strength And Honour
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Italy, Sicily, Syracuse - temple of Athena174 viewsbuilt in 480 BC
in 7. century AD adapted to basilica
Johny SYSEL
Italy- Forum Romanum- Basilica Emilia- Frisco with everyday life.jpg
Italy- Forum Romanum- Basilica Emilia- Frisco with everyday life89 viewsThe Basilica Julia was built in 54-48 BCE by Julius Caesar as a part of his reorganisation of the Forum Romanum, where it replaced the Basilica Sempronia. It is located on the S. side of the main square of the Forum Romanum, between the Temple of Saturn and the Temple of Castor and Pollux.

Julius Caesar started construction in 54 BCE, but it was still unfinished at his death. It was built on the site of the Basilica Sempronia and a series of shops, the tabernae veteres, that were all demolished.

Augustus finished the building after Caesar's death, but had to reconstruct it again shortly after, due to its destruction by fire in 9 BCE. It was dedicated again in 2 BCE, this time in the name of Gaius Caesar and Lucius Caesar, Augustus' designated heirs at the time.

The basilica was later damaged much by the fire in 283 CE, and restored a few years after by Diocletian. It was again destroyed when Alaric sacked the city in 410 CE.

The Basilica Julia was of huge proportions. The basilica rested on a low podium, seven steps high on the E. side and just one on the W. side, due to the sloping terrain. Of outer dimensions 101×49m, the central nave of the basilica was 82×18m. The four lateral aisles, two on each side, were two storeys high, with vaulted ceiling and arches decorated by semi-columns. The central nave was three storeys high.

A series of shops stood behind the basilica towards the Velabrum. A Temple of Augustus was also built in the area behind the basilica by Tiberius.

The function of the Basilica Julia was to house tribunals and other activities from the Forum when weather didn't permit outdoor meetings. The central nave probably divided in four by wooden removable structures to allow the hearing of more cases at a time. The basilica also housed some administrative offices of the city.

Game boards and graffiti are incised in the steps and in the pavement of the side aisles by idling visitors to the Forum. Some of this can still be seen on the side of the main square of the forum.

The building was in ruin already in late Antiquity, and subsequently stripped of all reusable material, i.e., almost everything.

Very little of the building remains now. The basic floor plan can be seen, and some parts of brick walls remain towards the Temple of Saturn, some bases of statues still in their original position, and the four step podium remain. The brick column bases are reconstructions of the 19th century.
John Schou
Italy- Forum Romanum- The basilica of Majencius front and back.jpg
Italy- Forum Romanum- The basilica of Majencius front and back100 viewsThe Basilica of Maxentius (Basilica Maxentii) or the Basilica of Constantine (Basilica Constantini) was the last of the great civilian basilicas on the Roman Forum. The ruins of the basilica is located between the Temple of Amor and Roma and the Temple of Romulus, on the Via Sacra.

The construction of the basilica was initiated by Maxentius in 308 CE, and finished by Constantine after he had defeated Maxentius in the battle of the Milvian Bridge in 312 CE. As other similar buildings, it was destined for commercial and administrative activities. It is likely that the basilica housed the offices of the Prefect of the City, the highest imperial official in late antiquity.

The site chosen for the basilica was on the Velia, a low ridge connecting the Esquiline Hill and the Palatine Hill. Large parts of the Velia was levelled in preparation for the construction of the basilica. Literary sources tell that earlier the site was occupied by the Horrea Piperatica, the central market and storage facility for pepper and spices, built in the time of Domitian. Also on the site was a sanctuary of the penates publici which had to be moved.

The Basilica of Maxentius is built with arches, which is very atypical. All the other public basilicas had flat ceilings supported by wooden beams. The construction techniques used borrowed more from the great imperial baths than from the traditional basilica.
The basilica is one of the most impressive buildings on the Forum Romanum. The ground plan is rectangular, oriented E.-W., covering an area of 100×65m divided into a central nave and to lateral aisles and an atrium on the E. side where the original entrance was.

The central nave measured 80×25m and was covered by three groin vaults with a maximum height of 35m, supported by eight monolithic Corinthian columns of 14.5m. Each of the two aisles was made up of three interconnected coffered vaults, 20.5m wide and 24m high, communicating with the central nave by three huge openings.

Light was provided by two rows of three large windows in five of the six lateral vaults, and by windows in the sides of the now collapsed cross vaults over the central nave. The windows in two of the vaults in the surviving N. side of the building give a good idea of the amount of light inside the building.

The floor in both the central and the lateral spaces were a geometric pattern of squares with circles and lozenges of multi-coloured marble, similar to the floor in the Pantheon.

The walls were in opus latericium, originally with a marble veneer. The vaults were in opus caementicium with a gilded stucco finish. The roof was covered with gilded bronze tiles.

The entrance of the original project of Maxentius was to the east, from a branch of the old Via Sacra behind the Temple of Amor and Roma. It lead into an elongated atrium, connected to the central nave and the lateral aisles by five gateways.

In the W. end was a huge apse, 20m in diameter, where a colossal seated statue of Maxentius stood. This statue was later changed to look like Constantine. The statue was an acrolith (the head, hands and feet were of marble, while the rest was of other materials), and the remains of the statue were found in 1486 in the apse.

Constantine changed the plan when he took over the unfinished basilica. He had a another entrance added on the S. side, on the Via Sacra, where a monumental stairway led to a porch of four porphyry columns and via three double doorways into the central part of the S. aisle. In front of this new entrance, in the central vault of the N. aisle, another apse was added, smaller than the apse in the W. end. In back of this apse a niche held a standing statue of Constantine, and smaller, square-headed niches, two rows of four niches on each side, which might have housed a gallery of Constantine's relatives and lieutenants. This room could be closed by wooden doors, and it is likely the central part of the office of the Prefect of the City was there.

Of the original building only the three vaults of the N. aisle remain, devoid of all decorations. The vaults of the S. and central nave probably collapsed under an earthquake in c. 847. The floor plan is clearly visible, however, and the remaining structures give a vivid impression of the grandeur of the original edifice.

The remains of the Colossal Statue of Constantine I are in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori on the Campidoglio, and one of the columns from the central nave was moved to the Piazza Santa Maria Maggiore in 1614. The remaining columns have disappeared. The bronze tiles from the roof were reused for the first Basilica of Saint Peter.

John Schou
Italy- Forum Romanum- The basilica of Trajan.jpg
Italy- Forum Romanum- The Forum of Trajan58 viewsThe Forum of Trajan has a more complicated foundation than the other Imperial Forums. The piazza is closed, with the Basilica Ulpia. At the back of this the Trajan column was elevated between the two Libraries, and it was believed that the complex concluded with the Temple dedicated to Divo Trajan. One entered the piazza through a curved arch passageway, a type of arch of triumph, in the center of a convex wall decorated with jutting columns.
An equestrian statue of Trajan occupied the center of the piazza, which was bordered by porticos with decorated attics-similar to the Forum of Augustus but with Caryatids instead of Daci. Spacious covered exedras opened up behind the porticos. The facade of the basilica, that closed the piazza, also had an attic decorated with Daci statues. The inside of the Basilica had 5 naves with columns along the short sides and apses at both ends; the very spacious central nave had two floors.
The Trajan Column was closed in a small courtyard, bordered by porticos opposite of the Library's facade. These were constituted of large rooms with niches in the walls and decorated with two types of columns.
The temple was probably of an enormous dimension and probably closed by a fenced portico. Today's archeological excavations in the Forum of Trajan have demonstrated that the Temple of Trajan's position is not what it was hypothesized to be in the past. Archeological evidence has clarified the findings in the area to be Insulae- remains of houses rather than those from a temple structure. These findings lie underneath what is today the Province headquarters- the palazzo of Valentini, next to the Column's location.
Rather, the temple was probably situated exactly in the middle of the forum area, where excavation is now taking place.

The Forum of Trajan was utilized as a splendid area of representation for public ceremonies. We know, for example, that in 118 A.D. Adriano publicly burned tables with citizen's debts in the piazza, as a statement to the treasury.
Also, in the late epoch, exedras behind the lateral porticos were used to host poetry readings and conferences.
Court hearings and ceremonies for the freedom of slaves were probably held in the apses of the Basilica.
The Library was probably used as a sort of historical archive of the Roman state and also conserved republican annals.
The sculptural decorations in the various Forum spaces transmitted messages of imperial propaganda of Trajan.
Above all was the celebration of the Daci conquest and the victorious army with focus on the achievement of peace. The representation was sculpted into the walls with images of the conquests.
Images of cupids watering griffins on the entrance wall allude again to the peacefulness of the Empire's power.
The expansion and growth of the Empire, completed with the campaign towards the Orient and interrupted by the death of the Emperor, would have allowed Trajan to consider himself the new founder of Rome.
His representation as a hero is justified in his sepulcher in the base of the Column, in the heart of the city.

Forum of Trajan
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107 A.D. - Dacia (Romania) conquered and work begins;
January 15th 112 A.D. – Inauguration of the Forum and the Basilica Ulpia;
May 18th 113 A.D. – Inauguration of the Trajan Column;
117 A.D. – Trajan dies and the arch of triumph is ordered by the Senate;
125-138 A.D. – Probable dedication to the temple on behalf of Adrian.

Complex Area: 300x180 meters
uncovered piazza area: 120x90 meters

Area of the Basilica Ulpia: 180x60 meters
Height of Trajan's Column: 39.81 meters
John Schou
Italy- Pompeii- Brothel.jpg
Italy- Pompeii- Brothel59 viewsSome of the most fascinating clues about the lives of the ancient peoples who made their lives in Pompeii can be found in the numerous brothels in the city. It is an indication of the prosperity of the city -- people had money to burn. Here is one example of the Pompeian "houses of ill repute". I chose this one because of its unusual architecture and fine frescoes.

Ancient Pompeii was full of erotic or pornographic frescoes, symbols, inscriptions, and even household items. The ancient Roman culture of the time was much more sexually permissive than most present-day cultures.

When the serious excavation of Pompeii began in the 18th century, a clash of the cultures was the result. A fresco on a wall that showed the ancient god of sex and fertility, Priapus with his extremely enlarged penis, was covered with plaster and only rediscovered because of rainfall in 1998.[1] In 1819, when king Francis I of Naples visited the exhibition at the National Museum with his wife and daughter, he was so embarrassed by the erotic artwork that he decided to have it locked away in a secret cabinet, accessible only to "people of mature age and respected morals." Re-opened, closed, re-opened again and then closed again for nearly 100 years, it was made briefly accessible again at the end of the 1960s (the time of the sexual revolution) and has finally been re-opened in the year 2000. Minors are not allowed entry to the once secret cabinet without a guardian or a written permission.As previously mentioned, some of the paintings and frescoes became immediately famous because they represented erotic, sometimes explicit, sexual scenes. One of the most curious buildings recovered was in fact a Lupanare (brothel), which had many erotic paintings and graffiti indicating the services available -- patrons only had to point to what they wanted. The Lupanare had 10 rooms (cubicula, 5 per floor), a balcony, and a latrina. It was one of the larger houses, perhaps the largest, but not the only brothel. The town seems to have been oriented to a warm consideration of sensual matters: on a wall of the Basilica (sort of a civil tribunal, thus frequented by many Roman tourists and travelers), an immortal inscription tells the foreigner, If anyone is looking for some tender love in this town, keep in mind that here all the girls are very friendly (loose translation).

The function of these pictures is not yet clear: some authors say that they indicate that the services of prostitutes were available on the upper floor of the house and could perhaps be a sort of advertising, while others prefer the hypothesis that their only purpose was to decorate the walls with joyful scenes (as these were in Roman culture). The Termae were, however, used in common by males and females, although baths in other areas (even within Pompeii) were often segregated by sex.

John Schou
Italy- Pompeii- The Basilica and The Forum .jpg
Italy- Pompeii- The Basilica and The Forum 43 viewsBASILICA
Forum of Pompeii c. 120 B.C. These more massive columns are from the basilica, the most important public building in Pompeii. Constructed prior to the Roman period, the basilica had three aisles and five entrance doors onto the forum. In the rear we see a two-tiered colonnade which has columns in the Doric style on the bottom and slender Ionic columns on top of a cross beam. In Pompeii many columns were made of brick and covered with stucco.

The Forum
ENTRANCE TO THE FORUM Forum of Pompeii After 80 B.C. One of the two arches originally covered with marble which flank the Temple of Jupiter and are the main entrances to the forum. The temple was built under the Samnites in the second century B.C.
FORUM OF POMPEII After 80 B.C. The Forum of Pompeii has a central rectangular space, 466 feet long by 124 feet wide, surrounded by the most important public buildings in the city. Like other forums, it is set up on an axial plan. A colonnade lines three sides. In the center of the fourth side, visible in the distance, is the Temple of Jupiter, known as the Capitolium. The forum was paved with travertine stone and only pedestrians were permitted in its precinct. Situated on an old site, it was largely rebuilt after 80 B.C. when Pompeii became a Roman colony. The forum was again in the process of rebuilding after the earthquake of 62 AD. It was buried under the eruption of Vesuvius seen in the distance in 79.

John Schou
Italy- Rome -circusmaximus model.jpg
Italy- Rome -circusmaximus model58 viewsA circus designates a circle or course for chariot racing. Aside from the Circus Maximus, the largest and oldest, there were three other circuses in Rome: the Circus Flaminius (221 BC), which actually was not a circus at all but a public square; the Circus Gaii et Neronis (circa AD 40), where many of the Christian martyrdoms occurred and on which St. Peter's basilica was built (the obelisk brought to Rome by Caligula to adorn its spina still stands in the square); and the Circus Maxentius (AD 309), built as part of his villa on the Via Appia and the best preserved.

In this view, the starting gates are in the foreground, with the royal box dominating the viewing standing on the left" or "and the royal box dominating the viewing stands on the left. The palace overlooks the Circus from the Palatine Hill.

The Circus Maximus was another public entertainment center, and was just a single, specific facility in Rome. The Maximus was used mostly for chariot racing. It could seat 250,000 people! There were other circuses in ancient Rome.

This oval basin, nearly 600 meters long, is almost entirely filled in with dirt. It was once a race track. It was made in the time of the Etruscan kings (presumably Tarquinio Prisco). Augustus adorned the brick structure with an imperial stage, which was rebuilt by Trajan, enlarged by Caracalla and restored by Constantine. During the reign of Constantine, the Circus could hold more than 200,000 spectators. Today only the outline remains (the area it occupied is now a public garden).


The most popular events were the chariot races held in the Circus Maximus, an arena that held up to 300,000 spectators. Competing teams with brightly decorated horses attracted fierce loyalty, and up to a dozen four-horse chariots crowded together through the dangerous turns, lap after lap. Successful charioteers became so wealthy that even emperors envied their riches.

John Schou
Italy- Rome- Coliseum constructed by Flavius and seen from outside~0.jpg
Italy- Rome- Coliseum constructed by Flavius and seen from outside53 viewsColosseum
The Colosseum or Coliseum, originally known as the Flavian Amphitheatre (lat. Amphitheatrum Flavium), is an amphitheatre in Rome, capable of seating 50,000 spectators, which was once used for gladiatorial combat. It was built by Emperor Vespasian and his son, Titus, between AD 72 and AD 90. It was built at the site of Nero's enormous palace, the Domus Aurea. The Colosseum's name is derived from a colossus (a 130-foot or 40-metre statue) of Nero which once stood nearby.

Construction
The construction of the Colosseum began under the Emperor Vespasian in AD 72 and was completed by his son, Titus, in the 80s AD. It was built at the site of Nero's enormous palace, the Domus Aurea, which had been built after the great fire of Rome in AD 64. Some historians are of the opinion that the construction of the Colosseum might have been financed by the looting of King Herod the Great's Temple in Jerusalem which occurred about AD 70. Dio Cassius said that 9,000 wild animals were killed in the one hundred days of celebration which inaugurated the amphitheatre opening. The arena floor was covered with sand to sop up the blood.

The Colosseum hosted large-scale spectacular games that included fights between animals (venationes), the killing of prisoners by animals and other executions (noxii), naval battles (naumachiae, via flooding the arena), and combats between gladiators (munera). It has been estimated that between 500,000 and 1,000,000 people died in the Colosseum games.

History of the name Colosseum
The Colosseum's name is derived from a colossus (a 130-foot or 40-metre statue) of Nero nearby. This statue was later remodeled by Nero's successors into the likeness of Sol, the sun god, by adding the appropriate solar crown. The link to Nero's colossus seems to have been forgotten over time, and the name was corrupted to Coliseum in the Middle Ages. Both names are frequently used in modern English, but "Flavian Amphitheatre" is generally unknown. In Italy, it is still known as il colosseo, but other Romance languages have gone for forms such as le colisée and el coliseo.

Description
The Colosseum measured 48 metres high, 188 metres long, and 156 metres wide. The wooden arena floor was 86 metres by 54 metres, and covered by sand. Its elliptical shape kept the players from retreating to a corner, and allowed the spectators to be closer to the action than a circle would allow.

The Colosseum was ingeniously designed. It has been said that most spectacle venues (stadiums, and similar) have been influenced by features of the Colosseum's structure, even well into modern times. Seating (cavea) was divided into different sections. The podium, the first level of seating, was for the Roman senators, and the emperor's private, cushioned, marble box was also located on this level. Above the podium was the maenianum primum, for the other Roman aristocrats who were not in the senate. The third level, the maenianum secundum, was divided into three sections. The lower part (the immum) was for wealthy citizens, while the upper part (the summum) was for poor citizens. A third, wooden section (the maenianum secundum in legneis) was a wooden structure at the very top of the building, added by Domitian. It was standing room only, and was for lower class women.

Underneath the arena was the hypogeum (literally, "underground"), a network of tunnels and cages where gladiators and animals were held before contests began. There were also numerous trap doors in the arena floor for the various animals hidden underneath. The arena floor no longer exists, and the hypogeum walls and corridors are clearly visible in the ruins of the building. The entire base of the Colosseum was equivalent to 6 acres (160,000 m²).

A most ingenious part of the Colosseum was its cooling system. It was roofed using a canvas covered net-like structure made of ropes, with a hole in the center. This roof sloped down towards the center to catch the wind and provide a breeze for the audience. Sailors manipulated the ropes. The Colosseum also had vomitoria - passageways that open into a tier of seats from below or behind. The vomitoria of the Colosseum in Rome were designed so that the immense venue could fill in 15 minutes, and be evacuated in 5 minutes. Each entrance and exit was numbered, as was each staircase. There were 80 entrances at ground level, 76 for ordinary spectators, two for the imperial family, and two for the gladiators. The vomitoria quickly dispersed people into their seats and upon conclusion of the event disgorged them with abruptness into the surrounding streets - giving rise, presumably, to the name.

Later history
The Colosseum was in continuous use until 217, when it was damaged by fire after it was struck by lightning. It was restored in 238 and gladiatorial games continued until Christianity gradually put an end to those parts of them which included the death of humans. The building was used for various purposes, mostly venationes (animal hunts), until 524. Two earthquakes (in 442 and 508) caused a great damage to the structure. In the Middle Ages, it was severely damaged by further earthquakes (847 and 1349), and was then converted into a fortress. The marble that originally covered it was burned to make quicklime. During the Renaissance, but mostly in the Baroque age, the ruling Roman families (from which many popes came) used it as a source of marble for the construction of St. Peter's Basilica and the private Palazzi. A famous description is in the saying Quod non fecerunt Barbari, fecerunt Barberini; what the Barbarians weren't able to do, was done by the Barberinis (one such family).

The Venerable Bede (c. 672-735) wrote

Quandiu stabit coliseus, stabit et Roma; (As long as the Colosseum stands, so shall Rome)
Quando cadit coliseus, cadet et Roma (When the Colosseum falls, so shall Rome)
Quando cadet Roma, cadet et mundus. (When Rome falls, so shall the world)
Note that he used coliseus, i.e. he made the name a masculine noun. This form is no longer in use.

In 1749, as a very early example of historic preservation, Pope Benedict XIV forbade the use of the Colosseum as a quarry. He consecrated the building to the Passion of Christ and installed Stations of the Cross, declaring it sanctified by the blood of the Christian martyrs who were thought to have perished there. Later popes initiated various stabilization and restoration projects. Every Good Friday the pope leads a procession within the ellipse in memory of Christian martyrs. However, there is no historical evidence that Christians were tortured and killed in the Colosseum [2]. It is presumed that the majority of Christian martyrdom in Rome took place at the Circus Maximus.

In recent years, the local authorities of Rome have illuminated the Colosseum all night long whenever someone condemned to the death penalty gets commuted or released.

John Schou
Italy- Rome- Coliseum seen from outside~0.jpg
Italy- Rome- Coliseum seen from outside48 viewsColosseum
The Colosseum or Coliseum, originally known as the Flavian Amphitheatre (lat. Amphitheatrum Flavium), is an amphitheatre in Rome, capable of seating 50,000 spectators, which was once used for gladiatorial combat. It was built by Emperor Vespasian and his son, Titus, between AD 72 and AD 90. It was built at the site of Nero's enormous palace, the Domus Aurea. The Colosseum's name is derived from a colossus (a 130-foot or 40-metre statue) of Nero which once stood nearby.

Construction
The construction of the Colosseum began under the Emperor Vespasian in AD 72 and was completed by his son, Titus, in the 80s AD. It was built at the site of Nero's enormous palace, the Domus Aurea, which had been built after the great fire of Rome in AD 64. Some historians are of the opinion that the construction of the Colosseum might have been financed by the looting of King Herod the Great's Temple in Jerusalem which occurred about AD 70. Dio Cassius said that 9,000 wild animals were killed in the one hundred days of celebration which inaugurated the amphitheatre opening. The arena floor was covered with sand to sop up the blood.

The Colosseum hosted large-scale spectacular games that included fights between animals (venationes), the killing of prisoners by animals and other executions (noxii), naval battles (naumachiae, via flooding the arena), and combats between gladiators (munera). It has been estimated that between 500,000 and 1,000,000 people died in the Colosseum games.

History of the name Colosseum
The Colosseum's name is derived from a colossus (a 130-foot or 40-metre statue) of Nero nearby. This statue was later remodeled by Nero's successors into the likeness of Sol, the sun god, by adding the appropriate solar crown. The link to Nero's colossus seems to have been forgotten over time, and the name was corrupted to Coliseum in the Middle Ages. Both names are frequently used in modern English, but "Flavian Amphitheatre" is generally unknown. In Italy, it is still known as il colosseo, but other Romance languages have gone for forms such as le colisée and el coliseo.

Description
The Colosseum measured 48 metres high, 188 metres long, and 156 metres wide. The wooden arena floor was 86 metres by 54 metres, and covered by sand. Its elliptical shape kept the players from retreating to a corner, and allowed the spectators to be closer to the action than a circle would allow.

The Colosseum was ingeniously designed. It has been said that most spectacle venues (stadiums, and similar) have been influenced by features of the Colosseum's structure, even well into modern times. Seating (cavea) was divided into different sections. The podium, the first level of seating, was for the Roman senators, and the emperor's private, cushioned, marble box was also located on this level. Above the podium was the maenianum primum, for the other Roman aristocrats who were not in the senate. The third level, the maenianum secundum, was divided into three sections. The lower part (the immum) was for wealthy citizens, while the upper part (the summum) was for poor citizens. A third, wooden section (the maenianum secundum in legneis) was a wooden structure at the very top of the building, added by Domitian. It was standing room only, and was for lower class women.

Underneath the arena was the hypogeum (literally, "underground"), a network of tunnels and cages where gladiators and animals were held before contests began. There were also numerous trap doors in the arena floor for the various animals hidden underneath. The arena floor no longer exists, and the hypogeum walls and corridors are clearly visible in the ruins of the building. The entire base of the Colosseum was equivalent to 6 acres (160,000 m²).

A most ingenious part of the Colosseum was its cooling system. It was roofed using a canvas covered net-like structure made of ropes, with a hole in the center. This roof sloped down towards the center to catch the wind and provide a breeze for the audience. Sailors manipulated the ropes. The Colosseum also had vomitoria - passageways that open into a tier of seats from below or behind. The vomitoria of the Colosseum in Rome were designed so that the immense venue could fill in 15 minutes, and be evacuated in 5 minutes. Each entrance and exit was numbered, as was each staircase. There were 80 entrances at ground level, 76 for ordinary spectators, two for the imperial family, and two for the gladiators. The vomitoria quickly dispersed people into their seats and upon conclusion of the event disgorged them with abruptness into the surrounding streets - giving rise, presumably, to the name.

Later history
The Colosseum was in continuous use until 217, when it was damaged by fire after it was struck by lightning. It was restored in 238 and gladiatorial games continued until Christianity gradually put an end to those parts of them which included the death of humans. The building was used for various purposes, mostly venationes (animal hunts), until 524. Two earthquakes (in 442 and 508) caused a great damage to the structure. In the Middle Ages, it was severely damaged by further earthquakes (847 and 1349), and was then converted into a fortress. The marble that originally covered it was burned to make quicklime. During the Renaissance, but mostly in the Baroque age, the ruling Roman families (from which many popes came) used it as a source of marble for the construction of St. Peter's Basilica and the private Palazzi. A famous description is in the saying Quod non fecerunt Barbari, fecerunt Barberini; what the Barbarians weren't able to do, was done by the Barberinis (one such family).

The Venerable Bede (c. 672-735) wrote

Quandiu stabit coliseus, stabit et Roma; (As long as the Colosseum stands, so shall Rome)
Quando cadit coliseus, cadet et Roma (When the Colosseum falls, so shall Rome)
Quando cadet Roma, cadet et mundus. (When Rome falls, so shall the world)
Note that he used coliseus, i.e. he made the name a masculine noun. This form is no longer in use.

In 1749, as a very early example of historic preservation, Pope Benedict XIV forbade the use of the Colosseum as a quarry. He consecrated the building to the Passion of Christ and installed Stations of the Cross, declaring it sanctified by the blood of the Christian martyrs who were thought to have perished there. Later popes initiated various stabilization and restoration projects. Every Good Friday the pope leads a procession within the ellipse in memory of Christian martyrs. However, there is no historical evidence that Christians were tortured and killed in the Colosseum [2]. It is presumed that the majority of Christian martyrdom in Rome took place at the Circus Maximus.

In recent years, the local authorities of Rome have illuminated the Colosseum all night long whenever someone condemned to the death penalty gets commuted or released.

John Schou
Italy- Rome- Coliseum seen from outside 1~0.jpg
Italy- Rome- Coliseum seen from outside 145 viewsColosseum
The Colosseum or Coliseum, originally known as the Flavian Amphitheatre (lat. Amphitheatrum Flavium), is an amphitheatre in Rome, capable of seating 50,000 spectators, which was once used for gladiatorial combat. It was built by Emperor Vespasian and his son, Titus, between AD 72 and AD 90. It was built at the site of Nero's enormous palace, the Domus Aurea. The Colosseum's name is derived from a colossus (a 130-foot or 40-metre statue) of Nero which once stood nearby.

Construction
The construction of the Colosseum began under the Emperor Vespasian in AD 72 and was completed by his son, Titus, in the 80s AD. It was built at the site of Nero's enormous palace, the Domus Aurea, which had been built after the great fire of Rome in AD 64. Some historians are of the opinion that the construction of the Colosseum might have been financed by the looting of King Herod the Great's Temple in Jerusalem which occurred about AD 70. Dio Cassius said that 9,000 wild animals were killed in the one hundred days of celebration which inaugurated the amphitheatre opening. The arena floor was covered with sand to sop up the blood.

The Colosseum hosted large-scale spectacular games that included fights between animals (venationes), the killing of prisoners by animals and other executions (noxii), naval battles (naumachiae, via flooding the arena), and combats between gladiators (munera). It has been estimated that between 500,000 and 1,000,000 people died in the Colosseum games.

History of the name Colosseum
The Colosseum's name is derived from a colossus (a 130-foot or 40-metre statue) of Nero nearby. This statue was later remodeled by Nero's successors into the likeness of Sol, the sun god, by adding the appropriate solar crown. The link to Nero's colossus seems to have been forgotten over time, and the name was corrupted to Coliseum in the Middle Ages. Both names are frequently used in modern English, but "Flavian Amphitheatre" is generally unknown. In Italy, it is still known as il colosseo, but other Romance languages have gone for forms such as le colisée and el coliseo.

Description
The Colosseum measured 48 metres high, 188 metres long, and 156 metres wide. The wooden arena floor was 86 metres by 54 metres, and covered by sand. Its elliptical shape kept the players from retreating to a corner, and allowed the spectators to be closer to the action than a circle would allow.

The Colosseum was ingeniously designed. It has been said that most spectacle venues (stadiums, and similar) have been influenced by features of the Colosseum's structure, even well into modern times. Seating (cavea) was divided into different sections. The podium, the first level of seating, was for the Roman senators, and the emperor's private, cushioned, marble box was also located on this level. Above the podium was the maenianum primum, for the other Roman aristocrats who were not in the senate. The third level, the maenianum secundum, was divided into three sections. The lower part (the immum) was for wealthy citizens, while the upper part (the summum) was for poor citizens. A third, wooden section (the maenianum secundum in legneis) was a wooden structure at the very top of the building, added by Domitian. It was standing room only, and was for lower class women.

Underneath the arena was the hypogeum (literally, "underground"), a network of tunnels and cages where gladiators and animals were held before contests began. There were also numerous trap doors in the arena floor for the various animals hidden underneath. The arena floor no longer exists, and the hypogeum walls and corridors are clearly visible in the ruins of the building. The entire base of the Colosseum was equivalent to 6 acres (160,000 m²).

A most ingenious part of the Colosseum was its cooling system. It was roofed using a canvas covered net-like structure made of ropes, with a hole in the center. This roof sloped down towards the center to catch the wind and provide a breeze for the audience. Sailors manipulated the ropes. The Colosseum also had vomitoria - passageways that open into a tier of seats from below or behind. The vomitoria of the Colosseum in Rome were designed so that the immense venue could fill in 15 minutes, and be evacuated in 5 minutes. Each entrance and exit was numbered, as was each staircase. There were 80 entrances at ground level, 76 for ordinary spectators, two for the imperial family, and two for the gladiators. The vomitoria quickly dispersed people into their seats and upon conclusion of the event disgorged them with abruptness into the surrounding streets - giving rise, presumably, to the name.

Later history
The Colosseum was in continuous use until 217, when it was damaged by fire after it was struck by lightning. It was restored in 238 and gladiatorial games continued until Christianity gradually put an end to those parts of them which included the death of humans. The building was used for various purposes, mostly venationes (animal hunts), until 524. Two earthquakes (in 442 and 508) caused a great damage to the structure. In the Middle Ages, it was severely damaged by further earthquakes (847 and 1349), and was then converted into a fortress. The marble that originally covered it was burned to make quicklime. During the Renaissance, but mostly in the Baroque age, the ruling Roman families (from which many popes came) used it as a source of marble for the construction of St. Peter's Basilica and the private Palazzi. A famous description is in the saying Quod non fecerunt Barbari, fecerunt Barberini; what the Barbarians weren't able to do, was done by the Barberinis (one such family).

The Venerable Bede (c. 672-735) wrote

Quandiu stabit coliseus, stabit et Roma; (As long as the Colosseum stands, so shall Rome)
Quando cadit coliseus, cadet et Roma (When the Colosseum falls, so shall Rome)
Quando cadet Roma, cadet et mundus. (When Rome falls, so shall the world)
Note that he used coliseus, i.e. he made the name a masculine noun. This form is no longer in use.

In 1749, as a very early example of historic preservation, Pope Benedict XIV forbade the use of the Colosseum as a quarry. He consecrated the building to the Passion of Christ and installed Stations of the Cross, declaring it sanctified by the blood of the Christian martyrs who were thought to have perished there. Later popes initiated various stabilization and restoration projects. Every Good Friday the pope leads a procession within the ellipse in memory of Christian martyrs. However, there is no historical evidence that Christians were tortured and killed in the Colosseum [2]. It is presumed that the majority of Christian martyrdom in Rome took place at the Circus Maximus.

In recent years, the local authorities of Rome have illuminated the Colosseum all night long whenever someone condemned to the death penalty gets commuted or released.

John Schou
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum and temple of Saturn.jpg
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum and temple of Saturn45 viewsThe Temple of Saturn (Templum Saturni or Aedes Saturnus) is the oldest temple in the Forum Romanum, consecrated for the first time in c. 498 BCE. It is located in the W. end of the Forum, behind the Rostra and the Basilica Julia, across the Clivus Capitolinus from the Temple of Vespasian and Titus.

There have been three temples dedicated to Saturn on the location. The first was built in the last years of the Roman Kingdom, but was first consecrated in the first decade of the Roman Republic. Very little is known about this archaic temple, but it was probably Etruscan in style, just as the contemporary Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus on the Capitolium.

The first temple was torn down in 42 BCE and a new temple built in stone, by the aedile L. Munatius Plancus. The tall, massive, travertine clad podium, measuring 40×22.5m with a height of 9m, is from this building. This temple was in turn destroyed by the fire of 283 CE, which destroyed major parts of the Forum Romanum.

The temple was reconstructed under Diocletian after the fire, but the ground plan and podium from 42 BCE was retained. The temple was of the Ionic order with six columns on the facade. The eight surviving columns of red and grey granite are from this third temple, which largely used recycled material—not all columns, bases and capitals match stylistically.

The inscription on the architrave is also from this period. It reads: "Senatus populusque romanus incendio consumptum restituit"; meaning "The Roman senate and people restored what fire had consumed".

In front of the podium, under the now collapsed stairway, were two rooms, one of which served as the Aerarium, the State Treasury. On the side of the podium holes remain from where a plate was attached for the posting of public documents and acts pertinent to the Aerarium.

An altar dedicated to Saturn, the Ara Saturni, stood in front of the temple, on the other side of the road that passes just in front of the temple. The remains of this altar are now under a roof just in front of the Umbilicus Urbis Romae, near the Arch of Septimius Severus. See this map for an illustration of the probable location of the altar.

Inside the temple stood a statue of of Saturn, which would be carried in procession when triumphs were celebrated. The feast of the Saturnalia on December 17th was a part of the cult of Saturn and was started with a sacrifice at the Temple of Saturn.
1 commentsJohn Schou
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum and temple of Saturn 1.jpg
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum and temple of Saturn 131 viewsThe Temple of Saturn (Templum Saturni or Aedes Saturnus) is the oldest temple in the Forum Romanum, consecrated for the first time in c. 498 BCE. It is located in the W. end of the Forum, behind the Rostra and the Basilica Julia, across the Clivus Capitolinus from the Temple of Vespasian and Titus.

There have been three temples dedicated to Saturn on the location. The first was built in the last years of the Roman Kingdom, but was first consecrated in the first decade of the Roman Republic. Very little is known about this archaic temple, but it was probably Etruscan in style, just as the contemporary Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus on the Capitolium.

The first temple was torn down in 42 BCE and a new temple built in stone, by the aedile L. Munatius Plancus. The tall, massive, travertine clad podium, measuring 40×22.5m with a height of 9m, is from this building. This temple was in turn destroyed by the fire of 283 CE, which destroyed major parts of the Forum Romanum.

The temple was reconstructed under Diocletian after the fire, but the ground plan and podium from 42 BCE was retained. The temple was of the Ionic order with six columns on the facade. The eight surviving columns of red and grey granite are from this third temple, which largely used recycled material—not all columns, bases and capitals match stylistically.

The inscription on the architrave is also from this period. It reads: "Senatus populusque romanus incendio consumptum restituit"; meaning "The Roman senate and people restored what fire had consumed".

In front of the podium, under the now collapsed stairway, were two rooms, one of which served as the Aerarium, the State Treasury. On the side of the podium holes remain from where a plate was attached for the posting of public documents and acts pertinent to the Aerarium.

An altar dedicated to Saturn, the Ara Saturni, stood in front of the temple, on the other side of the road that passes just in front of the temple. The remains of this altar are now under a roof just in front of the Umbilicus Urbis Romae, near the Arch of Septimius Severus. See this map for an illustration of the probable location of the altar.

Inside the temple stood a statue of of Saturn, which would be carried in procession when triumphs were celebrated. The feast of the Saturnalia on December 17th was a part of the cult of Saturn and was started with a sacrifice at the Temple of Saturn.

John Schou
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum and the Basilica of Majencio.jpg
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum and the Basilica of Majencio38 viewsThe Basilica of Maxentius (Basilica Maxentii) or the Basilica of Constantine (Basilica Constantini) was the last of the great civilian basilicas on the Roman Forum. The ruins of the basilica is located between the Temple of Amor and Roma and the Temple of Romulus, on the Via Sacra.

The construction of the basilica was initiated by Maxentius in 308 CE, and finished by Constantine after he had defeated Maxentius in the battle of the Milvian Bridge in 312 CE. As other similar buildings, it was destined for commercial and administrative activities. It is likely that the basilica housed the offices of the Prefect of the City, the highest imperial official in late antiquity.

The site chosen for the basilica was on the Velia, a low ridge connecting the Esquiline Hill and the Palatine Hill. Large parts of the Velia was levelled in preparation for the construction of the basilica. Literary sources tell that earlier the site was occupied by the Horrea Piperatica, the central market and storage facility for pepper and spices, built in the time of Domitian. Also on the site was a sanctuary of the penates publici which had to be moved.

The Basilica of Maxentius is built with arches, which is very atypical. All the other public basilicas had flat ceilings supported by wooden beams. The construction techniques used borrowed more from the great imperial baths than from the traditional basilica.
The basilica is one of the most impressive buildings on the Forum Romanum. The ground plan is rectangular, oriented E.-W., covering an area of 100×65m divided into a central nave and to lateral aisles and an atrium on the E. side where the original entrance was.

The central nave measured 80×25m and was covered by three groin vaults with a maximum height of 35m, supported by eight monolithic Corinthian columns of 14.5m. Each of the two aisles was made up of three interconnected coffered vaults, 20.5m wide and 24m high, communicating with the central nave by three huge openings.

Light was provided by two rows of three large windows in five of the six lateral vaults, and by windows in the sides of the now collapsed cross vaults over the central nave. The windows in two of the vaults in the surviving N. side of the building give a good idea of the amount of light inside the building.

The floor in both the central and the lateral spaces were a geometric pattern of squares with circles and lozenges of multi-coloured marble, similar to the floor in the Pantheon.

The walls were in opus latericium, originally with a marble veneer. The vaults were in opus caementicium with a gilded stucco finish. The roof was covered with gilded bronze tiles.

The entrance of the original project of Maxentius was to the east, from a branch of the old Via Sacra behind the Temple of Amor and Roma. It lead into an elongated atrium, connected to the central nave and the lateral aisles by five gateways.

In the W. end was a huge apse, 20m in diameter, where a colossal seated statue of Maxentius stood. This statue was later changed to look like Constantine. The statue was an acrolith (the head, hands and feet were of marble, while the rest was of other materials), and the remains of the statue were found in 1486 in the apse.

Constantine changed the plan when he took over the unfinished basilica. He had a another entrance added on the S. side, on the Via Sacra, where a monumental stairway led to a porch of four porphyry columns and via three double doorways into the central part of the S. aisle. In front of this new entrance, in the central vault of the N. aisle, another apse was added, smaller than the apse in the W. end. In back of this apse a niche held a standing statue of Constantine, and smaller, square-headed niches, two rows of four niches on each side, which might have housed a gallery of Constantine's relatives and lieutenants. This room could be closed by wooden doors, and it is likely the central part of the office of the Prefect of the City was there.

Of the original building only the three vaults of the N. aisle remain, devoid of all decorations. The vaults of the S. and central nave probably collapsed under an earthquake in c. 847. The floor plan is clearly visible, however, and the remaining structures give a vivid impression of the grandeur of the original edifice.

The remains of the Colossal Statue of Constantine I are in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori on the Campidoglio, and one of the columns from the central nave was moved to the Piazza Santa Maria Maggiore in 1614. The remaining columns have disappeared. The bronze tiles from the roof were reused for the first Basilica of Saint Peter.

John Schou
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum Basilica Julia.jpg
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum Basilica Julia97 viewsThe Basilica Julia was built in 54-48 BCE by Julius Caesar as a part of his reorganisation of the Forum Romanum, where it replaced the Basilica Sempronia. It is located on the S. side of the main square of the Forum Romanum, between the Temple of Saturn and the Temple of Castor and Pollux.

Julius Caesar started construction in 54 BCE, but it was still unfinished at his death. It was built on the site of the Basilica Sempronia and a series of shops, the tabernae veteres, that were all demolished.

Augustus finished the building after Caesar's death, but had to reconstruct it again shortly after, due to its destruction by fire in 9 BCE. It was dedicated again in 2 BCE, this time in the name of Gaius Caesar and Lucius Caesar, Augustus' designated heirs at the time.

The basilica was later damaged much by the fire in 283 CE, and restored a few years after by Diocletian. It was again destroyed when Alaric sacked the city in 410 CE.

The Basilica Julia was of huge proportions. The basilica rested on a low podium, seven steps high on the E. side and just one on the W. side, due to the sloping terrain. Of outer dimensions 101×49m, the central nave of the basilica was 82×18m. The four lateral aisles, two on each side, were two storeys high, with vaulted ceiling and arches decorated by semi-columns. The central nave was three storeys high.

A series of shops stood behind the basilica towards the Velabrum. A Temple of Augustus was also built in the area behind the basilica by Tiberius.

The function of the Basilica Julia was to house tribunals and other activities from the Forum when weather didn't permit outdoor meetings. The central nave probably divided in four by wooden removable structures to allow the hearing of more cases at a time. The basilica also housed some administrative offices of the city.

Game boards and graffiti are incised in the steps and in the pavement of the side aisles by idling visitors to the Forum. Some of this can still be seen on the side of the main square of the forum.

The building was in ruin already in late Antiquity, and subsequently stripped of all reusable material, i.e., almost everything.

Very little of the building remains now. The basic floor plan can be seen, and some parts of brick walls remain towards the Temple of Saturn, some bases of statues still in their original position, and the four step podium remain. The brick column bases are reconstructions of the 19th century.



John Schou
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum Cloaca Maxima.jpg
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum Cloaca Maxima163 viewsDoor leading to the Cloaca Maxima, situated in the eastern stairs of the Basilica Julia at the Roman Forum. Here, you can sometimes hear (and smell) the sewer.

The outlet of the Cloaca maxima ("greatest sewer"). This drain was built as a canal through the Forum Romanum in the sixth century and its construction is generally attributed to king Tarquinius Priscus. In the second century BCE, the canal was covered.

The Cloaca Maxima was one of the world's earliest sewage systems. Constructed in ancient Rome in order to drain local marshes and remove the waste of one of the world's most populous cities, it carried effluent to the River Tiber, which ran beside the city.

The name literally means Great Sewer. According to tradition it may have been initially constructed around 600 BC under the orders of the king of Rome, Lucius Tarquinius Priscus.

This public work was largely achieved through the use of Etruscan engineers and large amounts of semi-forced labour from the poorer classes of Roman citizens.

Although Livy describes it as being tunnelled out beneath Rome, he was writing a great deal after the event. From other writings and from the path that it takes, it seems more likely that it was originally an open drain, formed from streams from three of the neighbouring hills, that were channeled through the main Forum and then on to the Tiber. This open drain would then have been gradually built over, as building space within the city became more valuable. It is possible that both theories are correct, and certainly some of the lower parts of the system suggest that they would have been below ground level even at the time of the supposed construction.

There were many branches off from the main sewer, but all seem to be 'official' drains that would have served public toilets, bath-houses and other public buildings. Private residences in Rome, even of the rich, would have relied on some sort of cess-pit arrangement for sewage.

The Cloaca Maxima was well maintained throughout the life of the Roman Empire and there is evidence to suggest it was still working long after the traditional fall of the Western Empire. In 33 BC it is known to have received an inspection and overhaul from Agrippa, and archaeology reveals several building styles and material from various ages, suggesting that the systems received regular attention. In more recent times, the remaining passages have been connected to the modern-day sewage system, mainly to cope with problems of backwash from the river.

The Cloaca Maxima was thought to be presided over by the goddess Cloacina.

The Romans are recorded — the veracity of the accounts depending on the case — to have dragged the bodies of a number of people to the sewers rather than give them proper burial, among them the emperor Elagabalus and Saint Sebastian: the latter scene is the subject of a well-known artwork by Lodovico Carracci.

The outfall of the Cloaca Maxima into the river Tiber is still visible today near the bridge Ponte Rotto, and near Ponte Palatino. There is a stairway going down to it visible next to the Basilica Julia at the Forum.

It is often said that it is still in use; this is not untrue, but the whole truth is that only a trickle of water flows through the age-old sewer. The exit shown on this picture is just south of the ancient Roman bridge now known as Ponte Rotto.


1 commentsJohn Schou
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum and the temple of Vesta and the Basilica of Majencio.jpg
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum The Basilica of Majencio and the temple of Castors46 viewsThe Basilica of Maxentius (Basilica Maxentii) or the Basilica of Constantine (Basilica Constantini) was the last of the great civilian basilicas on the Roman Forum. The ruins of the basilica is located between the Temple of Amor and Roma and the Temple of Romulus, on the Via Sacra.

The construction of the basilica was initiated by Maxe