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Search results - "Athens"
atenas-tetra.jpg
Athens18 viewsATTICA, Athens.
Circa 454-404 BC.
AR Tetradrachm
xokleng
COCK_BOTH.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 146/5 BC19 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
34 mm Thompson issue 18
Thompson catalogue:Obs Gaziantep 146?:Rev NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
below control mark ME
2 magistrates : XAPΙ ΗPA
RF symbol : Cock with Palm
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
greek1.jpg
ATTICA,Athens. AR tetradrachm72 viewsThomson 31b/bmc 445/ 135-134bc
obv: Helmeted head of Athena bust R.
rev: Owl std.r.head facing on amphora. Magistrates name in field
Asklepios std.l. holding serpent. intwined scepter. Z on amphora,delta
I below. all within wreath
4 commentshill132
48+1_Even_Better.jpg
Parliament of 49 Owls16 views24 Thompson old catalogue
13 Thompson middle catalogue
8 Thompson late catalogue of which 3 are post-Sullan
3 Imitations of which 1 "old catalogue" 1, "late catalogue" & 1 "post Sullan"
1 pseudo-Athenian New Style Thompson type ii Sullan "Lucullean" issue
cicerokid
00009x00_copy.jpg
17 viewsATTICA, Athens
PB Tessera. (15mm, 4.00 g)
Struck circa 200-263 AD
Helmeted head right
Blank
Lang & Crosby 246

The style of the bust on this token closely matches one discovered in the Stoa at the Athenian Agora, firmly dated to the mid 3rd century AD.
Ardatirion
Athens_token.jpg
30 viewsATTICA, Athens
PB Tessera. (24mm, 7.60 g)
Struck circa 50-200 AD
Helmeted head of Athena right
Boukranion
Lang & Crosby 251

Ardatirion
09270630.jpg
0.3 Athenian Tetradrachm (archaic)91 viewsAR Tetradrachm of Athens
449 - 404 BCE
25 mm, 16.6 gm

Obv. archaic Athena r. helmeted
Rev. Owl with A (theta) E; olive and crescent in upper left corner
test cut through Owl
Zam
830.jpg
0.30 AR Athenian Tetradrachm 454-415 BCE62 viewsATTICA: Athens. Ca. 454(?)-415 BC. AR tetradrachm. Athena / Owl. Nice centering.

Silver tetradrachm, pl. XXII, 6´. Svoronos pl. 15, 30., 17.1gm, 24mm, gVF, 449-413 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right with almond shaped eye, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring,; reverse A?E right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, prong tail, to left olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square.
1 commentsEcgþeow
Aigina_turtle.jpg
002a, Aigina, Islands off Attica, Greece, c. 510 - 490 B.C.88 viewsSilver stater, S 1849, SNG Cop 503, F, 12.231g, 22.3mm, Aigina (Aegina) mint, c. 510 - 490 B.C.; Obverse: sea turtle (with row of dots down the middle); Reverse: incuse square of “Union Jack” pattern; banker's mark obverse. Ex FORVM.


Greek Turtles, by Gary T. Anderson

Turtles, the archaic currency of Aegina, are among the most sought after of all ancient coins. Their early history is somewhat of a mystery. At one time historians debated whether they or the issuances of Lydia were the world's earliest coins. The source of this idea comes indirectly from the writings of Heracleides of Pontus, a fourth century BC Greek scholar. In the treatise Etymologicum, Orion quotes Heracleides as claiming that King Pheidon of Argos, who died no later than 650 BC, was the first to strike coins at Aegina. However, archeological investigations date the earliest turtles to about 550 BC, and historians now believe that this is when the first of these intriguing coins were stamped.

Aegina is a small, mountainous island in the Saronikon Gulf, about midway between Attica and the Peloponnese. In the sixth century BC it was perhaps the foremost of the Greek maritime powers, with trade routes throughout the eastern half of the Mediterranean. It is through contacts with Greeks in Asia Minor that the idea of coinage was probably introduced to Aegina. Either the Lydians or Greeks along the coast of present day Turkey were most likely the first to produce coins, back in the late seventh century. These consisted of lumps of a metal called electrum (a mixture of gold and silver) stamped with an official impression to guarantee the coin was of a certain weight. Aegina picked up on this idea and improved upon it by stamping coins of (relatively) pure silver instead electrum, which contained varying proportions of gold and silver. The image stamped on the coin of the mighty sea power was that of a sea turtle, an animal that was plentiful in the Aegean Sea. While rival cities of Athens and Corinth would soon begin limited manufacture of coins, it is the turtle that became the dominant currency of southern Greece. The reason for this is the shear number of coins produced, estimated to be ten thousand yearly for nearly seventy years. The source for the metal came from the rich silver mines of Siphnos, an island in the Aegean. Although Aegina was a formidable trading nation, the coins seemed to have meant for local use, as few have been found outside the Cyclades and Crete. So powerful was their lure, however, that an old proverb states, "Courage and wisdom are overcome by Turtles."

The Aeginean turtle bore a close likeness to that of its live counterpart, with a series of dots running down the center of its shell. The reverse of the coin bore the imprint of the punch used to force the face of the coin into the obverse turtle die. Originally this consisted of an eight-pronged punch that produced a pattern of eight triangles. Later, other variations on this were tried. In 480 BC, the coin received its first major redesign. Two extra pellets were added to the shell near the head of the turtle, a design not seen in nature. Also, the reverse punch mark was given a lopsided design.

Although turtles were produced in great quantities from 550 - 480 BC, after this time production dramatically declines. This may be due to the exhaustion of the silver mines on Siphnos, or it may be related to another historical event. In 480 BC, Aegina's archrival Athens defeated Xerxes and his Persian armies at Marathon. After this, it was Athens that became the predominant power in the region. Aegina and Athens fought a series of wars until 457 BC, when Aegina was conquered by its foe and stripped of its maritime rights. At this time the coin of Aegina changed its image from that of the sea turtle to that of the land tortoise, symbolizing its change in fortunes.

The Turtle was an object of desire in ancient times and has become so once again. It was the first coin produced in Europe, and was produced in such great quantities that thousands of Turtles still exist today. Their historical importance and ready availability make them one of the most desirable items in any ancient coin enthusiast's collection.

(Greek Turtles, by Gary T. Anderson .
1 commentsCleisthenes
01-Athens.jpg
01. Athens Tetradrachm.131 viewsTetradrachm, 449 - 413 BC.
Obverse: "Archaic style" head of Athena, wearing crested helmet ornamented with olive leaves and floral scroll.
Reverse: ΑΘΕ / Owl, olive twig, and crescent moon.
17.15 gm., 24 mm.
S. #2526.
2 commentsCallimachus
cng2.jpg
01.- Attica Tetradrachm (454-404 BC)23 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm (22mm, 17.09 g, 8h). Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597. VF, lightly toned, minor area of porosity on obverse, graffito and slight die shift on reverse.
Purchased at Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. auction in 2015.
3 commentsOscar D
montaje.JPG
02.- Attica Tetradrachm (287-262 BC)11 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 287-262 BC. AR Tetradrachm (23mm, 16.80 g). Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square.
Purchased at Filatelia Numismatica Santos in 2015.
Oscar D
KnidosARdrachm.jpg
020a, CARIA, Knidos. Circa 465-449 BC. AR Drachm.66 viewsCARIA, Knidos. Circa 465-449 BC. AR Drachm - 16mm (6.06 g). Obverse: forepart of roaring lion right; Reverse: archaic head of Aphrodite right, hair bound with taenia. Cahn 80 (V38/R53); SNG Helsinki 132 (same dies); SNG Copenhagen 232 (same dies). Toned, near VF, good metal. Ex Barry P. Murphy.

While this coin falls within the time frame that numismatists call "Classical" Greek coinage, I have chosen to place it in both the "Archaic" (coin 020a) and "Classical" Greek sections of my collection. This specimen is one of those wonderful examples of transition--it incorporates many elements of the "Archaic" era, although it is struck during the "Classical" Greek period and anticipates characteristics of the later period.

As noted art historian Patricia Lawrence has pointed out, "[this specimen portrays] A noble-headed lion, a lovely Late Archaic Aphrodite, and [is made from]. . . beautiful metal." The Archaic Aphrodite is reminiscent of certain portraits of Arethusa found on tetradrachms produced in Syracuse in the first decade of the 5th century BC.

Knidos was a city of high antiquity and as a Hellenic city probably of Lacedaemonian colonization. Along with Halicarnassus (present day Bodrum, Turkey) and Kos, and the Rhodian cities of Lindos, Kamiros and Ialyssos it formed the Dorian Hexapolis, which held its confederate assemblies on the Triopian headland, and there celebrated games in honour of Apollo, Poseidon and the nymphs.

The city was at first governed by an oligarchic senate, composed of sixty members, and presided over by a magistrate; but, though it is proved by inscriptions that the old names continued to a very late period, the constitution underwent a popular transformation. The situation of the city was favourable for commerce, and the Knidians acquired considerable wealth, and were able to colonize the island of Lipara, and founded a city on Corcyra Nigra in the Adriatic. They ultimately submitted to Cyrus, and from the battle of Eurymedon to the latter part of the Peloponnesian War they were subject to Athens.

In their expansion into the region, the Romans easily obtained the allegiance of Knidians, and rewarded them for help given against Antiochus by leaving them the freedom of their city.

During the Byzantine period there must still have been a considerable population: for the ruins contain a large number of buildings belonging to the Byzantine style, and Christian sepulchres are common in the neighbourhood.

Eudoxus, the astronomer, Ctesias, the writer on Persian history, and Sostratus, the builder of the celebrated Pharos at Alexandria, are the most remarkable of the Knidians mentioned in history.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cnidus

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
athensfraction.jpg
1. Attica, Athens. 460-455 BC. (Most Likely an Eastern imitation)94 viewsAR Obol.
obv: Helmeted head of Athena right
rev: Owl standing right, head facing, AQE to right, leaf to left.
CGPCGP
0023-075.jpg
1700 - Mark Antony, Fourree denarius113 viewsMinted in Athens in 32 BC
ANTON AVG IMP III COS DES III III V R P C, bare head of Mark Antony right
ANTONINVS / AVG IMP III in two lines
3,52 gr
Ref : RCV # 1478, HCRI # 347, RSC # 2, Cohen # 2
2 commentsPotator II
FulviaQuinariusLion.jpg
1ae2 Fulvia45 viewsFirst wife of Marc Antony

ca 83-40 BC

AR Quinarius
Bust of Victory right with the likeness of Fulvia, III VIR R P C
Lion right between A and XLI; ANTONI above, IMP in ex

RSC 3, Syd 1163, Cr489/6

Fulvia was the first Roman non-mythological woman to appear on Roman coins. She gained access to power through her marriage to three of the most promising men of her generation, Publius Clodius Pulcher, Gaius Scribonius Curio, and Marcus Antonius. All three husbands were politically active populares, tribunes, and supporters of Julius Caesar. Fulvia married Mark Antony in 47 or 46 BC, a few years after Curio's death, although Cicero suggested that Fulvia and Antony had had a relationship since 58 BC. According to him, while Fulvia and Antony were married, Antony once left a military post to sneak back into Rome during the night and personally deliver a love letter to Fulvia describing his love for her and how he had stopped seeing the famous actress Cytheris. Cicero also suggested that Antony married Fulvia for her money. At the time of their marriage, Antony was an established politician. He had already been tribune in 49 BC, commanded armies under Caesar and was Master of the Horse in 47 BC. As a couple, they were a formidable political force in Rome, and had two sons together, Marcus Antonius Antyllus and Iullus Antonius.

Suetonius wrote, "[Antony] took a wife, Fulvia, the widow of Clodius the demagogue, a woman not born for spinning or housewifery, nor one that could be content with ruling a private husband, but prepared to govern a first magistrate, or give orders to a commander-in-chief. So that Cleopatra had great obligations to her for having taught Antony to be so good a servant, he coming to her hands tame and broken into entire obedience to the commands of a mistress. He used to play all sorts of sportive, boyish tricks, to keep Fulvia in good-humour. As, for example, when Caesar, after his victory in Spain, was on his return, Antony, among the rest, went out to meet him; and, a rumour being spread that Caesar was killed and the enemy marching into Italy, he returned to Rome, and, disguising himself, came to her by night muffled up as a servant that brought letters from Antony. She, with great impatience, before received the letter, asks if Antony were well, and instead of an answer he gives her the letter; and, as she was opening it, took her about the neck and kissed her."

After Julius Caesar was assassinated, Antony became the most powerful man in Rome. Fulvia was heavily involved in the political aftermath. After Caesar's death, the senate realized his popularity and declared that they would pass all of Caesar's planned laws. Antony had attained possession of Caesar's papers, and with the ability to produce papers in support of any law, Fulvia and Antony made a fortune and gained immense power. She allegedly accompanied Antony to his military camp at Brundisium in 44 BC. Appian wrote that in December 44 and again in 41 BC, while Antony was abroad and Cicero campaigned for Antony to be declared an enemy of the state, Fulvia attempted to block such declarations by soliciting support on Antony's behalf.

Antony formed the second triumvirate with Octavian (the future emperor Augustus) and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus on 43 BC and began to conduct proscriptions. To solidify the political alliance, Fulvia's daughter Clodia was married to the young Octavian. Appian and Cassius Dio describe Fulvia as being involved in the violent proscriptions, which were used to destroy enemies and gain badly needed funds to secure control of Rome. Antony pursued his political enemies, chief among them being Cicero, who had openly criticized him for abusing his powers as consul after Caesar's assassination. Though many ancient sources wrote that Fulvia was happy to take revenge against Cicero for Antony's and Clodius' sake, Cassius Dio is the only ancient source that describes the joy with which she pierced the tongue of the dead Cicero with her golden hairpins, as a final revenge against Cicero's power of speech.

In 42 BC, Antony and Octavian left Rome to pursue Julius Caesar's assassins, Marcus Junius Brutus and Gaius Cassius Longinus. Fulvia was left behind as the most powerful woman in Rome. According to Cassius Dio, Fulvia controlled the politics of Rome. Dio wrote that "the following year Publius Servilius and Lucius Antonius nominally became consuls, but in reality it was Antonius and Fulvia. She, the mother-in‑law of Octavian and wife of Antony, had no respect for Lepidus because of his slothfulness, and managed affairs herself, so that neither the senate nor the people transacted any business contrary to her pleasure."

Shortly afterwards, the triumvirs then distributed the provinces among them. Lepidus took the west and Antony went to Egypt, where he met Cleopatra VII. When Octavian returned to Rome in 41 BC to disperse land to Caesar's veterans, he divorced Fulvia's daughter and accused Fulvia of aiming at supreme power. Fulvia allied with her brother-in-law Lucius Antonius and publicly endorsed Mark Antony in opposition to Octavian.

In 41 BC, tensions between Octavian and Fulvia escalated to war in Italy. Together with Lucius Antonius, she raised eight legions in Italy to fight for Antony's rights against Octavian, an event known as the Perusine War. Fulvia fled to Greece with her children. Appian writes that she met Antony in Athens, and he was upset with her involvement in the war. Antony then sailed back to Rome to deal with Octavian, and Fulvia died of an unknown illness in exile in Sicyon, near Corinth, Achaea.
Blindado
GallienusAntVirtus.jpg
1cy Gallienus17 views253-268

Bronze antoninianus

Radiate, draped bust, right, GALLINVS AVG
Mars standing left, holding globe in right hand and spear in left hand, P in right field, VIRTVS AVG

RIC 317

Gallienus oversaw a period of disintegration of the empire and lost control over the East, Gaul, Spain, and Britain.

Zosimus observed: [When Valerian left for the East] As the Germans were the most troublesome enemies, and harrassed the Gauls in the vicinity of the Rhine, Gallienus marched against them in person, leaving his officers to repel with the forces under their command any others that should enter Italy, Illyricum, and Greece. With these designs, he possessed himself of and defended the passages of the Rhine, at one time preventing their crossing, and at another engaging them as soon as they had crossed it. But having only a small force to resist an immense number, he was at a loss how to act, and thought to secure himself by a league with one of the German princes. He thus not only prevented the other Barbarians from so frequently passing the Rhine, but obstructed the access of auxiliaries.

Eutropius recorded: Gallienus, who was made emperor when quite a young man, exercised his power at first happily, afterwards fairly, and at last mischievously. In his youth he performed many gallant acts in Gaul and Illyricum, killing Ingenuus, who had assumed the purple, at Mursa, and Regalianus. He was then for a long time quiet and gentle; afterwards, abandoning himself to all manner of licentiousness, he relaxed the reins of government with disgraceful inactivity and carelesness. The Alemanni, having laid waste Gaul, penetrated into Italy. Dacia, which had been added to the empire beyond the Danube, was lost. Greece, Macedonia, Pontus, Asia, were devastated by the Goths. Pannonia was depopulated by the Sarmatians and Quadi. The Germans made their way as far as Spain, and took the noble city of Tarraco. The Parthians, after taking possession of Mesopotamia, began to bring Syria under their power.

Zosimus resumes: Gallienus in the mean time still continued beyond the Alps, intent on the German war, while the Senate, seeing Rome in such imminent danger, armed all the soldiers that were in the city, and the strongest of the common people, and formed an army, which exceeded the Barbarians in number. This so alarmed the Barbarians, that they left Rome, but ravaged all the rest of Italy. At this period, when Illyricum groaned under the oppression of the Barbarians, and the whole Roman empire was in such a helpless state as to be on the very verge of ruin, a plague happened to break out in several of the towns, more dreadful than any that had preceded it. The miseries inflicted on them by the Barbarians were thus alleviated, even the sick esteeming themselves fortunate. The cities that had been taken by the Scythians were thus deserted.

Gallienus, being disturbed by these occurrences, was returning to Rome to relieve Italy from the war which the Scythians were thus carrying on. It was at this time, that Cecrops, a Moor, Aureolus and Antoninus, with many others, conspired against him, of whom the greater part were punished and submitted. Aureolus alone retained his animosity against the emperor.

The Scythians, who had dreadfully afflicted the whole of Greece, had now taken Athens, when Gallienus advanced against those who were already in possession of Thrace, and ordered Odonathus of Palmyra, a person whose ancestors had always been highly respected by the emperors, to assist the eastern nations which were then in a very distressed condition. . . .

While affairs were thus situated in the east, intelligence was brought to Gallienus, who was then occupied in the Scythian war, that Aurelianus, or Aureolus, who was commander of the cavalry posted in the neighbourhood of Milan to watch the motions of Posthumus, had formed some new design, and was ambitious to be emperor. Being alarmed at this he went immediately to Italy, leaving the command against the Scythians with Marcianus, a person of great experience in military affairs. . . . Gallienus, in his journey towards Italy, had a plot formed against him by Heraclianus, prefect of the court, who communicated his design to Claudius, in whom the chief management of affairs was vested. The design was to murder Gallienus. Having found a man very ready for such an undertaking, who commanded a troop of Dalmatians, he entrusted the action to him. To effect it, the party stood by Gallienus at supper and informed him that some of the spies had brought intelligence, that Aureolus and his army were close at hand. By this they considerably alarmed him. Calling immediately for his horse and arms, he mounted, ordering his men to follow him in their armour, and rode away without any attendance. Thus the captain finding him alone killed him.
Blindado
JulianIIAE3VotX.jpg
1en Julian II "Apostate"26 views360-363

AE3

Pearl-diademed, helmeted, cuirassed bust left, holding shield & spear, D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG
VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath, palm branch-BSIS-palm branch in ex [?].

RIC 415

According to Zosimus: Constantius, having so well succeeded in his design against Vetranio, marched against Magnentius, having first conferred the title of Caesar on Gallus, the son of his uncle, and brother to Julian who was afterwards emperor, and given him in marriage his sister Constantia. . . . CONSTANTIUS, after having acted towards Gallus Caesar in the manner I have related, left Pannonia to proceed into Italy. . . . He scarcely thought himself capable of managing affairs at this critical period. He was unwilling, however, to associate any one with himself in the government, because he so much desired to rule alone, and could esteem no man his friend. Under these circumstances he was at a loss how to act. It happened, however, that when the empire was in the greatest danger, Eusebia, the wife of Constantius, who was a woman of extraordinary learning, and of greater wisdom than her sex is usually endowed with, advised him to confer the government of the nations beyond the Alps on Julianus Caesar, who was brother to Gallus, and grandson to Constantius. As she knew that the emperor was suspicious of all his kindred, she thus circumvented him. She observed to him, that Julian was a young man unacquainted with the intrigues of state, having devoted himself totally to his studies; and that he was wholly inexperienced in worldly business. That on this account he would be more fit for his purpose than any other person. That either he would be fortunate, and his success would be attributed to the emperor's conduct, or that he would fail and perish; and that thus Constantius would have none of the imperial family to succeed to him.

Constantius, having approved her advice, sent for Julian from Athens, where he lived among the philosophers, and excelled all his masters in every kind of learning. Accordingly, Julian returning from Greece into Italy, Constantius declared him Caesar, gave him in marriage his sister Helena, and sent him beyond the Alps. . . .

Constantius, having thus disposed of Julian, marched himself into Pannonia and Moesia, and having there suppressed the Quadi and the Sarmatians, proceeded to the east, and was provoked to war by the inroads of the Persians. Julian by this time had arrived beyond the Alps into the Gallic nations which he was to rule. Perceiving that the Barbarians continued committing the same violence, Eusebia, for the same reasons as before, persuaded Constantius to place the entire management of those countries into the hands of Julian. . . . Julian finding the military affairs of Gallia Celtica in a very ruinous state, and that the Barbarians pased the Rhine without any resistance, even almost as far as the sea-port towns, he took a survey of the remaining parts of the enemy. And understanding that the people of those parts were terrified at the very name of the Barbarians, while those whom Constantius had sent along with him, who were not more than three hundred and sixty, knew nothing more, as he used to say, than how to say their prayers, he enlisted as many more as he could and took in a great number of volunteers. He also provided arms, and finding a quantity of old weapons in some town he fitted them up, and distributed them among the soldiers. The scouts bringing him intelligence, that an immense number of Barbarians had crossed the river near the city of Argentoratum (Strasburg) which stands on the Rhine, he no sooner heard of it, than he led forth his army with the greatest speed, and engaging with the enemy gained such a victory as exceeds all description.

After these events he raised a great army to make war on the whole German nation; He was opposed however by the Barbarians in vast numbers. Caesar therefore would not wait while they came up to him, but crossed the Rhine, preferring that their country should be the seat of war, and not that of the Romans, as by that means the cities would escape being again pillaged by the Barbarians. A most furious battle therefore took place; a great number of the Barbarians being slain on the field of battle, while the rest fled, and were pursued by Caesar into the Hercynian forest, and many of them killed. . . .

But while Julian was at Parisium, a small town in Germany, the soldiers, being ready to march, continued at supper till midnight in a place near the palace, which they so called there. They were as yet ignorant of any design against Caesar [by Constantius], when some tribunes, who began to suspect the contrivance against him, privately distributed a number of anonymous billets among the soldiers, in which they represented to them, that Caesar, by his judicious conduct had so managed affairs, that almost all of them had erected trophies over the Barbarians ; that he had always fought like a private soldier, and was now in extreme danger from the emperor, who would shortly deprive him of his whole army, unless they prevented it. Some of the soldiers having read these billets, and published the intrigue to the whole army, all were highly enraged. They suddenly rose from their seats in great commotion, and with the cups yet in their hands went to the palace. Breaking open the doors without ceremony, they brought out Caesar, and lifting him on a shield declared him emperor and Augustus. They then, without attending to his reluctance, placed a diadem upon his head. . . .

Arriving at Naisus, he consulted the soothsayers what measures to pursue. As the entrails signified that he must stay there for some time, he obeyed, observing likewise the time that was mentioned in his dream. When this, according to the motion of the planets, was arrived, a party of horsemen arrived from Constantinople at Naisus, with intelligence that Constantius was dead, and that the armies desired Julian to be emperor. Upon this he accepted what the gods had bestowed upon him, and proceeded on his journey. On his arrival at. Byzantium, he was received with joyful acclamations. . . .

[After slashing through Persia and crossing the Tigris,] they perceived the Persian army, with which they engaged, and having considerably the advantage, they killed a great number of Persians. Upon the following day, about noon, the Persians drew up in a large body, and once more attacked the rear of the Roman army. The Romans, being at that time out of their ranks, were surprised and alarmed at the suddenness of the attack, yet made a stout and spirited defence. The emperor, according to his custom, went round the army, encouraging them to fight with ardour. When by this means all were engaged, the emperor, who sometimes rode to the commanders and tribunes, and was at other times among the private soldiers, received a wound in the heat of the engagement, and was borne on a shield to his tent. He survived only till midnight. He then expired, after having nearly subverted the Persian empire.

Note: Julian favored the pagan faith over Christianity and was tarred by the church as "the apostate."
Blindado
AR_Obol.jpg
2. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Obol 18 views(8.5mm, 0.66 g, 11h). Helmeted head of Athena right, with frontal eye / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig to left; all within incuse square. Kroll 13; HGC 4, 1665. VF, find patina, minor roughness.

CNG Auction 431, Lot: 178.
Dino
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2009-Austria - Carnuntum22 viewsThe huge "Heidentor" (Heathens' Gate) was erected between 354 AD and 361 AD as a triumphal monument for Emperor Constantius II. berserker
BOTLAUREL_2012.JPG
201243 viewsTHIS YEAR'S WINNERS
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BOTLAUREL_2014.JPG
201453 viewsTHIS YEAR'S WINNERS
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1165_P_Hadrian_RPC2329_5.jpg
2329 PHRYGIA, Laodicea Hadrian Medallion Zeus standing53 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2329.5; Von Aulock, Phrygiens -; SNG München -; SNG von Aulock-; SNG Copenhagen 575; BMC 195

Obv. ΑΥ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС ΟΛΥΜΠΙΟС
Laureate head of Hadrian, r. with drapery on l. shoulder

Rev. ΛΑΟΔΙΚΕΩΝ
Zeus Laodiceus standing facing, head l., holding eagle in his extended r. hand, l. resting on sceptre

36.37 gr
39 mm
12h

Note.
From the Group CEM Collection, Classical Numismatic Group 90, 23 May 2012, 1058 and ex Waddell II, 12 September 1987, 363.

The epithet 'Olympios' was adopted by Hadrian in 128/9 following the dedication of the temple of Zeus Olympios in Athens. It emphasized the emperor's Panhellenic program and enthusiastic Philhellenism, for Zeus Olympios, chief god of the Greek peoples, was the Panhellenic god before all others. RPC suggests that the impressive Laodicean medallions bearing the new epithet were struck on the occasion of Hadrian's visit to the city in June 129.
6 commentsokidoki
triobol.jpg
3. Attica, Athens. 300-287 BC. 136 viewsAr Hemidrachm (triobol).
Obv; Helmeted hd of Athena right.
Rev; Owl. Dark tone but good silver.
Scarce old collection coin.
1.97g. 13mm.
4 commentsCGPCGP
athens-counter.jpeg
4 countermarks on Athens Tetradrachm185 views449-413 B.C. Attica Old style Tetradrachm

Obverse: Head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, hair in parallel curves. 4 countermarks across cheek.

Reverse: AOE Right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square. Test cut and counter punch, and countermark.

1 commentsDk0311USMC
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4. Attica, Athens. 449-413 BC.89 viewsAR Hemidrachm

obv: Helmeted head of Athena right, profile eye
rev: Owl standing facing with closed wings, olive sprig. (Die break on owl)

2.1g, 12mm.
2 commentsDino
athenshemi.jpg
5. Attica, Athens. 393-300 BC.48 viewsAR Hemidrachm

obv: Helmeted head of Athena right, profile eye
rev: Owl standing facing with closed wings, olive sprig.
Svoronos 43ff, BMC 162ff.
2.1g, 12mm.
CGPCGP
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501. Constantine I Lyons Sol14 viewsLyons

Originally, the important city in this area was that of Vienne, at a crossroads of Celtic trails, and port for the Greek trade. They had been largly Hellanised during the 2nd - 1st centuries BCE, then caught up in the conflicts involving Rome and Athens. Roman traders had settled there and competition started a revolt, driving the Romans to the north. At the present site of Lyons, they sought and received refuge from the Gallic tribe called Segusiavi. At that time, Lyons was just a tribe of Celts occupying the top of a hill, later to be called Fourviere. A Roman settlement was begun, and then later used by Julius Caesar to launch his campaigns against the Helvetii in 58 BCE.

The site of Lyons, being on a crossroads as well as a connection to the Mediterranean, was early recognised as being strategically important. In 43 BCE, the city of Lugdunum became an official Roman colony recognised by the Roman senate, founded by the governor of Gallia Comata (province of Comata), Lucius Munatius Plancus. Later, in 27 BCE, then Emperor Augustus divided Gallia Comata into three provinces, and Lugdunum became the capital of Gallia Lugdunensis. [The third province was Gallia Aquitania.]

Lyons became the financial center for taxation purposes of Aquitania and Lugdunum provinces, and an official mint was established there. Also, the state cult honoring Augustus [or the present Emperor] was established at Lyons, drawing many pilgrims and supplicants. Drusus, the father of Claudius, (born 10 BCE) was stationed at Lyons, being in charge of Gallia Comata. Also, a cohort of Roman policemen were stationed at lyons, to protect the mint. A bronze inscription found at Lyons records the speech given to the Roman Senate in 48 CE by Emperor Claudius, arguing for the acceptance of admission of senators from Gallia Comata.

Through Lyons [and Vienne] passed the great roads leading to the different regions of Gaul and towards Italy. Trade with Gaul, Britain and Germany passed through Lyons, mostly supplying Roman colonies on the the frontier. Later, these routes were paved by the Romans to facilitate trade and troop movement. Lyons became an important trade and military center. However, intercity rivalry with Vienne to the south never died, and indeed Vienne became jealous over time.

Lyons was burnt to the ground in 65 CE but quickly rebuilt. It prospered until 197 when it was sacked in a civil war. The city of Lyons had backed the unfortunate loser in a battle between two Roman generals. Cities to the south [Arles, Vienne, and to the north, Trier] took over the economic functions of Lyons; and the city of Lyons was again plundered 269. Lyons fought back, and the trade wars raged on, until early in the 4th century when the aqueducts of Lyons were destroyed. Without water, the hillsite of Lyons [the Fourviere Hill] became untenable. The merchants moved down to the city below, or out of the city entirely. The protection of Lyons was thus much more difficult. And the decline of the Roman Empire also spelled the decline of many of its cities.

RIC VII Lyons 34 C3

ecoli
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5050 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Tetradrachm 117-18 AD Dikaiosyne standing20 viewsReference.
RPC III, 5050 (this coin). Dattari-Savio Pl. 65, 1347 (this coin).Emmett 833.2

Issue L B = year 2

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΝΟС (sic) ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СƐΒ
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., drapery on l. shoulder

Rev. L Β
Dikaiosyne standing facing, head l., holding scales and cornucopia

12.52 gr
25 mm
12h

Note.
From the Dattari collection.

In ancient Greek culture, Dikē (/ˈdiːkeɪ/ or /ˈdɪkiː/; Greek: Δίκη, English translation: "justice") was the goddess of justice and the spirit of moral order and fair judgement based on immemorial custom, in the sense of socially enforced norms and conventional rules. According to Hesiod (Theogony, l. 901), she was fathered by Zeus upon his second consort, Themis. She and her mother were both personifications of justice. She is depicted as a young, slender woman carrying a physical balance scale and wearing a laurel wreath while her Roman counterpart (Justitia) appears in a similar fashion but blind-folded. She is represented in the constellation Libra which is named for the Latin name of her symbol (Scales). She is often associated with Astraea, the goddess of innocence and purity. Astraea is also one of her epithets referring to her appearance in the nearby constellation Virgo which is said to represent Astraea. This reflects her symbolic association with Astraea, who too has a similar iconography.

The sculptures of the Temple of Zeus at Olympia have as their unifying iconographical conception the dikē of Zeus, and in poetry she is often the attendant (paredros) of Zeus.
In the philosophical climate of late 5th century Athens, dikē could be anthropomorphised as a goddess of moral justice.
She was one of the three second-generation Horae, along with Eunomia ("order") and Eirene ("peace")
okidoki
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6. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 460-404 BC. 197 viewsDrachm (14mm, 3.43 g, 6h). Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 10; SNG Copenhagen 41. Near VF, graffito on reverse.

CNG Electronic Auction 217, Lot: 66.
4 commentsCGPCGP
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7. Attica, Athens. 449-413 BC260 viewsAR tetradrachm
Head of Athena Right. Crested helmet. Archaic style almond shaped eye.
Owl standing right. Olive sprig/crescent left. AOE right.
SNGCop 31
24mm 17.0g
exMalter Galleries
10 commentsDino
athenstet1.JPG
8. Attica, Athens. 449-413 BC64 viewsAR tetradrachm
Head of Athena Right. Crested helmet. Archaic style almond shaped eye.
Owl standing right. Olive sprig/crescent left. AOE right. Test cuts owl head and tail.
SNGCop 39
22mm 17.3g
CGPCGP
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Achaea. Attica, Athens. AE2295 viewsObv: Bust of Athena r. wearing crested Corinthian helmet and aegis.
Rev: AΘH NA IΩN Bucranium bound by wreath.
Time of Hadrian and the Antonines.
BMC 810.
ancientone
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Achaea. Attica, Athens. AE2268 viewsObv: Draped bust of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet.
Rev: AΘHN-A-IΩN, Athena Parthenos standing facing, Nike crowning her with wreath extended in right hand, left holds a spear and rests on a grounded shield.
c. 115 - 160 A.D.
BMC Attica 686-7.
ancientone
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Achaea. Attica, Athens. AE2216 viewsObv: Draped bust of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet.
Rev: AΘHNAIΩN, Athena standing facing, head left, holding spear in right hand and shield in left.
Kroll 318
ancientone
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Achaea. Attica, Athens. AE22. Triptolemos45 viewsObv: Bust of Athena l. wearing crested Corinthian helmet and aegis.
Rev: AΘH NA IΩN / Triptolemos standing in biga drawn by winged serpents, l.
Time of Hadrian and the Antonines.
22mm., 6.1g.
ancientone
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AE denier tournois, Duchy of Athens or Florentine Dukes of Athens 1388-1394 CE20 viewsObverse: +GVI DVXATENES cross, sometimes with pellet in center
Reverse: THEBANI CIVIS, castle tourneys
Mint: Ahens/Frankish Greece
Date; 1388-1394 CE
16mm, .61g
Malloy p. 391.105,saulcy XVII,17
wileyc
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Alexander III556 viewsAlexander III AR Tetradrachm. ‘Amphipolis’ mint. Struck under Kassander, circa 316-314 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; shield in left field, pellet-in-Π below throne. 17.1 g.

Price 136; Troxell, Studies, issue L8.

Thanks for the atribution Lloyd!


Most lifetime issues of Alexander the Great were usualy bulky/thick, which did not alow for the entire design of the die to imprint on the coin. IMO looked better then the wide thin flan. (edit: though this one is Struck under Kassander)

The coin was hand stuck with a die/avil. Dies were usually made of Bronze because it was sofeter and easier to work with then iron, (though some were made of iron as well) then the was anealed to make it stronger and less brittle.

The planchets were made by pouring molten metal into a mold and saved until needed. When it was ready to be used, they heated it just below melting point and placed it between the dies and the punch die was struck with a hammer.


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"Building upon his father's success in Greece, Alexander III (Alexander the Great, reigned 336-323 BC) set about the conquest of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. By the time of his death at the age of 31, he ruled most of the known world from Greece to Afghanistan. Initially Alexander continued to mint Philip's gold and silver coins. Soon, however, the need for a silver coinage that could be widely used in Greece caused him to begin a new coinage on the Athenian weight-standard. His new silver coins, with the head of Herakles on one side and a seated figure of Zeus on the other, also became one of the staple coinages of the Greek world. They were widely imitated within the empire he had forged."

--------------------------------------

"......Alexander seems to have liked Amphipolis, because one of his last plans was to spend no less than 315 ton silver for a splendid new temple in the city that was to be dedicated to Artemis Tauropolus. It was never built, but after Alexander's death on 11 June 323 in Babylon, his wife queen Roxane settled in Amphipolis, which appears to have become one of the residences of the Macedonian royals. In 179, king Philip V died in the town."


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Amphipolis , ancient city of Macedonia, on the Strymon (Struma) River near the sea and NE of later Thessaloníki. The place was known as Ennea Hodoi [nine ways] before it was settled and was of interest because of the gold and silver and timber of Mt. Pangaeus (Pangaion), to which it gave access. Athenian colonists were driven out (c.464 BC) by Thracians, but a colony was established in 437 BC Amphipolis became one of the major Greek cities on the N Aegean. This colony was captured by Sparta, and Brasidas and Cleon were both killed in a battle there in 422 BC After it was returned to Athens in 421 BC, it actually had virtual independence until captured (357 BC) by Philip II of Macedon. He had promised to restore it to Athens, and his retention of Amphipolis was a major cause of the war with Athens. In 148 BC it became the capital of the Roman province of Macedonia. Paul, Silas, and Timothy passed through Amphipolis (Acts 17.1). Nearby is the modern Greek village of Amfípolis."

--------------------------------

"A quick look at the WildWinds database( http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/greece/macedonia/kings/alexander_III/t.html ) indicates that the style and monograms are consistent with an Amphipolis issue, with perhaps a little less care than usual in the engraving of the reverse. The closest I could locate with a quick look is Price 133 (variant), although yours appears to have a shield rather than dolphin in the left field reverse."
16 commentsrandy h2
alexanderx.jpg
Alexander the Great47 viewsObv: Head of beardless Herakles, right, wearing lion skin headdress.
Rev: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ in exergue; Charioteer in Biga right, Trident below.
"Alexandria (Antigoneia)" mint, struck c.310-301 BC. Extremely rare!

Attribution to this mint has been questioned of late (Meadows, NC 2004),
although no firmer alternative has yet been put forward. A mint in the Troad
seems to be likely, given that three were found in the excavations at Troy.

This is an extremely desirable and very difficult to find item. It appears that
there are none on any of the modern sales databases, and I know of only
one other that has been offered via a 'small seller' on an online auction site.

There is one in the British museum, at least one in Berlin (I-B), one in
the Portolos collection (Athens); another in Paris (B 80); the three that
were found at Troy, the one offered online, and now this one.
Please feel free to let me know of any other known specimens.

Among the rarest bronzes of the series.
Price 1587; Gaebler p.169, 7 pl.XXXI,26;
Bellinger Troy A1; BM 1921,0213.196.
(dealer's image {edited})
OldMoney
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Alexander the Great at the Acropolis museum50 viewsGrant H
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Alpha Bank18 viewsThis is an exact copy of a Tetradrachm from the Alpha Bank numismatic collection.The Athenian Owl the Tetradrachm of the city of Athens is the best known coin of antiquity.This coin exceeded the boundaries of the issuing authority and was widely used in international trade for a long period of time.Grant H
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Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 168 - 149 B.C.62 viewsBronze AE 20, SGCV I 1394; (SNG Cop 62), weight 7.8 g, max. diameter 21.75 mm, Amphipolis mint, Roman rule, c. 168 - 149 B.C.; Obv. diademed head of Artemis Tauropolos right, bow and quiver at shoulder; Rev. ΑΜΦΙΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ, two goats on their hind legs, contending head to head. Green patina, very worn.

Artemis Tauropolos was an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshipped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" in her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians by Iphigenia. Tauropolia was a festival of Artemis in Athens. - Wikipedia
Steve E
Map_Ancient_City_of_Athens.jpg
Ancient Athens: map13 viewsOne element in this map that I find intriguing is the clearly delineated walls running from the city 'proper' to the port. After instigating the Peloponnesian War, Pericles' plan was to 'wage' a battle of attrition with Sparta. Athenians would 'hunker down' behind her walls, be re-supplied by sea and simply, as it were, wait until Spartan resources and resolve had been depleted. Pericles' plan seemed to be working until the ships supplying Athens delivered a terrible cargo: the plague. It did not take very long for the plague to ravage the walled-in city, and Pericles was one of its victims.

This interesting map is one of many on FORVM's Resources page.
See: http://forumancientcoins.com/forvm/Collectors_Resources.html
Cleisthenes
Ancient_Greek_Zoo.jpg
Ancient Greek Bestiary376 viewsClockwise: Lion of Chersonessos, Dyrrhachion Cow, Calf and Wasp; Dove of Sikyon; Pegasos of Leukas (mythical); Lion and Bull of Tarsos; Macedonian Horse and Human.
Center: Owl of Athens.
Of the animals listed above, it is said that the human animal is the most violent and destructive of all.
4 commentsJason T
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Ancient Greek Coin Collection From Sixth to First Centuries B.C.309 viewsHere are the coins I started collecting from 2012 to present. As Aristotle wrote two millennia ago that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, there is no better way to present a collection of Greeks than to put them all together in a single shot. (Please click on picture for bigger resolution and to show greater details on coins).

Top row from left to right: AEOLIS, MYRINA. AR "Stephanophoric" Tetradrachm. Circa 150 BC**ILLYRIA, DYRRHACHION. AR Stater. Circa 340-280 BC**IONIA, SMYRNA. AR “Stephanophoric” Tetradrachm. Circa 150-145 BC** PELOPONNESOS, SIKYON. AR Stater. Circa 335-330 BC**ATTICA, ATHENS. “New style” Tetradrachm. Circa 169 BC.

Fifth row: BACTRIA, Antialkidas. AR Drachm. Circa 145-135 BC**CAPPADOCIA. Ariobarzanes I AR Drachm. Circa 96-63 BC**THRACE, ABDERA. AR Tetrobol. Circa 360-350 BC**THRACE, CHERSONESSOS. AR Hemidrachm. Circa 386-338 BC.

Fourth row: LUCANIA, METAPONTION. AR Stater. Circa 510-480 BC**THESSALIAN LEAGUE. AR Stater. Circa 196-146 BC**MACEDONIA. Kassander AR Tetradrachm. Circa 317-315 BC**AKARNANIA, LEUKAS. AR Stater. Circa 320-280 BC**PAMPHYLIA, ASPENDOS. AR Stater. Circa 330-300 BC.

Third row: SELEUKID SYRIA. Antiochos VI AR Drachm. Circa 144-143 BC**LUCANIA, METAPONTION. AR Stater. Circa 340-330 BC**LUCANIA, VELIA. AR Stater. Circa 280 BC**PARTHIA. Mithradates II AR Drachm. Circa 121-91 BC.

Second row: MYSIA, PERGAMMON. Eumenes I AR Tetradrachm. Circa 263-241 BC**CILICIA, TARSOS. Mazaios AR Stater. Circa 361-334 BC**THRACE. Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 297-281 BC**CILICIA, TARSOS. Pharnabazos AR Stater. Circa 380-374 BC**THRACE, MARONEIA. AR Tetradrachm. Mid 2nd cent. BC.

Bottom row: SELEUKID SYRIA. Antiochos Euergetes VII AR Tetradrachm. Circa 138-129 BC**MACEDON. Alexander III AR Tetradrachm. Circa 325-315 BC**CILICIA, AIGEAI. AR Tetradrachm. Circa 30 BC**PAIONIA. Patraos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 335-315 BC**PAMPHYLIA, SIDE. AR Tetradrachm. Circa 155-36 BC.
10 commentsJason T
AtticaEleusisTriptolemosMed.jpg
ANIMALS/PINK FLOYD, Track 3. Pigs (Three Different Ones)22 viewsATTICA, Athens.
Eleusinian festival coinage, 360-330 BC
AE16
Obv: Triptolemos, holding grain ear in right hand, seated left in winged chariot being drawn by two serpents
Rev: pig standing right on mystic staff; bucranium below
Ref: SNG Cop. 415

Composite picture of the collection:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-104363

Interactive presentation:
http://prezi.com/q7mw1k1zur65/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share


TIF
OWL2.jpg
ANTIQUITIES, Greek, South Italian “Owl skyphos”, 4th Century B.C.41 viewsA South Italian “Owl skyphos”
This is one of the most iconic pieces of pottery from the ancient Greek world, showing the owl Goddess Athena.
A piece that would of had much sentimental value to its original owners, reminding them as they drank wine of their homeland in Athens.
Totally intact and lovely style.
75mm x 145mm across the handles
Mid 4th century BC
superflex
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Antoninus Pius. Thrace, Philippopolis; 25 viewsAres

In Greek mythology, Ares ("battle strife") is the god of war and son of Zeus (king of the gods) and Hera. The Romans identified Mars, the god of war (whom they had inherited from the Etruscans) with Hellenic Ares, but among them, Mars stood in much higher esteem. Among the Hellenes, Ares was always mistrusted: his birthplace and true home was placed far off, among the barbarous and warlike Thracians (Iliad 13.301; Ovid); to Thrace he withdrew after he was discovered on a couch with Aphrodite ( Odyssey 8.361).

Although important in poetry, Ares was only rarely the recipient of cult worship, save at Sparta, where he was propriated before battle, and in the founding myth of Thebes, and he appeared in few myths (Burkert 1985, p.169). At Sparta there was a statue of the god in chains, to show that the spirit of war and victory was never to leave the city. At Sparta young dogs and even humans were sacrificed to him. The temple to Ares in the agora of Athens that Pausanias saw in the 2nd century AD had only been moved and rededicated there during the time of Augustus; in essence it was a Roman temple to Mars. The Areopagus, the "hill of Ares" where Paul preached, is sited at some distance from the Acropolis; from archaic times it was a site of trials. Its connection with Ares, perhaps based on a false etymology, may be purely etiological. Ares s throne at Mount Olympus is said to be covered with human skin.

Antoninus Pius AE18 of Philippopolis, Thrace. AVT AI ADRIA ANTWNEIN, bare head right / FILIPPOPOLEITWN, Ares standing left, holding spear in left hand, shield leaning against him at right. BMC 10.
ecoli
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Apollo Lykeios49 viewsThe statue of Apollo Lykeios is a standard depiction on coins from Marcianopolis. It shows Apollo resting after defeating the Python snake. It is suggested that this statue was made by Praxiteles, but Euphranor is named too.

The name Lykeios is referring to the Lykeion, a famous grove in Athens, were the original statue was located. The original is lost but several Roman copies have survived.

Jochen
AthensTet.jpg
AR Athens Tetradrachm27 viewsAR Athens Tetradrachm, 440 – 420 B.C., Athens, 25.8mm, 17.12g, 45°, SNG Cop 32.
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right, wearing earring. Countermark on cheek.
Rev: AΘE. Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent behind.
Marti Vltori
athens.JPG
AR Tetradrachm, Athens72 viewsAR Tetradrachm, Athens, ca. 450 BC, Obv: Athena in crested helm right; Rev: Owl standing, branch left, ΑΘΕ left, three test cuts, otherwise Nice Very Fine. Ex. Pegasi.3 commentsMolinari
arabia_0_6g.jpg
Arabia; Saba. Athens owl imitation: 0.6g8 viewsArabia; Saba. Athens owl imitations: small fraction. 0.6g. Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right, three olive leaves, Rev: ΑΘΕ, owl right, head facingPodiceps
arabia_2_6g.jpg
Arabia; Saba. Athens owl imitation: hemidrachm, 2.6g11 viewsArabia; Saba. Athens owl imitations: hemidrachm. 2.6g. Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right, three olive leaves, Saba letter G, Rev: ΑΘΕ, owl right, head facingPodiceps
ArcadiaThelpusaGetaIsis1_(exBassem).jpg
Arcadia, Thelpusa. Geta, as Caesar. Potentially unpublished.24 viewsArcadia, Thelpusa. Geta, as Caesar (AD 198–209). Æ 21.75mm, 3.97 g, 2h. Struck AD 202–205.
Obverse: [ΛΟ]Υ [•] CЄΠΤΙ [•] ΓЄΤΑC [KAI?], bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust left, seen from behind.
Reverse: ΘЄΛΠΟ – ΥCΙΩΝ, Isis standing left, wearing lotus and holding sistrum in right hand over lighted altar and situla in left.
References: Potentially unpublished. Cf. BCD Peloponnesos 1767 (Septimius Severus with capital W-shaped omega); Mi Sup. IV, 124 (same). For possibly another specimen of Geta, see Numismatic Museum of Athens 544.
Ex Bassem Doau, 5-29-2014.

My thanks to Dr. Klaus Vondrovec of the Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien for kindly showing me three of their Thelpusa bronzes of Geta (Mionnet Sup. IV, 126–128). From these it was possible to partially restore the obverse inscription on my piece, made possible by the fact that all four coins were struck with the same obverse die.
Mark Fox
82000559.jpg
ARGOLIS, Argos33 viewsA Neolithic settlement was located near the central sanctuary of Argois, removed 45 stadia (8 km; 5 miles) from Argos, closer to Mycenae. The temple was dedicated to "Argivian Hera". The main festival of that temple was the Hekatombaia, one of the major festivals of Argos itself. Walter Burkert (Homo necans, p. 185) connected the festival to the myth of the slaying of Argus Panoptes by Hermes ("shimmering" or "quick"), and only secondarily associated with mythological Argus (or the toponym).

Argos was a major stronghold of Mycenaean times, and along with the neighbouring acropolis of Mycenae and Tiryns became a very early settlement because of its commanding positions in the midst of the fertile plain of Argolis.

During Homeric times it belonged to a follower of Agamemnon and gave its name to the surrounding district; the Argolid which the Romans knew as Argeia. The importance of Argos was eclipsed by nearby Sparta after the 6th century BC.[dubious – discuss]

Because of its refusal to fight or send supplies in the Graeco-Persian Wars, Argos was shunned by most other city-states.[citation needed] Argos remained neutral or the ineffective ally of Athens during the 5th century BC struggles between Sparta and Athens.

The Mythological kings of Argos are (in order): Inachus, Phoroneus, Argus, Triopas, Agenor, Iasus, Crotopus, Pelasgus (aka Gelanor), Danaus, Lynceus, Abas, Proetus, Acrisius, Perseus, Megapénthês, Argeus, and Anaxagoras. An alternative version (supplied by Tatiānus[2]) of the original 17 consecutive kings of Argōs includes Apis, Argios, Kriasos, and Phorbas between Argus and Triopas, explaining the apparent unrelation of Triopas to Argus.

After the original 17 kings of Argos, there were three kings ruling Argos at the same time (see Anaxagoras), one descended from Bias, one from Melampus, and one from Anaxagoras. Melampus was succeeded by his son Mantius, then Oicles, and Amphiaraus, and his house of Melampus lasted down to the brothers Alcmaeon and Amphilochus.

Anaxagoras was succeeded by his son Alector, and then Iphis. Iphis left his kingdom to his nephew Sthenelus, the son of his brother Capaneus.

Bias was succeeded by his son Talaus, and then by his son Adrastus who, with Amphiaraus, commanded the disastrous Seven Against Thebes. Adrastus bequethed the kingdom to his son, Aegialeus, who was subsequently killed in the war of the Epigoni. Diomedes, grandson of Adrastus through his son-in-law Tydeus and daughter Deipyle, replaced Aegialeus and was King of Argos during the Trojan war. This house lasted longer than those of Anaxagoras and Melampus, and eventually the kingdom was reunited under its last member, Cyanippus, son of Aegialeus, soon after the exile of Diomedes.

Argos played a role in the Peloponnesian war and beyond.

ARGOLIS, Argos. Circa 90-50 BC. AR Triobol (2.16 g, 1h). Trypis, magistrate. Forepart of wolf at bay right / Large A; T-PY/ΠI-C in two lines around, piloi of the Dioskouroi below crossbar; all within incuse square. BCD Peloponnesos 1169. VF, darkly toned.

Ex BCD Collection (not in previous BCD sales).

Ex-CNG eAuction 82, Lot: 559 110/150

ecoli
ArgosWolf200.JPG
Argos, Argolis145 viewscirca 3rd century BC
AR Triobol (15mm, 2.25g)
O: Forepart of wolf left.
R: Large A, eagle standing right on thunderbolt beneath; IP-EΩ-NO-Σ (Hieronos, magistrate) in corners, all within shallow incuse square.
SNG Cop 42; BCD Peloponnesos 1177; SNG Delepierre 2273; Sear 2795v
ex Empire Coins

The origins of Argos are pre-Mycenaean, making it one of the most ancient cities in Greece.
Argos played a prominent role in The Iliad, being claimed by Hera as "one of the three cities dearest to Me". While they did supply ships and soldiers (including the hero Diomedes) for Agamemnon's war with Troy, Argos later remained neutral during the Graeco-Persian wars. And though ostensibly allied with Athens during her war with Sparta at the end of the 5th century BC, Argos was basically a non-participant.

Recent speculation dates this coin to the time of Cleopatra VII and may in fact have been issued by her. I remain skeptical, however it is an interesting theory.
5 commentsEnodia
aristotle.jpg
Aristotle, 384-322 B.C.28 viewsAristotle was born in Stagira in north Greece, the son of Nichomachus, the court physician to the Macedonian royal family. He was trained first in medicine, and then in 367 he was sent to Athens to study philosophy with Plato. He stayed at Plato's Academy until about 347. Though a brilliant pupil, Aristotle opposed some of Plato's teachings, and when Plato died, Aristotle was not appointed head of the Academy. After leaving Athens, Aristotle spent some time traveling, and possibly studying biology, in Asia Minor (now Turkey) and its islands. He returned to Macedonia in 338 to tutor Alexander the Great; after Alexander conquered Athens, Aristotle returned to Athens and set up a school of his own, known as the Lyceum. After Alexander's death, Athens rebelled against Macedonian rule, and Aristotle's political situation became precarious. To avoid being put to death, he fled to the island of Euboea, where he died in 322 B.C.

Aristotle is said to have written 150 philosophical treatises. The 30 that survive touch on an enormous range of philosophical problems, from biology and physics to morals to aesthetics to politics. Many, however, are thought to be "lecture notes" instead of complete, polished treatises, and a few may not be the work of Aristotle but of members of his school.

A full description of Aristotle's contributions to science and philosophy is beyond the scope of this gallgery. Suffice it to say that Aristotle became virtually lost to Western Civilization during the so-called "dark ages." In the later Middle Ages, Aristotle's work was rediscovered and enthusiastically adopted by medieval scholars. His followers called him Ille Philosophus (The Philosopher), or "the master of them that know," and many accepted every word of his writings -- or at least every word that did not contradict the Bible -- as eternal truth. Fused and reconciled with Christian doctrine into a philosophical system known as Scholasticism, Aristotelian philosophy became the official philosophy of the Roman Catholic Church. As a result, some scientific discoveries in the Middle Ages and Renaissance were criticized simply because they were not found in Aristotle. It is one of the ironies of the history of science that Aristotle's writings, which in many cases were based on first-hand observation, were used to impede observational science.

"Mine is the first step and therefore a small one, though worked out with much thought and hard labor. You, my readers or hearers of my lectures, if you think I have done as much as can fairly be expected of an initial start. . . will acknowledge what I have achieved and will pardon what I have left for others to accomplish," Aristotle.

See: http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/history/aristotle.html hosted by the University of California, Berkeley Museum of Paleontology.
Cleisthenes
Athens,_Attica__GC_18.jpg
Athen, Attica 449-413 BC3 viewsjaseifert
Athena_Owl_Tet_2d.jpg
Athena * Owl, Athenian AR Tetradrachm * 449-413 BC.487 views
Athena * Owl, Archaic style Athenian Silver Tetradrachm.

Obv: Head of Athena right-facing, archaic almond shaped eye, crested helmet engraved with three olive-leaves & floral scroll, wire necklace, circular earring, hair neatly drawn across forehead in parallel curves and which falls below the neck guard of the helmet in elegant, looped coils, neck truncated with row of dots.
Rev: AOE vertical in right field, Owl standing erect to the right, head facing, prong tail, feet resting on bottom line of the lower plane of the incuse, pellet in center of forehead; to left olive twig and crescent, all engraved within incuse square.

Exergue: (None)

Mint: Athens
Struck: 449-413 BC.

Size: 22.26 x 23.63 mms
Weight: 17.8 grams
Die axis: 90°

Condition: Absolutely gorgeous. Beautifully toned, bright, clear, lustrous silver with superb high-relief details both sides.

Refs:*
Sear, GC, 2526; Vol. I, pg. 236.

12 commentsTiathena
Deified_Alexander_.jpg
Athena and Deified Alexander402 viewsThe deified Alexander the Great is depicted on the obverse of this coin of Lysimachos, dating to the early third century BC.

In the years following his death Alexander the Great came to be the subject of cult worship throughout the Mediterranean basin. His corpse was appropriated by Ptolemy I who transported it to Egypt, initially interring it at Memphis, then to a mausoleum and center of worship in Alexandria. It survived until the 4th century AD when Theodosius banned paganism, only to disappear without trace.

Athena depicted on the reverse of this coin was the patron goddess of Athens. She came to be worshiped throughout much of the Mediterranean basin during Hellenistic period.
7 commentsLloyd T
Athen_owl_Tetradrachm_.jpg
Athena and her owl 182 viewsIn Greek mythology, a Little Owl baby (Athene noctua) traditionally represents or accompanies Athena, the virgin goddess of wisdom, or Minerva, her syncretic incarnation in Roman mythology. Because of such association, the bird often referred to as the "owl of Athena" or the "owl of Minerva" has been used as a symbol of knowledge, wisdom, perspicacity and erudition throughout the Western world.
The reasons behind the association of Athena and the owl are lost in time. Some mythographers, such as David Kinsley and Martin P. Nilsson suggest that she may descend from a Minoan palace goddess associated with birds and Marija Gimbutas claim to trace Athena's origins as an Old European bird and snake goddess.
On the other hand, Cynthia Berger theorizes about the appeal of some characteristics of owls such as their ability to see in the dark to be used as symbol of wisdom while others, such as William Geoffrey Arnott, propose a simple association between founding myths of Athens and the significant number of Little Owls in the region (a fact noted since antiquity by Aristophanes in The Birds and Lysistrata).
In any case, the city of Athens seems to have adopted the owl as proof of allegiance to its patron virgin goddess, which according to a popular etiological myth reproduced on the West pediment of the Parthenon, secured the favor of its citizens by providing them with a more enticing gift than Poséidon.
Owls were commonly reproduced by Athenians in vases, weights and prize amphoras for the Panathenaic Games. The owl of Athena even became the common obverse of the Athenian tetradrachms after 510 BC and according to Philochorus, the Athenian tetradrachm was known as glaux throughout the ancient world and "owl" in present day numismatics. They were not, however, used exclusively by them to represent Athena and were even used for motivation during battles by other Greek cities, such as in the victory of Agathocles of Syracuse over the Carthaginians in 310 B.C. in which owls flying through the ranks were interpreted as Athena’s blessing or in the Battle of Salamis, chronicled in Plutarch's biography of Themistocles.
(Source: Wikipédia)
moneta romana
Athena_Parthenos.jpg
Athena Parthenos228 viewsAttica, Athens, ca. 264-267 AD, Æ 21
Helmeted head of Athena right. / AΘHN-AIΩN Athena Parthenos standing left holding Nike, shield and spear.
Kroll, Agora, 284; Sv-pl 82, 5ff; SNG Copenhagen 384.
(21 mm, 4.98 g, 6h)

The statue of Athena depicted on the reverse of this coin is a representation of Phidias cult statue of Athena in the Parthenon on the acropolis of Athens. The statue is stood in the Parthenon until the Fifth century AD, when it was destroyed by fire.

This is amongst the last of the “Roman series” of coins issued from the mint in Athens. In 267 AD Germanic raiders sacked the city bringing to an end the operations of the Athenian mint.
Lloyd T
454-404_BC_-_Athenian_Tetradrachm.jpg
Athenian Classical Tetradrachm -- 454-404 BC19 views16.99 g, 22 mm, 270°
Athens Mint
Silver Tetradrachm
Near VF, toned, test cut on reverse, minor deposits and light scratches.
Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31

Obverse: Classical Bust of Athena.
Reverse: AOE; Owl, Crescent, and Olive Sprig Within Incuse Square.

Owls were the first widely used international coin. They popularized the practice of putting a head on the obverse of a coin and an animal on the reverse. Athena was goddess of both wisdom and warfare and was the patron goddess of Athens. The owl is Athena's attribute or mascot. According to mythology, Athena at times took the very form of her owl. The owl species depicted on Athenian Owls is the Athena Noctua, also called the Little Owl or Minerva Owl.
Hydro
Athena_2.jpg
Athenian Owl451 viewsAttica-Athens
Silver tetradrachm
449-414 B.C.
16.54g, 24mm, 0o
13 commentsmihali84
Athens_Owl.jpg
Athenian Owl484 viewsAttica-Athens
Silver tetradrachm
449-414 B.C.
17g, 24mm, 45o
Interesting Countermark on reverse
6 commentskypros84
Image1.JPG
Athenian Owl Silver Tetradrachm c. 454-414 B.C.57 viewsAthens. c. 454-414 BC. AR tetradrachm (24mm, 17.20 gm, 8h).
Obv: Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet ornamented with three laurel leaves and vine scroll.
Rev: ΑΘΕ Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind, all within incuse square.
Ref: SNG Copenhagen 32.
Extremely Fine.
mjabrial
Athensowl.jpg
Athenian Tetradrachm25 viewsSilver Tetradrachm minted in Athens between 300-262 BC. 16.81 g

Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right

Rev: Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent to l, AΘE in right field
chuy1530
athens.jpg
athens78 viewsAthens, Greece,Tetradrachm, 449-413 B.C.
Obverse- Head of Athena right.
Reverse- AQE right, owl standing right.
17.gm, 21.mm.
1 commentsb70
a142.jpg
Athens44 viewsAttica - Athens
Tetradrachm
Obverse:Head of Athena right in crested helmet
Revarse:Owl standing right, head facing, olive spring and crescent to left

22.14mm 12.77gm

MODERN CAST FAKE

I bought it as "unknown" 12$ at ebay
maik
a_127f.JPG
Athens127 viewsAttica-Athens
Tetradrachm 450-404 bc
Obverse:Helmeted head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves
Reverse:ATHE ; owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind

16.68gm 24.85mm

Sear 2526
2 commentsmaik
g_041.JPG
Athens79 viewsAttika,Athens "new style" 168-50 b.c
Tetradrachm 115 - 114 BC

Obverse:Head of Athena,wearing helmet
Reverse:Owl standing right on amphora;ΑΘΕ magistrates names ΜΗΤΡΟΔΩΡΟΣ ΚΑΛΛΗ at left and ΔΗΜΟΣΘΕ right;grapes right;ΣΦ under amphora

28.67mm 16.71gm

Sear 1 pages 239-240 , Thompson 635
3 commentsmaik
p_028~0.JPG
Athens53 viewsTetradrachm

Modern
Randygeki(h2)
athenowl.jpg
Athens AR Classical Tetradrachm 454-431 BC16 viewsOBVERSE: Helmeted head of Athena right
REVERSE: Owl perched right, Olive leaves and crescent moon in left field; ethnic [AOE] in right field obscured by obverse test punch.

This type of owl is from the high point of Athens' domination of the Greek world. According to Reid Goldsborough's classification it is distinguished by the confident smile on the face of Athena, her full rounded features and, on the reverse, the short legged owl. The coin is somewhat crystallized as seen by the surfaces and its low conductivity. Crystallization is rarely found in Owls, I suspect because their high relief required heating the planchet strongly before striking. Not a perfect coin but the character of Athena nicely represents the opinion that the Athenians had of themselves in their heyday.

weight 16.95 gms
daverino
Gallienus_Athens.jpg
Athens - AE7 views
struck in the reign of Gallienus 264-267 AD
draped bust of Athena right wearing crested Corinthian helmet
Athena Parthenos facing, head left, holding Nike with wreath. Left hand resting on shield set on ground holding spear
AΘHNA_IΩN
BMC Attica p. 95, 684; SNG Cop 384
Johny SYSEL
1342_Athens.jpg
Athens - AE7 views264-267 AD
draped bust of Athena right wearing crested helmet
mirror image of acropolis of Athens from northwest - Panathenaic way lead upward to the Propylaia; at summit, large statue of Athena Promachos standing right, Erechtheion to right; in center of rock, niche representing the Cave of Pan with his statue
AΘH_NAIΩN
Kroll 375 (same obv. die as 372b); Walker, Chronological 111–13a; Svoronos, Monnaies, pl. 98, 30–6
ex Galata
Johny SYSEL
Athènes 224-198 BC.jpg
Athens - AE 12 (224-198 BC)14 viewsHead of helmeted Athena right
A Θ E , owl standing right, head facing, in wreath
Ginolerhino
1452_Athens_drachm.jpg
Athens - AR drachm9 views431-393 BC
head of Athena right - almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll
owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent left
AΘE
SNG Cop 41; Kroll 10; Dewing 1601; Svoronos pl. 11, 20; HGC 4 1631
ex Künker
Johny SYSEL
Athens_tetra_1.jpg
Athens - AR tetradrachm55 views431-393 BC
head of Athena right - almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll
owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent left
AΘE right
Phoenician contermark
bēth yōdh
(Type C), Sear 2526
16,5g 22mm

Three cuts over the owl probably weren't test cuts but intentional destruction of a symbol of unpopular Athens.
Johny SYSEL
Athens.jpg
Athens - AR tetradrachm30 views431-393 BC
head of Athena right - almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll
owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent left
AΘE
(Type C), Sear 2526
16,5g 22mm
ex Jiří Militký
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
ath3.JPG
Athens - tetradrachm52 viewsAttique, Athènes 483-480 BC Tétradrachme 16,6g
A:/ Tête d'Athéna à dr. coiffée d'un casque attique à cimier, les cheveux rangés en petites nattes autour du front.
R:/ (A)θE Chouette debout à droite, la tête de face , à g. une pousse d'Olivier.
Seltman Groupe E, Svoronos pl.3, 25-39
Brennos
ath2.JPG
Athens - tetradrachm54 viewsAttique, Athènes 490-482 BC Tétradrachme 17.08g
A:/ Tête d'Athéna à dr. coiffée d'un casque attique à cimier, les cheveux rangés en petites vagues autour du front tombant sur la tempe en natte.
R:/ AθE Chouette debout à droite, la tête de face , à g. une pousse d'Olivier.
Seltman Groupe M, Svoronos pl.5 34
Brennos
ath1_mm_coins_Sv_PL_6_11_Selt_330_A214P275.JPG
Athens - tetradrachm52 viewsAttique, Athènes 505-490 BC Tétradrachme 16.77g
A:/ Tête d'Athéna à dr. coiffée d'un casque attique à cimier, les cheveux rangés en petites nattes.
R:/ AθE Chouette debout à droite, la tête de face , à g. une pousse d'Olivier.
Seltman Groupe L n°330 (A214/P275), Svoronos pl.6 11
Brennos
Athènes 2.jpg
Athens - tetradrachm (IVth C. BC)32 viewsObv.: head of Athena right weraing helmet and wreath. Phoenician countermark on her cheek.
Rev.: AΘE , owl right.
Ginolerhino
Athènes 1.jpg
Athens - tetradrachm (Vth - IVth C. BC)29 viewsObv.: head of Athena right, wearing helmet and wreath.
Rev.: AΘE , owl right.
Ginolerhino
CHALKOUS_BOTH_2.jpg
Athens AE2 Star & 2 Crescents Chalkous 87/6 BC4 viewsObv: Athena in Corinthian helmet
Rev: Grounded fulminating Zeus advancing right about to hurl thunderbolt
ΑΘΕ
ethnic surrounding Zeus
Symbol RF: Pontic Star & 2 Crescents
AE2 (18mm) 9.05gm
Kroll 97 Mithradatic war issue King Mithradates & Aristion as magistrates
cicerokid
athens_01.jpg
Athens AR Tetradrachm78 viewsObv: Head of Athena right, with profile eye.
Rev: AQE - Owl standing right, head facing, olive twing and crescent behind.
Year: 4th century BC
Ref: Sear 2537
3 commentsoa
2v0jzlx.jpg
Athens AR Tetradrachm22 viewsAthens Tetradrachm 120 - 110 b.c
12h, 11g, 26mm.
O: Head of Athena facing right.
R: Standing owl
Ref: due to weight, possible Fouree.
Andrew B2
8y82lk.jpg
Athens AR Tetradrachm26 viewsAR Tetradrachm. 430 - 322 b.c
12g, 19mm, 9h.
O: Head of Athena facing right
R: Standing owl. Olive branch on Left, AOE on right.
Ref: Work In Progress (on ID board)
Andrew B2
Athens_Attica.jpg
ATHENS ATTICA AR Tetradrachm, Thompson 477a, New Style Owl57 viewsOBV: Helmeted head of Athena right
REV: Owl standing right, head facing, on overturned amphora; to left, eagle standing right on thunderbolt; Gamma on amphora, ΗΡΑ in exergue; all within laurel wreath
16.8g
Minted at Athens, 127/26 BC
1 commentsLegatus
worn_owl.jpg
Athens c. 393-300 BC, tetradrachm48 viewsAttica. Athens c. 393-300 BC, tetradrachm, 16.23 g, eye seen in profile, Sear GCV I: 2537.1 commentsPodiceps
Athens_drachm_struck_454-404bc,_4_15g,_Roma_e6_lot_80,_Feb_22_2014,_£140,_total_£171(_282_25).jpg
Athens drachm 454-404 bc15 viewsChance Vandal
EmerGTetAttica.jpg
Athens Emergency Issue Plated Tetradrachm Circa 406-404 BC949 viewsQuote from David Sear:

"Athens was the greatest power in the Greek world throughout most of the 5th century BC. Its famous 'owl' coinage, principally of silver tetradrachms, possibly commenced in 510 BC on the occasion of the downfall of the tyrant Hippias. On these celebrated coins the helmeted head of the goddess Athena was accompanied by her attendant owl and the first three letters of the ethnic 'AQE'. Later, a diadem of olive leaves was added to Athena's helmet and a cresent moon was placed in the reverse field, though the precise chronological significance of these changes remains uncertain. To the intense chagrin of the Spartans Athens became the leader of the Greek states, including those of Ionia, in the epic struggle against the expansionist policies of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. The victories at Salamis (480 BC) and the Eurymedon (circa 467) clearly established the Athenian supremacy in the Aegean world. Initially, the Delian League (founded in 477) was an alliance of independent states sharing a common cause under the leadership of Athens. It gradually developed into an Athenian maritime empire with the member cities obliged to pay an annual tribute into the League's treasury on Delos. In 454 this treasury, amounting to 5,000 talents of silver, was actually removed to Athens and the vast wealth was openly employed for the aggrandizement of the city, now under the leadership of the great statesman Pericles. Vast building projecdts, such as the monumental edifices on the Acropolis, were financed in this way. From 431, however, Athens became embroiled in the protracted Peloponnesian War and increasingly the wealth of the state was dissipated in this futile cause. This attractive tetradrachm belongs to the exceptionally large ouput of Athenian 'owls' made during the second half of the 5th century. In contrast to the artistic development taking place at mints in other parts of the Mediterranean world, the late archaic style of the earlier 5th century became 'frozen' on these issues which represent the first truly imperial coinage of the Greek world. As Athens restricted or forbade the issue of independent currency at many of the cities within her sphere of influence the 'owls' came to circulate over an increasingly wide area. But this all came to an end with the defeat of Athens by Sparta in 404 BC and during the period immediately preceding this catastrophe the Athenians were reduced to the desperate expedient of issuing bronze tetradrachms and drachms with a thin surface coating of silver. This specimen is an excellent example of this emergency coinage the production of which drew contemporary comment from Aristophanes who, in his play Frogs (717ff), compares the decline in the quality of the leading citizens with the recent debasement of the Athenian coinage."
3 commentsGunner
athens_newStyle_AR30_16_82g.jpg
Athens New Style tetradrachm157 viewsPolycharm(os), Nikog(enes), and Aianti-, magistrates, struck 133/2
30mm, 16.82g, 11h
ob: head of Athena Parthenos right, wearing necklace, pendent earring, and triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with the protomes of four horses above the visor, a Pegasos in flight rightward above the raised earpiece, and a curvilinear ornament on the shell
rev: Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora; A-ӨE above ΠOΛY-XAPM/NIKOΓ/AIAN/TI (magistrates’ names) in five lines across field; winged kerykeion to left, B on amphora, ΔI below; all within wreath

Thompson 377 var. (same obv. die; unlisted month/control letters combination)

ex Triton XIV, Lot: 216
3 commentsareich
2_PALMS_ROMA_March_2019.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 160/59 BC46 viewsObv: Athena right in tri-form helmet
Thompson issue 5 16.97 Gm 32 mm
Thompson Catalogue: Obs:New : Rev:New
Rev:ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on amphora
2 Magistrates monograms beside each a single palm.
Symbol: 2 Palms
All surrounded by an olive wreath
4 commentscicerokid
Both_No_Symbol_1.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 161/0 BC6 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
34.2mm 16.97g Thompson issue 4
Thompson catalogue : Obs 13 : Rev (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates monograms in both fields
No symbol type
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
ISIS_Post_Sulla.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 83/2 BC8 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29 mm 16.82 gm Thompson issue 82 Thompson catalogue:ll69a
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Θ control ΔI below
2 magistrates : ARCHITIMOS DEMETRI
RF symbol : Isis
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
Savoca_15th_28052017_800_X__resisze_Beatyl_with_Fillets.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 84/3 BC8 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
28 mm 16.47 gm Thompson issue 81 Thompson catalogue: Obs 1160 ? Rev: NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark B control [] below
2 magistrates : KLEOPHANES EPITHETHES
RF symbol : Beatyl with Fillets
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_Tyche_Staff___Cornucopia~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 100/9 BC3 viewsObs : Athena Parthanos right in tri-form helmet
16.25g 29mm Thompson issue 65
Thompson catalogue: Obs 875 : Rev NEW
REV : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathanaic amphora
on which month mark Λ control ME below
3 magistrates : DOSITHEOS XARIAS XAIR
RF symbol : Tyche, Staff & Cornucopia
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_DIONYSOS~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 104/3 BC5 viewsObs: Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
32mm !6.75g Thompson issue 61
Thompson catalogue Obs 802 : Rev h (not in plates)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Η ? control ΑΠ below
3 magistrates : ANDREAS CHIRANAUTES DEMETRI
RF symbol : Dionysus & Demeter
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_QUIVER~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 109/8 BC5 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos in tri-form helmet
30mm 16.64gm Thompson issue 56
Thompson catalogue: Obs 724 : Rev ? (altered)
Rev : AΘE ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Δ/Γ control ΠΕ below
3 magistrates : DAMON SOSIKRATES KRITON
RF symbol : Quiver & Bow
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_NEW_TRIP.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 113/2 BC7 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29mm 16.73 gm Thompson issue 52
Thompson catalogue : Obs 680 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark M control ME below
3 magistrates : EUMAREIDES KLEOMEN PYRRI
RF symbol : Triptolemos in biga pulled by snakes
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_GRAPES~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 115/4 BC7 viewsbs: Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.56g 29mm Thompson issue 50
Thompson catalogue : Obs 639 : Rev ? (altered)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Γ/Β/Α control ΣΦ below
3 magistrates : METRODOROS DEMOSTHE(N) KALLIPH / PYRROS
RF symbol : Bunch of Grapes on vine leaf
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_NEW_DOUBLE_CORNUCOPIA~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 120/9 BC6 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
28mm 16.50g Thompson issue 45
Thompson catalogue: Obs 543 : Rev f/g (not in plates)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Δ control ΔΙ below
3 magistrates : APHRODiSI DIOGE PHILOX
RF symbol : Double Cornucopia with Fillets
All surrounded within an olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_DIOSCURI~0.jpg
Athens New Style tetradrachm 123/2 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthanos right in tri-form helmet
16.23g 30mm Thompson issue (new) 42
Thompson catalogue: 479g
REV : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathanaic amphora
on which month mark Δ control ΣΦ below
3 magistrates : MIKION EURYKLEI BOYKATTHES
RF symbol : Dioscuri
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_PROW~0.jpg
Athens New Style tetradrachm 124/3 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos in tri-form helmet
16.81g 30mm Thompson issue (new) 41
Thompson catalogue : 532
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Ε control ΣΦ below
3 magistrates : KAPAIX EPGOKLE KLE
RF symbol : Prow of Ship
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_TRIPOD~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 125/4 BC5 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29mm 16.67g Thompson issue 40
Thompson catalogue : 470f
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Θ control ΜΕ below
3 magistrates : POLEMON ALKETES ARIS
LF symbol : Tripod
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_FULMEN~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 126/5 BC5 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.65gm 32mm Thompson issue 39
Thompson catalogue Obs 450 : Rev b (not in plates)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Ε control ΗΡ below
3 magistrates : EPIGENE SOSANDROS ELIODO
LF symbol : Eagle on Thunderbolt
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_CADUCEUS~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 133/2 BC6 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29mm 17.06g Thompson issue 32
Thompson catalogue: Obs 378 : Rev d (not in plates)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Ε control ΔΙ below
3 magistrates : POLYCHARM NIKOG DIONYSIOU
LF symbol : Winged Caduceus
All surrounded within an olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_ASKLEPIOS~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 135/4 BC10 viewsbs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.63g 29.2mm Thompson issue 30
Thompson catalogue: Obs 354 : Rev NEW
Rev : AΘE ethnic
Owl standing on overturned Panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Ν control ΗΡ below
3 magistrates : MENED EPIGENO ARISTE
LF symbol : Asklepios clutching stick with snake entwined
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_LIONSKIN~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 136/5 BC7 viewsObs: Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.81 g 31.5mm Thompson issue 29
Thompson catalogue: Obs 332: Rev c (not in plates)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Δ control: ΗΡ below
3 magistrates : HRA ARISTOPH POLYM
LF symbol: Bow Club & Lionskin
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_NEW_NIKE.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 137/6 BC4 viewsbs: Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.82gm 30mm Thompson issue 28
Thompson catalogue: Obs 315 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Β control ΜΕ below
2 magistrates : MIKI ΘΕΟΦΡΑ
RF symbol : Nike driving Quadriga
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_HELIOS~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 138/7 BC4 viewsbs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
33mm 16.87gm Thompson issue 27
Thompson catalogue : 288a
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Α control ΗΡ in LF
LF - ΓΛΑΥ RF - ΕΧΕ
2 magistrates
RF symbol : Radiate facing bust of Helios
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_Aplustre~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 139/8 BC6 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet: No Pegasos
32.8mm 16.87g Thompson issue (new) 26
Thompson catalogue : Obs 264 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
upon which month mark Κ control AN below
2 complex magistrates monograms in both fields
RF symbol : Aplustre
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_EAGLE~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 141/0 BC4 viewsObs: Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
35mm 16.53gm Thompson issue 24
Thompson catalogue : Obs 230 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Δ control ΣΦ below
2 complex magistrates monograms
RF symbol : Eagle perching on right monogram
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
APOLLO_BOTH~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 143/2 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.00 gm 34.4mm Thompson issue 22
Thompson catalogue : Obs 188 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on which
month mark Θ below left control mark ME 2 magistrates : ΔΙΟΦΑ ΔΙΟΔΟ
LF symbol : Apollo
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_THRYSOS~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 144/3 BC6 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.75gm 34mm Thompson issue 21
Thompson catalogue : Obs : GAZIANTEP 185 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Ε control ΤΙ below
2 complex magistrates monograms
RF symbol : Filleted Thyrsos
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
HORSE_BOTH~1.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 145/4 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.70 gm 34.8mm Thompson issue 20
Thompson catalogue : Obs 160 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on which
month mark Γ : LF control mark ΣΦΑΙ
2 magistrates : ΠΑΔΩ ΛΥΣΙΑ
RF symbol :Forepart of Bridled Horse
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_TRIDENT.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 147/6 BC SOLD10 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.74 gm 34mm Thompson issue 18
Thompson catalogue : Obs 127 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
below control mark ΠΡΟ
2 magistrates : ΑΔΕΙ ΗΛΙΟ
RF symbol : Trident Head
All within a surrounding olive wreath SOLD
cicerokid
Dionysos_Mine_Cornucopia_Both.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 148/7 BC10 viewsObs: Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
31mm 16.59gm Thompson issue 17
Thompson catalogue: Obs 120/NEW?: Rev (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates : AMMO ΔΙΟ
LF symbol : Cornucopia
EY below amphora
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_PALM_LEAF.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 149/8 BC5 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
34mm 16.64g Thompson issue 16
Thompson catalogue: Obs 109 : Rev (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : AΘE ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which 2 control letters Ε ? : RF month mark Ι
ΠOΛΥ , TI - MPΔ monogram
2 magistrates : ΠΟΛΥ TIMARCHIDES
Symbol : Palm Leaf (oblique behind owl)
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_KERNOS~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 150/9 BC3 viewsObs: Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
34.5mm 16.70gm Thompson issue 15
Thompson catalogue: Obs 99: Rev (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates : AMMO ΔΙΟ
LF symbol : Kernos
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_NEW_TERM_of_HERMES.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 151/0 BC5 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
32 3 mm 17.20 g Thompson Issue 14
Thompson catalogue: Obs 87 : Rev NEW
Rev : AΘE ethnic
Owl Standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark M/B
2 magistrates mongrams in both fields
LF symbol : Term of Hermes
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_SERPENTS.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 152/1 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
33mm 16.92 g Thompson Issue 13
Thompson catalogue: Obs 80 ?? : Rev 79a
Rev : AΘE ethnic
Owl Standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Ζ
XM monogram left, AΦN monogram right
2 magistrates : MOSCHOS PHANIAS
RF symbol : 2 Serpents
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_CICADA~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 153/2 BC3 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
34.2mm 16.80 g Thompson issue 12
Thompson catalogue : Obs 66 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month letter A
2 magistrates monograms in both fields
LF symbol : Cicada
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_PILAII.jpg
Athens New Style tetradrachm 154/3 BC3 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
34.5mm 16.72g Thompson issue 11
Thompson catalogue : Obs 60 : Rev (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 complex magistrates monograms in both fields
RF symbol : Caps of Dioscuri
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_GRAIN_EAR.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 155/4 BC6 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
33mm 17.2gm Thompson issue 10
Thompson catalogue: Obs 50 : Rev: (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 Complex magistrates monograms in both fields
LF symbol: Ear of Grain
All surrounded by olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_TROPHY_EXCELLENT.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 156/5 BC7 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
32mm 16.82gm Thompson issue 9
Thompson catalogue: Obs 43 : Rev: (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 Complex magistrates monograms in right field
LF symbol: Trophy
All surrounded by olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_NIKE_WREATH_PHOTO~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 157/6 BC2 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
Lions tailed pegasos type
33.8 mm 16.32gm Thompson issue 8
Thompson catalogue: 34b ? ( not in plates)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates monograms in both fields
RF symbol:Nike presenting Wreath
All surrounded by olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_TOP_RUDDER_REV.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 158/7 BC5 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos in tri-form helmet wearing aegis
15 55g 32.5mm Thompson issue 7
Thompson catalogue : Obs 27 : Rev NEW (no rudder)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates monograms : NAUKRATES ARI....
NO RUDDER SYMBOL BELOW LF MONOGRAM
EXE graffito below left centre olive wreath
All within surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_CLUB_again.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 159/8 BC2 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.94gm 36mm Thompson Issue 6
Thompson catalogue : Obs 22 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
LF monogram RF monogram Π ω
2 magistrates
RF symbol : Club
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_Cornucopia_161_BC.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 161/0 BC6 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
32mm 16.66g Thompson issue 4
Thompson catalogue : Obs 13 : Rev: 3c (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates monograms in both fields
RF symbol: Cornucopiae
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
PHANIAS_BOTH.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 162/1 BC3 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
33.6mm 16.73g Thompson issue 3
Thompson catalogue : Obs 10 : Rev NEW/ f/g (not in plates)?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates
1 monogram in LF - ΦΑΝΙ in RF
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
Kernos_Bakhos_Both.gif
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 163/2 BC14 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
35.5mm 16.29g Thompson issue 2
Thompson catalogue : Obs 7 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates
1 monogram in LF & in RF
2 Symbols Kernos in RF: Bakhos below amphora
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
T_OBV___REV_2~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 164/3 BC7 viewsObs: Athena Parthenos in tri-form helmet
right,wearing Aegis, Biga on neckguard
No border of dots
33.5 mm 16.15gm Thompson issue 1
Thompson catalogue:Obs 3 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates monograms in both fields
All surrounded by olive wreath with single tie
cicerokid
STAG_299_16_60_g.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 79/8 BC31 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
30 mm 16.60 gm Thompson issue 86 Thompson catalogue: Obs 1217 Rev: New/Not in plztes?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark ? control ? below
2 magistrates : NESTOR MNASEAS
RF symbol : Stag
All surrounded by an olive wreath
1 commentscicerokid
Poppy_BOTH.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 82/1 BC5 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29 mm 16.82 gm Thompson issue 83 Thompson catalogue: Obs 1183 Rev: not in plates/ NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark K control ΔI below
2 magistrates : LYSANDROS OINOPHILOS
RF symbol : Poppy Head between 2 Grain Ears
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
Athens_CNG_GRIFFIN_2011.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 89/88 BC18 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
32 mm 16.78 gm Thompson issue (new) 77
Thompson catalogue: Obs:1131 Rev: Not in plates
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark B control EΠ below
3 magistrates : APELLICON GORGIAS DIOGE
RF symbol : Leaping Griffin
All surrounded by an olive wreath
1 commentscicerokid
Roma_and_Nike.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 90/89 BC13 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
30.5 mm 15.67 gm corroded Thompson issue (new) 76
Thompson catalogue: 1128a
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Γ control ΠΡ below
3 magistrates : KOINTOS KLEAS DIONYSI
RF symbol : Roma & Nike
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_ROMA_EXCELLENT~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 91/0 BC2 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29.9 mm 16.4 gm Thompson issue (new) 75
Thompson catalogue: Obs1122/Rev1123 NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark H/Z control ΣTΕ/ΔΑ below
2 magistrates : XENOCLES HARMOXENOS
RF symbol : Roma seated
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_D___T.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 92/1 BC2 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
30 mm 16.2 gm Thompson issue (new) 74
Thompson catalogue: Obs1076/Rev Not in plates/NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Δ control ?? below
2 magistrates : XENOCLES HARMOXENOS
RF symbol : Dolphin & Trident
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_New_Pegassos~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 94/3 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
28.5mm 16.25 gm Thompson issue (New) 67
Thompson catalogue: Obs 972 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Θ control Α Π below
3 magistrates : ARIST(I)ON PHILON HGEAS
RF symbol : Drinking Pegasos
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_Gorgoneon.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 95/4 BC5 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
28.5mm 16.76 gm Thompson issue (New) 66
Thompson catalogue: 937a ? (not in plates)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Γ control MH below
3 magistrates : NIKETES DIONYSIOS MENE
RF symbol : Gorgon Head
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_COILED_SERPENT~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 97/6 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
28 mm 16.8 gm Thompson issue 70
Thompson catalogue: Obs NEW: Rev 1019 (altered) NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Ζ/Γ control ΣΟ/ΠΕ below
2 magistrates : XENOCLES HARMOXENOS
RF symbol : Coiled Serpent
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_IMITATION_CICADA.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm c153/2 BC4 viewsObs : Athena
32.5mm 16.27g Die axis: 6 o'clock
Thompson catalogue : IMITATION
Obs : 1350 Rev : NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic Above symbol LF Cicada
Below ΠΟ
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_DIOKLES_TO_DEY.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm c47 BC23 viewsbs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet with tr-partite earings
27mm 17.04gm Thompson (new) issue 105
Thompson catalogue: Obs: I260 Rev:NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark A: control ΣΩ below
2 magistrates : DIOKLES TO DEY MEDEIOS
RF symbol : Hygieia
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
Both__Ares_New_Style__80_BC.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm c80/9 BC5 viewsbs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29mm 16.04gm Thompson (new) issue 85
Thompson catalogue: IMITATION 1419ba
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Α control ΔΙ below
2 magistrates : EUMELOS THEOXENID(E)S
RF symbol : Ares
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
Superb_Both_Aetolia.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm c90/9 BC7 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29 mm 16.53 gm Thompson issue (new) 75
Thompson catalogue: IMITATION Obs : 1420 Rev : NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark A control ? below
2 magistrates : XENOCLES HARMOXENOS
RF symbol : Aetolia ?
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
Athens Old Style Tetradrachm.JPG
Athens Old Style Tetradrachm88 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 449-413 BC, Athens Greece
Obverse: Helmeted Head of Athena Right
Reverse: AOE, Owl standing right, olive sprig and crescent left.
25mm, 17.3gm
1 commentsJerome Holderman
00001-athensOwl.jpg
Athens Owl67 viewsAthens Owl Tetradrachm
24 mm 17.14 gm
Head of Athena right
Owl standing right
2 commentsJohn Campbell
Athens_Owl_Tetradrachm.JPG
Athens Owl Tetradrachm70 viewsSilver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526, gVF, toned, Athens mint, weight 16.994g, maximum diameter 24.7mm, die axis 270o, c. 420 - 413 B.C.;
OBV: head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves;
REV: ΑΘΕ right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;

EX: Forvm Ancient Coins

Click on the image for a large more detailed close-up picture.
1 commentsRomanorvm
owl6.jpg
Athens tetradrachm179 viewsAthens --AR Tetradrachm (after 449BC). Helmeted head of athena right, owl standing right within incuse square. Sear 2526. 3 commentsfeatherz
Athens4drC.JPG
Athens Tetradrachm113 viewsObv. Helmeted head of Athena right
Rev. Owl standing right, olice branch in left corner, AOE down right side.
Sear 2526.
1 commentsLordBest
athenstet.jpeg
Athens Tetradrachm57 views449-413 B.C. Attica Old style Tetradrachm 17g

Obverse: Head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, hair in parallel curves. Test cut and Countermark on cheek.
Reverse: AOE Right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square. Test cuts and counter punch in eye.

2 commentsDk0311USMC
athens.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm232 viewsTetradrachm (AR), 17.05g, 28mm, 6h. Ca. 449-404. Flament pl. IV, 2 (this coin). ex Glendinning, 18-20 April 1955 no383. Waxy deposit in Athena's ear and below the earring was cleaned, see the new photo in my gallery (I initialy believed it was horn silver)6 commentspaparoupa
athena_clean.JPG
Athens Tetradrachm110 viewsTetradrachm (AR), 17.05g, 28mm, 6h. Ca. 449-404. Berry 66. Flament pl. 26, 8.

After Minos' suggestion I investigated the deposit in Athena's ear and below the earring. Under 12.5X it seemed to be some kind of waxy deposit rather than horn silver as I thought. Removed with a coctail toothpick under magnification with really smooth moves. I believe this was remains of wax somebody used to protect (?) the coin. I am astonished that previous owner + auction houses didn't try to clean it as it clearly made the coin look a bit odd. All in all, I am even happier with my Athena now.
1 commentspaparoupa
Athens.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm159 viewsArchaic head of Athena r., with almond shaped eye, wearing crested helmet
ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round
earring.

ΑΘΕ right
owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, prong tail, to left olive twig
and crescent, all within incuse square

Athens 449-413 BC

16.74g

SNG Copenhagen 31; Sear 2526

Ex-Calgary Coin

Sold back Feb 2019
8 commentsJay GT4
owl.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm (Van Alfen 35)40 viewsAttica, Athens, AR Tetradrachm. 393-300 B.C.. Obv: Head of Athena right, eye in profile. Rev: Owl standing to r., head facing, to r. A-theta-E, to left, olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square, test cut. 22 mm, 16.58 grams. Van Alfen, Peter. American Journal of Numismatics, second series, volume 16-17, number 35, this coin.2 commentsLucas H
Athens_owl.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm 449BC-413BC51 viewsDie axis 45 degrees
Sear2526
Unusual concave left side of incuse square, possably from an impacted die
Paul D3
Athens_tetradrachm_struck_454-404bc,_16_71g,_Roma_e4_lot_118,_Mar_1_2014,_£360,_total_£440_91(_745_14).jpg
Athens tetradrachm 454-404 bc29 views1 commentsChance Vandal
va18.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm Athena and Owl29 viewsAthens. 4th Century B.C.. Athenian tetradrachm. 17.05g. Obverse: Head of Athena right, eye in profile, test cut. Reverse: Owl standing right, head facing , to right AOE, olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square. Van Alfen, AJN, 16-17, 18, this coin. Ex Amphora.
1 commentsLucas H
va17.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm Athena and Owl18 viewsAthens. 4th Century B.C.. Athenian tetradrachm. 17.06g. Obverse: Head of Athena right, eye in profile, test cut. Reverse: Owl standing right, head facing , to right AOE, olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square, two test cuts. Van Alfen, AJN, 16-17, 17, this coin. Ex Amphora.
1 commentsLucas H
va67.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm Athena and Owl eastern31 viewsAthens. 4th Century B.C.. Easter style Athenian tetradrachm. 16.99 g. Obverse: Head of Athena right, eye in profile. Reverse: Owl standing right, head facing , to right AOE, olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square. Test cut. Van Alfen, AJN, 16-17, 67, this coin. Ex Amphora.
1 commentsLucas H
owl,_van_alfen_56.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm Athena and Owl eastern38 viewsAthens. 4th Century B.C.. Easter style Athenian tetradrachm. 16.21 g. Obverse: Head of Athena right, eye in profile. Reverse: Owl standing right, head facing , to right AOE, olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square. Van Alfen, AJN, 16-17, 56, this coin. Ex Amphora.1 commentsLucas H
Athens_Tetradrachm_Athena_and_Owl_eastern.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm Athena and Owl eastern43 viewsAthens. 4th Century B.C.. Eastern style Athenian tetradrachm. (16.7 g, 21x25.4mm, 9h). Obverse: Head of Athena right, eye in profile. Reverse: Owl standing right, head facing , to right AO[E], olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square. Crack on obverse at 3 o'clock, two test cuts on reverse. Ex Amphora.

Van Alfen, AJN, 16-17, 57, this coin. Style Group II. The "A" of the ethnic on the reverse is missing a portion of one leg, giving it the appearance of a backwards "P."
2 commentsLucas H
ATHENS.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm, 16,95 gram, 25 mm. C.449 to 413 BC31 viewsAthens Tetradrachm, 16,95 gram, 25 mm.

Obv. Head of Athena right, wearing crested helmet.

Rev. Owl standing right, head facing.
Lee S
Athens Tetradrachm-2.JPG
Athens Tetradrachm-254 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 449-413 BC, Athens Greece
Obverse: Helmeted Head of Athena Right
Reverse: AOE, Owl standing right, olive sprig and crescent left.
22 X 25mm, 16.9gm
1 commentsJerome Holderman
athena_owl.jpg
Athens Triobol (Hemidrachm)30 viewsAttica. Athens c. 393-300 B.C. AR Triobol (Hemidrachm), 2,07g, Obv: Head of Athena right (obv. off-centered). Rev: ATHE, Owl standing facing, wings closed, olive-branch on either side. BMC 11.168. Sear GCV I: 2539.Podiceps
90201q00_(1).jpg
Athens, 449-413 B.C.50 viewsOld Style Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526, F, test cuts, Athens mint, weight 17.053g, maximum diameter 24.3mm, die axis 315o, c. 449 - 413 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse AΘE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square; ex CNG auctionjimmynmu
Athens_1b_img~1.jpg
Athens, AR Tetradrachm, ca 393 - 370 BC74 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right with eye seen in true profile, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll
Rev:– owl standing right, head facing, to right ATE in large lettering, to left olive sprig and crescent
Minted in Athens c. B.C. 393 - 370.
Reference:– Flamen p. 126, 1 (Pi I); Svoronos Athens plate 19, 17; SNG Cop -
Ex-Forum Ancient Coins
16.699g, 24.31mm, 270o

The following information was provide by Forum with the coin:-

"Transitional style tetradrachms include all of the wide spectrum of variants with the eye in profile issued after the classic "old style" almond eye tetradrachms but before the broad thinner flan "new style" tetradrachms. Recent research has classified variations of the transitional style - Pi Type, Quadridigité Style, Heterogeneous Style and sub-groups of the styles, and proposed chronologies for the different styles and groups.

This coin is the earliest transitional type, the first Pi style type, essentially identical to the "old style" with the exception of the eye in profile. The "Pi" designation is based on the P shape of the floral spiral and palmette ornamentation on the helmet bowl. The coin can be classified as Pi style, group 1. The floral ornament on examples this early do not yet resemble Pi."
maridvnvm
Athens_1b_img.jpg
Athens, AR Tetradrachm, ca 393 - 370 BC89 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right with eye seen in true profile, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll
Rev:– owl standing right, head facing, to right ATE in large lettering, to left olive sprig and crescent
Minted in Athens c. B.C. 393 - 370.
Reference:– Flamen p. 126, 1 (Pi I); Svoronos Athens plate 19, 17; SNG Cop -
Ex-Forum Ancient Coins
16.699g, 24.31mm, 270o

The following information was provide by Forum with the coin:-

"Transitional style tetradrachms include all of the wide spectrum of variants with the eye in profile issued after the classic "old style" almond eye tetradrachms but before the broad thinner flan "new style" tetradrachms. Recent research has classified variations of the transitional style - Pi Type, Quadridigité Style, Heterogeneous Style and sub-groups of the styles, and proposed chronologies for the different styles and groups.

This coin is the earliest transitional type, the first Pi style type, essentially identical to the "old style" with the exception of the eye in profile. The "Pi" designation is based on the P shape of the floral spiral and palmette ornamentation on the helmet bowl. The coin can be classified as Pi style, group 1. The floral ornament on examples this early do not yet resemble Pi."
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Athens_1d_img.jpg
Athens, AR Tetradrachm, ca 393-350 BC44 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right with realistic profile eye, wearing crested Attic helmet, earring and necklace, bowl ornamented with spiral and three olive leaves .
Rev:– ATE, right, Owl standing right, head facing, crescent and olive sprig with berry behind
Minted in Athens from . c.393-350 B.C.
Reference:– SNG Cop 64, SGCV I 2537
maridvnvm
077_2.jpg
Athens, Attica32 views287 - 270 B.C.
Bronze AE13
2.70 gm, 13 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena right wearing crested Corinthian helmet
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, wings closed, A to left, Θ to right, all within corn wreath
Sear 2565;
BMC 11, p.22, 229;
Kroll 53;
HGC 4, 1737
Jaimelai
athens_50.jpg
Athens, Attica17 views353-294 B.C.
Silver Triobol
1.95 gm, 12 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena right wearing crested
Attic helmet and round ear ring, eye in profile
Rev.: Owl standing facing, on either side olive branches with two pairs of leaves;
A / Ε - Θ around
Kroll 19;
HGC 1642;
Sear 2539;
BMC 11, p.16, 162

Jaimelai
023~5.JPG
Athens, Attica30 views449 - 413 B.C.
Silver Obol
0.72 gm, 8 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena right wearing crested Attic helmet and round ear ring
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, wings closed A Θ E to right, olive sprig (single leaf and berry) behind
Sear 2530; BMC 11, p.10, 99
1 commentsJaimelai
Eleusis_AE.JPG
Athens, Attica136 viewsEleusinian Festival Coinage
340-335 BC
AE 16 (16mm, 3.65g)
O: Triptolemos seated left in winged chariot drawn by two serpents, holding grain ear in right hand.
R: Pig standing right on mystic staff; EΛEYΣI above, bucranium in ex.
SNG Cop 416; Sear 2586v

The Sons of Dysaules
The story of Triptolemus being charged with bringing agriculture to man has been well told. That of his brother Eubouleus perhaps less so.
Eubouleus was a swineherd whose pigs were lost when the Earth gaped open to swallow up Persephone.
Pigs were sacrificed during the Eleusinian Rites in a women’s mystery ritual known as the Thesmophoria. The piglets would be washed in the sea during the Procession and then brought back to the Sanctuary and ritually slaughtered.
It is interesting to note that in ancient Greek religion pigs were thought to be able to absorb miasma from humans, making this an even more appropriate offering.

"It is said, then, that when Demeter came to Argos she was received by Pelasgos into his home, and that Khrysanthis, knowing about the rape of Kore, related the story to her. Afterwards Trokhilos, the priest of the mysteries, fled, they say, from Argos because of the enmity of Agenor, came to Attika and married a woman of Eleusis, by whom he had two children Eubouleos and Triptolemos. That is the account given by the Argives."
~ Pausanias, Description of Greece 1. 14. 3
8 commentsEnodia
026_(2).jpg
Athens, Attica64 views307 - 300 B.C.
Bronze AE14
4.16 gm, 14 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena right wearing Corinthian helmet with three crests, adorned with serpent
Rev.: Owl standing left, head facing, wings closed
A to right, H Θ to left, all in olive wreath
Kroll 50; [SNG Copenhagen 94]
BMC 11, p.22, 240
HGC 4, 1719
3 commentsJaimelai
Athena_angled.jpg
Athens, Attica36 views307 - 300 B.C.
Bronze AE14
4.16 gm, 14 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena right wearing Corinthian helmet with three crests, adorned with serpent
Rev.: Owl standing left, head facing, wings closed
A to right, H Θ to left, all in olive wreath
Kroll 50; [SNG Copenhagen 94]
BMC 11, p.22, 240

Same coin shot on angle to show thickness and sculpture of coin. "The heaviness of the Owl-left coinage is matched by the exceptional quality of its alloy, die engraving and striking, making it altogether one of the most carefully prepared bronze coinages ever minted at Athens." from Kroll 1993.
Jaimelai
athens_33.jpg
Athens, Attica22 views454 - 404 B.C.
Silver Tetradrachm
17.04 gm, 25 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena with frontal eye right, wearing crested Attic helmet with three olive leaves above visor and floral scroll on bowl
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind, all in square incuse; A Θ E to right
HGC 4, 1597;
Sear 2526;
BMC 11, 62
Jaimelai
Triobol_33.jpg
Athens, Attica47 views454 - 404 B.C.
Silver Triobol
2.11 gm, 13 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena right wearing crested
Attic helmet and round ear ring
Rev.: Owl standing facing, on either side olive branches with two pairs of leaves;
A / Ε - Θ around
Kroll 12;
HGC 1641;
Sear 2528;
BMC 11, p.9, 82-89
Jaimelai
o_50.JPG
Athens, Attica18 views400/390-294 B.C.
Silver Hemiobol
0.34 gm, 6.5 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena right wearing crested Attic helmet and round ear ring, eye in profile
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, wings closed, olive leaf behind; A Θ E to right
HGC 1682;
Sear 2531 var.;
[SNG Cop 59]
[Svoronos pl. 17, 52–56]
Jaimelai
Athens_hemiobol.JPG
Athens, Attica33 views454-404 BC
AR Hemiobol (7mm, 0.30g)
O: Helmeted head of Athena right.
R: Owl standing right with head facing, olive sprig behind; AΘE to right, all within incuse square.
Kroll 14; SNG Cop 59; Sear 2531v
ex Artifact Man

1 commentsEnodia
athensc_50.jpg
Athens, Attica 2 views270 - 261 B.C.
Bronze AE14
2.60 gm, 14 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena right wearing crested Corinthian helmet
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, wings closed; A on top, Θ to left, E to right, above owl; wreath in right field
BMC 11, p.22, 236-38;
Kroll 1993, 57;
HGC 4, 1728
Jaimelai
Athens_tetradrachm.jpg
Athens, Attica Tetradrachm72 viewsAR Tetradrachm
Size: 23 mm Weight: 16.73 grams Die axis: 9h

Athens, Attica
454 – 415 BCE

Obverse: Head of Athena to right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves above the visor and a floral scroll on the bowl. Hair is drawn in parallel curves, wears a round earring.

Reverse: Owl standing to right, head facing with tail feathers as a single protrusion. Olive sprig and crescent moon to upper left. AΘE to right.

Notes:
- Some porosity and crystallisation, attractive style. Possible bankers mark on cheek.

Ex Freeman & Sear, 2008
2 commentsPharsalos
4070_4071.jpg
Athens, Attica, AE18, Athena advancing right.25 viewsAE18
Athens, Attica
Greece
Mid 20's - 19BC
18.0mm
O: NO LEGEND; Helmeted head of Athena Parthenos, right.
R: NO LEGEND; Athena advancing right, holding transverse spear and aegis, owl to right, all within olive wreath.
Exergue: AΘΕ, left field.
Kroll 149; Svoronos plate 80, 29.
Harlan Berk
Chicago Coin Expo 4/6/17 4/17/17
1 commentsNicholas Z
Ath_dek_elect_w.jpg
Athens, dekadrachm126 viewsThis is a British Museum electrotype (made by Robert Ready in the late 19th century with his RR mark on the edge) of the largest circulating Greek coin. With the price of these at about $500,000 dollars when they come on the market a good quality reproduction like this is the nearest most of us will come to handling one of them.
48.21 gm, 34 mm; original weighs 42.7 gm.
Manzikert
Athens_owl.jpg
Athens, Greece, Eye-in-Profile Style Pi Type III or IV, Tetradrachm, c. 353 - 340 B.C.176 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Sear GCV I 2547, (SNG München 96), (SNG Delepierre 1479), gVF, banker's mark, 16.358g, 22.8mm, 225 deg., Obv. head of Athena right with eye seen in true profile, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll, no pellet above earring; Rev. owl standing right, head facing, to right AθE in large lettering, to left olive sprig and crescent; nicely centered on a very tight round flan, slight evidence that it was stuck on a demonetized folded/hammerred flan; slightly toned.



The style of Athena's face with the banker's mark have great appeal to me. I bought it for my 50th birthday!

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins

Photo by Forvm Ancient Coins
9 commentsSteve E
AthenTetVF.jpg
Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, 449 - 413 B.C.127 viewsSilver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526, VF, near full crest, Athens mint, 16.410g, 25.1mm, 90o. Obverse: head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; Reverse: AQE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square.

This coin is one of the most familiar of all the coins struck throughout the ancient Mediterranean. The images of Athena and her Owl, while not static, changed undramatically, in an unhurried and deliberate way. Although its production rests firmly during the time that numismatists call the Classical era (479 BC --336 BC), this coin's "style" better reflects the earlier Archaic period.

The Athenian "Owl" (until its debasement as a result of the Peloponnesian War) was the standard of its day. Between the late 5th century BC and the late 3rd century BC, these coins were the currency against which all other coins were measured. This high esteem was due to the Athenian tetradrachms' consistent weight and quality of silver.

"The little elf-like owl dear to ancient Athens had greenish-blue-gray eyes that could see clearly where humans could not. Glaukopis -- the "shining eyed one" was often shortened to glaux, a nickname for the tetradrachm that bore the owl's likeness" (http://notes.utk.edu/bio/unistudy.nsf/0/da0222e2e80272fd85256785001683e4?OpenDocument).

It is only with the emergence of the Imperial coinage of Alexander the Great (beginning quickly after his ascension to the throne in 336 BC) that the ancient world had another coin as widely accepted. As Martin J. Price notes, "“The impressive list of twenty-three mints on Asian soil and one in Egypt, all used to strike Alexander’s imperial coinage during his lifetime, shows that there was a conscious policy of providing this form of money on an empire-wide basis" (Price, Martin J. The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. Zurich: The Swiss Numismatic Society in Association with British Museum Press, 1991. 72).

More than two millennia after the Athenian Tetracrachm was first struck, the 26th President of The United States, Theodore Roosevelt (b. 1858; d. 1919), is said to have carried an Athenian "Owl" in his pocket--to remind him just how beautiful a coin could be.

J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
Athens_tet.jpg
Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, 449 - 413 B.C.118 viewsSilver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31ff; Starr pl. xxii, 6; SGCV I 2526, VF, test cut, Athens mint, weight 16.870g, maximum diameter 24.5mm, die axis 225o, obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse AQE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;


The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.

Ex Forum
1 commentsPhiloromaos
Athens_Tetradrachm.jpg
Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, 449 - 413 B.C.463 viewsSilver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526, EF, light scuff on cheek, 17.184g, 25.6mm, 180o, Athens mint, obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse AQE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;

A superb beauty ex FORVM .


The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.

*With my sincere thank , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
9 commentsSam
Athens,_Greece,_Old_Style_Tetradrachm,_c__454_-_404_B_C_.jpg
Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, c. 454 - 404 B.C.202 views*In honor of Christmas and Chanukah , from FORVM , new to my collection ;
A masterpiece example of group Copenhagen 31 .

My best wishes to all of you.


Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG München 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, EF, fabulous owl, well centered on a tight flan, no test cuts, a little obverse die wear, contact marks, 17.168g, 25.0mm, 90o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse AQE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square.

The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
EX FORVM .
The Sam Mansourati Collection.
4 commentsSam
Athens,_Greece,_Old_Style_Tetradrachm,_c__454_-_404_B_C_~0.jpg
Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, c. 454 - 404 B.C.114 viewsIn honor of Christmas :
Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Munchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, Choice EF, bold well centered strike, high relief as usual for the type, attractive surfaces, graffito on reverse, small edge cracks, 17.176g, 24.7mm, 30o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AQE downward on right, all within incuse square.

The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.

FORVM Ancient Coins. / From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
10 commentsSam
AthensOwl.jpg
Athens, Greece, Pi-Style III Tetradrachm, 353 - c. 340 B.C67 viewsSilver tetradrachm, 17.1g, Athens mint, oval flan, typical of the type.
O: Head of Athena right with eye seen in true profile, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and pi-style floral scroll, pellet in ear.
R: Owl standing right, head facing, to right AΘE in large lettering, to left olive sprig and crescent, pellet over eyes.
- Kroll Pi-Style p. 244, fig. 8; Flament p. 126, 3; SNG Cop 63; SNG Munchen 96; SNG Delepierre 1479; Svoronos Athens pl. 20: 2

Unlike the customary flans of 5th and earlier 4th century Athenian tetradrachms that have solid, rounded edges from having been cast in a mold, these were struck on thick planchets made of flattened, folded-over, older tetradrachms. The flattened coins were not just folded in two but were folded over a second time to produce a planchet of three or four layers

There are three distinct features of this type of Athens Owl coinage. 1st, they have flans that are commonly misshapen. A number of them are so distorted that numismatists and collectors in Greece have long referred to them as “logs” (koutsoura); these are the tetradrachms in the form of long, stretched ovals with one or two nearly straight sides. 2nd, since the flans, of whatever shape, were ordinarily too small for the full relief designs of the dies, relatively few pi-style coins were minted with their entire obverse and/or reverse type showing. 3rd, just as the diameters and surface areas of the pi flans are generally smaller than those of Athenian tetradrachms of the 5th century and of the first half of the 4th century, they tend also to be exceptionally thick.

The name Pi-style refers to the floral helmet ornament on the obverse which resembles the Greek letter pi (P) bisected by a long central tendril.
5 commentsNemonater
68411q00.jpg
Athens, Mithradatic War Issue, 87-86 B.C.27 views"In 87 B.C., Mithridates moved his forces into Greece and established Aristion as a tyrant in Athens. Sulla landed in Epirus and marched through Boeotia into Attica. Most cities declared their allegiance to Rome, foremost among them Thebes. Athens, however, remained loyal to Mithridates. After a long and brutal siege, Sulla's rough battle hardened legions, veterans of the Social War, took Athens on the Kalends of March 86 B.C. They looted and burned temples and structures built in the city by various Hellenistic kings to honor themselves and gain prestige. Months later, only after they ran out of water, Aristion surrendered the Akropolis. Athens was looted and punished severely. Roman vengeance ensured Greece would remain docile during later civil wars and Mithridatic wars."

Bronze chalkous, SNG Cop 307, BMC Attica p. 81, 554; Kroll 97; Svoronos Athens pl. 84, 45 - 48, F, thick flan, 9.775g, 19.7mm, 45o, Athens mint, Mithradates VI of Pontos & Aristion, 87 - 86 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; reverse Zeus advancing right, nude, hurling thunderbolt with right, left extended, A/Q-E flanking below arms, star between two crescents (one above and one below) in lower right field;
jimmynmu
Athens1a_img.jpg
Athens, Silver tetradrachm137 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right, droopy eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and bent-back palmette, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves.
Rev:– ΑΘΕ, right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;
Minted in Athens from . B.C. 449 - 413.
Reference:– SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526

Ex- Forum Ancient Coins where they graded it gVF, "X" Graffiti on obverse, test cut on reverse.

17.070g, 26.1mm, 270o
5 commentsmaridvnvm
Athens_1c_img.jpg
Athens, Silver tetradrachm53 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right, droopy eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and bent-back palmette, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves.
Rev:– ΑΘΕ, right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;
Minted in Athens from . B.C. 449 - 413.
Reference:– SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526

Test cut on Athena's neck, bankers mark on jaw with graffiti on cheek. Small test cut through eye of owl and running in the field to the right of the owl through the leg.

17.06g, 23.32mm, 90o
maridvnvm
Athens_1c_img~0.jpg
Athens, Silver tetradrachm35 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right, droopy eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and bent-back palmette, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves.
Rev:– ΑΘΕ, right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;
Minted in Athens from . B.C. 449 - 413.
Reference:– SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526

Test cut on Athena's neck, bankers mark on jaw with graffiti on cheek. Small test cut through eye of owl and running in the field to the right of the owl through the leg.

17.06g, 23.32mm, 90o

Updated image using new photography setup.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Athens_1a_img.jpg
Athens, Silver tetradrachm 39 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right, droopy eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and bent-back palmette, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves.
Rev:– ΑΘΕ, right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;
Minted in Athens from . B.C. 449 - 413.
Reference:– SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526

Ex- Forum Ancient Coins where they graded it gVF, "X" Graffiti on obverse, test cut on reverse.

17.070g, 26.1mm, 270o

Updated image using new photography setup.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Athens-O.jpg
Athens-O21 viewsJerome Holderman
Picture 004.jpg
Athens-O18 viewsJerome Holderman
Athens-O~0.jpg
Athens-O16 viewsJerome Holderman
Athens-R.jpg
Athens-R14 viewsJerome Holderman
Athens-R~0.jpg
Athens-R13 viewsJerome Holderman
Athens,_229_-_197_BC.jpeg
Athens; Head of Athena right/ AΘE, Zeus standing right, throwing thunderbolt, AE 1717 viewsAthens, 229 - 197 B.C. 17mm, 6.4g. Obverse: head of Athena right. Reverse: AΘE, Zeus standing right, throwing thunderbolt. SNG Cop 296ff. Ex areich, photo credit areichPodiceps
athens_owl~0.jpg
Athens; Head of Athena right/ AΘH, Owl left, AE 169 viewsAthens, 3rd century B.C. 16mm, 3.08g. Obverse: helmeted head of Athena right
Reverse: AΘH, owl left. Cf. Klein 205, Svor. Pl. 106, 61. Ex areich
Podiceps
2690084.jpg
ÁTICA - ATENAS29 viewsAR Tetradracma 23 mm 16.99 gr.

Anv: Cabeza de Atenas vistiendo Casco coronado, crestado y ornamentado con tres hojas de oliva y detalles florales.
Rev: "A Θ E" – Búho parado a derecha, su cabeza viendo al frente. Una rama de olivo y medialuna detrás.
Según el catálogo "Imperial Persian Coinage" de G.F. Hill editado en 1919, el resello/contramarca/marca de Banquero que aparece en esta moneda, se encuentra individualizada con el numero 45ff, según el Autor se trataría de una creciente (hay seis tipos diferentes) y posiblemente realizada en la región indo-bactriana.

Acuñación: 431 - 413 A.C.
Ceca: Atenas - Ática

Referencias: Sear GCTV Vol.I #2526 Pag.236 – BMC Vol.11 (Attica, Megaris, Aegira) #67/71 Pag.7 – SNG Copenhagen #31 - Kroll #8 - SNG VIII Hart #774/7 - Headlam #360/1
1 commentsmdelvalle
2690083.jpg
ÁTICA - ATENAS13 viewsAR Tetradracma 23 mm 16.99 gr.

Anv: Cabeza de Atenas vistiendo Casco coronado, crestado y ornamentado con tres hojas de oliva y detalles florales.
Rev: "A Θ E" – Búho parado a derecha, su cabeza viendo al frente. Una rama de olivo y medialuna detrás.
Corte/marca de comprobación en la frente de búho en reverso.

Acuñación: 431 - 413 A.C.
Ceca: Atenas - Ática

Referencias: Sear GCTV Vol.I #2526 Pag.236 – BMC Vol.11 (Attica, Megaris, Aegira) #67/71 Pag.7 – SNG Copenhagen #31 - Kroll #8 - SNG VIII Hart #774/7 - Headlam #360/1
mdelvalle
Attica_Athens.jpg
Attica39 viewsAthens,
After 449 BC
AR tetradrachm
20mm, 17.04g
Kroll 8
Samson L2
rjb_greek4_08_07.jpg
Attica - Athens22 viewsAR hemiobol
449-413 BC
O - Helmeted head of Athena right
R - Owl standing right, AΘE
Possibly an eastern imitation
mauseus
rjb_greek3_08_07.jpg
Attica - Athens25 viewsAR drachm
449-413 BC
O - Helmeted head of Athena right
R - Owl standing right, AΘE
mauseus
greece~1.jpg
Attica - Athens (400/390-353 BC)41 viewsAR tetradrachm (24mm, 17.12 gm, 9h). Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 15. SNG Copenhagen 64.RobertBohn
4260158.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm 18.5 mm 17.10g 9h typical oblong flan from folding.17 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right with profile eye and pi-style palmette.Owl standing right head facing olive sprig and crescent behind.Grant H
FotorCreated~85.jpg
Attica Athens AR plated Tetradrachm 22mm 15.39 g 9h23 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right,with frontal eye.Rev owl standing right,head facing olive sprig and crescent moon behind,all within incuse square.Grant H
Untitled_collage_(1).jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetartemorion 1/4 obol circa 350 BC 5mm 0.14 g Svoronos pl.17, 53-5638 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right.Rev crescent and AOE.
Very rare issue.
Grant H
FotorCreated~79.jpg
Attica Athens emergency issue AR plated Drachm circa 454-404 BC 13 mm 3.20g23 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right.Rev owl standing right head facing,olive sprig behind all within incuse square.Grant H
FotorCreated~67.jpg
Attica Athens emergency issue AR plated Obol circa 406-404 BC 0.32 g24 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right.Rev AOE owl standing right.
Unpublished as a fouree,but of Harlan Berk BBS .
NGC VG 3/2 2490353-003
Grant H
FotorCreated~3.jpg
Attica Athens emergency issue circa 406-404 BC 23.88mm 11.622g 9h21 viewsHead of Athena right wearing round earring and pearl necklace,and creasted helmet ornamented with three olive leaves along front edge,palmette on bowl and spiral behind ear.Her hair drawn across forehead in parallel curves.Rev AOE before owl standing right head facing,in erect posture,the tail feathers represented as a single prong,olive sprig and lunar crescent in upper field to left all within incuse square.Grant H
FotorCreated~54.jpg
Attica Athens AR Diobol circa 430-322 BC10 mm 1.15 g 12h29 viewsHead of Athena right of fine style but rough execution,wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet,the front adorned with three upright olive leaves, and the back with a floral ornament.Rev double bodied owl head facing. Grant H
FotorCreated~63.jpg
Attica Athens AR Hemidrachm circa 454-404 BC 12mm 1.87g 3h19 viewsHead of Athena of fine style eye in profile but rough execution,wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet,the front adorned with three upright olive leaves and the back a floral ornament.Rev owl facing wings closed AOE on either side an olive branch.Grant H
FotorCreated~68.jpg
Attica Athens AR Hemidrachm circa 454-404 BC 13mm 1.99g 3h19 viewsHead of Athena right of fine style eye in profile but of rough execution wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet,the front adorned with three upright olive leaves and the back a floraql ornament.Rev owl facing wings closed AOE,on either side an olive branch.Grant H
mC4RJ7oAaKp8Tc6Fg9Zk2YjHpXn3Q5.jpg
Attica Athens AR obol circa 454-404 BC 9mm 0.68g29 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right.Rev owl standing right,head facing,olive sprig behind,all within incuse square.Grant H
Enter_custom_name_hereatt_02031968s.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetartemorion 1/4 obol circa 350 BC 5mm 0.14g 12h Svoronos pl.17 53-56 very rare27 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right.Crescent and AOE.Grant H
FotorCreated~1.jpg
Attica Athens AR Drachm circa 450-430 BC 16mm 4.17g 5h24 viewsHead of Athena right of archaic style,eye in profile wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet.Rev AOE owl standing right head facing olive sprig as on the tetradrachm,but no crescent moon all in incuse square.Grant H
00269Q00.jpg
Attica Athens AR Drachm circa465-460 BC 4.35g73 viewsHead of Athena right of archaia style,wearing earring and close-fitting crested helmet with single volute ornament behind.Rev AOE Incuse square, within which owl right,behind olive-spray with two leaves and berry. 2 commentsGrant H
FotorCreated~32.jpg
Attica Athens AR Hemiobol circa 450 BC 7mm 0.33g 4h 23 viewsHead of Athena right of archaic style,wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet as on decadrachm.Rev incuse square within which owl right behind olive leaf with berry AOE.Grant H
FotorCreated~47.jpg
Attica Athens AR Obol circa 450 BC 8.60 mm 0.727g 6h27 viewsHead of Athena right wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves along front edge palmette on bowl,and spiral behind ear.Rev AOE retrograde before owl standing right head facing olive leaf with berry in upper field to left all within incuse square.
Obols are relatively more numerous in this group than in any previously.It is tempting to connect this odd fact with the introduction by Perikles of state pay for various public activities in terms of obols perday.Starr p.56
Grant H
FotorCreated~31.jpg
Attica Athens AR Obol circa 450-430 BC 8.5mm 0.64g 3h15 viewsHead of Athena right of archaic style wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet.Rev AOE owl standing right head facing,behind olive leaves with berry all within incuse square. Grant H
Untitled_collage_(2)~0.jpg
Attica Athens AR Obol circa 454-404 BC 10 mm 0.65g 11h26 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right.Rv. Owl standing right head facing,olive sprig behind,all within incuse square.Grant H
Athens_Silver_Tetradrachm.jpg
Attica Athens AR silver Tetradrachm121 viewsAttica Athens AR silver Tetradrachm - some horn silver on the reverse which could be improved
Size: 22.5mm Weight: 16.69 grams
Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right. Countermark on cheek, test cut through helmet
Reverse: AΘE, Owl standing right, head facing, crescent and olive sprig behind, the same countermark on the reverse
Antonivs Protti
FotorCreated~80.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetardrachm circa 430-322 BC 21mm 17.05 g 1h14 viewsHead of Athena right,eye in profile wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet.Rev owl standing right with head facing,wings closed behind crescent and olive sprig with two leaves.Grant H
FotorCreated~18.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetartemorion 1/4 of an obol circa 350 BC 5mm 0.14g 12h29 viewsHead of Athena right of more advanced style the eye seen in true profile she wears crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll.Rev AOE above crescent all within incuse square.Grant H
78000631.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 154-3 BC 35mm 16.13g 12h20 viewsHead of Athena Parthenos right wearing pendent earring and close fitting helmet with triple crest,adorned in front with the foreparts of four or more horses abreast,on the side with a flying Pegasos and on the back with a scroll resembling an aplustre,border of dots.Rev AOE owl right head facing wings closed standing on amphora lying on its side.The whole in olive wreath.Caps of the Dioskouroi to lower right monograms flanking owl.Grant H
5wdJzQk7g8BGbx9RH6Zpf4A3Gn2Ne3.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 350-294 BC 22mm 17.06g 9h 16 viewsHead of Athena right with profile eye.Rev owl standing right head facing olive sprig and crescent moon behind.Grant H
FotorCreated~81.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 353- 294 BC21mm 17.22g 6h17 viewsHead of Athena right with eye in profile,wearing close fitting helmet,and round earring.Rev owl standing right head facing,behind olive sprig and crescent moon.Grant H
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Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 353-294 BC 23mm 17.05g 7h17 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right with profile eye and Pi style palmetle.Rev owl standing right head facing olive sprig and crescent moon behind.Grant H
pjimage~0.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 430-322 BC 27mm 16.85g 3h19 viewsHead of Athena right of fine style,eye in profile wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet,the front adorned with three upright olive leaves,and the back with a floral ornament.Rev AOE owl standing right head facing wings closed.Behind crescent moon and olive sprig with two leaves and berry.Grant H
FotorCreated~5.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 440-430 BC 27mm16.87g 5h18 viewsHead of Atnena to right wearing disc earring,pearl necklace and a creasted helmet adorned with three olive leaves and a spiral palmette.Rev AOE owl standing to right head facing the viewer,to left olive sprig and crescent moon all within incuse square.
With lots of crest showing
Grant H
FotorCreated~83.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 480-450 BC 23mm 16.25g 2h15 viewsHead of Athena right of archaic style weareing round earring,and close fitting crested helmet.Rev owl standing right,wings closed,behind crescent moon and olive spray.All within incuse square.Grant H
FotorCreated~82.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 482-480 BC 23mm 16.58g 1h14 viewshead of Athena right in an unwreathed crested helmet,crest support on helmet is ornamented with a line small chevrons and dots.Coarse style with a large eye and thick lips,row of studs on side of helmet,round earring.Rev owl standing right head facing,head and eyes large.AOE right left an olive spray with two leaves and berry,all within an incuse square.Grant H
FotorCreated~84.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 510-480 BC 22mm 16.91g 11h18 viewsHead of Athena of very archaic style right,wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet with simple volute ornament behind.Rev AOE owl right head facing and wings closed,behind olive spray. Grant H
ATTICA_ATHENS.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm, SG 2537, Owl29 viewsOBV: Helmeted head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor & a spiral palmette on the bowl; eye in profile
REV: AQE, owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig & crescent behind
16.9g, 22mm

Minted at Athens, 350-300 BC
Legatus
FotorCreated~74.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetradradchm circa 393-294 BC 20mm 17.09g 2h 19 viewsHead of Athena rightof more advanced style the eye seen in true profile,she wears crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll.Rev owl standing right, head facing,to right AOE to left olive twig and crescent moon. Grant H
FotorCreated~41.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tritartemorion 3/4 obol circa 393-294 BC 8mm 0.50g 7h18 viewsHead of Athena right of fine style wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet,the front adorned with three upright olive leaves,and the back with a floral ornament.Rev AOE three creacents,horns inwards.
The playwright Aristophanes tells us coins of tiny size like this one were carried in the mouth when shopping.in one of his plays a young girl greets her father by kissing him on the mouth and extracts coins coins from his inner cheek with her tongue.Aristoph Waps line 609
Grant H
Attica,_Athens_new_style_owl_w_amphora_tet.jpg
ATTICA ATHENS CIRCA 165 B.C. NEW STYLE 8 viewsHelmeted head of Athena, r.
Owl standing r. on amphora; I on amphora; winged caduceus in l. field; DI below.AQE / POLU-XARM / NIKOG / QEMIS-TOKLH
Thompson 379d
jaseifert
Owl.jpg
Attica Owl15 viewsAttica Owl
Sear 2537

Athens AR Tetradrachm. c350 BC, Head of Athena right in ivy-crested helmet, eye in profile / Owl standing right, head facing, olive twig and crescent behind, AØE before. BMC 144, SNGCop 65.
simmurray
Picture_261.JPG
Attica Owl80 viewsSear 2537

Athens AR Tetradrachm. c350 BC, Head of Athena right in ivy-crested helmet, eye in profile / Owl standing right, head facing, olive twig and crescent behind, AØE before. BMC 144, SNGCop 65.
1 commentssimmurray
Screenshot_2019-06-04_18_06_17.png
Attica, AR Tetradrachm.14 viewsAthens 350 B.C. 15.80g - 24.3mm, Axis 3h.

Obv: Head of Athena right in ivy-crested helmet, eye in profile.

Rev: A-Θ-E - Owl standing right, head facing, olive twig and crescent behind, A-Θ-E before. Test cut on the owl and bankers mark in front.

BMC 144, SNG Cop 65; Sear SG 2537.
scarli
vcoin1616LG.jpg
Attica, Athens840 viewsAthens, ca. 449-413 BC. Silver tetradrachm.
Denomination : Silver tetradrachm.
Size : 23.7 x 24.3 mm Weight : 17.20 grams.
Reference : Sear-2526.
Grade : gVF and better centered than usual with a significant part of the crest showing.
Obverse : Head of Athena right.
Reverse : Owl standing right, with an olive sprig and crescent moon over its shoulder, with a AQE to the right.
Ex-Calgary Coin 1150
8 commentsecoli
152481LG.jpg
ATTICA, Athens403 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 168/5-50 BC. AR New Style Tetradrachm (30mm, 16.74 gm). Struck circa 136/5 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / A-QE, owl standing right on amphora; magistrates MI-KI and QEO-FRA; Nike in quadriga right in right field, M on amphora, SW below amphora; all within wreath. Cf. Thompson 315-323 (unlisted dies). EF, lightly toned. Ex -CNG STORE 8951 commentsecoli
collage8-1.jpg
Attica, Athens36 viewsAttica, Athens
130-90 BC

O: Helmeted head of Athena right
R: Two owls standing facing on a thunderbolt, AOE below; all within wreath

Ae; 14mm; 3.43g
arizonarobin
attica_res3.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS22 viewsca. 80 - 40 BC
AE 21.5 mm 6.05 g
O: Helmeted head of Athena Parthenos
R: A-Q[E] Owl standing within wreath
laney
Attica_Athens_res_b.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS37 views133/132 BC
New Style Tetradrachm, 16.91 g, 30 mm
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right,
Rx: Owl standing on amphora, winged caduceus left, magistrates ΠOΛYXAPM, NIKOΓ, and ΘEMIΣTOKΛH, month [I] on amphora, ME below
Thompson-379e-i
(ex HJBerk)
2 commentslaney
new_tet_athens_10_21_res.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS103 views133/132 BC
New Style Tetradrachm, 16.91 g, 30 mm
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right,
Rx: Owl standing on amphora, winged caduceus left, magistrates ΠOΛYXAPM, NIKOΓ, and ΘEMIΣTOKΛH, month [I] on amphora, ME below
Thompson-379e-i
(ex HJBerk)
2 commentslaney
198_xlarge_66c8652abf68d7f955c61e8c6b67c171.jpg
Attica, Athens55 viewsAR Tetradrachm (25mm, 17.09g)
c. 454-404 BCE

O: Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet
R: AΘE, Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent left; all within incuse square


SNG München 49; Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597
2 commentsSalaethus
athena_owl_attica.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS23 viewsca. 454-404 BC
AR Tetradrachm 25 mm max., 17 g
O: Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested decorated Attic helmet
R: Owl standing right, head facing; olive spring and crescent to left; AΘE to right, all within incuse square
laney
athena_owl_attica~0.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS26 viewsca. 454-404 BC
AR Tetradrachm 25 mm max., 17 g
O: Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested decorated Attic helmet
R: Owl standing right, head facing; olive spring and crescent to left; AΘE to right, all within incuse square
laney
athens_owl_k.jpg
Attica, Athens11 viewsAR tetradrachm, 25mm, 17g, 3h; 449-404 BC
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena right, archaic eye.
Rev.: A Θ E; Owl right, tail as single prong.
Reference: Cf. SNG Cop. 1621, 17-12-525
1 commentsJohn Anthony
IMG_0561.JPG
ATTICA, Athens7 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 322/17-307 BC. Æ . Helmeted head of Athena right / Two owls confronted, heads facing; Eleusis ring between; all within olive wreath. Kroll 44; SNG Copenhagen 92. ecoli
IMG_0559.JPG
ATTICA, Athens15 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 322/17-307 BC. Æ (15mm, 2.26 g, 6h). Helmeted head of Athena right / Two owls standing confronted, heads facing; AΘ between; all within wreath. Kroll 46; HGC 4, 1726. ecoli
IMG_0500.JPG
ATTICA, Athens13 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 335-322/17 BC. Æ Dichalkon (1.85 g, 1h). Helmeted head of Athena right / Double-bodied owl standing, bodies confronted, head facing; crescent and olive-sprig above. Kroll 43; SNG Copenhagen 72-3.ecoli
EA81BECE-4035-493A-B8E7-57DE6394FB8B.jpeg
Attica, Athens10 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 25-19 BC. Æ (17mm, 7.96 g, 12h). Helmeted head of Athena right / Sphinx seated right, wearing modius; all within olive wreath. Kroll 153; SNG Copenhagen 303; Svoronos pl. 80, 18-21.
ecoli
athens.jpg
Attica, Athens (353 - 294 B.C)50 viewsAR Tetradrachm
O: Helmeted head of Athena right
R: AΘE Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent to left; all within incuse square.
16.59g
21 mm
Kroll -; HGC 4, 1599

Ex. Numismatik-Naumann, Auction 52, Lot 126
4 commentsMat
AthensTetradrachmNewStyle.jpg
Attica, Athens Silver Tetradrachm, New Style, c. 115/114 B.C.35 viewsAttica, Athens Silver Tetradrachm, New Style, c. 115/114 B.C.
31.4mm, 16.61 grams.
Obv: Head of Athena to right, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with a palmette and gryphon.
Rev: Owl standing three-quarters right, head facing, on amphora, cluster of grapes on vine in right field, Δ on amphora, ΠE below.
Ref: Thompson 633g.
About Extremely Fine.
1 commentsmjabrial
greek46.jpg
Attica, Athens Ar "New Style" Tetradrachm146 views(135-134 BC). Mened-, Epigeno-, and Diod(o)-, magistrates.
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora; magistrates’ names in fields; to left, Asklepios standing left, holding serpent-entwined scepter; B on amphora, ΓΛ below; all within wreath.
Thompson 348f (same obv. die); SNG Copenhagen 240 (same obv. die).
12 commentsMinos
athe.jpg
Attica, Athens Ar Tetradrachm107 views(454-415 BC)
Obv.: Head of Athena right in crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, wearing round earring and bead necklace.
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind, AOE before.
Starr, pl. xxii, 6´. SNG Cop. 31ff.
9 commentsMinos
greek68.jpg
Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm66 views(454-415 BC)
Obv.: Head of Athena right in crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, wearing round earring and bead necklace.
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind, AOE before.
2 commentsMinos
attica_owl.jpg
Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm15 viewsAttica, Athens
AR Tetradrachm
c350 BC
Head of Athena right in ivy-crested helmet, eye in profile / Owl standing right, head facing, olive twig and crescent behind, AØE before.
"Eye in profile" type, struck with rusty reverse die

Discussed and authenticated on FORVM board - Thanks rover1.3 and Joe Sermanini!

Sear 2537, BMC 144, SNGCop 65.
Sosius
Attica_Athens_AR_Tetradrachm.jpg
Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm25 viewsAttica, Athens AR Tetradrachm, Circa 460-440 BC
weight = 17.00g, 25 mm
NGC AU* - Strike 5/5 - Surface 5/5 - Die Shift [4163031-001]

Obv: Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet ornamented with laurel leaves and vine scroll
Rev: ΑΘΕ, Owl with wings folded standing right, head facing; behind, olive-spray and crescent; all within incuse square

Kroll 8. Dewing 1591-8. SNG Copenhagen 31. Ex. Stacks Coin Galleries sale of November 1992, Lot 108.
1 commentsKevin P
Comb06022017060702.jpg
Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm.74 views Circa 454-404 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31. 16.01g, 23mm, well centred.
Ex.Savoca Coins.
3 commentsCanaan
s-l500.jpg
Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Eastern imitation.92 viewsObv. Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev. Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind, AΘE to right; all within incuse square.
17.06g, 22.2mm.
Kroll 15; SNG Copenhagen 64. Bankers marks on both sides.
Ex. London Ancient Coins LAC.
2 commentsCanaan
greek83.jpg
Attica, Athens AR Triobol45 views(454-404 BC)
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena.
Rev.: Owl standing facing between olive sprays.
SNG Copenhagen 44.
1 commentsMinos
greek82~0.jpg
Attica, Athens AR Triobol (Clean)31 views(454-404 BC)
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena.
Rev.: Owl standing facing between olive sprays.
SNG Copenhagen 44.
Minos
G001.jpg
Attica, Athens Classical Owl Type Tetradrachm24 viewsTest cut to right of owls headZaph0dd
Athens_hemiobol_comb.jpg
Attica, Athens Hemiobol113 viewsATTICA, ATHENS
AR Hemiobol.
454(?)–415 BC.

O: Head of Athena right with frontal eye, in crested Attic helmet adorned with olive leaves above visor / R: AQE, owl standing three-quarters r, olive sprig behind, all in incuse square.

Svoronos pl. 17, 52–56. SNG Cop 59–61, Sear sg2531 VF

4 commentsSosius
100359.jpg
Attica, Athens Tetradrachm21 views Attica, Athens. Ca. 454-404 B.C. AR tetradrachm (23 mm, 15.76 g, 9 h). Helmeted head of Athena right, with frontal eye / ΑΘΕ, owl standing right, head facing; above and behind, olive sprig and crescent; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31. Two test cuts.
TLP
Wappenmünzen.jpg
Attica, Athens Wappenmunzen34 viewsAttica, Athens
"Wappenmünzen" AR obol
~550-525 B.C.
0.56g

O: Wheel with four spokes

R: Incuse square divided by two diagonals

Sear 1831

EF, rare
1 commentsSosius
AthensOwlI.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena and Owl44 viewsAttica, Athens, 449-413 BC, silver tetradrachm, 21 mm, 16.88 g.
O: Head of Athena to right, the eye seen in facing, archaic style, banker's mark on cheek.
R: Owl standing to right, head facing; to right A-theta-E; to left, olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square, two test cuts and crescent banker's mark in field.

This was the first true "silver dollar" of the ancient world, the coins manufactured in Athens circulated wherever the Greeks travelled. Furthermore, similar coins were struck at a number of Eastern mints, and this may be one of them.

Dark toning with beautiful dark blue highlights.
Nemonater
Athen_AR-Tetradrachm_-BC_Sear-_Q-001_11h_28,5mm_16,68g-s.jpg
Attica, Athens, ( 123-122 B.C.), AR-Tetradrachm (New style), Sear , Athena and Owl,113 viewsAttica, Athens, ( 123-122 B.C.), AR-Tetradrachm (New style), Sear , Athena and Owl,
Obv:– Helmeted head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet.
Rev:– A-ΘE across top, magistrates' names MIK-IΩN, EVRVKΛEI, APE/ΣTO/Σ across fields, (), Owl standing facing on amphora, To right, the Dioscouri standing left, one holding patera, both holding staffs. Κ letter on amphora, ΣΦ below..
diameter: 28,5mm, weght: 16,68g , axis: 11h,
mint: Attica, Athens, date:123-122 B.C., ref.:Thompson 488 d/e/f, (Svoronos JAN X, 173; BMC 459; cf Sear 2555-2559 (magistrates).???)
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Athen_AR-Tetradrachm_-BC_Sear-_Q-001_11h_29,5mm_16,41g-s.jpg
Attica, Athens, ( 126-125 B.C.), AR-Tetradrachm (New style), Sear , Athena and Owl,132 viewsAttica, Athens, ( 126-125 B.C.), AR-Tetradrachm (New style), Sear , Athena and Owl,
Obv:– Head of Athena right wearing Attic helmet.
Rev:– A-QE across top, magistrates' names BOY/ΛAP/ME left, EΠI/ΓEN, and ΣΩΣAN/ΔROΣ to right (Boylar, Epigenus and Sosandros), Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora; to left, an eagle standing right on thunderbolt. Amphora letter I and control ME below.
diameter: 29,5mm, weght: 16,41g , axis: 11h,
mint: Attica, Athens, date: 126-125 B.C., ref.:Thompson 453e, ,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
ATTICA,_Athens_AR-Triobol_Helmeted_head_of_Athena_right_Owl_standing_facing_between_two_olive-sprigs_A_E_SNG-Cop-68_cc-393-300-BC_Q-001_axis-9h_10,5-12mm_2,00g-s.jpg
Attica, Athens, (393-300 B.C.), AR-Triobol, SNG Cop. 68, Athena and Owl,80 viewsAttica, Athens, (393-300 B.C.), AR-Triobol, SNG Cop. 68, Athena and Owl,
Obv:– Helmeted head of Athena right
Rev:– Owl standing facing between two olive-sprigs. Large A Θ E.
diameter: 10,5-12mm, weght: 2,00g , axis: 9h,
mint: Attica, Athens, date: 393-300 B.C., ref.:SNG Cop. 68,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Athen_AR-Tetradrachm-449-413_BC,_Sear_2526_23mm_17,19g.jpg
Attica, Athens, (449-413 B.C.), AR-Tetradrachm, Sear 2526, Athena and Owl,298 viewsAttica, Athens, (449-413 B.C.), AR-Tetradrachm, Sear 2526, Athena and Owl,
Obv:– Head of Athena right, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll
Rev:– owl standing right, head facing, to right AΘE in large lettering, to left olive sprig and crescent
diameter: 23mm, weght: 17,19g , axis- h,
mint: Attica, Athens, date: 449-413 B.C., ref.:Sear 2526,
Q-001
5 commentsquadrans
01008AB.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS, 121-120 BC85 viewsTetradrachm, 29mm, 16.8g
"Three graces" type New Style, Magistrates EURYKLEI, ARIARI and XENOKRA. Control ΔI.

O: Head of Athena wearing triple crested Arthenian helmet ornamented with Pegasos and foreparts of horses
R: Owl stg r facing an upturned amphora, 3 figures adv

SGC-2557
4 commentsAZRobbo
01009AB.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS, 125-124 BC61 viewsTetradrachm, 29mm, 16.78g
"Tripod" type New Style, THEODOTOS as 3rd magistrate, "A" Month

O: Head of Athena wearing triple crested Arthenian helmet ornamented with Peasos and foreparts of horses
R: Owl stg r facing an upturned amphora, Tripod in LF, ΜΕ under amphora, 3 Magistrates POLEMON ALKETES THEOLTOS, all surrounded by wreath

Thompson 466a (s.o.d.)

Ex Freeman & Sear
2 commentsAZRobbo
GR-JJWDLG.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS, 420-404 BC88 viewsTetradrachm, 420-404BC, 24mm, 16.9g

O - Helmeted head of Athena right
R - Owl standing right, head facing; AOE in fr., olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square.

SNG Cop 31
1 commentsrobertpe
1000AB.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS, 449-413 BC197 viewsTetradrachm, 24mm, 17.14g

O: Head of Athena right, wearing helmet ornamented with vine scroll and laurel leaves.
R: Owl facing standing right, head facing, AΘE to right, olive sprig and crescent to left, all within incuse square.

After 449 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor & a spiral palmette on the bowl / AΘE, owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig & crescent behind.

SNG Copenhagen 31. SG.2526

Ex Washington Numismatic Gallery
7 commentsAZRobbo
01024AB.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS, 449-413 BC68 viewsTetradrachm , 22mm, 16.85g

O.Head of Athena right, wearing helmet with necklace
R. AΘE, owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig & crescent behind, ; all within incuse square.

Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31

Ex CNG, 262, Lot 95
2 commentsrobertpe
01023AB.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS, 449-413 BC49 viewsTetradrachm , 25mm, 16.96g

O.Head of Athena right, wearing helmet with necklace
R. AΘE, owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig & crescent behind, ; all within incuse square.

Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31

Ex CNG - 262, Lot 90
1 commentsrobertpe
Attica,_Athens,_AR_Tetradrachm_.jpg
Attica, Athens, 454-413 BC, AR Tetradrachm 47 viewsHead of Athena right, wearing created Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves above visor and floral design on bowl.
Owl facing standing right, head facing, AΘE to right, olive sprig and crescent to left, all within incuse square.

SNG Copenhagen 31; Sear 2526.

(23 mm, 17.04 g, 9h).
Freeman & Sear.
3 commentsn.igma
Athens_Tetradrachm_.jpg
Attica, Athens, 454-413 BC, AR Tetradrachm34 viewsHead of Athena right, wearing created Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves above visor and floral design on bowl.
Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig & crescent behind, AΘE to right, all within incuse square.

Svoronos pl. 13, 20.

(24 mm, 17.07 g, 7h).
Harlan J. Berk Buy or Bid Sale 184, 7 May 2013, 63; ex-Freeman & Sear 2008
1 commentsn.igma
DSC05515.JPG
ATTICA, ATHENS, AR Trihemiobol, weight 1,02 g, diameter 11 mm, after 449 BC96 viewsATTICA, ATHENS, AR Trihemiobol, weight 1,02 g, diameter 11 mm, after 449. BCSNGCop 50
Obs:Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: Owl standing facing, wings spread; olive sprig above.
Beautifuly centered and struck to high relief and good metal. A splendid example of the ancient work of art. The design of this Trihemiobol is ultimately derived from the famous Athenian Dekadrachm. The dekadrachms (and this coin too) stand apart from the Athenian coinage. (the transformation of the revers type from an owl in profile to one facing the viewer)


Antonio Protti
Attica,.JPG
ATTICA, ATHENS, AR Trihemiobol, weight 1,02 g, diameter 11 mm, after 449 BC178 viewsATTICA, ATHENS, AR Trihemiobol, weight 1,02 g, diameter 11 mm, after 449. BCSNGCop 50

Obs:Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: Owl standing facing, wings spread; olive sprig above.

The design of this Trihemiobol is ultimately derived from the famous Athenian Dekadrachm. The dekadrachms (and this coin too) stand apart from the Athenian coinage. (the transformation of the revers type from an owl in profile to one facing the viewer)

4 commentsAntonivs Protti
G_302_Athens.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, AΘE, Tritetartemorion 15 viewsAttica. Athens
Tritetartemorion (454-404 BC)
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: A Θ Ε within three crescents
Ag, 6mm, 0.48g
Ref.: Kroll 21b, SNG Copenhagen 57
shanxi
Athen_02.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Bukranion13 viewsAttica. Athens
Æ22, AD 260-268
Time of Gallienus
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena right
Rev.: AΘHNAIΩN, Facing bucranion with fillets hanging from horns.
Æ 21.5mm, 5.16g
Ref.: Kroll 401, SNG Copenhagen 376
shanxi
G_303_Athens_fac.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Double bodied owl5 viewsAttica. Athens
AE 14
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: AΘE, Double bodied owl standing facing; in each upper corner olive spray; Eleusis ring below
AE, 1.58g, 14.5mm
Ref.: Kroll 43
shanxi
G_294_Athens_fac.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, Hemiobol29 viewsAttica. Athens
Hemiobol (after 449)
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: A Θ Ε, Owl standing right, olive spring.
Ag, 0.33g, 7mm
Ref.: Kroll 14, SNG Copenhagen 59
Ex E.E. Clain-Stefanelli collection

photographic image (top) and electron microscopic image (bottom)

1 commentsshanxi
G_052_Athen_fac~0.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, New Style Tetradrachm12 viewsAttica. Athens
New Style Tetradrachm
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: Owl standing right on amphora, Dioscuri left, holding sceptre and patera, A - ΘE flanking owl's head, MIKIΩN EYPYKΛEI ΣΩKRATHΣ magistrates, ME below amphora, E on amphora. All within wreath
AR, 16.22g,29mm
Ref.: Thompson 483 a,b
Ex Pegasi Numismatics, 1999
shanxi
G292_Athens_fac.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, New Style Tetradrachm19 viewsAttica. Athens
New Style Tetradrachm
Obv: Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet
Rev: Owl standing right on amphora, no symbol, A - ΘE flanking owl's head, ΔIOTIMOΣ MAΓAΣ XAPINAYTHΣ magistrates, ΣΦ below amphora, Γ on amphora. All within wreath
AR, 16.47g, 28mm
Ref.: Thompson 656 a,b
Ex Sothebys London, June 2000
1 commentsshanxi
G_368_Athens.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, Obol15 viewsAttica. Athens
Obol (454-404 BC)
Obv: Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet decorated with olive wreath.
Rev: AΘΕ, Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent behind.
Ag, 0.63g, 9.3mm
Ref.: SNG Copenhagen 53-6, SNG München 49.
Ex Numismatik Naumann, Auction 80, Lot 871 (part of)
1 commentsshanxi
G_376_Athens.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, Obol11 viewsAttica. Athens
Obol (after 449)
Obv: Head of Athena to right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves and palmette
Rev: AΘE Owl standing right, head facing; to left, olive leaf and fruit; all within incuse square.
Ag, 9 mm, 0.69 g, 3 h
Ref.: Kroll 13
Ex Leu Webauction 8, Lot 265
shanxi
G_301_Athens_fac2.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, Tetradrachm37 viewsAttica. Athens
Silver tetradrachm, ca. 454-404 BC
Av: Helmeted head of Athena right, with frontal eye.
Rv: AΘE. Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent to left; all within incuse square.
AR, 17.16g, 23mm
Ref.: Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597.
2 commentsshanxi
G_310_Athen_fac.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, Tetradrachm18 viewsAttica. Athens
Silver tetradrachm, ca. 454-404 BC
Av: Helmeted head of Athena right, with frontal eye.
Rv: AΘE. Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent to left; all within incuse square.
AR, 17.15g, 23.1mm
Ref.: Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597.
1 commentsshanxi
G_024_Athen_fac.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, Transitional Pi-Style Tetradrachm17 viewsAttica. Athens
Silver tetradrachm, Ca. 353-297 BC
Transitional Pi-Style
Av: Head of Athena right with profile eye in crested Attic helmet ornamented with three olive leaves above visor
Rv: ΑΘΕ, owl of later style standing three-quarters right, olive sprig and crescent moon behind
AR, 17.01g, 23mm
Ex Pegasi Numismatics, 1999
1 commentsshanxi
Athen_01.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, Triobol45 viewsAttica. Athens
Triobol (454-404 BC)
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: A - Θ - Ε, Owl standing facing between olive sprays.
Ag, 2.0g, 11mm
Ref.: Kroll 12.
Ex Pecunem Gitbud&Naumann auction 29
1 commentsshanxi
Athens,_AE_Obol,_125-175_AD.jpg
Attica, Athens, ca. 125-175 AD, Æ 1916 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right.
AΘHNA-IΩN Theseus advancing left wielding club, chlamys in left hand.

Kroll, Agora, 209a (same dies); Sv-pl 96, 20 (same dies).

(19 mm, 4.79 g, 6h).
Harlan J. Berk Buy or Bid Sale 160, 13 August 2008, 358
n.igma
Athens,_AE_21,_264-267_AD.jpg
Attica, Athens, ca. 264-267 AD, Æ 2115 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right.
AΘHN-AIΩN Athena standing left holding Nike, shield and spear.

Kroll, Agora, 284; Sv-pl 82, 5ff; SNG Copenhagen 384.

(21 mm, 4.98 g, 6h).
Harlan J. Berk Buy or Bid Sale 160, 13 August 2008, 355.
n.igma
G_380_Athens_fac.jpg
Attica, Athens, Demeter, poppy and grain ears2 viewsAttica. Athens
Eleusinian festival coinage
Obv.: Veiled head of Demeter right
Rev.: A-ΘE, poppy with crossed grain ears.
Æ, 13 mm., 3,44 g.
Ref.: J.N.Svoronos “Les monnaies d'Athènes” pl.104 / 38-45, Kroll 150
shanxi
athkr94OR.jpg
Attica, Athens, Kroll 9465 viewsAttica, Athens, 99-98 B.C. AE, 4.79g 17mm, Kroll 94
O: Helmeted head of Athena right
R: A Θ E, Zeus advancing right, hurling thunderbolt. Dioscuri caps surmounted by stars l., and r.
1 commentscasata137ec
athen_SNGcop31.jpg
Attica, Athens, SNG Copenhagen 31200 viewsThe famous Attic owl, 449-413 BC
AR - tetradrachm (classic style), 17.1g, 24.2mm
obv. Archaic head of Athena r., with almond shaped eye, wearing crested helmet
ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round
earring.
rev. AQE right
owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, prong tail, to left olive twig
and crescent, all within incuse square
SNG Copenhagen 13; Sydenham 2526
nice VF, good metall (Thanks to Salem!)
7 commentsJochen
attica_athen_Thompson715b.jpg
Attica, Athens, Thompson 715b173 viewsAttica, Athens, 110/109 BC
AR - tetradrachm ('New Style'), 16.64g, 33mm
struck under magistrates Zoilos, Euandros and Lysippos
obv. Head of Athena Parthenos, wearing crested Attic helmet, decorated with gryphion, r.
rev. Owl, stg. r. on amphora reclined r.
in l. and r. field A - QE
beneath ZOI - LOS / EYA / NDRO / LYSI / PP
in r. feld grain, beneath a bee
Amphora inscribed with Gamma (number of month)
beneath SF
All within olive wreath
ref. Thompson 715b
EF, slightly toned

A must for every collector. I have waited a long time for this coin. A wonderful portrait!
9 commentsJochen
G_298_Athen_fac.jpg
Attica, Athens, Triptolemos, Piglet 10 viewsAttica. Athens
Circa 322/17-307 BC
Eleusinian festival coinage
Obv.: Triptolemos, holding grain ears, seated left in winged chariot drawn by two snakes
Rev.: AΘE, Piglet standing right on mystic staff, Plemochoe in exergue
Æ 15.5mm, 3.31g
Ref.: Kroll 40; SNG Copenhagen 419
shanxi
GRK_Athens_tetradrachm.JPG
Attica, Athens.46 viewsSear 2526, SNG Copenhagen 31.

AR Tetradrachm (24 mm.), struck 454 to 393 B.C.

Obv: Head of Athena right wearing helmet Athena's helmet decorated with floral scroll and three olive leaves.

Rev: AΘE to left, owl standing right, olive sprig and crescent to left; all within incuse.
1 commentsStkp
Attica_Athens_Thompson363fg.jpg
Attica, Athens. 20 viewsAttica, Athens. 134-133 BC. New Style AR Tetradrachm (16.73 gm). Head of Athena parthenos r., wearing crested Attic helmet. / Owl r., standing on prostrate amphora, A-OE above. Magistrates Timarchos, Nikago(ras), and Sosig- TIM-APXO[Y] / NIKAΓO / ΣΩΣIΓ to r.; anchor and star to l., [Δ] on amphora, ME beneath. VF. HGC 4 #1602; M.Thompson 363 f&g; Svoronos Monnaies plate 50 #5; HGC 4 #1602. cf SNG ANS 3 #719.
Christian T
Attica_Athens_SNG-Cop32.jpg
Attica, Athens.14 viewsAttica, Athens. 449-413 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.17 gm). Head of Athena r., wearing crested Attic helmet decorated w/ 3 olive leaves over visor & spiral palmette on bowl / Owl standing r., head facing; crescent moon and olive sprig behind. nEF. CNG 46 #281. SNG Cop 32; HGC 4 #1597(C); Flament 2007 Gp II. Christian T
Attica_Athens_SNG-Cop31ff.jpg
Attica, Athens.14 viewsAttica, Athens. 449-413 BC. AR Tetradrachm (16.99 gm). Head of Athena r., wearing crested Attic helmet decorated w/ olive leaves, bankers marks on cheek. / Owl standing r., head facing; crescent moon and olive sprig behind. VF. HGC 4 #1597 (C) SNG Cop 31ff; Kroll 8; Flament 2007 Gp II.Christian T
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-Mx3SLs6f4XPx.jpg
Attica, Athens. (Circa 454-404 BC)44 viewsAR Tetradrachm

24mm, 16.57g

Obv: Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace with pendants, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl

Rev: Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square.

Test cuts on both sides.

Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597
2 commentsNathan P
00221q00.jpg
Attica, Athens. (Circa 454-449 BC)30 viewsAR Tetradrachm

25 mm, 17.20 g

This is a transitional Owl tetradrachm that bridges the early classical owls (minted from 478-454) with the subsequent mass classical (standardized) coinage, which really got going in the early 440s BC to finance Pericles' building projects like the Parthenon and then later the Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC) vs. Sparta. The 454 date is critical in that it was the year that Athens moved the treasury of the Delian league (confederation of Greek states led by Athens to defend against the Persian threat) from Delos to Athens.

This coin shares many attributes of Starr V early classical coinage (465-454 BC). On the obverse, the olive leaves on Athena's helmet connect to her diadem with small stems (which disappear in the mass coinage). In addition, the palmette leaves on Athena's helmet are smaller, less decorative, and more realistic. Finally, Athena is smiling (she starts to frown as the war with Sparta goes badly) and is more beautifully depicted than in the more hastily produced mass coinage.

On the reverse, like with the Starr V coins, the incuse is quite noticeable and the AOE (short for AOENAION, or "Of the Athenians") is written in smaller letters (they are much bigger in the mass coinage). Also, the owl is stouter, has smaller eyes, and his head is at an angle rather than parallel to the ground like all later issues.

The only difference between the Starr V owls and this example is in the owl's tail - in Starr V it ends with three small feathers. On this coin and all subsequent coinage the owl's tail ends in a single prong. Given all the other similarities to Starr V it is likely this coin was minted soon after the Treasury's move from Delos to Athens - perhaps 454/453.
2 commentsNathan P
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-VwCSeKXIBCf~2.jpg
Attica, Athens. (Circa 475-465 BC)30 viewsAR Tetradrachm

24 mm, 17.19 g

Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right

Reverse: Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig to left; all within incuse square.

Starr Group IV, HGC 4, 1595. Test cut on reverse.

Chester Starr arranged Athens' coinage from ca. 480 until the mid 5th century into five groups, and his chronology is still widely accepted today (although the dating of the final groups is now considered too late). The style of the "transitional" Athenian tetradrachms from the late 470s through the early 450s B.C. – Starr's groups II through V – is considered the high mark of Athenian coinage. By the time of Starr's Group IV, production of tetradrachms had steadily increased and the uptick in the number of required dies (and engravers) necessitated a greater standardization of style. On the obverse, the head of Athena changes little from Starr's Group III – the goddess has a bold profile and retains her "archaic smile"; the hair on her forehead is arranged in two waves, with a small bend above the eye; and on her helmet, her leaves float above the visor (sometimes referred to as a "laurel wreath," these leaves were first introduced after the victory over the Persians in 480/79 BC). One difference from Group III is the helmet's palmette, which goes from pointing to the adjacent olive leaf to more parallel. On the reverse, the back leg of the Group IV's owl often stretches further back and the tail feather no longer touches the rear claw.
1 commentsNathan P
PCW-G6443.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. 449-413 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.24 gm; 22 mm)37 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind. SNG Cop. 31; Starr pl. XXII, 7. Nicely struck on a compact flan. Elegant style with a full crest. Shallow marks on Athena's cheek. Choice Extremely Fine. Not from the recent hoards. Nice old-cabinet toning. 4 commentsMark R1
Athens_-_Attica.jpg
Attica, Athens. 87/86 BC13 viewsAttica, Athens. 87/86 BC. AE 18 to 19mm. Weight 6.96g. Head of Athena, wearing Corinthian helmet / Zeus standing, hurling thunderbolt; star between crescents to right. Svoronos pl. 81, 47. Kroll 97 ddwau
athensBC87.jpg
Attica, Athens. 87/86 BC. AE18.29 viewsObv: Head of Athena, wearing Corinthian helmet.
Rev: Zeus standing, hurling thunderbolt; star between crescents to right.
18mm., 8.7 gm.
1 commentsancientone
IMG_0083.JPG
ATTICA, Athens. AR Tetradrachm95 viewsCirca 454-404 B.C. 17.15 grams. Obverse: archaizing head of Athena right. Reverse: owl standing right, olive sprig left upper corner with crescent moon below, ethnic to right field, all within incuse square. Kroll 8. HGC 4, 1597. SNG Copenhagen 31. SNG Munchen 49. Dewing 1591-7. Gulbenkian 519-21. Kraay & Hirmer 362. Choice EF, well centered, high relief (as usual).
Ex CNG
The quintessential "Old Style" or "Classical Style" silver tetradrachm representative coin of Classical Athens called "glaukes" or owls. Silver probably came from the mines of Laurion or from member city states of the Delian League. Countless articles and exhaustive studies had been made regarding the enormous output of these coins during its remarkable existence. One of the early trade coins of the ancient world and undeniably well travelled from the Pillars of Hercules to ancient India, hence its ubiquitous nature. What more could be said of it?
3 commentsJason T
new_style_tripod.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. c. 165-42 BC. 14 viewsAR Tetradrachm (29mm, 16.7 g, 12h).
New Style coinage. Polemon, Alketes and Aris, magistrates.
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev.: A - ΘE / ΠΟΛΕ - ΜΩΝ / ΑΛΚΗ – ΤΗΣ / APIΣ; Owl standing right on amphora; to tripod to left, Θ on amphora, ΣΦ below.
Reference:Thompson 469a / 17-61-550
1 commentsJohn Anthony
30783LG.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. Circa 142/141 BC147 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 142/141 BC. AR New Style Tetradrachm (32mm, 16.46 g, 12h) . Thompson 209b (same rev. die)
Helmeted head of Athena right / A-QE, owl standing right on amphora; Macedonian helmet surmounted by a star to right, G on amphora, EM to left, magistrates DH/MH & IE/RW; all within wreath.
Ex CNG ; Ex Wayne C. Phillips
2 commentsVladislavs D
new_style_k.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. Circa 165-42 BC 12 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 27mm, 16.6g, 12h, New Style. Socrates, Dionysodoros, and Zoilos, magistrates. Struck 116/5 BC.
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev.: A-ΘE / ΣOKΡ / ATHΣ / ΔIONΥ / ΣOΔΩ / MOY / ΣΩI; Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora; in right field, facing cult statue of Apollo Delios, holding Three Graces and bow; B on amphora, ΣO below.
Reference: Thompson 616a / 17-47-601
1 commentsJohn Anthony
2d2Do7PpbQ8RLfx4F6wA9yMMpS3m56.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. Circa 350-294 BC. AR Tetradrachm , UNCLEANED.42 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 350-294 BC. AR Tetradrachm , UNCLEANED.
23MM , 16.90 GM _13500 sold
Antonivs Protti
Tet_1.jpg
Attica, Athens. Circa 449-404 B.C. AR Tetradrachm29 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive spray and crescent behind; all within incuse square.
Maximum Diameter: 27.9 mm
Weight: 16.21 g

Six test cuts.
1 commentsTheEmpireNeverEnded
Tet_2.jpg
Attica, Athens. Circa 449-404 B.C. AR Tetradrachm, Sear 2526, SNG Cop 3122 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / AΘE, owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind.
Maximum Diameter:
Weight: 17.14 g

Two test cuts.
TheEmpireNeverEnded
Greece-Athens_45403.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC11 viewsAR Tetradrachm (24mm, 17.00 g, 8h). Helmeted head of Athena right, with frontal eye / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent to left; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597. VF, toned, bankers’ marks, graffiti.Christopher B2
Greece-Athens_45402.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC18 viewsAR Tetradrachm (24mm, 17.00 g, 8h). Helmeted head of Athena right, with frontal eye / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent to left; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597. VF, toned, bankers’ marks, graffiti.1 commentsChristopher B2
Kroll_8.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm36 views(24mm, 17.20 g, 2h).
Helmeted head of Athena right, with frontal eye / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597. Good VF, toned. Attractive early style.

This tetradrachm belongs among the earlier period of the “frontal eye” issues of the mid-late 5th century. The palmette is still delicate, as is the general style of the owl, and the incuse is rather deep and abruptly transitions to the flat surface.
1 commentsLeo
athenstet.jpg
Attica, Athens. Tetradrachm.88 viewsAttica, Athens. Circa 449-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm (23mm, 16.95 g). Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet / Owl standing right, head facing; olive spray and crescent behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31. VF, lightly porous, scratches on obverse, reverse test cut.2 commentsCANTANATRIX
IMG_3970.jpg
Attica. Athens60 viewsAttica. Athens circa 454-404 BC.
Drachm AR

13mm., 4,13g.

Head of Athena with profile eye to right, wearing disc earring, pearl necklace and a crested Attic helmet adorned with three olive leaves and a pi-style palmette /
ΑΘΕ, owl standing to right, head facing the viewer, olive sprig with berry in upper left field, all within incuse square.

very fine

Kroll 10; HGC 4, 1631.
6 commentsRandygeki(h2)
ZomboDroid_24042019221139.jpg
ATTICA. Athens. Circa 430s -420s BC. AR Tetradrachm.13 viewsObv: Head of Athena to right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves and palmette.

Rev: ΑΘΕ Owl standing right, head facing; to left, olive sprig and crescent; all within incuse square.
Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597.
F, test cuts.
26mm // 16,65g.
Canaan
DSC_0006.JPG
ATTICA. Athens. Ca. 2nd-1st centuries BC. AR tetradrachm27 viewsATTICA. Athens. Ca. 2nd-1st centuries BC. AR tetradrachm (34mm, 16.94 gm, 12h). NGC XF 4/5 - 3/5, brushed, die shift. New Style coinage, ca. 148/7 BC, Ammo(nius) and Dio-, magistrates. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with a vine scroll, Pegasus above solid upturned cheek flap / A-ΘE / AM/MΩ / ΔIO, owl standing facing on overturned amphora; kerchnos in left field, A below, all within wreath. Thompson 101a. 4 commentsMark R1
Owl.jpg
Attica: Athens Tetradrachm117 viewsArchaic head of Athena r., with almond shaped eye, wearing crested helmet
ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round
earring.

ΑΘΕ right
owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, prong tail, to left olive twig
and crescent, all within incuse square

16.8g

SNG Copenhagen 13; Sydenham 2526
ex-Time Machine Vcoins
2 commentsJay GT4
Tetradracma_Ateniense.jpg
ÁTICA - ATENAS99 viewsEmisión realizada en el siglo de Aristóteles.
AR Tetradracma 20 mm 17.1 gr.

Anv: Cabeza de Atenas vistiendo Casco coronado, crestado y ornamentado con tres hojas de oliva y detalles florales.
Rev: "A Θ E" – Búho parado a derecha, su cabeza viendo al frente. Un ramo de olivo y medialuna detrás.
El viejo formato almendrado del ojo de Atenas en los tetradracmas anteriores al 393 A.C., cambia a un ojo mas real de perfil. Esta es una muy extensa serie, donde la gran mayoría fue acuñada muy descuidadamente en cospeles irregulares y de gran espesor.

Acuñación: 393 - 300 A.C.
Ceca: Atenas - Ática

Referencias: Sear GCTV Vol.I #2537 Pag.237 – BMC Vol.11 (Attica, Megaris, Aegira) #132/44 – SNG Copenhagen #63/4 - SNG München #91 - SNG Lockett #1873 - SNG Delepierre #1469 - Dewing #1635 - SNG VIII Hart #786
4 commentsmdelvalle
athens_ae_owl.jpg
Æ 10. Frontal owl10 viewsAttica, Athens Æ10. 406-393 B.C. 1,15 g,. Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing: E A Q. Babelon, Traité, Pl. CXCII 6, III 95; Cf SNG München, Attika 67-73.Podiceps
athens_2_bodied.jpg
Æ 11, Double-bodied owl15 viewsAttica, Athens, c. early or mid-330's-322/317 BC, 1.81g. Obv: Head of Athena r.; Rx: Double-bodied owl, beneath Eleusis ring. BMC-222..;The Athenian Agora-43; Svoronos-35-42, pl. 22. AE 11. Ex D. Lepczyk Auction; Ex John Twente Collection; Ex H.J.BerkPodiceps
athens.jpg
Æ 12, owl standing right, head facing15 viewsAthens, Greece, c. 120 - 140 A.D. Bronze AE 12, BMC Attica p. 101, 730, F, Athens mint, 2.543g, 15.6mm, 180o, obverse helmeted bust of Athena right; reverse “ΑΘΗ”, owl standing right, head facing, olive spray behind. Ex FORVMPodiceps
athens_owl.jpg
Æ 13; Athena/ owl8 viewsAthens, 3rd-2nd century B.C. Æ 13 mm. Helmeted bust of Athena right / Owl standing to right, head facing. Sear GCV I: 2565. Ex Sayles & Lavender. Podiceps
athens_owls.jpg
Æ 13; Head of Athena r./ Double-bodied owl, kalathos23 viewsAttica Athens, 3rd Century B.C. AE 12.89mm, 1.77g; Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right. Reverse: Two confronting owls, heads overlapping at center, kalathos in exergue. SNG 92, BMC pl. VI / 6. Podiceps
athens_2_bodied~0.jpg
Æ 14, Diobol; Double-bodied owl, kalathos in ex14 viewsAthens, Attica, Greece, 350 - 262 B.C. Bronze diobol, SGCV I 2563; BMC Attica p. 21, 220 ff., F, 3.442g, 14.3mm, 180o, obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse “AQE”, double-bodied owl, head facing, olive sprays above, kalathos (basket) in ex. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Athens_2_owls.jpg
Æ 14; Head of Athena r./ Two owls20 viewsAthens, Attica, AE 14mm, 2.7g Ca. 3rd c. B,C. Head of Athena right in crested Attic helmet / Two owls standing towards one another left and right, heads turned facing, within wreath. ΑΘΕ in exergue. Kroll 46; SNG Copenhagen 89. Podiceps
nikaia_caracalla_MionnetsuppV_601cf.jpg
Bithynia, Nikaia, Caracalla, cf. Mionnet suppl. V, 60119 viewsCaracalla, AD 197-218
AE 15, 2.09g, 15.47mm, 0°
obv. ANTWNINOC AVGOVC (NINO between rays of crown)
Bust, draped and cuirassed, radiate, r.
rev. CEOVHREIA - NIKAIEWN (HR ligate)
Prize basket with palm branch
ref. cf. Mionnet Suppl. V, 601 (for Severus); not in Mionnet, Rec. Gen., Weiser, SNG von Aulock, SNG Copenhagen, BMC, Imhoof, Jürgling
very rare, about SS, nice green patina

The Severeia were games in honour of Severus and his sons, frequently testified by incscriptions and coins in the entire eastern half of the empire, especially in Athens and Asia minor, but in Mauretania too, often together with other deities (Pauly)
2 commentsJochen
105034.jpg
BOEOTIA, Thebes171 viewsIn the late 6th century BC the Thebans were brought for the first time into hostile contact with the Athenians, who helped the small village of Plataea to maintain its independence against them, and in 506 repelled an inroad into Attica. The aversion to Athens best serves to explain the unpatriotic attitude which Thebes displayed during the Persian invasion of Greece (480–479 BC). Though a contingent of 700 was sent to Thermopylae and remained there with Leonidas until just before the last stand when they surrendered to the Persians[1], the governing aristocracy soon after joined King Xerxes I of Persia with great readiness and fought zealously on his behalf at the battle of Plataea in 479 BC. The victorious Greeks subsequently punished Thebes by depriving it of the presidency of the Boeotian League, and an attempt by the Spartans to expel it from the Delphic amphictyony was only frustrated by the intercession of Athens.

In 457 Sparta, needing a counterpoise against Athens in central Greece, reversed her policy and reinstated Thebes as the dominant power in Boeotia. The great citadel of Cadmea served this purpose well by holding out as a base of resistance when the Athenians overran and occupied the rest of the country (457–447). In the Peloponnesian War the Thebans, embittered by the support which Athens gave to the smaller Boeotian towns, and especially to Plataea, which they vainly attempted to reduce in 431, were firm allies of Sparta, which in turn helped them to besiege Plataea and allowed them to destroy the town after its capture in 427 BC. In 424 at the head of the Boeotian levy they inflicted a severe defeat upon an invading force of Athenians at the Battle of Delium, and for the first time displayed the effects of that firm military organization which eventually raised them to predominant power in Greece.

After the downfall of Athens at the end of the Peloponnesian War the Thebans, finding that Sparta intended to protect the states which they desired to annex, broke off the alliance. In 404 they had urged the complete destruction of Athens, yet in 403 they secretly supported the restoration of its democracy in order to find in it a counterpoise against Sparta. A few years later, influenced perhaps in part by Persian gold, they formed the nucleus of the league against Sparta. At the battles of Haliartus (395) and Coronea (394) they again proved their rising military capacity by standing their ground against the Spartans. The result of the war was especially disastrous to Thebes, as the general settlement of 387 stipulated the complete autonomy of all Greek towns and so withdrew the other Boeotians from its political control. Its power was further curtailed in 382, when a Spartan force occupied the citadel by a treacherous coup-de-main. Three years later the Spartan garrison was expelled, and a democratic constitution definitely set up in place of the traditional oligarchy. In the consequent wars with Sparta the Theban army, trained and led by Epaminondas and Pelopidas, proved itself the best in Greece. Some years of desultory fighting, in which Thebes established its control over all Boeotia, culminated in 371 in a remarkable victory over the pick of the Spartans at Leuctra. The winners were hailed throughout Greece as champions of the oppressed. They carried their arms into Peloponnesus and at the head of a large coalition permanently crippled the power of Sparta. Similar expeditions were sent to Thessaly and Macedon to regulate the affairs of those regions.

However the predominance of Thebes was short-lived; the states which she protected refused to subject themselves permanently to her control, and the renewed rivalry of Athens, which had joined with Thebes in 395 in a common fear of Sparta, but since 387 had endeavoured to maintain the balance of power against her ally, prevented the formation of a Theban empire. With the death of Epaminondas at Mantinea in 362 the city sank again to the position of a secondary power. In a war with the neighbouring state of Phocis (356–346) it could not even maintain its predominance in central Greece, and by inviting Philip II of Macedon to crush the Phocians it extended that monarch's power within dangerous proximity to its frontiers. A revulsion of feeling was completed in 338 by the orator Demosthenes, who persuaded Thebes to join Athens in a final attempt to bar Philip's advance upon Attica. The Theban contingent lost the decisive battle of Chaeronea and along with it every hope of reassuming control over Greece. Philip was content to deprive Thebes of her dominion over Boeotia; but an unsuccessful revolt in 335 against his son Alexander was punished by Macedon and other Greek states by the severe sacking of the city, except, according to tradition, the house of the poet Pindar.

BOEOTIA, Thebes. Circa 395-338 BC. AR Stater (21mm, 11.98 gm). Boeotian shield / Amphora; magistrate AM-FI. Hepworth, "The 4th Century BC Magistrate Coinage of the Boiotian Confederacy," in Nomismatika Xronika (1998), 2; BMC Central Greece -. Fine.

Ex-Cng eAuction 105, Lot: 34 225/200

2 commentsecoli
233689_l.jpg
Boeotia, Thebes (Circa 379-368 BC)20 viewsAR Stater

22 mm, 11.44 g

Obverse: Boeotian shield

Reverse: Amphora; ΠO-ΘI (Pothi - magistrate) across field.

Hepworth 81; BCD Boiotia 515; HGC 4, 1331

Thebes was the largest city of the ancient region of Boeotia. It was a major rival of ancient Athens, and sided with the Persians during the 480 BC invasion under Xerxes and Sparta during the Peloponnesian war (431-404 BC). In 404 BC, they had urged the complete destruction of Athens; yet, in 403 BC, they secretly supported the restoration of its democracy in order to find in it a counterpoise against Sparta. A few years later, influenced perhaps in part by Persian gold, they formed the nucleus of the league against Sparta. The result of the war was disastrous to Thebes, and by 382 BC a Spartan force was occupying its citadel. Three years later, the Spartan garrison was expelled and a democratic constitution was set up in place of the traditional oligarchy. In the consequent wars with Sparta, the Theban army, trained and led by Epaminondas and Pelopidas, proved itself formidable. Years of desultory fighting, in which Thebes established its control over all Boeotia, culminated in 371 BC in a remarkable victory over the Spartans at Leuctra.
Nathan P
Hosidius_Geta~0.jpg
C. Hosidius C. f. Geta - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²65 BC
¹68 BC
diademed and draped bust of Diana, bow and quiver over shoulder
III VIR / GETA
attacked boar right, spear in shoulder, hound below
C HOSIDI C F
¹Crawford 407/2; Sydenham 903; Kestner 3317; BMCRR I Rome 3389; RSC I Hosidia 1, SRCV I 346
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,6g
ex Marc Walter

"Oineus, king of Kalydon in Aitolia, once had feasted the gods at an harvest festival but forgotten to butcher an animal for Artemis. The goddess was enraged and sent a big boar who wasted the fertile fields of the king. Oineus called for help and from all parts of Greece the heroes came to help him. There were the Curetes from Pleuron, the brothers of Althaia, the wife of Oineus. There were the Dioscurs Kastor and Polydeikes and their Messenian cousins Idas and Lynkeus. Theseus came from Athens, Iphikles, half-brother of Herakles, came from Thebens, Iason, Admetos, Peirithos, Peleus and Eurytion came from Thessalia, Telamon from Salamis, Amphiaraos from Argos, Ankaios and Atalante from Arcadia and much more. Herakles was prevented by his labours. On top of the heroes stood Meleagros, the son of Oineus and Althaia.
The hunt for the Calydonean boar ended very disastrous. Many heroes lost their lifes. Ankaios was the first killed by the boar. Peleus accidentally hit his father-in-law Eurytion with his spear. A second hunter too was killed by the boar.
The big catastrophe happened at the 6th day of the hunt. On this day Atalanta hit the boar with her arrow and Meleagros gave him the deathblow. Then he awarded head and skin of the boar to Atalante. But his uncles, brother of his mother Althaia, didn't tolerate that. They insisted on the rights of their clan. A dispute occured, they snatched the trophies from Atalante and then a fight began in which Meleagros slew his uncles. When Meleagros was born the fates predicted that he will live only as long as the log in the oven. Althaia pulled it out of the fire and hid it in a secret place. When she heard of the death of her brothers she enraged, got the log and threw it in the fire. When it was burnt Meleagros break down dead when he was dissecting the boar." - Jochen's Coins of mythological interest
Johny SYSEL
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CALABRIA, Tarentum185 viewsTaranto was founded in 706 BC by Dorian immigrants as the only Spartan colony, and its origin is peculiar: the founders were Partheniae, sons of unmarried Spartan women and perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta); these unions were decreed by the Spartans to increase the number of soldiers (only the citizens of Sparta could become soldiers) during the bloody Messenian Wars, but later they were nullified, and the sons were forced to leave. According to the legend Phalanthus, the Parthenian leader, went to Delphi to consult the oracle and received the puzzling answer that he should found a city where rain fell from a clear sky. After all attempts to capture a suitable place to found a colony failed, he became despondent, convinced that the oracle had told him something that was impossible, and was consoled by his wife. She laid his head in her lap and herself became disconsolate. When Phalanthus felt her tears splash onto his forehead he at last grasped the meaning of the oracle, for his wife's name meant clear sky. The harbour of Taranto in Apulia was nearby and he decided this must be the new home for the exiles. The Partheniae arrived and founded the city, naming it Taras after the son of the Greek sea god, Poseidon, and the local nymph Satyrion. A variation says Taras was founded in 707 BC by some Spartans, who, the sons of free women and enslaved fathers, were born during the Messenian War. According to other sources, Heracles founded the city. Another tradition indicates Taras himself as the founder of the city; the symbol of the Greek city (as well as of the modern city) is Taras riding a dolphin. Taranto increased its power, becoming a commercial power and a sovereign city of Magna Graecia, ruling over the Greek colonies in southern Italy.

In its beginning, Taranto was a monarchy, probably modelled on the one ruling over Sparta; according to Herodotus (iii 136), around 492 BC king Aristophilides ruled over the city. The expansion of Taranto was limited to the coast because of the resistance of the populations of inner Apulia. In 472 BC, Taranto signed an alliance with Rhegion, to counter the Messapii, Peuceti, and Lucanians (see Iapygian-Tarentine Wars), but the joint armies of the Tarentines and Rhegines were defeated near Kailìa (modern Ceglie), in what Herodotus claims to be the greatest slaughter of Greeks in his knowledge, with 3,000 Reggians and uncountable Tarentines killed. In 466 BC, Taranto was again defeated by the Iapyges; according to Aristotle, who praises its government, there were so many aristocrats killed that the democratic party was able to get the power, to remove the monarchy, inaugurate a democracy, and expel the Pythagoreans. Like Sparta, Tarentum was an aristocratic republic, but became democratic when the ancient nobility dwindled.

However, the rise of the democratic party did not weaken the bonds of Taranto and her mother-city Sparta. In fact, Taranto supported the Peloponnesian side against Athens in the Peloponnesian War, refused anchorage and water to Athens in 415 BC, and even sent ships to help the Peloponnesians, after the Athenian disaster in Sicily. On the other side, Athens supported the Messapians, in order to counter Taranto's power.

In 432 BC, after several years of war, Taranto signed a peace treaty with the Greek colony of Thurii; both cities contributed to the foundation of the colony of Heraclea, which rapidly fell under Taranto's control. In 367 BC Carthage and the Etruscans signed a pact to counter Taranto's power in southern Italy.

Under the rule of its greatest statesman, strategist and army commander-in-chief, the philosopher and mathematician Archytas, Taranto reached its peak power and wealth; it was the most important city of the Magna Graecia, the main commercial port of southern Italy, it produced and exported goods to and from motherland Greece and it had the biggest army and the largest fleet in southern Italy. However, with the death of Archytas in 347 BC, the city started a slow, but ineluctable decline; the first sign of the city's decreased power was its inability to field an army, since the Tarentines preferred to use their large wealth to hire mercenaries, rather than leave their lucrative trades.

In 343 BC Taranto appealed for aid against the barbarians to its mother city Sparta, in the face of aggression by the Brutian League. In 342 BC, Archidamus III, king of Sparta, arrived in Italy with an army and a fleet to fight the Lucanians and their allies. In 338 BC, during the Battle of Manduria, the Spartan and Tarentine armies were defeated in front of the walls of Manduria (nowadays in province of Taranto), and Archidamus was killed.

In 333 BC, still troubled by their Italic neighbours, the Tarentines called the Epirotic king Alexander Molossus to fight the Bruttii, Samnites, and Lucanians, but he was later (331 BC) defeated and killed in the battle of Pandosia (near Cosenza). In 320 BC, a peace treaty was signed between Taranto and the Samnites. In 304 BC, Taranto was attacked by the Lucanians and asked for the help of Agathocles tyrant of Syracuse, king of Sicily. Agathocles arrived in southern Italy and took control of Bruttium (present-day Calabria), but was later called back to Syracuse. In 303 BC-302 BC Cleonymus of Sparta established an alliance with Taranto against the Lucanians, and fought against them.

Arnold J. Toynbee, a classical scholar who taught at Oxford and other prestigious English universities and who did original and definitive work on Sparta (e.g. The Journal of Hellenic Studies, vol. xxxiii 1913 p. 246-275) seemed to have some doubts about Tarentum (Taranto) being of Spartan origin.

In his book The Study of History vol. iii p. 52 he wrote: "...Tarentum, which claimed a Spartan origin; but, even if this claim was in accordance with historical fact..." The tentative phrasing seems to imply that the evidence is neither conclusive or even establishes a high degree of probability of the truth that Tarentum (Taranto) was a Spartan colony.

CALABRIA, Tarentum. Circa 302-281 BC. AR Drachm (17mm, 2.91 gm). Helmeted head of Athena right, helmet decorated with Skylla hurling a stone / Owl standing right head facing, on olive branch; Vlasto 1058; SNG ANS 1312; HN Italy 1015. VF.

Ex-Cng eAuction 103 Lot 2 190/150
2 commentsecoli
Hyria.jpg
Campania, Hyrianoi. (Circa 405-400 BC)36 viewsFourrée Nomos (20.5mm, 6.33 g)

Obverse: Head of Athena wearing crested helmet decorated with olive-wreath and owl.

Reverse: Man-faced bull standing r. on exergual line, YDINA (retrograde) above. YDINA is in Oscan script and means "Urina", another name for Hyria.

For prototype, cf. HN Italy 539.

The city, named both Nola (new city) and Hyria (which Nola likely arose from), was situated in the midst of the plain lying to the east of Mount Vesuvius, 21 miles south of Capua. While Neapolis was the focus of minting in this general area, Neapolitan designs were adopted by several new series of coins, some of them bearing legends in Oscan script referring to communities that are otherwise unknown (such as the Hyrianoi). Complex die linking between these different series indicate, at the very least, close cooperation in minting. Didrachms sharing motives (Athena/man headed bull), but with legends referring to different issuing communities on the reverse, testify to the integration into a common material culture in Campania in the late fifth to early fourth century. The die sharing and use of legends in Oscan script allow for an interpretation of these issues as indigenous coinages struck in the Campanian mileu.

The influence of Athens on Hyria can be seen not only in the great number of Greek vases and other articles discovered at the old city but by the adoption of the head of Pallas with the Athenian owl as their obverse type.

This particular coin is an ancient forgery, which were quite common in Magna Graecia and typically of much higher quality than fourrees produced elsewhere. In ON THE FORGERIES OF PUBLIC MONEY [J. Y. Akerman
The Numismatic Chronicle and Journal of the Numismatic Society, Vol. 6 (APRIL, 1843–JANUARY, 1844), pp. 57-82] it is noted that ancient forgeries tend "to be most abundantly found to belong to the most luxurious, populous, and wealthy cities of Magna Graecia...Nor is it surprising that the luxury and vice of those celebrated cities should have led to crime; and among crimes, to the forging of money, as furnishing the means for the more easy gratification of those sensual indulgences, which were universally enjoyed by the rich in those dissipated and wealthy cities. Many of the coins of the places in question having been originally very thickly coated, or cased with silver (called by the French, fourrees), pass even now among collectors without suspicion."
1 commentsNathan P
Chalkis.JPG
Chalkis, Euboia75 views340-294 BC
AR Drachm (18mm, 3.46g)
O: Head of nymph Chalkis (or Hera?) right, hair rolled.
R: Eagle flying right, holding serpent in his talons and beak; trophy of arms below.
SNG Cop 432; Sear 2482
From the Wallace and BCD collections. ex Pegasi Numismatics

Chalkis was an important Ionian colony on the island of Euboia, and the homeland of many Greek colonies in Magna Graecia, including Cumae and Rhegium.
After the ruin of neighboring Eretria by Athens, Chalkis was left as the supreme power in the region. However Athens conquered Chalkis in 506 BC, establishing a settlement of 4000 Athenians on the island and leaving all of Euboea as a dependency. A rebellion in 446 was put down by Perikles of Athens, who sent more colonists to settle nearby Histiaea, establishing a firm control of this island which was so strategically important to the security of the mother city.
By 410 Euboea had once again regained its’ independence, but fell to the Macedonians under Phillip II, and then finally to Rome.
1 commentsEnodia
max pagan com.JPG
Civic Issue under Maximinus II 23 viewsAE 14.8 mm 1.33 grams 310-312 AD
1/4 Nummus
OBV :: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI. Zeus sitting left on throne holding scepter in left and glode in right hands
REV :: VICTOR-IA AVGG. Nike walking left holding wreath in right hand, palm in left. Delta in left , Epsilon in right fields
EX :: unknown
Minted in Antioch ?
Vagi 2955, Sear ( under Julian II) 4080
purchased 04/2008

Note: The Civic Issues of Antioch, Alexandria and Nicomedia were thought to have been produced by Julian II when RIC VI was written, therefore the entire series is missing. This series was produced during the period of Christian persecution by Maximinus II, Diocletian and Galerius and the Antioch issues portray important local statues: the Tyche erected by Eutychides (a pupil of Lysippus), the Apollo by Bryaxis of Athens and possibly the Zeus Nikephoros of the Temple of Apollo at Daphne which Antiochos IV commissioned for his great festival of 167 BC.

Historical information taken from Coinage of the Roman Empire, Vol II, p.516 by David Vagi
Johnny
civic issue.jpg
Civic Issue under Maximinus II49 viewsAnonymous Civic Issue during the time of Maximinus II, AE Quarter Follis, c.310-312, Antioch, Officina 10
GENIO AN_TIOCHENI
Tyche, turreted and veiled, seated facing on rock, river-god Orontes swimming in front
APOLLONI-SANCTO
Apollo standing facing, head left, patera in right hand, lyre in left
I in right field
SMA in exergue
16mm x 17mm, 1.65g
RIC VI, --; Vagi 2954
purchased 09/09/2007
Note: The Civic Issues of Antioch, Alexandria and Nicomedia were thought to have been produced by Julian II when RIC VI was written, therefore the entire series is missing. This series was produced during the period of Christian persecution by Maximinus II, Diocletian and Galerius and the Antioch issues portray important local statues: the Tyche erected by Eutychides (a pupil of Lysippus), the Apollo by Bryaxis of Athens and possibly the Zeus Nikephoros of the Temple of Apollo at Daphne which Antiochos IV commissioned for his great festival of 167 BC.

Historical information from Coinage of the Roman Empire, Vol II, p.516 by David Vagi
Johnny
Atheny~0.jpg
Countermark on Athens - AR tetradrachm 182 views431-393 BC
head of Athena right - almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll
owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent left
AΘE right
Phoenician contermark
bēth yōdh (yōdh~hand; bēth~house
(Type C), Sear 2526
RARE CONTERMARK
16,5 g 22 mm
Johny SYSEL
normal_Athens_Owl~0.jpg
Countermark on Athens Owl285 viewsAttica-Athens
Silver tetradrachm
449-414 B.C.
17g, 24mm, 45o
Interesting Countermark on reverse
1 commentskypros84
DUCHY ATHENS 1.jpg
CRUSADER - Duchy of Athens view #170 viewsDuchy of Athens, anonymous; made during reign of William I (1280-1287) or Guy II (1287-1308). Billon Denier.
Obv: Castle Tournois, "+DVX ATENES"
Rev.: Cross, "+THBANE CIVIS"
Thebes mint. Similar to Metcalfe 1040-1048, variety A4

This view is with no lighting effects. The condition is not the best!
Thanks (again!) to Manzikert for identification!
dpaul7
DUCHY ATHENS 2.jpg
CRUSADER - Duchy of Athens view #260 viewsDuchy of Athens, anonymous; made during reign of William I (1280-1287) or Guy II (1287-1308). Billon Denier.
Obv: Castle Tournois, "+DVX ATENES"
Rev.: Cross, "+THBANE CIVIS"
Thebes mint. Similar to Metcalfe 1040-1048, variety A4.

This view is with lighting effects to show the coin better. The condition is not the best!
Thanks (again!) to Manzikert for identification!
dpaul7
Athens_Gui_II_de_la_Roche.jpg
Crusaders, Athens, Frankish Greece, Guy I de La Roche, 1287-1308 Billon denier tournois 47 viewsCrusaders, Athens, Frankish Greece, Guy I de La Roche, 1287-1308 Billon denier tournois
20 mm 0.75 g.
Reverse : + . ThEBAHICIVIS. castle tournois , star below .
Obverse : + GVIDVXATENES , cross pattée
Metcalf 1077 type 2 . CCS 95 .
Ex Jacobowitz
Vladislav D
31493q00.jpg
Crusaders, Athens, Frankish Greece, William or Minority of Guy I de La Roche, 1280 - 1294 Billon denier tournois42 viewsCrusaders, Athens, Frankish Greece, William or Minority of Guy I de La Roche, 1280 - 1294 Billon denier tournois
0.812g, 18.8mm, 180o, obverse : + : G: DVX•ATENES, cross pattée, double annulet stops except pellet after DUX, square E's; reverse : + : ThEBE: CIVIS, castle tournois, double annulet stops, square E's;
CCS 86 ; Malloy Crusaders 86, Metcalf Crusaders Series A2 (A1 in first edition), Tzamalis GR 105
Ex Alex G. Malloy Ex A.J. Seltman Ex FORUM
Vladislavs D
Crusaders,_Athens,_Guy_II__of_La_Roche_(1287_-_1308),_GVI_DVX_ATENES,_ThEBANI_CIVIS,_Q-001,11h,_17-18,5mm,_0,68g-s.jpg
Crusaders, Athens, Guy II. de la Roche, (1287-1308), AR-denar, Athens, ᵞ✠ᵞThЄBΛNI:CIVIS, Châtel tournois, #1117 viewsCrusaders, Athens, Guy II. de la Roche, (1287-1308), AR-denar, Athens, ᵞ✠ᵞThЄBΛNI:CIVIS, Châtel tournois, #1
avers: :✠:GVI•DVX•ΛTЄNЄS, Cross pattée.
reverse: ᵞ✠ᵞThЄBΛNI:CIVIS, Châtel tournois.
diameter: 17,0-18,5mm, weight: 0,68g, axis: 11h,
mint: Athens, mint mark: ,
date:1287-1308 A.D., ref: Metcalf, Crusades, Malloy CCS 94var.,
Q-001
"Guy II de la Roche (1280 – 5 October 1308) was the Duke of Athens from 1287, the last duke of his family. He succeeded as a
minor on the death of his father, William I, at a time when the duchy of Athens had exceeded the Principality of Achaea in wealth,
power, and importance."
quadrans
Crusaders,_Athens,_William_I___de_la_Roche,_1280-1287_,_G_DVX_ATENES,_ThEBE_CIVIS,_Q-001,_6h,_18,5-19mm,_0,95g-s.jpg
Crusaders, Athens, William I. (Guy I.?) de la Roche, (1280-1287), AR-denar, Athens, :✠:ThЄBЄ֍CIVIS, Châtel tournois, #1125 viewsCrusaders, Athens, William I. (Guy I.?) de la Roche, (1280-1287), AR-denar, Athens, :✠:ThЄBЄ֍CIVIS, Châtel tournois, #1
avers: :✠:G•DVX֍ΛTЄNЄS, Cross pattée.
reverse: :✠:ThЄBЄ֍CIVIS, Châtel tournois.
diameter: 18,5-19,0mm, weight: 0,95g, axis: 6h,
mint: Athens, mint mark: ,
date:1280-1287 A.D., ref: Metcalf, Crusades, 271 - 274; Taf. 41., Malloy CCS 89c., Scarce variation !
Q-001
"William I. (Guy I.?) de la Roche (died 1287) succeeded his brother, John I, as Duke of Athens in 1280. He was the first official "duke" of Athens; previous dukes had actually been "lords.""
quadrans
37498_Delos,_Athenian_Cleruchy,_c__2nd_-_1st_Century_B_C_.jpg
Delos, Athenian Cleruchy, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C. AE 9, Owl on column13 viewsDelos, Athenian Cleruchy, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C. Bronze AE 9, Svoronos, Athens, plate 106, 39-40; BMC -; SNG Cop -, Fine, Delos mint, 1.175g, 9.7mm, 0o, obverse head right; reverse A [“Θ”] E, owl on column; rare. A cleruchy was a special type of colony developed by Athens. Unlike the colonies of other cities, the cleruchs kept Athenian citizenship. Using the cleruchy system, Athens kept population growth under control, while increasing its economic and military power. Besides Delos, other cleruchies were at Salamis, Chalkis, on Samos, and in Thracian Chersonese. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
crusaders_GuyIIathens_18mm_70g.jpg
Denier - Guy II de La Roche 1294-1308 AD19 viewsObverse
Cross
Lettering: GVI DVX ATENES
Translation: Grand Duke of Athens

Reverse
Castle Tournois
Lettering: THEBANI CIVIS
Translation: City of Thebes

18mm
.70g

Metcalf 1078
wileyc
Dikaia_Drachm_-_490_BC.jpg
Dikaia, Thrace Drachm -- 492-475 BC18 views3.17 g, 15.80 mm, 180°
Minted in Dikaia, Thrace
Silver Drachm
Schönert-Geiss Bisanthe 28 (V1/R1), SNG Cop 552 (Same Dies), Traité II 1795 (Different Dies, Selymbria)

Obverse: Head of Herakles Wearing Nemean Skin Headdress Right.
Reverse: Shallow Incuse Square Containing Rooster Standing Right Within Dotted, Square Border

Dikaia was located in Thrace, in the region between the river Nestos and the river Hebros. It was founded by settlers from Eretria. Dikaia has also been known as “Dikaia Beside Abdera” to differentiate it from Dikaia in Macedonia. Eponymous mythical founder was Dikaios, son of Poseidon. Coins from Dikaia circulated as far as Egypt in ancient times, a testament to its large commercial activities. Another testimony to this is the large sums it paid in taxes to Athens in the 5th century BC; combined with Abdera, this amount reached 75 talents each year. Mentions of the city in the works of Strabo, Skylac, and Pliny indicate that it survived until Roman times. Dikaia has now been identified as the small archaeological site of Katsamakia.
_______________________
A FORVM purchase of mine. Purchased primarily for the archaic style Head of Herakles on the obverse, I've come to love this coin among my favorites.
Hydro
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Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt.36 viewsBillon tetradrachm, Geissen 3243; Dattari 5624; Milne 4915; Curtis 1956; SNG Cop 994; BMC Alexandria p. 326, 2530; Kampmann -, VF, crowded flan cuts off right side of obverse legend, Alexandria mint, 7.290 grams, 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, 29 Aug 288 - 28 Aug 289 A.D.; obverse and#913; and#922; and#915; and#927;and#933;and#913;and#923; and#8710;and#921;and#927;and#922;and#923;and#919;and#932;and#921;and#913;and#925;and#927;C Cand#917;and#914;, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Alexandria standing left, turreted, head of Serapis in right, long scepter vertical in left, L - E (year 5) flanking across field, star right.

Ptolemy Soter integrated Egyptian religion with that of the Hellenic rulers by creating Serapis, a deity that would win the reverence of both groups. This was despite the curses of the Egyptian priests against the gods of previous foreign rulers (i.e Set who was lauded by the Hyksos). Alexander the Great had attempted to use Amun for this purpose, but Amum was more prominent in Upper Egypt, and not as popular in Lower Egypt, where the Greeks had stronger influence. The Greeks had little respect for animal-headed figures, and so an anthropomorphic statue was chosen as the idol, and proclaimed as the equivalent of the highly popular Apis. It was named Aser-hapi (i.e. Osiris-Apis), which became Serapis, and was said to be Osiris in full, rather than just his Ka (life force). Ptolemy`s efforts were successful - in time Serapis was held by the Egyptians in the highest reverence above all other deities, and he was adored in Athens and other Greek cities.


EX; FORVM Ancient Coins.

*With my sincere thank and appreciation , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.
Sam
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Duchy of Athens: Guy II de la Roche (1287-1308) BI Denier Tournois, Athens (CCS 93)7 viewsObv: ✠ ❜CVI•DVX✿ATNS❜, or various other stop marks; Cross pattée
Rev: ThBANI✿CIVIS, or variation; Castle tournois
Dim: 20 mm, 0.88 g

Requires MUFI-compatible fonts for proper rendering of legends
Quant.Geek
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DYNASTS OF LYCIA. Perikles (Circa 380-360 BC)18 viewsTetrobol. Uncertain mint, possibly Limyra.

18 mm, 2.80 g

Obv: Facing scalp of lion.
Rev: 𐊓𐊁𐊕-𐊆𐊋-𐊍𐊁 ("Perikle" in Lycian), Triskeles ("three legs" in Greek) within incuse circle.

Müseler VIII.47-51; SNG von Aulock 4254-5.

Lycia initially fought for the Persians in the Persian Wars, but on the defeat of the Achaemenid Empire by the Greeks, it became intermittently a free agent. After a brief membership in the Athenian Empire, it seceded and became independent (its treaty with Athens had omitted the usual non-secession clause), was under the Persians again, revolted again (the Revolt of the Satraps), was conquered by Mausolus of Caria, returned to the Persians, and went under Macedonian hegemony at the defeat of the Persians by Alexander the Great.

Pericles, who ruled from 380 BC to about 360 BC, was ruler during the Revolt of the Satraps. The Satraps’ revolt was a rebellion in the Achaemenid Empire of several satraps against the authority of the Great King Artaxerxes II Mnemon. During the Revolt of the Satraps, Pericles declared himself king of Lycia and drove out the Xanthian ruler Arttum̃para. Pericles is regarded as the last king of Lycia. After the revolt failed, the land once again reverted to the empire.

Struck during the reign of Pericles (Perikle), c. 380-361/2 BC, this issue may be connected to Perikles' conquests in Lycia and Caria and/or the satrapal revolt of 362/1. It was, however, struck in great haste and with little quality control: the vast majority of the surviving examples were struck from worn or broken dies and are often poorly centered on small flans.
Nathan P
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Early Classical Owl Dekadrachm, modern copy.327 viewsAR 43.7gms.
Athena in crested helmet, rt.
Owl with Spread Wings. A TH E Around
Stamped copy below.
Copy of Athens Dekadrachm S2516.
6 commentsDino
EB0022b_scaled.JPG
EB0022 Artemis / Club in Wreath8 viewsMacedonia under Roman Rule, AR Tetradrachm, 167-148 BC.
Obverse: Draped bust of Artemis right, wearing stephane, with bow and quiver over shoulder, all in tondo of Macedonian shield with stars in double circles around edge.
Reverse: MAKEΔONΩN ΠΡΩTHΣ above and beneath horizontal club, ΣIAYΡ monogram above, TKΡ and TYΡE monograms below, all within oak wreath, thunderbolt in outer left field.
References: BMC 7; AMNG III-1, 176; Athens 1237; Hunter 4; Walcher 947..
Diameter: 30mm, Weight: 17.02g.
EB
EB0037.JPG
EB0037 Athena / Owl6 viewsAttica, Athens. After 393 BC. AR Triobol.
Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Reverse: Owl standing facing between two olive-sprigs.
References: Cf. SNG Cop 68.
Diameter: 12.5mm, Weight: 2.016g.
EB
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EB0038 Athena / Owl9 viewsAthens Fourré Tetradrachm. Emergency Issue of 406/405 BC.
Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right (archaic eye).
Reverse: AΘE, owl standing right; olive-sprig and crescent above.
References: Svoronos 19; Starr pl.XXIII, 12.
Diameter: 25mm, Weight: 16.575g.
EB
EB0041b_scaled.JPG
EB0041 Athena / Owl22 viewsATTICA, Athens. AR Tetradrachm, ca 153-133 BC.
Obverse: Head of Athena right, wearing single-pendant earring and triple crested Attic helmet decorated with Pegasos and floral pattern.
Reverse: A-ΘE HΛI-EΠI OΔR-ΓENH ΣΩΣAN ΔPOΣ in five lines across fields, Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora, eagle on thunderbolt in left field, Λ on amphora.
References: -.
Diameter: 29mm, Weight: 16.535g.
1 commentsEB
EB0269b_scaled.JPG
EB0269 Athena / Owl2 viewsAthens, AE 15, 393-322 BC.
Obverse: Head of Athena right.
Reverse: Owl standing left in wreath.
References: Seaby 1002.
Diameter: 15mm, Weight: 3.842g.
EB
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EB0364 Mark Antony / Sol28 viewsMark Antony, AR Denarius, Athens mint, 38-37 BC.
Obv: M ANTONIVS M F M N AVGVR IM TER, Antony standing right, dressed as priest, veiled, wearing toga & holding a lituus.
Rev: III VIR R P C COS DESIG ITER ET TERT, radiate head of Sol right.
References: Syd. 1199.
Diameter: 18mm, Weight: 3.543 grams.
Note: Sold.
1 commentsEB
Egypt1a_img.jpg
Egypt, Athens Imitative, Silver tetradrachm164 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right, droopy eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and bent-back palmette, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves.
Rev:– ΑΘΕ, right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;
Minted in Egypt from . B.C. 420 - 380.
Reference:– cf. SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526 (Athens),

Ex- Forum Ancient Coins where they graded it VF. The metal did not fill the die completely on the obverse resulting in the rough flat high area near Athena's temple. A test cut on the reverse was filled with pitch in antiquity.

The silver is quite bright making it relatively tricky to photograph.

From the Harald Ulrik Sverdrup Collection. Ex CNG. From a small hoard of 5 Athenian and 4 Athenian imitative issues.

Comment provided by Forum -
"Athenian tetradrachms with this droopy eye and bent back palmette have been identified as Egyptian imitative issues because they are most frequently found in Egypt and rarely in Greece.

Early in his reign the Egyptian Pharaoh Hakor, who ruled from 393 to 380 B.C., revolted against his overlord, the Persian King Artaxerxes. In 390 B.C. Hakor joined a tripartite alliance with Athens and King Evagoras of Cyprus. Persian attacks on Egypt in 385 and 383 were repulsed by Egyptian soldiers and Greek mercenaries under the command of the Athenian general Chabrias. Perhaps these coins were struck to pay the general and his Greek mercenaries."

17.157g, 25.3mm, 270o
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Egypt_1a_img.jpg
Egypt, Athens Imitative, Silver tetradrachm34 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right, droopy eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and bent-back palmette, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves.
Rev:– ΑΘΕ, right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;
Minted in Egypt from . B.C. 420 - 380.
Reference:– cf. SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526 (Athens),

Ex- Forum Ancient Coins where they graded it VF. The metal did not fill the die completely on the obverse resulting in the rough flat high area near Athena's temple. A test cut on the reverse was filled with pitch in antiquity.

The silver is quite bright making it relatively tricky to photograph.

From the Harald Ulrik Sverdrup Collection. Ex CNG. From a small hoard of 5 Athenian and 4 Athenian imitative issues.

Comment provided by Forum -
"Athenian tetradrachms with this droopy eye and bent back palmette have been identified as Egyptian imitative issues because they are most frequently found in Egypt and rarely in Greece.

Early in his reign the Egyptian Pharaoh Hakor, who ruled from 393 to 380 B.C., revolted against his overlord, the Persian King Artaxerxes. In 390 B.C. Hakor joined a tripartite alliance with Athens and King Evagoras of Cyprus. Persian attacks on Egypt in 385 and 383 were repulsed by Egyptian soldiers and Greek mercenaries under the command of the Athenian general Chabrias. Perhaps these coins were struck to pay the general and his Greek mercenaries."

17.157g, 25.3mm, 270o

Updated image using new photography setup.
maridvnvm
60319LG.jpg
Elis, Olympia192 viewsOlympia (Greek: Ολυμπία Olympí'a or Ολύμπια Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. Both games were held every olympiad (i.e. every four years), the Olympic Games dating back possibly further than 776 BC. In 394 emperor Theodosius I, or possibly his grandson Theodosius II in 435, abolished them because they were reminiscent of paganism.

The sanctuary itself consists of an unordered arrangement of various buildings. To the north of the sanctuary can be found the prytaneion and the Philippeion, as well as the array of treasuries representing the various city states. The metroon lies to the south of these treasuries, with the Echo Stoa to the East. To the south of the sanctuary is the South Stoa and the Bouleuterion, whereas the West side houses the palaistra, the workshop of Pheidias, the Gymnasion and the Leonidaion. Enclosed within the temenos are the temples of Hera and Zeus, the Pelopion and the area of the altar, where the sacrifices were made. The hippodrome and later stadium were also to the East.

Olympia is also known for the gigantic ivory and gold statue of Zeus that used to stand there, sculpted by Pheidias, which was named one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World by Antipater of Sidon. Very close to the temple of Zeus (see photo of ruins below) which housed this statue, the studio of Pheidias was excavated in the 1950s. Evidence found there such as sculptor's tools, corroborates this opinion.

Excavation of the Olympia temple district and its surroundings began with a French expedition in 1829. German archaeologists continued the work in the latter part of the 19th century. The latter group uncovered, intact, the Hermes of Praxiteles statue, among other artifacts. In the middle of the 20th Century, the stadium where the running contests took place was excavated.

The Olympic flame of the modern-day Olympic Games is lit by reflection of sunlight in a parabolic mirror at the restored Olympia stadium and then transported by a torch to the place where the games are held.

When the modern Olympics came to Athens in 2004, the men's and women's shot put competition was held at the restored stadium.

The ancient ruins sits north of the Alfeios River and lies next to Cronius or Kronios hill (the hill of Kronos, or Saturn). Kladeos, a tributary of Alfeios, flows around the area.

The town has a school and a square (plateia). Tourism is popular throughout the late-20th century. The city has a train station and is the easternmost terminus of the line of Olympia-Pyrgos (Ilia). The train station which the freight yard is west of it is about 300 m east of the town centre.

It is linked by GR-74 and the new road was opened in the 1980s, the next stretch N and NE of Olympia will open in around 2005. Distance from Pyrgos is 20 km E(old: 21 km), about 50 km SW of Lampeia, W of Tripoli and Arcadia and 4 km north of Krestena and N of Kyparissia and Messenia. The highway passed north of the ancient ruins.

A reservoir is located 2 km southwest damming up the Alfeios river and has a road from Olympia and Krestena which in the late-1990s has been closed.

The area is hilly and mountainous, most of the area within Olympia is forested.

Elis, Olympia. After ca. 340/30-late 3rd century B.C. Æ unit (20 mm, 5.99 g). Laureate head of Zeus right / FA above, horse trotting right; [L]U below. BCD 339.3 (this coin). Near VF, dark brown patina.
Ex BCD Collection. Ex-John C Lavender G18
ecoli73
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Euboia, Hisiaia.13 viewsSear 2496, BCD Euboia 378-424, BMC 24 ff.

AR tetrobol, 12-13 mm, 3rd-2nd centuries B.C.

Obv: Wreathed head of nymph Histiaia with her hair rolled facing right.

Rev: ΙΣΤ--AIEΩN; nymph Histiaia seated right on stern of galley, wing on side of galley,control symbol(s), if any, below (off flan).

Histiaia, named after its patron nymph, commanded a strategic position overlooking the narrows leading to the North Euboian Gulf. In the Illiad, Homer describes the surrounding plain as “rich in vines.” In 480 B.C. the city was overrun by the Persians. After the Persian Wars it became a member of the Delian Confederacy. In 446 the Euboians revolted, seized an Athenian ship and murdered its crew. They were promptly reduced by Athens. Perikles exiled the population to Macedonia and replaced them with Athenians. The exiled population probably returned at the end of the Peloponnesian War in 404; thereafter they seem to have been largely under the control of Sparta until they joined the Second Athenian Confederacy in 376-375. The city appears to have become a member (for the first time) of the reconstituted league of Euboian cities in 340, but its allegiance during most of the 4th century seems to have vacillated between Athens and Macedonia. It was pro-Macedonian during the 3rd century, for which it was attacked in 208 and captured in 199 by a Roman-Pergamene force. The Roman garrison was removed in 194. To judge from the wide distribution of its coinage, Histiaia continued to prosper. Little is known of its later history, but finds at the site indicate it continued to be inhabited in Roman, Byzantine, and later times. (per NumisWiki)

The date of this extensive coinage is difficult to determine and is the subject of controversy. The bulk of it would appear to belong to the latter part of the third century B.C., and it may have commenced with the cessation of silver issues for the Euboian League circa 267 B.C. There are numerous imitations, of poor style and rough execution, which would seem to have been produced in Macedon just prior to the Roman victory over Perseus in 168 B.C. (per Sear)

Ref: Numismatik Lanz. Münzen von Euboia: Sammlung BCD. Auction 111 (November 25, 2002). Munich.
Stkp
athens_drachm_fouree.jpg
Fouree drachm, old style22 viewsAthens Greece 449 - 413 B.C. Old Style Fouree drachm. Fouree silver plated drachm, cf. SNG Cop 41 (official, Athens, c. 449 - 413 B.C.), F, test cut, 4.306g, 14.2mm, 270o, obverse head of Athena r., almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves & floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair across forehead in parallel curves; reverse , “AQE” right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, to left olive sprig and crescent, all within incuse square. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Gallienus_Syedra_JudgementOfAres_13_77g_28-29mm_LG.jpg
Gallienus, Syedra, judgement of Ares, AE2949 viewsGallienus, 253-268 AD, Syedra, Cilicia
29mm, 13.77g
Obv: AVT K ΠO ΛIK ΓAΛΛIHNOC CEB / IA; laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
Rev: CVEΔPEΩN, Ares, cuirassed and helmeted, standing left between Dike, standing to left, head right, and Hermes, standing to right, holding Kerykeion and wearing winged shoes, holding the arms of Ares
SNG PFPS VI 1239 (same dies)

ex Rutten & Wieland (seller's picture)

'CNG notes on a similar coin:

Ares slew Halirrhothios, son of Poseidon, for assaulting Ares' daughter, Alcippe. The site where Ares came before the gods for judgement, escorted by Dike (Justice) and the herald Hermes, became the Areopagus (Hill of Ares) in Athens, the location of the Athenian law courts. Ares was absolved of murder. It is unknown why this event had such import for Syedra, but the scene appears frequently on its 3rd century coinage.

In fact, as Johannes Nollé and Margret Karola pointed out*, it is known why Syedra issued coins with this scene: In late Hellenistic times the inhabitants of Syedra suffered from repeated assaults of pirates. In these dangerous times, the people of Synedra contacted the oracle of Klaros for help and received the advice to erect a statue of Ares bound by Hermes and being judged by Dike in their city. This statue would protect them against the assaults of the pirates. The base of the statue with the inscription of this action was found during the excavation of Syedra.

*Götter, Städte, Münzen: Kleinasiatische Münzen der Römischen Kaiserzeit, Begleitheft zu einer Ausstellung von Münzen der Pfälzer Provatsammlungen, Münzen 1994, o. 23 f.'
areich
Slab of the North Parthenon Frieze.jpg
Greece, Athens - Acropolis, Parthenon, Slab of the North Parthenon Frieze664 views
The Erectheum.jpg
Greece, Athens - Acropolis, The Erectheum851 views
nummuseum.jpg
Greece, Athens - Entrance to the Athens Numismatic Museum731 viewsThe former mansion of noted amateur archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann. What was inside those doors was truly marvelous.1 commentsmemphius
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Greece, Athens - Odeon of Herodes Atticus578 viewsBuilt in 161 AD1 commentsJohny SYSEL
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Greece, Athens - Parthenon476 viewsTemple of Athena built by Perikles.1 commentsJohny SYSEL
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Greece, Athens - Temple of Hephaestus and Athena Ergane528 viewsalso Theseion
Temple was used as church in christian times.
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
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Greece, Athens - Temple of Olympian Zeus321 viewscompleted by HadrianusJohny SYSEL
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Greece, Athens - The Gate of Schliemann's House - Athens237 viewsNot exactly an ancient site but as the home of the Greek Numismatic Museum it houses one of the great collections of ancient coins .... a must see on any visit to Athens.

This is photo is of one of the wrought iron gates of Schliemann’s Athenian mansion constructed in 1878/9. The swastika motif derives from his Trojan excavations and borders a design of winged sphinxes and acanthus leaves capped by an owl with spread wings.
Lloyd T
Temple_of_Olympian_Zeus.jpg
Greece, Athens - The Temple of Olympian Zeus 212 viewsLloyd T
13679867.jpg
Greece, Athens - Theatre of Dionysus312 views17000 spectratorsJohny SYSEL
13679031.jpg
Greece, Athens - tower of the Winds349 viewson the Roman agora,
built in 50 BC - maybe earlier
Johny SYSEL
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Greece, Athens, Acropolis, Parthenon, East Front of the Parthenon Restored and Dissected795 viewsJoe Sermarini
Northwest Corner of the Parthenon.jpg
Greece, Athens, Acropolis, Parthenon, North West Corner of the Parthenon790 views1 comments
Athens_3636.jpg
GREECE, Athens, Burial Monument of Dionysios of Kollitos.44 viewsBurial Monument of Dionysios of Kollitos at the first cemetery of Athens Kerameikos.Grant H
Athens_3483.jpg
Greece, Athens, Heinrich Schliemanns house.47 viewsReverse die of an Athenian Tetradrachm Heinrich Schliemanns house Grant H
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Greece, Athens, Heinrich Schliemanns house.46 viewsHeinrich Schliemanns coin cabinet at his family home,Athens Greece,where the national numismatic collection is housed.Grant H
Athens_3635.jpg
Greece, Athens, Kerameikos Ancient cemetery of Athens.48 viewsKerameikos Ancient cemetery of Athens, Mans best friend guarding his masters last resting place for twenty five hundred years.Grant H
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Greece, Athens, The Acropolis from the Pnyx.209 viewsThe Pnyx, the home of democracy is the sloping area in the foreground, while the Acropolis dominates the background. Here assembled the Athenian citizen body to hear the great Athenian masters of rhetoric and to cast their votes on the most momentous decisions in the history of ancient Athens. The speaker's platform cut from the rear bedrock face of the Pnyx is to be seen in the centre right. As seen here the remains of the Pynx date from its third and final phase of development in the mid-fourth century BC when it was greatly expanded to accommodate the growing citizen body.Lloyd
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Greece, Athens, The Approach to the Pynx from the Agora246 viewsThe home of democracy, the Pnyx was rebuilt and expanded in the 3rd quarter of the 4th century B.C., probably around 345-335 B.C. A massive, curved, retaining wall was built, as seen in this image. The steps of the old walkway from the Agora are visible and overbuilt by the retaining wall. Great Athenians such as Themistocles, Pericles and Socrates would have walked this path and steps in the heady days of the zenith Athenian democracy. 1 commentsLloyd
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Greece, Athens, The Parthenon50 viewsGrant H
Outer_Stone_Wall_of_the_Pnyx.JPG
Greece, Athens, The Pnyx - outer stone retaining wall.242 viewsThe home of democracy, the Pnyx was rebuilt and expanded in the 3rd quarter of the 4th century B.C., probably around 345-335 B.C. A massive, curved, retaining wall was built, as seen in this image. The steps of the old walkway from the Agora are visible and overbuilt by the retaining wall. Great Athenians such as Themistocles, Pericles and Socrates wolud have walked ths path and steps in the heady days of the zenith Athenian democracy. 1 commentsLloyd
Sounion.jpg
Greece, Cape Sounion - The Temple of Poseidon302 viewsAccording to legend, Cape Sounion is the spot where Aegeus, king of Athens, leapt to his death off the cliff, thus giving his name to the Aegean Sea.1 commentsLloyd T
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Greece, Delphi - Ionian column and treasure of Athens284 viewsJohny SYSEL
Athens_3368.jpg
Greece, Lavreotiki, Thorikos29 viewsThe washery, Thorikos
Level washery for concentrating lead ore. Situated next to the Ancient Theatre of Thorikos. Restored by the Belgian School of Athens.
Grant H
Athens_3338.jpg
Greece, Lavreotiki, Thorikos29 viewsAthenian silver mine.
Due to its proximity to the mines of Lavrion, Thorikos was the mining centre of the Lavreotika region. The site was inhabited from the Neolithic age (ca. 4500 BC) until the 1st century BC. The silver from here set the foundations of the city-state of Athens, making it possible to mint the city's famous silver “Owl” coin.
Grant H
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Greece, Lavreotiki, Thorikos34 viewsMetallurgy roadGrant H
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Greece, Lavreotiki, Thorikos41 viewsTheatre of Thorikos
Unique due to its shape which comprises an elongated layout with an oval orchestra, the theatre was built in the late 6th century BC and it is the earliest found so far in Greece. The theatre was excavated by the American School of Classical Studies in 1886.
Grant H
33488q00.jpg
Greek12 viewsAE16 Athens, Greece 3rd century B.C.
Ob. Helmeted head of Athena
Rev. Two confronting owls, heads facing, within wreath.
nathan s2
IMG_0815.JPG
GREEK Attica Athens22 viewsAttica, Athens Tetradrachm 420-415, AR 23.5mm., 17.14g. Head of Athena r., wearing crested helmet, earring and necklace; bowl ornamented with spiral and three olive leaves. Rev. ΑΘΕ Owl standing r., head facing; in upper field l., olive twig with two leaves and berry. All within incuse square. Svoronos Pl. XIII.
Naville Numismatics, Live Auction 8, 2014.
2 commentsDiogenes
Atenas-moeda1.jpg
GREEK, Athens 2nd cent. BC.23 viewsAR Tetradrachm of Athens 2nd cent. BC.

Weight: 16.3g
Ø 28mm

Obv: Head of Atena right.

Rev: Owl standing right, head facing, on club, in upper field A-QE, MIK-IWN, ...

gF/gVG

Sear 2553
Jorge C
120013.jpg
GREEK, Athens tetradrachm 449-404 BC148 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 449-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm (23mm, 17.01 g). Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive spray and crescent behind; all within incuse square. Dewing 1622; SNG Copenhagen 31. VF, light scratches on both sides, reverse banker's mark.2 commentssseverus
Athena Tetradrachm.jpg
GREEK, Athens, AR "New style" Tetradrachm, late hellenistic period103 viewsAverse: Helmeted head of Athena to right
Reverse: Owl perched on amphora, magistrate names
1 commentsOptimus
bpGS1H5Attica.jpg
GREEK, Athens, AR Tetradrachm, Barbarous Imitation107 viewsTetradrachm, 16.8 gm, 20 mm, 350-300 BC
Obv: Anepigraphic with head of Athena wearing crested helmet.
Rev: Owl standing right, head facing, (ΑΘΕ) to right; olive twig and crescent moon to left.
ex-Berk
Massanutten
Athens,_Attica.jpg
GREEK, Athens, Attica23 viewsDenomination: Tetradrachm
Date: After 393 BC
Weight: 16,85 g
Size: 21,01 mm
Condition: VF/VF
Obv: Head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet with frontal eye and wavy hair above, ornamented with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, wearing round earring, test cut on head.
Rev: AQE, owl standing right, head facing; olive-sprig and crescent above, test cut on neck.
Ref: Sear 2526-2528; SNG Copenhagen 63
Jorge C
atticajj3.jpg
Greek, Athens, Attica Tetradrachm53 viewsDate: 5th century BC.
Mint: Athens
Obverse: Head of Athena right, her helmet adorned in front with three olive-leaves, and at the back with a floral scroll.
Reverse: Incuse square, within which an owl right, head facing, olive-spray and small crescent moon behind, test cut at 17:00.
1 commentsXulodue
339a.jpg
Greek, Athens, Attica Tetradrachm59 viewsAttica, Athens. After 393 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.00 gm). Helmeted
head of Athena right / Owl standing right. SNG Copenhagen 63
1 commentsanthivs
bpGS1H2Attica.jpg
GREEK, Athens, Attica, AR Tetradrachm69 viewsTetradrachm, 16.8 gm, 20.5 mm, 325-275 BC, Sear (GC) 2547.
Obv: Anepigraphic with head of Athena, right, (wearing crested helmet ornamented with olive leaves and floral scroll).
Rev: Owl standing right, head facing, ΑΘΕ to right; olive twig and crescent moon to left; all within incuse square.
Comment: Careless and mis-shapen flans are common to this period.
Massanutten
2_bisTetradrachme_Athènes.jpg
Greek, Athens, Attica, Tetradrachm 211 views- Tétradrachme, Chouette, Athènes, 454-415 avant J.-C (Argent)
Avers : Tête d'Athéna à droite, coiffée du casque attique à cimier, orné de trois feuilles d'olivier et d'une palmette avec collier et boucles d'oreilles.
Revers : Chouette debout à droite, la tête de face ; derrière, une branche d'olivier et un croissant ; le tout dans les restes d'un carré creux.
Roger D2
86206p00.jpg
GREEK, Athens, Greece, Pi-Style III Tetradrachm, 353 - c. 340 B.C.51 viewsSH86206. Silver tetradrachm, Kroll Pi-Style p. 244, fig. 8; Flament p. 126, 3; SNG Cop 63; SNG Munchen 96; SNG Delepierre 1479; Svoronos Athens pl. 20: 2, Choice VF, well centered on a tight flan typical of the type, toned, bumps and marks, weight 17.153 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 270o, Athens mint, 353 - c. 340 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right with eye seen in true profile, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and pi-style floral scroll, pellet in ear; reverse owl standing right, head facing, pellet over eyes, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square1 commentsJoe Sermarini
Athen_tetra.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens136 viewsAttica, Athens. Tetradrachm.
Silver
16,88 g.
24 mm.
Ca. 460-404 f.Kr.
Ref: Kroll 8;SNG Copenhagen 31.
Ex: CNG.
3 commentsJan Terje R
152481LG~0.jpg
GREEK, ATTICA, Athens AR "New Style" Tetradrachm1840 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 168/5-50 BC. AR New Style Tetradrachm (30mm, 16.74 gm). Struck circa 136/5 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / A-QE, owl standing right on amphora; magistrates MI-KI and QEO-FRA; Nike in quadriga right in right field, M on amphora, SW below amphora; all within wreath. Cf. Thompson 315-323 (unlisted dies). EF, lightly toned.

Submitted by Ecoli
8 commentsecoli
bot6.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens AR "New Style" Tetradrachm535 views(135-134 BC). Mened-, Epigeno-, and Diod(o)-, magistrates.
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora; magistrates’ names in fields; to left, Asklepios standing left, holding serpent-entwined scepter; B on amphora, ΓΛ below; all within wreath.
Thompson 348f (same obv. die); SNG Copenhagen 240 (same obv. die).
6 commentsMinos
VA275-0083LG.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, "New style" Tetradrachm45 viewsTetradrachme 16,7g 32mm.Mened and Epigegeno magistrates.Attica Athen 167/6 BC
Thompson 348e
1 commentsKarsten K
Greece,_Attica,_Athens,_Silver,_Tetradrachm,_29mm,_16_73g,_122_BC.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, "New Style" Tetradrachm118 viewsGreece, Attica, Athens, 122 BC, Silver Tetradrachm, 29mm, 16.73g

mitresh
Athens_1b_img~0.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, 393 - 370 BC, AR Tetradrachm 407 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right with eye seen in true profile, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll
Rev:– owl standing right, head facing, to right AΘE in large lettering, to left olive sprig and crescent
Minted in Athens from . c. B.C. 393 - 370.
Reference:– Flamen p. 126, 1 (Pi I); Svoronos Athens plate 19, 17; SNG Cop -
ex-Forum

Transitional style tetradrachms include all of the wide spectrum of variants with the eye in profile issued after the classic "old style" almond eye tetradrachms but before the broad thinner flan "new style" tetradrachms. Recent research has classified variations of the transitional style - Pi Type, Quadridigité Style, Heterogeneous Style and sub-groups of the styles, and proposed chronologies for the different styles and groups.

This coin is the earliest transitional type, the first Pi style type, essentially identical to the "old style" with the exception of the eye in profile. The "Pi" designation is based on the P shape of the floral spiral and palmette ornamentation on the helmet bowl. The coin can be classified as Pi style, group 1. The floral ornament on examples this early do not yet resemble Pi.

16.699g, 13.1mm, 270o
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Athens_AR_Tetradrachm_440_-_430_BCE_50%.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, 440 - 430 BCE47 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 23.5mm, 17.02 gms, 10h

Obverse: head of Athena right, wearing earring of circular form and crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves along front edge, palmette on bowl, and spiral behind ear, her hair drawn across forehead in parallel curves.
Reverse: ΑΘΕ before owl standing right, head facing, in erect posture, the tail feathers represented as a single prong, olive sprig and lunar crescent in upper field to left, all within incuse square.

Kroll 8, SNG Copenhagen 31, Svoronos pl. 11, 6, Starr pl. xxii, 2, Sear GCTV 2526

Acquired: OTC, July 1991, Londinium - The Coin Store, North York, from the estate of a Toronto man who purchased the coin in the 1950's.
1 commentsScribonius Probus
Attica,_Athens,_Tetradrachm_449_BC_~0.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, 449-413 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Starr pl. xxii, 61179 viewsHead of Athena right, wearing helmet ornamented with vine scroll and laurel leaves.
Owl facing standing right, head facing, AΘE to right, olive sprig and crescent to left, all within incuse square.
Starr pl. xxii, 6; SNG Copenhagen 33; Sear 2526.
(22 mm, 17.18 g, 10h)
17 commentsLloyd T
Attica_Tetradrachm.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, 465-454 BC, AR Tetradrachm416 viewsObv. Head of Athena to right, wearing crested Attic helmet adorned with three olive leaves and palmette, round earring and pearl necklace.
Rev. Owl standing right with head facing, ΑΘΕ to right, crescent and olive sprig to left; all within incuse square.
Mint: Attica, Athens, ca. 465-454 BC.

17.10g, 24mm, 10h.

Starr Group V.B.

Ex Roma Numismatics, E-Sale 19, 1. August 2015, lot 95
9 commentskc
athens.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, AE1427 viewsAttica.Athens
AE 14mm

obv: head of Athena right
rev: two owls standing,heads facing all within olive wreath.
sear 2562
seaotter
00269Q00~0.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, AR Drachm circa 465-460 BC 4.35g109 viewsHead of Athena right,of archaic style,wearing round earring and close- fitting crested helmet with single volute ornament behind.Rev AOE Incuse square,within which owl right,behind,olive- spray with two leaves and berry.1 commentsGrant H
athensdrachma.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, AR Drachma, 454-404 B.C.65 viewsAttica, Athens AR Drachm. Circa 454-404 BC.
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square.
Kroll 10; SNG Copenhagen 41-43. 4.15g, 15mm, 10h.
chance v
OWL1.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, AR Tetradrachm 72 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll
Rev:– owl standing right, head facing, to right AΘE in large lettering, to left olive sprig and crescent
date: 449-413 BC,
mint: Minted in Athens, Diameter: 26mm, Weight: 17.1g
ref.:Sear 2526
Example of test cut to the nose area on Athena's bust, with a 'modern' repair to fill it in.
superflex
FotorCreated~2.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, AR Tetradrachm circa 440-430 BC26mm 17.14g 3h84 viewsHead of Athena to right with lots of creston helmet,wearing round earring and pearl necklace.Rev owl standing right with head facing olive sprig and crescent moon behind.Grant H
Tetra_owl.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, AR tetradrachm, 431-415 B.C.105 views Circa 431/415 BC
25,5mm / 17,16 grms ; die axis 9h
Obverse: "Archaic style" head of Athena, wearing crested helmet ornamented with olive leaves and floral scroll.
Reverse: ΑΘΕ / Owl, olive twig, and crescent moon.
S. #2526.
3 commentsmoneta romana
athensowl.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, AR tetradrachm, 454-404 B.C.49 viewsAttica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC.
Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl
Reverse: Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square.
Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 16.71g, 24mm, 11h.
chance v
13408_1-tile.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, AR Tetradrachm, 454-404 BC14 viewsTetradrachme 17,08g Athen Attica.Karsten K
Athen_AR-Tetradrachm-449-413_BC,_Sear_2526_23mm__17_19g-a.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, Athena and Owl359 viewsAttica, Athens, (449-413 B.C.), AR-Tetradrachm, Sear 2526, Athena and Owl,
Obv:– Head of Athena right, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll
Rev:– owl standing right, head facing, to right AΘE in large lettering, to left olive sprig and crescent
diameter: 23mm, weght: 17,19g , axis- h,
mint: Attica, Athens, date: 449-413 B.C., ref.:Sear 2526,
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans
obolo_atenas.JPG
GREEK, ATTICA, Athens, Obol16 viewsObolo de plata
449 - 420 a.C.
ANV: Atenea con casco acorazado
REV: Leyenda AQE, lechuza a derecha con rama de olivo y cuarto menguante

Originally uploaded by Pedro Jose D
*Alex
Greece,_Attica,_Athens,_Tetradrachm,_25_mm,_17_14g,_454-404_BC.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, Owl Tetradrachm57 viewsGreece, Attica, Athens, "Athenian Owl" Tetradrachm, 25 mm, 17.14g, 454-404 BC

Please also see the wonderful and comprehensive write up on the "Athenian Owl" at the link below:
http://athenianowlcoins.reidgold.com/
mitresh
Tetradracma_de_Atenas.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens, Tetradrachm46 viewsTetreadracma de plata
449 - 420 a.C.
ANV: Atenea con diadema acorazada
REV: Leyenda AQE, lechuza a derecha con rama de olivo y cuarto menguante
Pedro Jose D
athTetNico.JPG
GREEK, Attica, Athens, Tetradrachm 449-414 BC 148 viewsAttica, Athens AR Tetradrachm after 449 B.C. Obv-Helmeted head of Athena right. Rev-Owl standing, facing, with olive sprig and crescent behind. Nice even gray toning with superb high relief portrait. Struck 449-414 B.C.E. Super sharp detail . 17.00 g, Starr 22 ff.
4 commentsNico
2247LG bk.jpg
GREEK, Attica, Athens. After 449 BC. AR Obol (0.63 gm)71 viewsAttica, Athens.
After 449 BC.
AR Obol (0.63 gm).
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev.: Owl standing right; olive sprig above.
SNG Copenhagen 53.
Porous, good fine.
1 commentsJericho
Kroll_8~0.jpg
GREEK, ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm108 views(24mm, 17.20 g, 2h).
Helmeted head of Athena right, with frontal eye / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597. Good VF, toned. Attractive early style.

This tetradrachm belongs among the earlier period of the “frontal eye” issues of the mid-late 5th century. The palmette is still delicate, as is the general style of the owl, and the incuse is rather deep and abruptly transitions to the flat surface.
3 commentsLeo
AthensBarb.jpg
GREEK, Barbarous Copy of an Athenian Owl520 viewsTetradrachm with obverse head of Athena. Reverse has owl standing, right, with olive twig and crescent moon. Partial legend to right.
20 mm 16.8 gm
Some coins are like ugly kids. When they're yours, you love 'em!!
Massanutten
2 commentsMassanutten
Seleucid_Kingdom,_Seleukos_I_,_Tetradrachm,_Seleucia_on_Tigris_,_CSE_937_this_coin~0.jpg
GREEK, CSE 937 (this coin); CSE Plate 56, 937 (this coin)105 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Seleukeia on the Tigris

Head of Herakles right wearing lion skin headdress.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣEΛEYKOY Zeus Nikephoros seated left, NO in left field.

SC 119.3(a); HGC 9, 16f; ESM 23 (same dies A27-P79); CSE 937 (this coin); CSE 2, 58 (AHNS 1047).
Seleukeia on the Tigris mint ca. 300-296 BC.

(25 mm, 16.91 g, 12h).
ex-William K. Raymond Collection; ex- Arthur Houghton Collection.

Some time in the last five years of the fourth century BC the mint at Seleukeia on the Tigris opened to issue coinage in the name of Seleukos. Initial issues maintained the Zeus Aëtophoros (eagle) reverse image. However, shortly thereafter, the Zeus Nikephoros (Nike) image was introduced in parallel with the Aëtophoros image. The Nikephoros reverse was a direct allusion to Seleukos victory over Antigonos at Ipsos in 301 BC. This is one of three known examples of SC 119.3(a). The others are ESM 23 in the Danish national collection Copenhagen and CSE 2, 58 (AHNS 1047). Seleucid Coins lists another from the Tricala 1979 hoard (CH IX, 000) in the Athens Numismatic Museum, but this is in fact an example of ESM 24 (Zeus Aëtophoros) that was incorrectly catalogued as ESM 23 by Oeconomides - refer Oeconomides Pl. 66, 109. All noted examples are from the same obverse die. The obverse of this coin is a die match to that of a Zeus Aëtophoros issue with identical NO primary control which is now found in the Berlin collection (ESM 24; Newell Pl V, 4).
n.igma
Egypt1a_img~0.jpg
GREEK, Egypt, 420 - 380 BC, AR Tetradrachm (Athens owl imitative)273 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right, droopy eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and bent-back palmette, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves.
Rev:– AΘE, right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;
Minted in Egypt from . B.C. 420 - 380.
Reference:– cf. SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526 (Athens),
ex-Forum. From the Harald Ulrik Sverdrup Collection. Ex CNG. From a small hoard of 5 Athenian and 4 Athenian imitative issues.

Athenian tetradrachms with this droopy eye and bent back palmette have been identified as Egyptian imitative issues because they are most frequently found in Egypt and rarely in Greece.

Early in his reign the Egyptian Pharaoh Hakor, who ruled from 393 to 380 B.C., revolted against his overlord, the Persian King Artaxerxes. In 390 B.C. Hakor joined a tripartite alliance with Athens and King Evagoras of Cyprus. Persian attacks on Egypt in 385 and 383 were repulsed by Egyptian soldiers and Greek mercenaries under the command of the Athenian general Chabrias. Perhaps these coins were struck to pay the general and his Greek mercenaries.

The metal did not fill the die completley on the obverse resulting in the rough flat high area near Athena's temple. A test cut on the reverse was filled with pitch in antiquity.

17.157g, 25.3mm, 270o
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Greece,_Mysia,_Pergamum,_Cistophoric_Tetradrachm,_12_57g,_28mm,_166-67_BC,_issued_76_BC.jpg
GREEK, Mysia, Pergamon, Cistophoric Tetradrachm81 viewsGreece, Mysia, Pergamon, Cistophoric Tetradrachm, 12.57g, 28mm, 166-67 BC, issued 76 BC

Obv: Cista Mystica containing serpent escaping, all within an ivy wreath.

Rev: Bow case between 2 serpents. Pergamon monogram at left. Snake entwined Asklepian staff at right. "AP" above.

Near the West coast of present day Turkey, Pergamon, in the province of Mysia, was an insignificant city under the Persian empire. After Alexander the Great died, his bodyguard "Lysimachus" was given Thrace and north western Asia. After the battle of Ipsus "Lysimachus" secured Alexander's treasury worth over 25,000 talents. Pergamon was located in a natural fortress and "Lysimachus" strengthened the city and deposited his Asian treasure (9000 talents) in the city along with a military guard under his loyal follower "Philetaerus". "Lysimachus" died in 281 BC and Pergamon officially fell under Seulcid control. "Philetaerus" played the part of a faithful governor, but all the time he used the money to strengthen the city's defenses and founded the Attalid dynasty of the kingdom of "Pergamon". The kingdom successfully withstood attempts by Seulicid rulers to regain control. In 190 BC, Pergamon assisted the Romans to defeat Antiochus III of Syria. At this time, Rome had no territorial desires in Asia and they gave all the territories to Pergamon. Pergamon prospered and soon ranked as one of the major Greek cultural centers. Pergamon's library ranked second only to the library of Alexandria. But, to Rome's surprize the Pergamon King Attalus III (138 - 133 BC) gave the kingdom to Rome upon his death in 133 BC. During the confusion a certain "Aristonicus" seized the throne and changed his name to "Eumenes III". This forced the Romans to intervene and they seized the kingdom and made it the capital of the Roman province of Asia.

Pergamon first issued this coin under Eumenes II, who likely required a new currency after the treaty with Apameia in 188 BC expanded his economic and political territory. The new coinage is the first time a king’s portrait and name are omitted from Hellenistic currency. The cistophori (basket bearers) were the chief currency in Asia Minor for about 300 years. Originally introduced by king Eumenes II of Pergamon around 166 BCE, the obverse of these coins shows a cista mystica, i.e., a woven basket containing the sacred objects of a mystery cult. In the case of the cistophori, the basket contains snakes associated with the worship of Dionysus (Bacchus), the Greek god of wine and ecstasy. In the Dionysian mysteries a serpent, representing the god, was carried in a box called a cista on a bed of vine leaves. This may be the Cista mentioned by Clement of Alexandria which was exhibited as containing the phallus of Dionysus. The depiction on this famous type is what gives the coin its name - the Cistophorus. It was one of the most widely minted coin types in the ancient world. It seems that the Asian Greek states in what is now Turkey minted this coin in unison from around 150 BC. Some scholars believe this was undertaken for the common good, so traders could be confident in a coin of uniform weight and value, representing the collective wealth of Asian Greekdom.

The ivy wreath and the thyrsos staff on the reverse are also references to this god whom the Attalid kings of Pergamon claimed as their ancestor. The bow case (gorytos) on the reverse points to Herakles, the father of Telephos, the legendary founder and first king of Pergamon. Taken together, the obverse and reverse scenes appear to capture allegorical acts one and two of the Dionysian Cista fertility mythology in progress.

When the last Attalid king, Attalos III, died in 133 BCE, he left his entire kingdom to the Roman people. At the same time, his last will declared Pergamon and the other important cities of his realm "free cities", which meant that they did not have to pay tribute to Rome. Not surprisingly, Pergamon and the other cities continued to mint cistophori in grateful tribute to their former ruler. The city of Pergamum continued issue of cistophoric tetradrachm for eight decades after the city was willed to Rome in 133 BC.

1 cistophor equaled 3 Attic drachms, the currency of Athens, which had become the world's key currency during the campaigns of Alexander the Great. Later, 1 cistophor was equivalent to 3 Roman denarii. Because they were so easy to convert into the key currencies, 16 Anatolian towns soon minted cistophors, forming a kind of monetary union. When Pergamum became Roman about 133 BC, the Romans continued to mint cistophors.

Under the Attalids, Pergamon was not only the capital of an empire that soon stretched over most of Asia Minor, but also the seat of the second most famous library of the ancient world with more than 200,000 book rolls. When the kings of Egypt, the Ptolemies, whose capital, Alexandria, boasted the only comparable library, cut off Pergamene access to papyrus, the most important writing material, the Pergamenes invented pergamentum, i.e., parchment or vellum made from animal skins.

Today, the city is called Bergama and belongs to Turkey.
mitresh
Vlasto_1099~0.JPG
Greek, Ravel; Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Tarentine Coins formed by M. P. Vlasto - #1099104 viewsTaras, Calabria (Plate Coin)
302 - 281 BC (Period VI)
AR Drachm (16mm, 3.09g, 3h)
Nikokrates, magistrate.
O: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with Skylla throwing stone.
R: Owl with closed wings standing right on Ionic capital, head facing; [NIKO]KPAT[HΣ] to left, TA to right.
Vlasto 1099 (this coin); HN Italy 1052
From the M.P. Vlasto Collection. ex CNG

“Michel P. Vlasto was born in Athens on the 1st February 1874 and Studied in Marseilles.
… He was a born artist and very good at drawing. His artistic feeling made him a real worshipper of Greek art; everything beautiful charmed him; if he could have done so a museum would have been his home. The real pleasure he felt in admiring a beautiful work of Greek art was so intense that he used to say he could not imagine life without Art and that beauty and Happiness went together. As a result he could not feel happy unless he was surrounded by Beauty. The room where he used to spend most of his leisure was a kind of temple in which a few perfect specimens of Greek art were the idols he worshipped in a real religious way.
… But all these splendid surroundings were only the frame of the world famous collection of Tarentine coins which represented his chief interest in life and really his sole hobby. But he did not limit himself to collecting coins as most collectors do; he was a real self-made scholar; his knowledge of Tarentine numismatic was complete; there was not a single coin in a public or private cabinet which he did not know, and nothing was said or written about Tarentum, its history and its art which escaped him. He published several contributions to numismatics and many of his books are famous.”
~ Oscar E. Ravel (Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Tarentine Coins formed by M. P. Vlasto - 1947)
1 commentsEnodia
Aigospotamoi_AE20~0.jpg
GREEK, Thrace, Aigospotamoi, ca. 300 BC, Æ 20 114 viewsHead of Demeter left wearing stephane decorated with a laurel wreath and vine.
AIΓΟΣΠΟ Goat standing left, eight-rayed star beneath.
BMC Thrace, p. 187, 2 var. (star); SNG Copenhagen 850 var. (star).
(20 mm, 7.76 g, 12h).
Unique with the star symbol beneath goat and amongst the finest examples known of the single coinage emission from Aigospotamai.

Aigospotamoi (Goat Streams) is the site of two small rivulets flowing across a small plain from the hinterland of Gallipoli peninsula into the southwestern corner of the Sea of Marmara (the ancient Propontis) at its junction with the northern mouth of the Hellespont, a few kilometres to the northeast of the modern day township of Gallipoli (Gelibolu). In late summer of 405 BC it was the site of a naval engagement between the Peloponnesian and Athenian fleets. The Peloponnesian fleet lead by the brilliant Spartan general Lysander destroyed the Athenian fleet. The destruction of the Athenian navy at Aigospotamoi enabled the Peloponnesians to place a stranglehold on the Black Sea grain trade to Athens. The resultant starvation of the city brought to an end the 27 year long Peloponnesian War within six months.
5 commentsLloyd T
newstyle5.jpg
GREEK. 33 viewsAR tetradrachm. Athens (Attica) 113-112 BC. 16,7 grs. 12h. Helmeted head of Athena right / A-ΘE Owl standing right on amphora. To right Triptolemos in chariot drawn by serpents. Magistrates EYM-APEI-ΔHS, KΛEO-MEN, and AΣK in left field. Retrograde Z on amphora, Σ Φ below,all within wreath.
Thompson 678a. Svoronos pl. 53, 3.

benito
owl,_van_alfen_8.jpg
Greek: Athens Owl, Van Alfen 0838 viewsAttica, Athens, AR Tetradrachm. 393-300 B.C.. (20.6 mm, 17.12 grams). Obverse: Head of Athena right, eye in profile, banker's marks. Reverse: Owl standing to right, head facing, to right AOE, A-theta-E, to left, olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square, banker's marks. . Ex David Hendin. Van Alfen, Peter. American Journal of Numismatics, second series, volume 16-17, number 8, this coin.

This was part of a hoard David Hendin let Peter Van Alfen used for his article cited above. This example (as coins 14, 34, 37, 51 and 74 in Van Alfen's article cited above) bear the so-called quatrefoil countermark, a countermark found extensively on coins circulating in Egypt in the late fourth century. This mark might have been used by the Persian administration there at the time. (Van Alfen 2002b: 67-69)

Lucas H
va16.jpg
Greek: Athens Owl, Van Alfen 1640 viewsAthens. 4th Century B.C.. Athenian tetradrachm. (17.04g (17.06g weight published in article), 21.7mm, 9h). Obverse: Head of Athena right, eye in profile, test cut. Reverse: Owl standing right, head facing , to right AO[E], olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square, two test cuts. Van Alfen, AJN, 16-17, 16, this coin. Ex Amphora.
1 commentsLucas H
owl,_van_alfen_74.jpg
Greek: Athens Owl, Van Alfen 7445 viewsAthens. 4th Century B.C.. Easter style Athenian tetradrachm. 15.71 g. Obverse: Head of Athena right, eye in profile, banker's marks. Reverse: Owl standing right, head facing , to right AOE, olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square, banker's marks. Van Alfen, AJN, 16-17, 74, this coin. Ex Amphora.1 commentsLucas H
Owl~0.jpg
Greek: Athens Tetradrachm29 viewsAthens, AR Tetradrachm. c. 393-300 BC. (16.9 g., 24mm). Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right (eye triangular, seen in perspective). Test cut. Reverse: AOE, Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent behind, all within incuse square. Test cut. Cf: Sear Greek 2537.

This example of a Fourth Century (probably late Fourth Century) Owl is well centered on a tight flan. This type is alternatively described as Intermediate Style, Late Classical, Hellenistic, or Transitional. Less storied and more common than a Fifth Century Owl with Athena's almond shapped eye, I like this example.
Lucas H
AthensCountermarkTet.jpg
Heavily Countermarked Classical (Old-Style), c. 454 - 404 B.C. Athens Owl Tetradrachm75 views3 commentsNemonater
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Histiaia, Euboia25 viewsThe history of the island of Euboea is largely that of its two principal cities, Chalcis and Eretria, both mentioned in the Catalogue of Ships. Both cities were settled by Ionian Greeks from Attica, and would eventually settle numerous colonies in Magna Graecia and Sicily, such as Cumae and Rhegium, and on the coast of Macedonia. This opened new trade routes to the Greeks, and extended the reach of western civilization. The commercial influence of these city-states is evident in the fact that the Euboic scale of weights and measures was used among the Ionic cities generally, and in Athens until the end of the 7th century BC, during the time of Solon.[citation needed] The classicist Barry B. Powell has proposed that Euboea may have been where the Greek alphabet was first employed, c. 775-750 BC, and that Homer may have spent part of his life on the island.

Chalcis and Eretria were rival cities, and appear to have been equally powerful for a while. One of the earliest major military conflicts in Greek history took place between them, known as the Lelantine War, in which many other Greek city-states also took part. In 490 BC, Eretria was utterly ruined and its inhabitants were transported to Persia[clarification needed]. Though it was restored nearby its original site after the Battle of Marathon, the city never regained its former eminence.

Both cities gradually lost influence to Athens, which saw Euboea as a strategic territory. Euboea was an important source of grain and cattle, and controlling the island meant Athens could prevent invasion and better protect its trade routes from piracy.

Athens invaded Chalcis in 506 BC and settled 4,000 Attic Greeks on their lands. After this conflict, the whole of the island was gradually reduced to an Athenian dependency. Another struggle between Euboea and Athens broke out in 446. Led by Pericles, the Athenians subdued the revolt, and captured Histiaea in the north of the island for their own settlement.

By 410 BC, the island succeeded in regaining its independence. Euboea participated in Greek affairs until falling under the control of Philip II of Macedon after the Battle of Chaeronea in 338 BC, and eventually being incorporated into the Roman Republic in the second century BC. Aristotle died on the island in 322 BC soon after fleeing Athens for his mother's family estate in Chalcis.

Tetrobol, 275-225 BC, Sear (GC) 2496
Obv: Anepigraphic. Head of the nymph, Histiaia, right, wearing wreath of vine and hair rolled.
Rev: ΙΣΤΙΑΙΕΩΝ
The nymph Histiaia seated right on stern of galley and holding naval standard.

Ebay
ecoli
magnesia_ant_pius_unpublished.jpg
Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum, Antoninus Pius, unpublished39 viewsAntoninus Pius, AD 138-161
AE 34, 26.53g
struck under grammateus L. Dioskurides Gratos Metr.
obv. [T AI]LIOC KAICAR - ANTWNEINO[C]
Head, laureate, r.
rev. EPI DIOCKOVRID[OV] GR - MAG - NHTWN
Themistokles, nude to hips, std. l. on throne with lion's-feet, l. hand at parazonium hanging at his
l. side, with r. hand holding an oval shield inscribed by .EM/.AN/OC in three lines set on cippus;
re behind him a horse stg. r., head turned l.
cf. Schultz 100 (obv. only, same die), unpublished

This coin was very difficult to interprete. Because of the depiction of the male figure, nude, with parazonium,
very tall upper part of the body, the suggestion tends to Themistokles. There is another rare type of him
sacrificing before an altar, where he is depicted similarily. Themistokles is the famous heroe of Salamis who
after an ostrakismos had to flee from Athens. His former enemy the Persian king Artaxerxes I accommodated
him and made him satrap of Lampsakos and Magnesis ad Maeandrum due to his merits at Salamis.
Jochen
3340093.jpg
IONIA, Phokaia.38 viewsThe ancient Greek geographer Pausanias says that Phocaea was founded by Phocians under Athenian leadership, on land given to them by the Aeolian Cymaeans, and that they were admitted into the Ionian League after accepting as kings the line of Codrus. Pottery remains indicate Aeolian presence as late as the 9th century BC, and Ionian presence as early as the end of the 9th century BC. From this an approximate date of settlement for Phocaea can be inferred.

According to Herodotus the Phocaeans were the first Greeks to make long sea-voyages, having discovered the coasts of the Adriatic, Tyrrhenia and Spain. Herodotus relates that they so impressed Arganthonios, king of Tartessus in Spain, that he invited them to settle there, and, when they declined, gave them a great sum of money to build a wall around their city.

Their sea travel was extensive. To the south they probably conducted trade with the Greek colony of Naucratis in Egypt, which was the colony of their fellow Ionian city Miletus. To the north, they probably helped settle Amisos (Samsun) on the Black Sea, and Lampsacus at the north end of the Hellespont (now the Dardanelles). However Phocaea's major colonies were to the west. These included Alalia in Corsica, Emporiae and Rhoda in Spain, and especially Massalia (Marseille) in France.

Phocaea remained independent until the reign of the Lydian king Croesus (circa 560–545 BC), when they, along with the rest of mainland Ionia, first, fell under Lydian control[8] and then, along with Lydia (who had allied itself with Sparta) were conquered by Cyrus the Great of Persia in 546 BC, in one of the opening skirmishes of the great Greco-Persian conflict.

Rather than submit to Persian rule, the Phocaeans abandoned their city. Some may have fled to Chios, others to their colonies on Corsica and elsewhere in the Mediterranean, with some eventually returning to Phocaea. Many however became the founders of Elea, around 540 BC.

In 500 BC, Phocaea joined the Ionian Revolt against Persia. Indicative of its naval prowess, Dionysius, a Phocaean was chosen to command the Ionian fleet at the decisive Battle of Lade, in 494 BC. However, indicative of its declining fortunes, Phocaea was only able to contribute three ships, out of a total of "three hundred and fifty three". The Ionian fleet was defeated and the revolt ended shortly thereafter.

After the defeat of Xerxes I by the Greeks in 480 BC and the subsequent rise of Athenian power, Phocaea joined the Delian League, paying tribute to Athens of two talents. In 412 BC, during the Peloponnesian War, with the help of Sparta, Phocaea rebelled along with the rest of Ionia. The Peace of Antalcidas, which ended the Corinthian War, returned nominal control to Persia in 387 BC.

In 343 BC, the Phocaeans unsuccessfully laid siege to Kydonia on the island of Crete.

During the Hellenistic period it fell under Seleucid, then Attalid rule. In the Roman period, the town was a manufacturing center for ceramic vessels, including the late Roman Phocaean red slip.

It was later under the control of Benedetto Zaccaria, the Genoan ambassador to Byzantium, who received the town as a hereditary lordship; Zaccaria and his descendants amassed a considerable fortune from his properties there, especially the rich alum mines. It remained a Genoese colony until it was taken by the Turks in 1455. It is a titular see of the Roman Catholic Church.

IONIA, Phokaia. Circa 521-478 BC. AR Hemidrachm (9mm, 1.54 g). Head of griffin left / Quadripartite incuse square. SNG Copenhagen –; SNG von Aulock 2116; SNG Kayhan 512-6. VF, dark toning.
ecoli
IMG_5862.JPG
Island off Attica. AEGINA AR Stater.85 viewsCirca 456/45-431 B.C. (12.23gm, 21mm). Obverse: land tortoise with segmented shell. Reverse: large incuse square of heavy skew pattern. Milbank pl.2, 12; SNG Copenhagen 516; Dewing 1683; BMC Attica p. 137, 146; HGC 6, 437. Near EF, attractive light cabinet tone. Very desirable example of the type.

Ex Roma Numismatics (featured as a cover for e-Auction 57). Ex Shanna Schmidt Numismatics. Ex Munzenhandlung Harald Moller, Auction 72, 1 November 2018, lot 20.

Early commerce within the Aegean area include metal ingots used in trade. They had a distinctive plano-convex shape and were colloquially called "turtles" especially in Aegina. With the development of the concept of money, it is natural for the maritime island-state to design their coins with an image of a turtle since they had already been accustomed by the earlier ingots whose shape resembled the animal. Aegina was considered the first state to introduce money to the West that was first invented in either Ionia or Lydia. As maritime power, it rivaled Athens. Early obverse designs always feature a sea turtle. Why the inclusion of a land tortoise (testudo graeca) beginning in the middle of the 5th century B.C. is still unresolved. Few theories had been put forward: the most common was Aegina's defeat from its rival Athens, and the land tortoise symbolized sovereignty of Athens over Aegina.
6 commentsJason T
Thasos.jpg
ISLAND OFF THRACE. Thasos62 viewsCirca 480-463 B.C. AR Stater (21mm, 8.80gm). Le Rider, Thassienes 5; HPM pl. X, 12; HGC 6, 331; SNG Copenhagen 1010-2. Obverse: Ithyphallic satyr advancing right, carrying off protesting nymph. Reverse: quadripartite incuse square. VF, toned.

Ex CNG

The motif of the satyr abducting a maenad appears on several northern Greek coins. In the case of Thasos, an island just off the coast of Thrace in northern Greece, this Dionysiac motif serves to promote the island's famous wine. Satyrs belong to the retinue of Dionysos, the god of wine. They are only interested in drinking wine and having sex, usually with the maenads, the female followers of Dionysos. Satyrs are commonly represented as half-man, half-horse or goat, often with a horse tail and pointy horse ears. On the obverse of this coin, however, the satyr has mostly human traits, except for his goat legs. In addition, his bestial nature is made clear by means of his nudity (which visibly contrasts with the maenad's modest chiton), his obvious sexual arousal, and the fact that he is trying to abduct a maenad against her will, as evidenced by raising her right arm in protest (and about to slap her abductor!). The overtly sexual displays seen on many early Greek coins can be disconcerting to the modern eye, viewing them through the lens of centuries of Christian fulminations against ‘paganism’ and its erotic excesses. These scenes are at their most graphic in northern Greece, for example, on the archaic coins of Lete and the island of Thasos, showing the interplay of nymphs and satyrs. The towns and tribes of this region were only newly introduced to the ‘civilizing’ influences of the south, and were still close to their roots in farming and herding cultures. Their gods were not the Olympian super beings, but the spirits of nature, and the emphasis was on celebrating the fecundity of fields and flocks. Thasos gained its enormous wealth by virtue of its local silver mines as well as mines it controlled on the Thracian mainland opposite the island city-state. According to Herodotos (VI, 46), the city derived 200-300 talents annually from her exploitation of this mineral wealth. Such source of the sought-after white metal attracted foreign interest on the mines. The famous of these was when Athens attacked Thasos, ironically one of its members in the Delian League, in 465 B.C. with a single purpose in taking control of these mines. Additionally, Thasos gained much material wealth as a producer and exporter of high quality wines, which was tightly regulated by the government, and it was perhaps due to this trade in wine that her coinage spread throughout the Aegean making it a widely recognized and accepted coinage in distant lands.

2 commentsJason T
MISC_Venice_Tornesello_Venier.JPG
Italian States. Venice. Republic.65 viewsStahl 14-17, CNI VII, p. 112 48-57, Papadopoli, p. 321 7.

Billon tornesselo, 16 mm., struck 1382-1400 under Doge Antonio Venier (October 21, 1382 – November 23, 1400).

Obv: + • ANTO’ • VENERIO DVX [retrograde Ns], central cross pattée.

Rev: + • VEXILIFER VENETIA[L or R] [retrograde Ns], winged lion of St. Mark, seated facing, holding a book.

Note: As far as can be ascertained from the portions of the legend that are legible, this coin is a variant that is not recorded in the CNI. Of the ten variants recorded there, only two (Nos. 56 and 57 have retrograde Ns (with No. 56 ending in an L and No. 57 ending in an R). The obverse cross on this coin does not match the style on either of these, and the configurations of small pellets also differs.

Note: The tornesselo was minted in Venice, starting in 1353, for use in its Greek colonies of Coron and Modon, Negroponte and Crete, after the Frankish mints of Athens and Achaia ceased striking the denier tournois, in 1350. The name “tornesello,” meaning “little tower,” is derived from the tower on the reverse of the local Frankish coins that preceded it. The reverse legend is a truncated form of “Vexilifer Venetiarum,” meaning, “standard-bearer of Venice.” The coin’s use spread beyond the Venetian colonies until it became the principal coinage in Greece. They were struck in an alloy of eight parts copper to one part silver, and are typically poorly struck.
Stkp
MISC_Italian_States_Venice_Tornsello_Lando.jpg
Italian States. Venice. Republic.9 viewsCNI VII, p. 315 214 var.

Billon tornesselo, 0.46 g., 13.07 mm. max., 270°, struck under Doge Pietro Lando (1538-1545).

Obv: +[ • PET • ]LANDO • DVX, central cross pattée with pellets in quarters and at ends of cross arms.

Rev: + S MARCVS • VENET •, winged lion of St. Mark, seated facing, holding a book.

This coin is a variant that is not recorded in the CNI. Unlike the three Lando tornesello recorded there (Nos. 212-214), this coin lacks pellets on the reverse before and after the S.

The tornesselo was minted in Venice, starting in 1353, for use in its Greek colonies of Coron and Modon, Negroponte and Crete, after the Frankish mints of Athens and Achaia ceased striking the denier tournois, in 1350. The name “tornesello,” meaning “little tower,” is derived from the tower on the reverse of the local Frankish coins that preceded it. The original reverse legend was a truncated form of “Vexilifer Venetiarum,” meaning, “standard-bearer of Venice,” but that legend was changed during the reign of Doge Cristoforo Moro (1462-1471) to an abbreviated form of Saint Marks Venice. The coin’s use spread beyond the Venetian colonies until it became the principal coinage in Greece. They were struck in an alloy of eight parts copper to one part silver, and are typically poorly struck. By the time this coin was struck, Venice had lost all of its colonies for which the tornesello was originally intended other than Crete.
Stkp
MISC_Italy_Venice_Contarini_tornesello.jpg
Italian States. Venice. Republic. 10 viewsStahl 8-11, CNI VII, pp. 101-102 58-69, Papadopoli, p. 217 7-8.

Billon tornesello, struck under Doge Andrea Contarini (1367-1382), .59 g., 16.52 mm. max., 90°.

Obv: + • ANDR’ • CTAR•’ DVX •, central cross pattée.

Rev: + VEXILIFER[...] VENETIAʯ,, winged lion of St. Mark, seated facing, holding a book.

Note: This coin is a variant that is not recorded in the CNI. Of the twelve variants recorded there, none have a pellet between the second R and the apostrophe on the obverse.

Note: The tornesello was minted in Venice, starting in 1353, for use in its Greek colonies of Coron and Modon, Negroponte and Crete, after the Frankish mints of Athens and Achaia ceased striking the denier tournois, in 1350. The name “tornesello,” meaning “little tower,” is derived from the tower on the reverse of the local Frankish coins that preceded it. The reverse legend is a truncated form of “Vexilifer Venetiarum,” meaning, “standard-bearer of Venice.” The coin’s use spread beyond the Venetian colonies until it became the principal coinage in Greece. They were struck in an alloy of eight parts copper to one part silver, and are typically poorly struck.
Stkp
MISC_Italy_Venice_Steno_tornesello.jpg
Italian States. Venice. Republic. 13 viewsStahl 18-19, CNI VII, pp. 117-118, 38-43, Plate III 27; Papadopoli, p. 240 7.

Billon tornesello, struck under Doge Michael Steno (1400-1413), .55 g., 16.96 mm. max., 180°.

Obv: •+• MIChAEL STEN' DVX, central cross pattée.

Rev: +• VEXILIFER • VENET[IAʯ,] [retrograde N], winged lion of St. Mark, seated facing, holding a book.

Note: This coin is a variant that is not recorded in the CNI. Of the six variants recorded there, none have a pellet on either ide of the cross but do not have pellets between words on the obverse.

Note: The tornesello was minted in Venice, starting in 1353, for use in its Greek colonies of Coron and Modon, Negroponte and Crete, after the Frankish mints of Athens and Achaia ceased striking the denier tournois, in 1350. The name “tornesello,” meaning “little tower,” is derived from the tower on the reverse of the local Frankish coins that preceded it. The reverse legend is a truncated form of “Vexilifer Venetiarum,” meaning, “standard-bearer of Venice.” The coin’s use spread beyond the Venetian colonies until it became the principal coinage in Greece. They were struck in an alloy of eight parts copper to one part silver, and are typically poorly struck.
Stkp
MISC_Italy_Venice_Gradenigo_tornasello.jpg
Italian States. Venice. Republic. 11 viewsStahl 3, CNI VII, p. 82-83, 21-27, Plate III, 21; Papadopoli, p. 192, 8.

Billon tornesello, struck under Doge Giovanni Gradenigo (1355-1356), .54 g., 16.60 mm. max., 0°.

Obv: •+• IO : GRADOICO • DVX, central cross pattée.

Rev: +• VEXILIFER : VENECIAʯ,, winged lion of St. Mark, seated facing, holding a book.

Note: The tornesello was minted in Venice, starting in 1353, for use in its Greek colonies of Coron and Modon, Negroponte and Crete, after the Frankish mints of Athens and Achaia ceased striking the denier tournois, in 1350. The name “tornesello,” meaning “little tower,” is derived from the tower on the reverse of the local Frankish coins that preceded it. The reverse legend is a truncated form of “Vexilifer Venetiarum,” meaning, “standard-bearer of Venice.” The coin’s use spread beyond the Venetian colonies until it became the principal coinage in Greece. They were struck in an alloy of eight parts copper to one part silver, and are typically poorly struck.
Stkp
Thurium_AR_Stater.jpg
Italy, Lucania, Thurium52 viewsAR Stater, 7.79g. 22mm. c.410-400 B.C.

Engraver, Phrygillos (?). Head of Athena to right wearing crested helmet decorated with Skylla; "phi" in field to right. Rv. Bull pawing ground with head down to right; fish in exergue. SNG Oxford 871. HN 1782; a few small marks and some small metal breaks in front of face. Toned and of fine style

Ex: Numismatica Ars Classica, Zurich, Auction O, 2004, lot 1157.

Located on a fertile plain on the Gulf of Taranto near the site of Sybaris, Thurium was founded by Achaeans late in the 8th Century B.C. At the peak of its success, Sybaris had amassed a population nearly equal to that of Athens, had a six-mile defensive wall, and according to Strabo had as many as 25 cities and four native peoples under its authority. However, the thriving settlement was destroyed by Croton in 510 B.C. After two attempts to establish a new foundation on the ruined site that had been thwarted by Croton, a fresh attempt was made in the period 446 to 444/3 B.C. This remarkable undertaking was originally conceived by descendants of the Sybarites, but when the Crotonites opposed that enterprise as well, help was sought from Athens. Pericles came to their aid by sending colonists whom he had gathered from throughout Greece to participate in what he envisioned as a Panhellenic experiment in colonization. With financial and military support from Athens, the colonists set up their city, drawing on the talents of Protagoras of Abdera for its civil laws, Lampon of Athens for its sacred laws and Hippodamus of Miletus for its city-plan. Even the historian Herodotus is counted among the talented participants. As Thurium began to flourish its colonists from Greece soon ejected their co-founding Sybarites (who established another city on the river Traeis) and eventually distanced themselves even from their benefactor Athens. The city continued to prosper even after it came under Roman control following the defeat of Tarentum in 272. During the Second Punic War, Thurium was still a regional power and it held out as a Roman ally until the spring of 212, when resisting the Carthaginians became impossible. It was the last Greek city to fall to Hannibal, yet it also was the last city outside of Bruttium to remain in his camp. This was not appreciated by the Romans who consequently added its land to their ager publicus and, in 194 or 193, by which time the site was largely abandoned, founded in its place the Latin colony of Copia. Thurian coinage is substantial, and is renowned for the fine artistry of its dies. The head of Athena as an obverse type clearly is inspired by the coinage of Athens. The standing bull on the city’s early coins likely was derived from the old badge of Sybaris, yet the charging version of that animal may refer to the local spring Thuria, from which the new foundation took its name. On this example the bowl of Athena’s helmet is vividly decorated with Scylla, whose ribbed serpent-tail and dog foreparts are particularly well-engraved. Athena’s face retains the severe dignity of even the earliest issues of Thurium, making it a fine example of Attic-inspired art. The bull, as on all Thurian issues of this era, is fully animated with its tail lashing as it charges forth to engage some unseen foe.
Ex: A.D.M. Collection
2 commentsLeo
496_Greek.jpg
Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great31 viewsReference. this is the only example of this type known to Forum; possibly unique
Unpublished variety; Meydancikkale - (cf. 2691, different controls, same engraver), Müller -, SNG Cop -, Thompson -, Black Sea Hoard -, Armenak -

Note. Thrace, Ainos (Enez, Turkey) mint, likely posthumous, c. 282 - 272 B.C

Obv.
diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon
.

Rev. BASILEWS LUSIMACOU
Athena enthroned left, holding Nike and resting left elbow on shield decorated with lion’s head, spear resting to her right; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, monogram in inner left field, monogram in exergue

16.503 gr
28.6 mm
180o

Note.
Barry Murphy identified the mint for this coin as Ainos, noting, "Not the same dies or the same monograms, but clearly the same engraver as Meydicikkale 2691."

A subject ally of Athens, Aenus provided peltasts at the Battle of Sphacteria in 425 B.C. and sent forces to the Sicilian Expedition in 415. It was in the possession of Ptolemy Philopator in 222 B.C., of Philip V of Macedon in 200, of Lysimachos in 283, and later of Antiochus the Great, who lost it to the Romans in 185 B.C., whereupon the Romans declared Aenus a free city. It was still a free city in the time of Pliny the Elder.
2 commentsokidoki
Philip_II~0.jpg
Kings of Macedon. Philip II (Circa 359-336 BC)20 viewsAE 16, 6.23 g

Obverse: Head of Apollo right

Reverse: "ΦIΛIΠΠOY" (FILIPPOY) above naked youth on horse right, theta p control mark below

SNG ANS 927

The rise of Macedon during the reign of Philip II was achieved in part by his reformation of the Ancient Macedonian army, establishing the Macedonian phalanx that proved critical in securing victories on the battlefield. After defeating Athens and Thebes at the Battle of Chaeronea in 338 BC, Philip II led the effort to establish a federation of Greek states known as the League of Corinth, with him as the elected hegemon and commander-in-chief of a planned invasion of the Achaemenid Empire of Persia. However, his assassination in 336 BC (perhaps orchestrated by one of his wives, Olympias, and son, Alexander the Great) led to the immediate succession of Alexander.
Nathan P
KnidosCaria.jpg
Knidos, Caria, c. 465 - 449 B.C63 viewsSilver drachm, Cahn 80 (V38/R53), SNG Keckman 132 (same dies), SNG Cop 232 (same dies), aVF, toned, Knidos mint, weight 6.057g, maximum diameter 16.5mm, die axis 270o, c. 465 - 449 B.C.; obverse forepart of roaring lion right; reverse archaic head of Aphrodite right, hair bound with taenia, within incuse square; ex Barry P. Murphy

CARIA, Knidos. Circa 465-449 BC. AR Drachm - 16mm (6.06 g). Obverse: forepart of roaring lion right; Reverse: archaic head of Aphrodite right, hair bound with taenia. Cahn 80 (V38/R53); SNG Helsinki 132 (same dies); SNG Copenhagen 232 (same dies). Toned, near VF, good metal. Ex Barry P. Murphy.

While this coin falls within the time frame that numismatists call "Classical" Greek coinage, I have chosen to place it in both the "Archaic" (coin 020a) and "Classical" Greek sections of my collection. This specimen is one of those wonderful examples of transition--it incorporates many elements of the "Archaic" era, although it is struck during the "Classical" Greek period and anticipates characteristics of the later period.

As noted art historian Patricia Lawrence has pointed out, "[this specimen portrays] A noble-headed lion, a lovely Late Archaic Aphrodite, and [is made from]. . . beautiful metal." The Archaic Aphrodite is reminiscent of certain portraits of Arethusa found on tetradrachms produced in Syracuse in the first decade of the 5th century BC.

Knidos was a city of high antiquity and as a Hellenic city probably of Lacedaemonian colonization. Along with Halicarnassus (present day Bodrum, Turkey) and Kos, and the Rhodian cities of Lindos, Kamiros and Ialyssos it formed the Dorian Hexapolis, which held its confederate assemblies on the Triopian headland, and there celebrated games in honour of Apollo, Poseidon and the nymphs.

The city was at first governed by an oligarchic senate, composed of sixty members, and presided over by a magistrate; but, though it is proved by inscriptions that the old names continued to a very late period, the constitution underwent a popular transformation. The situation of the city was favourable for commerce, and the Knidians acquired considerable wealth, and were able to colonize the island of Lipara, and founded a city on Corcyra Nigra in the Adriatic. They ultimately submitted to Cyrus, and from the battle of Eurymedon to the latter part of the Peloponnesian War they were subject to Athens.

In their expansion into the region, the Romans easily obtained the allegiance of Knidians, and rewarded them for help given against Antiochus by leaving them the freedom of their city.

During the Byzantine period there must still have been a considerable population: for the ruins contain a large number of buildings belonging to the Byzantine style, and Christian sepulchres are common in the neighbourhood.

Eudoxus, the astronomer, Ctesias, the writer on Persian history, and Sostratus, the builder of the celebrated Pharos at Alexandria, are the most remarkable of the Knidians mentioned in history.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cnidus

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
Lampsakos_Mysia_Silver_diobol.jpg
Lampsakos, Mysia, c. 4th - 3rd Centuries B.C.57 viewsSilver diobol, Baldwin Lampsakos, Group B, Type I, pl. VI, 6; SNG Ashmolean 660; SNG BnF 1195; SNG Cop 191; SNGvA 1295; BMC Mysia p. 83, 36 ff., VF, well centered on a tight flan, toned, 1.458g, 11.7mm, 315o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 4th - 3rd Centuries B.C.; obverse Janiform female head, wearing taenia and disk earring; reverse LA-M-Y (clockwise, starting above), helmeted head of Athena right, in a shallow round incuse.

A very valuable example from FORVM.

Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta; Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
Sam
LUCANIA_THOURIOI.jpg
Lucania Thourioi Stater 385 - 360 BC.83 viewsObv ; Helmeted head of Athena, helmet decorated with Skylla holding trident.
Rev ; QOURIWN, bull butting; fish in exergue.
G/aVF , 20.8 mm, 7.44 gr.

EX THE COLIN E. PITCHFORK COLLECTION.
EX CNG.

Thourioi, was a city of Magna Graecia on the Gulf of Tarentum, near the site of the older Sybaris. It owed its origin to an attempt made in 452 BC by Sybarite exiles and their descendants to re-people their old home. The new settlement was crushed by Croton, but the Athenians lent aid to the fugitives and in 443 BC Pericles sent out to Thourioi a mixed body of colonists from various parts of Greece, among whom were Herodotus and the orator Lysias.
The pretensions of the Sybarite colonists led to dissensions and ultimately to their expulsion; peace was made with Croton, and also, after a period of war, with Tarentum, and Thourioi rose rapidly in power and drew settlers from all parts of Greece, especially from Peloponnesus, so that the tie to Athens was not always acknowledged. The oracle of Delphi determined that the city had no founder but Apollo, and in the Athenian Expedition in Sicily Thourioi was at first neutral, though it finally helped the Athenians.

Thourioi had a democratic constitution and good laws, and, though we hear little of its history till in 390 BC it received a severe defeat from the rising power of the Lucanians. Many beautiful coins testify to the wealth and splendor of its days of prosperity.

In the 4th century BC it continued to decline, and at length called in the help of the Romans against the Lucanians, and then in 282 BC against Tarentum. Thenceforward its position was dependent, and in the Second Punic War, after several vicissitudes, it was depopulated and plundered by Hannibal in 204 BC.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
3 commentsSam
skione.jpg
Macedon, Skione, hemiobol28 viewsca. 424 BC*
7mm, 0.31g
obv: laureate head of youth right
rev: Corinthian helmet


In 424 BC Skione rebelled against Athens and was completely destroyed in 421. It is thought that these coins were minted in the short interval between.
areich
6468LG.jpg
Macedonia, Amphipolis229 viewsAmphipolis was an ancient city of Macedonia, on the east bank of the river Strymon, where it emerges from Lake Cercinitis, about 3 m. from the sea.

Originally a Thracian town, known as Ennea Odoi ("Nine Roads"), it was colonized by Athenians with other Greeks under Hagnon in 437 BC, previous attempts--in 497, 476 (Schol. Aesch. De fals. leg. 31) and 465--having been unsuccessful.

In 424 BC it surrendered to the Spartan Brasidas without resistance, owing to the gross negligence of the historian Thucydides, who was with the fleet at Thasos. In 422 BC Cleon led an unsuccessful expedition to recover it, in which both he and Brasidas were slain (see Battle of Amphipolis).

The importance of Amphipolis in ancient times was due to the fact that it commanded the bridge over the Strymon, and consequently the route from northern Greece to the Hellespont; it was important also as a depot for the gold and silver mines of the district, and for timber, which was largely used in shipbuilding. This importance is shown by the fact that, in the peace of Nicias (421 BC), its restoration to Athens is made the subject of a special provision, and that about 417, this provision not having been observed, at least one expedition was made by Nicias with a view to its recovery.

Philip of Macedon made a special point of occupying it (357), and under the early empire it became the headquarters of the Roman propraetor, though it was recognized as independent. Many inscriptions, coins, etc., have been found here, and traces of the ancient fortifications and of a Roman aqueduct are visible.

Alexander III, 336-323 BC, Silver Tetradrachm, Price-113, struck 323-320BC at Amphipolis, 17.12 grams, 25.3 mm. Choice VF

Obv: Head of Herakles wearing lion skin headdress
Rev: Zeus enthroned with sceptre and eagle, parallel legs, Macedonian helmet in left field

Well centered and struck with a full EF reverse. Attractive lifetime issue of Alexander III 'The Great'. G5
2 commentsecoli
PhilipIIMacedonLifetimeTet.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C., Lifetime Issue136 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Le Rider 233 (D130/R188); SNG ANS 385 ff., VF, Pella, 14.163g, 25.4mm, 225o, 342 - 336 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse "FILIPPOU", naked youth on horse pacing right on horseback holding palm, thunderbolt below; ex CNG 214, 82; very high relief sculptural portrait, nice style, lifetime issue. Ex FORVM.

Philip II expanded the size and influence of the Macedonian Kingdom, but is perhaps best known as the father of Alexander the Great. He personally selected the design of his coins.

Philip II of Macedon (382 BC–336 BC; in Greek Φίλιππος = φίλος (friend) + ίππος (horse), transliterated Philippos) was the King of Macedon from 359 BC until his assassination. He was the father of Alexander the Great, Phillip III Arrhidaeus, and possibly Ptolemy I Soter, founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty.

Born in Pella, Philip was the youngest son of King Amyntas III and Eurydice. In his youth, (ca. 368 BC–365 BC) Philip was a hostage in Thebes, which was the leading city of Greece during the Theban hegemony. While a captive there, Philip received a military and diplomatic education from Epaminondas, was involved in a pederastic relationship with Pelopidas and lived with Pammenes, who was an enthusiastic advocate of the Sacred Band of Thebes. In 364 BC, Philip returned to Macedonia. The deaths of Philip's elder brothers, King Alexander II and Perdiccas III, allowed him to take the throne in 359 BC. Originally appointed regent for his infant nephew Amyntas IV, who was the son of Perdiccas III, Philip managed to take the kingdom for himself that same year.

Philip's military skills and expansionist vision of Macedonian greatness brought him early success. The hill tribes were broken by a single battle in 358 BC, and Philip established his authority inland as far as Lake Ohrid. He used the Social War as an opportunity for expansion. In 357 BC, he took the Athenian colony of Amphipolis, which commanded the gold mines of Mount Pangaion. That same year Philip married the Epirote princess Olympias, who was the daughter of the king of the Molossians. In 356 BC, Philip conquered the town of Crenides and changed its name to Philippi. Philip also attacked Abdera and Maronea, on the Thracian sea-board. Also in 356 Alexander was born and his race horse won in the Olympics in He took Methone in 354 BC, a town which had belonged to Athens. During the siege of Methone, Philip lost an eye.

Not until his armies were opposed by Athens at Thermopylae in 352 BC did Philip face any serious resistance. Philip did not attempt to advance into central Greece because the Athenians had occupied Thermopylae. Also in 352 BC, the Macedonian army won a complete victory over the Phocians at the Battle of Crocus Field. This battle made Philip tagus of Thessaly, and he claimed as his own Magnesia, with the important harbour of Pagasae.
Hostilities with Athens did not yet take place, but Athens was threatened by the Macedonian party which Philip's gold created in Euboea. From 352 to 346 BC, Philip did not again come south. He was active in completing the subjugation of the Balkan hill-country to the west and north, and in reducing the Greek cities of the coast as far as the Hebrus (Maritza). For the chief of these coastal cities, Olynthus, Philip continued to profess friendship until its neighboring cities were in his hands.

In 349 BC, Philip started the siege of Olynthus. Olynthus at first allied itself with Philip, but later shifted its allegiance to Athens. The Athenians did nothing to help Olynthus. Philip finally took Olynthus in 348 BC and razed the city to the ground. In 346 BC, he intervened effectively in the war between Thebes and the Phocians, but his wars with Athens continued intermittently.

Macedonia and the regions adjoining it having now been securely consolidated, Philip celebrated his Olympic games at Dium. In 347 BC, Philip advanced to the conquest of the eastern districts about the Hebrus, and compelled the submission of the Thracian prince Cersobleptes. Meanwhile, Athens had made overtures for peace, and when Philip, in 346 BC, again moved south, peace was sworn in Thessaly. With key Greek city-states in submission, Philip turned to Sparta; he sent them a message, "You are advised to submit without further delay, for if I bring my army into your land, I will destroy your farms, slay your people, and raze your city." Their reply was "If." Philip and Alexander would both leave them alone. Later, the Macedonian arms were carried across Epirus to the Adriatic Sea. In 342 BC, Philip led a great military expedition north against the Scythians, conquering the Thracian fortified settlement Eumolpia to give it his name, Philippoupolis (modern Plovdiv).

In 340 BC, Philip started the siege of Perinthus. Philip began another siege in 339 BC of the city of Byzantium. After unsuccessful sieges of both cities, Philip's influence all over Greece was compromised. However, Philip successfully reasserted his authority in the Aegean by defeating an alliance of Thebans and Athenians at the Battle of Chaeronea in 338 BC. He erected a memorial of a marble lion to the Sacred Band of Thebes for their bravery that still stands today. Philip created and led the League of Corinth in 337 BC. Members of the League agreed never to wage war against each other, unless it was to suppress revolution. Philip was elected as leader (hegemon) of the army of invasion against the Persian Empire. In 336 BC, when the invasion of Persia was in its very early stage, Philip was assassinated, and was succeeded on the throne of Macedon by his son Alexander the Great.

Philip’s Assassination

The murder happened in October of 336 BC, at Aegae, the ancient capital of the kingdom of Macedon. The court had gathered there for the celebration of the marriage between Alexander of Epirus and Philip's daughter. While the king was entering unprotected into the town's theatre (highlighting his approachability to the Greek diplomats present), he was killed by Pausanias of Orestis, one of Philip's seven bodyguards. The assassin immediately tried to escape and reach his associates who were waiting for him with horses at the entrance of Aegae. He was pursued by three of Philip's bodyguards and died by their hands.
The reasons for Pausanias' assassination of Phillip are difficult to fully expound, since there was controversy already among ancient historians. The only contemporary account in our possession is that of Aristotle, who states rather tersely that Philip was killed because Pausanias had been offended by the followers of Attalus, the king's father-in-law.

Whatever else that may be written about Philip II it must be recognized that he was responsible for making Macedon the ascendant Greek power. He reorganized the Macedonian army. It was this army that Alexander the Great inherited. Phillip II trained some of Alexander’s best generals: Antigonus Cyclops, Antipater, Nearchus, Parmenion, and Perdiccas.

According to the Greek historian Theopompus of Chios, Europe had never seen a man like king Philip of Macedonia, and he called his history of the mid-fourth century BCE the Philippic History. Theopompus had a point. Not even his better known son Alexander has done so much to change the course of Greek history. Philip reorganized his kingdom, gave it access to the sea, expanded its power so that it could defeat the Achaemenid Empire, and subdued the Greek city-states, which never regained their independence again. To achieve this, he modernized the Macedonian economy, improved the army, and concluded several marital alliances. The result was a superpower with one weakness: it was as strong as its king. When Philip's son Alexander died, the institutions were too weak, and Macedonia never recovered.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_II_of_Macedon
http://www.livius.org/phi-php/philip/philip_ii.htm
Ed. by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
PhilipAplustre_Tet_b.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom. Philip II, Amphipolis mint54 viewsMacedonian Kingdom. Philip II, 359-336 BC. Silver Tetradrachm, Amphipolis mint. Early posthumous issue, struck under Kassander.
O: Zeus right wearing laurel wreath with berries.
R: Φ I Λ I Π - Π OY (Of Philip) Naked youth on horse prancing right holding long palm branch and reins; aplustre below; Γ under foreleg. Rider pl. 46, 18; SNG ANS 740. Light golden toning.

Plutarch (Alex., 3)
"To Philip, however, who had just taken Potidaea, there came three messages at the same time:
the first that Parmenio had conquered the Illyrians in a great battle, the second that his race-horse had won a victory at the Olympic games, while a third announced the birth of Alexander. These things delighted him, of course, and the seers raised his spirits still higher by declaring that the son whose birth coincided with three victories would be always victorious."

Plutarch (Alex., 4.10)
"...and (Philip) took care to have the victories of his chariots at Olympia engraved upon his coins..."

The reverse-types of Philip’s coins are nearly all agonistic, and refer either to the games celebrated by him at Dium in
honour of the Olympian Zeus (Müller, Mon. d'Alex., pp. II and 344), or, preferably, to the great Olympian games where his
chariots were victorious. We have, indeed, the direct assertion of Plutarch (Alex., c. 4) in favour of the latter
hypothesis, τας εν ‘Ολυμπια νικας των αρματων εγχαραττων τοις νομισμασιν. Philip was also successful at Olympia with the
race-horse (ιππω κελητι νενικηκέναι; Plut., Alex., 3), a victory of which he perpetuated the memory on his tetradrachms. The horseman
with kausia and chlamys is less certainly agonistic, and may (perhaps with a play upon his name) represent the king
himself as a typical Macedonian ιππευς.
Philip’s coins were struck at many mints in various parts of his empire. For the various mint-marks which they bear see
Müller’s Num. d'Alex. le Grand, the local attributions in which are, however, to be accepted with great caution. They
continued to circulate in Europe long after his death, and the Gauls, when they invaded and pillaged Greece, took vast
numbers of them back into their own land, where they long continued to serve as models for the native currency of Gaul and
Britain. (Historia Numorum, Barclay V. Head, 1887)

It is clear that, trying hard to show off, to pass and ultimately to impose his Greek character, Philip was especially
interested in the aesthetic aspect of his coins and also in the propaganda and psychological effects they would have
on the rest of the Greek world, and especially on "those sarcastic, democratic Athenians" and on "the more barbarian" people than himself...

Demosthenes (19, 308)
"And as for Philip,—why, good Heavens, he was a Greek of the Greeks, the finest orator and the most thorough—going
friend of Athens you could find in the whole world. And yet there were some queer, ill-conditioned fellows in Athens who
did not blush to abuse him, and even to call him a barbarian! "
4 commentsNemonater
Antony_Fleet_galley.jpg
Mark Antony Fleet coinage159 viewsMarcus Antonius Fleet coinage (Light Series)

M ANT IMP TERT COS DESIG ITER ET TERT III VIR RPC
Conjoined heads of Marcus Antonius and Octavia right

M OPPIVS CAPITO PRO PR PRAEF CLASS FC
Galley under sail right

Tarentum (?) summer 37 BC
4.13g

Sear 1497, RPC 1470, CRI 296,

Very rare in any condition

Cleaned by Kevin at NRC.

The legendary Fleet coinage of Antony belongs to two series, heavy and light. The "light series" is thought to have been minted at a later date, possibly just after Antony returned from his conference with Octavian in 37 BC. The meeting saw the Pact of Tarentum. Part of that agreement saw Antony loan 120 ships to Octavian along with his Admirals Altratinus and Capito.

A fine insight into Antony's administrative abilities can be seen by his fleet coinage that came in sestertius, dupondius and as denominations. Of note is that Antony's "Fleet Coinage" shows the appearance of the first sestertius in bronze rather than silver. When Octavian (Augustus) reformed the coinage 20 years later he maintained the exact same denominations; sestertius, dupondius and as. After Actium Octavian also kept many if not all of the client Kings in their positions and territories. A strong case for Antony's capabilities as an administrator.

M. Oppius Capito occupied an important position in Antony's inner circle although little is known of him. Capito's coins are more abundant than those of his colleagues and only Capito's coins include the title "Praefectus classis" (Prefect of the fleet). Most of his coins are found in Greece and were probably minted in Piraeus, the harbor complex of Athens. Athens at this time was the home of Antony and Octavia so it is likely that Capito's mint would be located here.

Sold to Calgary Coin Jan 2016
4 commentsJay GT4
AntonySoldenarius.jpg
Mark Antony Sol denarius149 viewsM ANTONIVS M F M N AVGVR IMP TERT around (MP and RT ligatured)
Mark Antony, veiled and wearing the priestly robes of an Augur, standing right, holding lituus in right hand.

III VIR R P C COS DESIG ITER ET TERT
Radiate head of Sol right

Athens
Summer 38 BC

2.73g
Crawford 533/2, Sear Imperators 267

Purchased broken into several pieces and Glued together.

Antony's third Imperatorial acclimation resulted from Ventidius' victory at Gindarus. Antony's depiction in priestly robes of an augur emphasizes the importance which he placed on the possession of this religious office. The word AVGVR features prominently on most of Antony's remaining coinage right down to Actium. No doubt this was to stress his adherence to Republican traditions. Sol is symbolic of the East and shows Antony's personal concern for eastern affairs after the distraction caused by his extended stay in Italy starting in the second half of 40 BC and running almost the whole of the following year.
5 commentsJay GT4
AntonySolAVG.jpg
Mark Antony Sol denarius101 viewsM ANTONIVS M F M N AVGVR IMP TERT around (MP and RT ligatured)
Mark Antony, veiled and wearing the priestly robes of an Augur, standing right, holding lituus in right hand.

III VIR R P C COS DESIG ITER ET TERT
Radiate head of Sol right

Athens
Summer 38 BC

3.92g
Crawford 533/2, Sear Imperators 267

Ex-ANE, Ex-Seaby with original ticket

New Photo

Antony's third Imperatorial acclimation resulted from Ventidius' victory at Gindarus. Antony's depiction in priestly robes of an augur emphasizes the importance which he placed on the possession of this religious office. The word AVGVR features prominently on most of Antony's remaining coinage right down to Actium. No doubt this was to stress his adherence to Republican traditions. Sol is symbolic of the East and shows Antony's personal concern for eastern affairs after the distraction caused by his extended stay in Italy starting in the second half of 40 BC and running almost the whole of the following year
6 commentsJay GT4
Mark_Antony_RSC_13.JPG
Mark Antony, 83 - 30 BC104 viewsObv: M ANTONIVS M F M N AVGVR IMP TERT, Mark Antony, veiled and wearing the priestly robes of an augur, standing right holding lituus in right hand.

Rev: III VIR R P C COS DESIG ITER ET TERT, radiate head of Sol facing right.

Silver Denarius, Athens mint, Summer 38 BC

3.9 grams, 19.98 mm, 225°

RSC 13, S1474

Ex: Robert O. Ebert Collection. Stack’s N.Y.I.N.C. Auction, Lot #5582, January 2013.
3 commentsSPQR Matt
BD2C1A2B-743E-432B-97A3-4DA999E4ED43.jpeg
Megaris, Megara8 viewsMEGARIS, Megara. Circa 250-175 BC. Æ Chalkous Prow of galley left / Obelisk of Apollo; to left and right, dolphins swimming upward. BCD Peloponnesos 21.

Bridging Attica on the east and Corinthia on the west, Megaris comprised only a few towns, with Megara being its capital and only major city. Megaris’s location in the northern part of the Isthmus of Corinth put the region in the middle of any conflict between the two cities. Shortly before the outbreak of the Peloponnesian War, the Athenians sought revenge on the Megarians for their support of Corinth. As a result, Athens instituted the Megarian Decree, an embargo designed to economically strangle the Megarians; this decree was used as a pretext by some in Sparta for the Peloponnesian War. Siding with Sparta in the war, Megara lost its main port to the Athenian general Nikias, and, for a short time, a pro-Athenian goverment seized power in the city. While Megara remained prosperous following the war and founded colonies in Sicily and the Hellespont, little else is recorded. Megara periodically struck coinage from the 4th through 1st centuries BC.
ecoli
ATHEN.jpg
Mesopotamia, Mazaces (satrap under Alexander the Great and Philip III), c. 325 - 315 B.C.96 viewsSilver tetradrachm, similar to cf. Mitchiner (Indo-Greek and Indo Scythian Coinage I) p. 16 Type 13a 4 (owl also standing left), F, 16.85g, 24.1mm, 45o, uncertain mint, obverse head of Athena left, wearing earing and helmet ornamented with three olive leaves; reverse AQE, owl standing right head facing, olive sprig and lunar crescent in upper field to left; heavily oxidized (dark toned) surfaces; unpublished and possibly unique but similar to the attribution ref Mazaces type, Svoronos pl 23, 12 is another left facing Athena (fourree), these are the only known Athens type tetradrachms with Athena left1 commentssalem
Cordius.jpg
Mn. Cordius Rufus - AR denarius6 viewsRome or Athens
46 BC
conjoined heads of the Dioscuri with laureate pilei right, stars above
RVFVS III VIR
Venus Verticordia standing left, holding scales and scepter, Cupid on her shoulder
(MN)·CORDI
SRCV I 440, RSC I Cordia 2b, Sydenham 976a, Crawford 463/1b
3,65g

Moneyer is the only known member of Cordia gens. Later he served as preator and proconsul under Octavian.
After scandal with Vestal virgins the temple was dedicated to Venus Verticordia ("Venus the changer of hearts") in Rome 114 BC . Venus Verticordia is on one hand pun for Cordia and on the other hand supports Julius Caesar. Iulii claimed that their origin comes from Iulus son of Aeneas who was son of Venus.
Johny SYSEL
markianopolis_sev_alexander_AMNG993.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 32. Severus Alexander, HrJ (2014) 6.32.36.0217 viewsSeverus Alexander, AD 222-235
AE 25, 9.42g, 24.66mm, 330°
struck under governor Julius Gaetulicus
obv. AV KM AVR CEVH - ALEZANDROC
Head, laureate, r.
rev. VP.IOVLI.G ET - MARKIANOPO / LITW
Homonoia, in long garment and mantle, stg. l., holding cornucopiae and patera
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 993 (4 ex.)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1761 (cites AMNG 993)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2014) 6.32.36.2 (same dies)
about VF, dark green patina

The rev. legend is difficult to read and it has an unusual short name for Gaetulicus. Pick writes: "Postolakkas thought to read on the ex. from Athens IOVL(I/G)ET (I/G ligate) and intended to read that as IOVLIANov GETovlikov; but the line which seems to connect I and G is caused only by a die break going throug the dot; the ex. from Paris shows the same phenomenon." And I can add: And my coin too!
Jochen
nikopolis_geta_HrJ(2012)8_22_47_8.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 22. Geta, HrHJ (2018) 8.22.47.1019 viewsGeta as Caesar, AD 198-212
AE 16, 2.74g, 16.08mm, 210°
obv. LOV AV KAICAR GETAC
Bust, draped, bare-headed, r.
rev. NIKOPOLITWN PROC ICT
Tripod, central leg entwined by snake, head r.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1645 corr., pl.XX, 28 (1 ex., Athens):
writes draped and cuirassed!
b) Varbanov (engl.) 3254
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) 8.22.47.10
scarce, about VF, black green patina

The obv. legend is one of the 3 wrong legends which Pick mentions in AMNG I/1, p.423
Jochen
nikopolis_macrinus_HJ8_23_7_2_#1.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 23. Macrinus, HrHJ (2018) 8.23.07.02 #271 viewsMacrinus, AD 217-218
AE 27, 13.42g, 26.82mm, 345°
struck under governor Marcus Claudius Agrippa
obv. AV K OPPEL CE - VH MAKRI NOC
laureate head r.
rev. [VP AG]RIPPA NIKOPOL - ITWN PROC IC
in l. and middle field TR - W
Apollo Sauroktonos, nude, with crossed legs, l. leg set behind r. leg, stg. r., l.
hand resting on tree-stump, in bent r. hand holding branch with which he touches
the tree
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1687, pl. XIV, 35 (5 ex.)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 3372
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.23.7.2 (same dies)
d) Pat Lawrence obv. M, no.10 (gap between I and N on obv. not mentioned)
VF, dark green patina

Pick writes:"the left on a tree-stump from which a lizard(?) is jumping to him." But on this coin it is rather a branch with small round fruits.
Pat Lawrence (in 'The Pontianus and Agrippa Dies for Macrinus and Diadumenianus at Nicopolis ad Istrum"): Apollo Sauroktonos, so labeled by Pick (and Taf. XIV, 35) and earlier, though Postolakas at Athens: Achilles Postolakas, Catalogue of the Ancient Coins of Regions, Nations, Cities and Kingdoms, National Numismatic Museum, 1872, no.847, is at pains to describe what he sees: "...to one side and the other of Apollo, naked, stg. r., bending his l. knee, having his head laureate and holding with his r. hand a twig (or branch) slanting downwards, placing his raised l. hand on the little tree, stripped of its branches, stand in front of him." He, too, doubted wether we may read the elements between Apollo's torso and the tree trunk as a leaping lizard. Just as the 'Medici' Aphrodite of Agrippa's engraver is comically misconstrued, so is his Apollo Sauroktonos.
3 commentsJochen
nikopolis_macrinus_AMNG1783.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 23. Macrinus, HrHJ (2018) 8.23.34.07 (plate coin)33 viewsMacrinus, AD 217-218
AE 28, 10.8g, 28.31mm, 180°
struck under governor Statius Longinus
obv. AVT KM OP[ELIOC - CEVH MAKRINOC]
so-called heroic bust, slightly draped on l. shoulder, laureate, r.
rev. VP CTATI LONGIN[O - V NI - KOPOLITWN PR]O / C ICTR
Emperor, with cuirass and boots, laureate, stg. l., holding globe in
outstretched r. hand and resting with l. hand on spear.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1783 (2 ex., Athens, Paris)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 3532
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.23.34.7 (plate coin)
rare, about VF/F+, impressive portrait!
Jochen
nikopolis_macrinus_AMNG1772.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 23. Macrinus, HrHJ (2018) 8.23.35.16 (plate coin)36 viewsMacrinus AD 217-218
AE 25, 12.0g, 25.46mm, 195°
struck under legate Statius Longinus
obv. AVT KM OPELLI CEV. - MAK[REINOC AVG]
laureate head r.
rev. VP CTA LONG[INOV NIKO - POLIT]WN PROC IC
Nemesis-Aequitas, in long garment and mantle, [and wearing kalathos), stg. l., holding scales
in outstretched re hand and cornucopiae in li arm; wheel at her feet l.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1772 (2 ex., Athens, Paris)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 3460 var. (different obv. legend)
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.23.35.16 (plate coin)
about VF, glossy olive-green patina
Jochen
Nikopolis_Diadumenian_Hera.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 25. Diadumenian, HrHJ (2018) 8.25.03.0583 viewsDiadumenian, AD 217-218
AE 27, 10.12g, 27.17mm, 225°
struck under governor Statius Longinus
obv. K M OPPEL AN[TWN - DIADO]VMENIANOC
bust, draped and cuirassed(?), bare head, r.
rev. VP CT[A]TIOV LON - [GI - NOV] NIKOPOLITWN / PROC I (WN ligate)
in l. and r. field CT - R[W]
Hera in long garment and mantle, standing l., resting with raised l. hand on long sceptre and pouring libation from patera in r. hand.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1835 (2 ex., Athens, Moskau)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 3774 (but cites AMNG 1834 in error)
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.25.3.5
about VF, nice green patina, portrait!
2 commentsJochen
nikopolis_elagabal_AMNG1917.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 26. Elagabal, HrHJ (2018) 8.26.11.04 #1 (plate coin)42 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 26, 11.89g, 26.31mm, 225°
struck under governor Novius Rufus
obv. [AVT] K M AVRH - ANTWNEINOC
bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. VP NOBIOV ROVFO - V - NIKOPOLITWN
in l. field one below the other C IC / PR / O
in r. field one below the other T - RO / N
Ares, helmeted, with cuirass over short chiton, wearing boots, resting with r. hand on shield and with l. hand on reversed spear.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1917 (2 ex., Athens, Löbbecke)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 3969
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.26.11.4 (plate coin)
F+/about VF, nice light-green patina

Interesting rev. legend distribution: in left field CIC/PR/O, in r. field T-RO/N.
Because the figure here is cuirassed it is unsettled wether it is Ares or Virtus (Pick). Curtis Clay votes for Ares because Virtus should have a nude breast.
Jochen
nikopolis_elagabal_AMNG1917~0.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 26. Elagabal, HrHJ (2018) 8.26.11.04 #2 (plate coin)61 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 26, 12.7g, 25.68mm, 225°
struck under governor Novius Rufus
obv. [AVT K M AVRH] - ANTWNEINOC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from front, laureate, r.
rev. VP NOBIOV ROVFOV - NIKOPOLITWN
in l. field one below the other C IC / PR / O
in r. field one below the other T - RO / N
Ares, helmeted, in short military cloak and boots, stg. facing, head l., holding in
raised l. hand reversed spear and resting with r. hand on his shield.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1917 (2 ex., Athens, Löbbecke)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 3969
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.26.11.4 (plate coin)
rare, about VF

It could be Virtus too on the rev. I have choosen this coin because of its interesting legend distribution on the rev.!
1 commentsJochen
nikopolis_elagabal_AMNG1937.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 26. Elagabal, HrHJ (2018) 8.26.20.08 (plate coin)31 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 11.87g, 26.7mm, 180°
struck under governor Novius Rufus
obv. AVT M AVR - ANTWNINOC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. VP NOBIOV ROVFOV NIKOPOLITWN PROC I / CTRW
Asklepios, in himation, stg. frontal, head l., holding puff of garment over l. arm and resting with r. hand
on his snake-stuff.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1937 (2 ex., Athens, Vienna)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 3927 (doesn't mention AMNG!)
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.26.20.8 (plate coin)
rare, VF
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!
Jochen
nikopolis_elagabal_Moushmov1451.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 26. Elagabal, HrHJ (2018) 8.26.38.02 (plate coin)45 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 11.82g, 26.55, 210°
obv. AVTO K M AVR - ANTWNINOC
bust, draped and cuirassed, radiate, r.
rev. VP NOBIOV ROVFOV NI - KOPOLITWN PROC ICTR (PR ligate)
in l. upper field ON
Tyche, richly draped, wearing kalathos, stg. r., holding cornucopiae in l. arm and in r.
hand rudder set on globe
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1975 (3 ex., Athens, Rollin, Wien)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 4083 (doesn't mention AMNG 1975)
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.26.38.2 (plate coin)
F+/about VF, nice rev.
Jochen
nikopolis_gordianIII_AMNG2048.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 36. Gordian III, HrHJ (2018) 8.36.05.01 (plate coin)33 viewsGordian III, AD 238-244
AE 29, 9.6g, 28.65mm, 180°
struck under governor Sabinius Modestus
obv. AVT.K.M.ANTW.GORDIANOC. AVG (AVG ligate)
Bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. VP CAB MODECTOV NI - KOPOLEITWN PR / OCIC in r. field (WN and PR ligate)
Demeter, in long garment, puff of garment over r. arm, stg. facing, head l., holding grain-ears and poppy in outstretched r. hand and long flaming torch in l. hand.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 2048 (2 ex., Athens, Vienna)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 4134
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.36.5.1 (plate coin)
about VF, interesting traces of smoothing actions on rev.

Nice depiction of the torch!
Jochen
nikopolis_gordianIII_AMNG2047.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 36. Gordian III, HrHJ (2018) 8.36.05.0382 viewsGordian III, AD 238-244
AE 29, 12.30g, 28.79mm, 180°
struck under governor Sabinius Modestus
obv. AVT K M ANT G - ORDIANOC AVG
bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. VP CAB MODECTOV NI - KOP - OLEITWN POC (sic!) ICTR (WN ligate)
Demeter, stg. l., holding 2 corn-ears and a poppy-head in her outstretched r. hand, leaning
with l. hand on lighted torch.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 2047 (3 ex., Athens, Wien, Welzl)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 4186 corr. (rev. same die, writes in error ICTRON)
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.36.5.3 (same dies)
VF, dark green patina

POC may be a ligate PR?
1 commentsJochen
nerose14c.jpg
Nero, RIC 586, Sestertius of AD 66 (Portus Augusti)72 viewsÆ sestertius (22.54g, maximum Ø34.24mm, 6h), Lugdunum mint, struck AD 66.
Obv.: IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P MAX TR P P P, laureate head of Nero right, globe below tip of bust.
Rev.: PORT AVG (below) S C (above), aerial view of the harbor of Ostia, showing pier, breakwaters, lighthouse surmounted by the statue of Neptune, seven ships, and the figure of Tiber reclining left in foreground, holding rudder and dolphin.
Mac Dowall (The western Coinages of Nero, ANS SSN 161) 476; RIC 586 (R2); BMCRE 323 var. (different obv. legend); Cohen 253 var. (emperor's head to left); CBN 74 var. (different obv. legend); Sear (RCV) 1953var.

Certificate of Authenticity: David R Sear / A.C.C.S. Ref. 100CR/RI/C/V (January 6, 2015): "Grade: F and very rare, one of the most interesting types of Nero's sestertius series "

Extract of Sear's Historical and Numismatic Note: "This example commemorates the completion of the great harbor project to serve the needs of the imperial capital initiated by Claudius and completed under Nero. Ostia is situated at the mouth of the Tiber, but could not easily handle large sea-going vessels such as those of the grain fleet. Accordingly, Claudius initiated the construction of a new all-weather harbor at Portus, about two miles along the coast line to the north. This was a huge project, involving the construction of two great moles jutting out into the sea. The lighthouse erected at the end of one of these moles was built on foundations formed by sinking a large ship that Caligula had used to transport an obelisk from Egypt. This harbor, however, was very exposed to the weather and under Trajan was superseded by a new land-locked inner basin linked to the Tiber by a canal (cf. P.Connolly and H.Hodge, The Ancient City. Life in Classical Athens and Rome, pp. 128-30)"
3 commentsCharles S
athens_old_tetra.jpg
Old Style Tetradrachm, 449 - 413 B.C. 18 viewsAthens, Old Style Tetradrachm, 449 - 413 B.C. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526, aVF, Athens mint, 16.952g, 25.1mm, 45o, obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse, “AQE” right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square; reverse test cut. Ex FORVMPodiceps
athens_tetra.jpg
Old Style Tetradrachm, 449 - 413 B.C. owl testcut24 viewsATTICA. Athens. After 449 BC. AR Tetradrachm (24mm - 16.54 g). Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within an incuse square. Kroll 8; Dewing 1591; SNG Copenhagen 31. Porous VF, (brutal) test cut on the owl. Ex VauctionsPodiceps
Athenian tet.jpg
Owl - Athens265 viewsAR Tetradrachm of Athens
449 - 404 BCE
25 mm, 16.6 gm

Charming Athenian owl. Unfortunately, a test cuts was made right through the owl's face, but he is still visible.

posted by Zam
Zam
philistoOR.jpg
Palestine, Gaza mint, Attic standard Municipal coinage, Mildenberg, Gaza 7 or Athens, Attica mint, Svor. Pl.21.4053 viewsPalestine, Gaza mint, Attic standard Municipal coinage, Late 5th-mid 4th century B.C. AR, 15x11mm 3.72g, Mildenberg, Gaza 7
O: Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl, Aramaic mem on cheek
R: AQE, owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square.

OR

Athens, Attica mint, Drachm Ca.350 B.C. AR, 15x11mm 3.72g, Svor. Pl.21.40
O: Head of Athena r., eye in profile, wearing helmet decorated with olive leaves and palmette
R: Owl standing r., head facing, AQE to r., olive spray and crescent to l.
1 commentscasata137ec
Aspendos.jpg
Pamphylia, Aspendos (Circa 380-325 BC)27 viewsAR Stater

24 mm, 11.08 g

Obv: Two wrestlers grappling. Control: KI.

Rev: EΣTFEΔIIYΣ.
Slinger in throwing stance right. Triskeles right in field; countermark.


SNG France 104; SNG von Aulock 4557.

Aspendos was an ancient city in Pamphylia, Asia Minor, located about 40 km east of the modern city of Antalya, Turkey. It was situated on the Eurymedon River about 16 km inland from the Mediterranean Sea; it shared a border with, and was hostile to, Side. The wide range of its coinage throughout the ancient world indicates that, in the 5th century BC, Aspendos had become the most important city in Pamphylia. At that time, according to Thucydides, the Eurymedon River was navigable as far as Aspendos, and the city derived great wealth from a trade in salt, oil and wool.

There are two stories associated with Aspendos that I found interesting. In 389 BC Thrasybulus of Athens, in an effort to regain some of the prestige that city had lost in the Peloponnesian Wars, anchored off the coast of Aspendos in an effort to secure its surrender. Hoping to avoid a new war, the people of Aspendos collected money among themselves and gave it to the commander, entreating him to retreat without causing any damage. Even though he took the money, he had his men trample all the crops in the fields. Enraged, the Aspendians stabbed and killed Thrasybulus in his tent.

Many years later when Alexander the Great marched into Aspendos in 333 BC after capturing Perge, the citizens sent envoys asking him not to garrison soldiers there. He agreed, provided he would be given the taxes and horses that they had formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king. After reaching this agreement Alexander went to Side, leaving a garrison there on the city's surrender. Going back through Sillyon, he learned that the Aspendians had failed to ratify the agreement their envoys had proposed and were preparing to defend themselves. Alexander marched to the city immediately. When they saw Alexander returning with his troops, the Aspendians, who had retreated to their acropolis, again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to very harsh terms; a Macedonian garrison would remain in the city and 100 gold talents as well as 4,000 horses would be given in tax annually.
Nathan P
Pergamonacrop.jpg
Pergamon54 viewsThe oldest section of Pergamon, the acropolis or upper city, sits on an impressive steep ridge between two tributaries of the Caicus river. The ridge is naturally fortified on all but the S side which slopes down to the Caicus valley floor. The Caicus valley provides access from Pergamon to the Aegean coast and the port town of Elaea in the W and the Persian Royal Road to the E.

The upper city, which was fortified in the 4th or 3rd century B.C. contains the 3rd century Sanctuary of Athena, the oldest cult center of the city as well as palace quarters, barracks, and arsenals. In the 2nd century B.C. the 10,000 seat theater, the library adjacent to the Sanctuary of Athena, and the Great Altar of Zeus and Athena were added. In the 2nd century A.D. the monumental Trajaneum was erected on what must have been an earlier unknown cult center. From the upper agora a paved main street leads S and downslope to the middle city.

The city of Pergamon began to extend down the S slope in the 3rd century B.C. and during the 2nd century a massive building program completely transformed the entire lower slope. The major construction in the area was the gigantic gymnasium complex which extended down three large terraces linked by vaulted stairways and passages. The complex encorporated three open training courts, a covered track or xystus, a small theater or odeum, several shrines, and two large baths. Other major sections of the middle city included the Sanctuary of Demeter and Kore and, below the gymnasium along the main street leading to the Eumenes' Gate, the lower agora. North and E of the gymnasium massive terraces support the streets and houses of the residential quarter. In the first half of the 2nd century B.C. Eumenes II strengthened the entire fortification system of Pergamon and enclosed all of the middle city, which extended almost to the base of the south slope, within the new walls.

During the Roman Imperial period the city continued to expand southward and spread over the plain and the area occuppied by modern Bergama. The large Sanctuary of the Egyptian Gods (the "Kizil Avlu"), numerous bridges, and remains of the Roman stadium, theater, and amphitheater remain visible today.

Pergamon emerged as a power during the struggle for territorial control following the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. By the middle of the 3rd century Pergamon had been established as an independent state under the leadership of the Attalid dynasty. The power of the Attalids and the city grew as a result of successful battles against the Gauls of central Anatolia and careful political alliances with Rome.

The peak period of Pergamene power and achievement was reached during the reign of Eumenes II (197-159 B.C.). The kingdom had grown to include most of western Anatolia and was rich in agriculture and industry. Noted industrial exports included textiles, fine pottery, and "Pergamene paper" or parchment. The last industry developed when Ptolemy, reportedly jealous of the growing fame of the library in Pergamon, prohibited the export of papyrus from Egypt. Eumenes II enlarged the city of Pergamon to include all of the southern slope and enclosed the city with a new and stronger fortification wall. In addition to the major new constructions in the lower city Eumenes also commissioned the Great Altar of Zeus and Athena, the theater, and the new library in the upper city.

In the 2nd century B.C. Pergamon rivalled Athens and Alexandria as centers of Hellenic culture. The city possessed one of the greatest libraries of antiquity, monumental gymnasia, and numerous religious sanctuaries, including the Asklepion outside the city walls. Pergamon was a haven for noted philosophers and artists and was the center of a major movement in Hellenistic sculpture. The Attalids supported the arts and learning in Pergamon and elsewhere and made major donations, such as the Stoa of Attalos II in Athens.

The last Attalid ruler, Attalos III, bequeathed the kingdom of Pergamon to Rome in 133 B.C. During Roman rule the prosperity of Pergamon continued and the city had a period of commercial expansion. The city itself expanded to the plain S and W of the acropolis across the flat land now occuppied by modern Bergama.

See: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/siteindex?lookup=Pergamon

Cleisthenes
coins70.JPG
Pergamon, Mysia33 viewsPergamon or Pergamum (Greek: Πέργαμος, modern day Bergama in Turkey, 39°7′N 27°11′E) was an ancient Greek city, in Mysia, northwestern Anatolia, 16 miles from the Aegean Sea, located on a promontory on the north side of the river Caicus (modern day Bakırçay), that became an important kingdom during the Hellenistic period, under the Attalid dynasty, 282-129 BC. G34

The Attalids, the descendants of Attalus, the father of Philetaerus who came to power in 282 BC, were among the most loyal supporters of Rome among the Hellenistic successor states. Under Attalus I, they allied with Rome against Philip V of Macedon, during the first and second Macedonian Wars, and again under Eumenes II, against Perseus of Macedon, during the Third Macedonian War. For support against the Seleucids, the Attalids were rewarded with all the former Seleucid domains in Asia Minor.

The Attalids ruled with intelligence and generosity. Many documents survive showing how the Attalids would support the growth of towns through sending in skilled artisans and by remitting taxes. They allowed the Greek cities in their domains to maintain nominal independence. They sent gifts to Greek cultural sites like Delphi, Delos, and Athens. They defeated the invading Celts. They remodeled the acropolis of Pergamum after the Acropolis in Athens. The Great Altar of Pergamon is in the Pergamon Museum of Berlin.

Pergamon had the second best library in the ancient Greek civilisation, after Alexandria. When the Ptolemies stopped exporting papyrus, partly because of competitors and partly because of shortages, the Pergamenes invented a new substance to use in codices, called pergaminus or parchment after the city. This was made of fine calf skin, a predecessor of vellum.

When Attalus III died without an heir in 133 BC he bequeathed Pergamon to Rome, in order to prevent a civil war.

Close to the city was a sanctuary of Asclepius, the god of healing. In this place people with health problems could bath in the water of the sacred spring, and in the patients' dreams Asklepios would appear in a vision to tell them how to cure their illness. Archeology has found lots of gifts and dedications that people would make afterwards, such as small terracotta body parts, no doubt representing what had been healed.

In the first century AD, the Christian Church at Pergamon was one of the Seven Churches to which the Book of Revelation was addressed (Revelation 1:11, NRSV).

Pergamon, Mysia, struck by Philetairos, 282-263 BC.
Obv: head of athena wearing attic helmet right.
Rev: FILETAIROU, Asklepios seated left, feeding snake from patera.
SNG BN 1643 ff.

ecoli
persian_imitative_obol.jpg
Persian Empire, Imitative obol35 viewsPersian Empire, Gaza, Samaria, or Judaea. c. 375-333 B.C. Imitative of Athens AR obol. 8/7mm, .59 g. Hendin 1011. Obverse: helmeted head of Athena right, olive leaves on helmeted, eye in profile. Reverse: AOE, owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent behind. Ex Forvm.1 commentsLucas H
KneelingKing.jpg
Persian Empire, Lydia, Darius I 1/6 Siglos47 viewsPERSIA, Achaemenid Empire. temp. Darios I to Xerxes I. Circa 505-480 BC. AR Sixth Siglos (7mm, 0.84 g).

O: Persian king or hero in kneeling-running stance right, drawing bow
R: Incuse punch.

Carradice type II; Winzer 1.8 (Darios I), this denomination is otherwise unpublished in refs; cf. Klein 756 (1/4 siglos); SNG Kayhan 1027 (1/3 siglos).

"Darius I the Great ruled the Persian Empire at its peak. He is mentioned in the Biblical books of Ezra, Nehemiah, Daniel, Haggai, and Zechariah. He continued to allow the Jewish people to return to Israel and provided money for the restoration of the Temple in Jerusalem, which was completed in his sixth year. Darius invaded Greece to subjugate it and to punish Athens and Eretria for aiding the Ionian Revolt. He subjugated Thrace and forced Macedon to become a client kingdom, but his campaign ended at Marathon, where he was famously defeated by a smaller Greek army." - Forvm
Nemonater
NektaneboMed.jpg
PHARONIC KINGS OF EGYPT, Nektanebo II, 360-343 BC40 viewsAE
15 mm (4 mm thick), 4.4 gm
Obv: Ram leaping left, head reverted.
Rev: Scales of Ma'at; countermark with helmeted bust right.
Ref: Weiser 1

A few months ago a friend, upon hearing that I was collecting ancient coins, said he would like to have a coin issued by a pharaoh. Hmm. "I don't think there are any", I replied. I hadn't come across any in my whirlwind but voluminous searching, although I hadn't been searching for such a coin.

Turns out there are some. Nektanebo II, the last native pharaoh of Egypt, issued coins in bronze, gold, and perhaps silver. Prior to that, Egypt did produce some coins for the purpose of international trading-- imitations of Athens, Attica tets, for instance-- but Nektanebo appears to be the first pharaoh to issue coins for local use. Maybe.

Per auction house sales information from half a decade ago, it seems these bronzes were extremely rare. I wonder if a small horde was recently found because the prices have fallen and there are currently six specimens in retail e-stores and at least two more were auctioned off recently.

There is not universal agreement regarding the issuer, purpose, and location of circulation of these coins. Sellers tout it as the "sole pharonic issue"-- I'm sure that boosts desirability-- but it may not be accurate. Hope it is though.

CNG, in the description of this coin (one similar to mine),

Nekht-her-hebet, or Nektanebo II as he was known to the Greeks, was the nephew of Pharaoh Tachos (Djed-her). Placed in command of the Egyptian army in Syria during the Satrapal Revolt, he turned his troops against his own king and took Egypt by force. In 351-350 BC he repelled a Persian invasion but was driven from his throne in 344-343 BC by a second assault. He fled Egypt, found refuge in Ethiopia, and retained control of Upper Egypt for another few years. As the last pharaoh, Alexander sought to connect himself with Nektanebo after conquering Egypt, allowing the rumor that he was in fact his son to spread. Alexander’s connection to the pharaoh lasted, and for years the sarcophagus of Nektanebo II, now in the British Museum, was considered to be Alexander’s own.

The traditional attribution of this issue to Nektanebo, however enticing, has been increasingly contested. Finds of the coins have been consistently noted outside of Egypt. Kevin Butcher has placed the bronzes at Antioch circa 1st century BC, where the leaping ram imagery would fit well.

I wanted this coin for several reasons.

First, well… a pharaoh's coin? That's just cool.

Second, it depicts the Scales of Ma'at. Such a device was used in Jitterbug Perfume, a book by Tom Robbins, one of my favorite authors. In it, at a limbo-like way station, the newly dead have their hearts weighed against a feather. The heart must be light as a feather to move on. I was unaware until seeing this coin that the scene was taken directly from Egyptian mythology.

Third, it is for an almost-finished themed collection I've been working on.

Nektanebo II (translated from Egyptian "Nakhthorheb (meryhathor)" or "Nekht-her-hebet" or "Nekht-harhebi" ; alternate spelling Nectanebo), the last native Egyptian pharaoh, part of the 30th dynasty. His 17 year reign spanned from 360 to 343 BC.
Birth name: Nakht-hor-heb (mery-hathor) “Strong is His Lord Horus, Beloved of Hathor”
Throne name: Snedjem-ib-re Setep-en-inhur “Pleasing to the Heart of Re, Chosen of Onuris”

Additional biographic information about Nektanebo II
http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/nectanebo1.htm

About Ma'at, the Scales of Ma'at, and the weighing of hearts:
http://www.egyptartsite.com/judgement.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maat
http://www.aldokkan.com/religion/hall_maat.htm

4 commentsTIF
PhilistiaOverstruck.jpg
PHILISTIA (PALESTINE), Overstruck Drachm32 viewsPHILISTIA (PALESTINE), Uncertain mint. Mid 5th century-333 BC. AR Drachm (15mm, 3.95 g, 12h). Imitating Athens. Rotated 145 degrees and overstruck with same dies.
O: Helmeted head of Athena right, with profile eye
R: Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig left; all within incuse square.
-Gitler & Tal IX.1D; HGC 10, –.

The Philistian coins belong to a stratum of autonomous municipal coinages that enabled daily trade without being noticed by the Persian administration. The Persian Empire did not care about the fiscal policy of its subjects, so long as the taxes were paid. Obviously, the provincials were free to choose their own coin-types. Like their Northern neighbors in Samaria and Jerusalem, the Philistians adopted the Attic coin standard, and a great many of their coins are imitations of the Attic coins circulating in the Levant.
1 commentsNemonater
Phlious_obol_.jpg
Phliasia, Phlious, late 6th-early 5th Century BC, AR Obol or One Twelfth Stater22 viewsBent leg right.
Incuse square divided into six irregular compartments.

HGC 5, 136; BCD Peloponnesos 78 (same dies); Gr. Mu. 803,pl. XIII, 24; Seltman, Athens, pl. XIV a (= NC 1890, pl. XIX, 21).

(8 mm, 0.91 g).
CNG; ex- BCD Collection

One of eighteen examples known.

The bent leg obols of Phlious are amongst the earliest coinage of the Peloponnesos. The coins were struck on the Milesian (Asiatic) weight standard with a stater of 14.1 gm, in contrast to the Aeginitic weight standard that came to prevail on the subsequent coinage and throughout the Peloponessos in the fifth century BC. This use of Milesian weight standard and the iconography of the bent leg, which has no later representation in the coinage of Phlious make for something of an enigma. The weight standard may reflect the dominant trade partners of Phlious at the time, while the bent leg is less readily explained. As a result of these enigmatic attributes, there has been controversy over attribution of this coin type. In the nineteenth century, the type was commonly attributed to Phaselis in Lycia. Subsequently, Seltman attributed the coinage as part of the Athenian Wappenmunzen series; specifically he attributed the type to the Alkmaeonid exiles of Athens in Phocis. However, recent studies refute these earlier attributions. Recorded find spots of all but one example have been in Phliasia or nearby Arkadia. This plus the fact that the largest associated denomination, a half stater bears the letter Φ make the attribution to Phlious certain. Eighteen examples of the type are known, one in each of the Berlin and London museum collections, twelve from the dispersal of the BCD collection and four others from other collections. Five obverse dies are accounted for in the series.
n.igma
eumenia_BMCphrygia21.jpg
Phrygia, Eumeneia (Fulviana), Fulvia BMC Phrygia 2133 viewsFulvia, wife of Marcus Antonius, c. 41-40 BC
AE 20, 7.43g
struck under magistrate Zmertorix, son of Philonidas
obv. Head of Fulvia as winged Nike, draped, with chignon, r.
rev. Athena, in chiton and peplos, helmeted, advancing l., holding spear and round
shield
FOVLOVIANWN / ZMERTORIGOC / FILWNIDOV
RPC I 3139; BMC Phrygia 21
rare, good F

Fulvia was the first real woman depicted on a coin!

Fulvia was first married to P. Clodius, the Roman firebrand. After his violent death in 52 BC she married C. Scribonius Curio, who likewise met an untimely end in Africa. She married Mark Antony in 44 BC, and became an outspoken defender of his interests in Rome while he campaigned in the east (and enjoyed the attentions of Cleopatra). The city of Eumenia was re-named Fulviana in her honor by Antony's partisans. By 40 BC Fulvia's strident attacks on Octavian had provoked a reaction, and she had to flee first to southern Italy and then to Greece. She met Antony at Athens, where he upbraided her for antagonizing Octavian when he was trying to maintain a semblance of cordial relations. Fulvia died at Sicyon shortly thereafter. Sometime afterward these coins struck at "Fulviana" had their ethnic scratched off.
Jochen
Bactria,_Antimachos_I_AR_Tetradrachm~0.jpg
Poseidon - Ποσειδῶν441 viewsPoseidon is portrayed on the reverse of this Baktrian tetradrachm issued by Antimachos I (ca. 175-170 BC). A uniquely curious choice for a landlocked country, although the association of Poseidon with earthquakes (which regularly shake the region of Afghanistan) may have been a determining factor in Antimachos choice of a patron god.

Poseidon (Ποσειδῶν) was the god of the sea and the earth-shaker (god of earthquakes) of Greek mythology. He was the protector of many Hellenic cities, although he lost the contest for Athens to Athena. The contest revolved around a gift of each god to the city, with the preferred one of the Athenians determining the outcome. Poseidon struck the ground with his trident, whereupon a spring came into being, only its water proved salty. Athena on the other hand, offered an olive tree making the choice of the Athenians decisive. To placate Poseidon on their choice the Athenians erected a temple to him (Poseidon) at Cape Sounion to the south of Athens.


4 commentsLloyd T
SULLA_MINE_BOTH.jpg
Pseudo-Athenian New Style Tetradrachm c86-84 BC6 viewsObs: Fine style head of Athena Parthenos with prominent highly artistic horse protomes.
Rev: Owl standing on panathenaic amphora
2 Monograms of Roman official Marcus Lucullus: Quaestor
MAPKOY TAMIOY
Name and office
!6.40gm 28.5mm
Thompson Sulla ll Obs: 1315 Rev: NEW?
All surrounded by olive wreath
cicerokid
ptolemy_II_s581.jpg
Ptolemy II, Zeus, AE 25.7, Svoronos 58123 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 581, SNG Cop 124, Weiser 12, VF, 14.640g, 25.7mm, 0o, obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left, with spread wings, “ΣΩ” monogram above shield over “ΧΑΡ” left, “Λ” between legs; nice style. The pre-reform coinage of Ptolemy II with Galatian shield was probably minted between 275 B.C. and 262 B.C. No central depressions appear on these coins. This type with a XAP monogram under the shield has been found in Greece and may have been used to pay troops during the Chremonidean war, during which Ptolemy II supported Athens. ex FORVMPodiceps
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ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Elagabalus, AE30, Etenna in Pisidia, Zeus enthroned right, unlisted209 viewsEtenna in Pisidia, Elagabalus, 218-222 AD.
Æ30 (29-30mm / 16.42 g),
Obv.: [AY] K M AYP - ANT[ΩNEINO] , laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: ETEN - NEΩ[N] , Zeus enthroned right, holding scepter. Unlisted, same obv. die as von Aulock, Pisidien II, no. 568, pl. 13 ; Rev: cf. ANS 1981.40.23 .

Curtis Clay:
This coin seems to be from the same obv. die as von Aulock, Pisidien II, no. 568, pl. 13. ANTWNEINO before face, vA attributes to Elagabalus, though the same coin, in Athens, had earlier been published as Caracalla.
Zeus seated right is a new type for Elagabalus at this mint, though vA has it both earlier, for Septimius and for Caracalla under Septimius, and later, for Sev. Alex. and Tranquillina.
Arminius
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ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Macrinus. AE 30. Nicopolis Ad Istrum.113 viewsMacrinus (217-218), Bronze,Moesia Inferior: Nicopolis ad Istrum, c. AD 217-218; AE (g 14,28; mm 30; h 1); AYT K M OΠEΛ - CEY MAKPINOC, laureate and cuirassed bust r., Rv. VΠ CTA ΛONΓINOY NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC IC / TPON, Athens standing r., holding spear and shield. Varbanov -; AMNG I, 1476. Green patina, extremely fine.3 commentsRuslan K
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ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Titus Tetradrachm349 viewsSilver tetradrachm

AYTOK TITOY KAIΣO YEΣΠAΣIANOY ΣEB
laureate head of Titus right

ΣAPAΠIΣ
bust of Serapis right, wearing taenia, modius on head ornamented with branches of laurel, date LB (year 2) right

Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 79 - 28 Aug 80 A.D
12.254g, 25.4mm

Milne 456 - 457; Geissen 319; Dattari 426; cf. BMC Alexandria p. 34, 281 (year 3); Emmett 235

Ex-Forum

This is the Wildwinds example

Ptolemy Soter, wanting to integrate Egyptian religion with that of their Hellenic rulers, promoted worship of Serapis as a deity that would win the reverence of both groups alike. This was despite the curses of the Egyptian priests against the gods of previous foreign rulers (i.e Set who was lauded by the Hyksos). Alexander the Great had attempted to use Amun for this purpose, but Amum was more prominent in Upper Egypt, and not as popular in Lower Egypt, where the Greeks had stronger influence. The Greeks had little respect for animal-headed figures, and so an anthropomorphic statue was chosen as the idol, and proclaimed as the equivalent of the highly popular Apis. It was named Aser-hapi (i.e. Osiris-Apis), which became Serapis, and was said to be Osiris in full, rather than just his Ka (life force). Ptolemy's efforts were successful - in time Serapis was held by the Egyptians in the highest reverence above all other deities, and he was adored in Athens and other Greek cities.

4 commentsJay GT4
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Augustus, AR Denarius, Eastern Mint (Northern Peloponnese ?) 21B.C53 viewsObv: AVGVSTVS Bare head of Augustus right
Rev: IOVI OLVI Hexastyle temple
Weight: 4.11g

Sear RCV I 1614 BMCRE 666 BMCRR East 257 RSC 182

There is a certain amount of difference of opinion over the reverse of this coin, not only from the reading of the legend, but also the date and place of minting. Sear gives the reverse legend as IOV OLV and BMCs Roman Empire and Republic as IOVI OLV or IOVI OLVM.. However, both references give the date as 20/21B.C. to commemorate Augustus' visit to Athens, but Sear says that another reference prefers to assign it to the Pergamene Mint six years earlier. This coin here certainly seems to give a clear reverse legend as IOVI OLVI.
1 commentsnemesis
GG-AugJupit35__9[2].jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Augustus, AR Denarius, Eastern Mint (Northern Peloponnese ?) 21B.C.37 viewsObv: AVGVSTVS Bare head of Augustus right
Rev: IOVI OLVI Hexastyle temple
Weight: 4.11g

Sear RCV I 1614 BMCRE 666 BMCRR East 257 RSC 182

There is a certain amount of difference of opinion over the reverse of this coin, not only from the reading of the legend, but also the date and place of minting. Sear gives the reverse legend as IOV OLV and BMCs Roman Empire and Republic as IOVI OLV or IOVI OLVM.. However, both references give the date as 20/21B.C. to commemorate Augustus' visit to Athens, but Sear says that another reference prefers to assign it to the Pergamene Mint six years earlier. This coin here certainly seems to give a clear reverse legend as IOVI OLVI.
1 commentsnemesis
Vespas10b.jpg
Roman Empire, Vespasian, unpublished variant of RIC 1497 and RPC II 147095 viewsDescription: Vespasian medium bronze, 11,1g, 30mm, 6h
Obv.: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVGVST, laureate head right
Rev.: PONT MAX TR POT P P.COS.VIII.CENS (around) S C (field), Ceres, veiled, standing left with two corn ears and cornucopiae.
RIC 1497 (not Roman mint, possibly Ephesus, AD 77-78) var. (obv. legend ends in AVGVST (B-type) not AVGVSTVS (A-type)). The coin as a B-type is probably unpublished so far in combination with this reverse.
RIC 1497 matches with RPC II 1470 and was R3 (only one known). The recent RPC S3 Supplement reports of another example found in Athens during excavations (To Mouseio kai è anaskaphè. Eurèmata apo ton chôro anegersès tou neou mouseiou tès Akropolès (Athens, 2006), p. 45, n° 90.)

1 commentsCharles S
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, 32 BCE60 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 32 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.72g; 18mm).
Athens Mint.

Obv: ANTON AVG IMP III COS DES III III V R P C. Bare head of Antony facing right.

Rev: ANTONIVS AVG IMP III, in two lines.

References: Crawford 542/2; HCRI 347; Sydenham 1209.

Provenance: Ex Andrew McCabe Collection [CNG eSale 385 (26 Oct 2016) Lot 470]; CNG 49 (17 Mar 1999), Lot 1316; Reinhold Faelten Collection [Stack's (20 Jan 1938) Lot 1495].

On the obverse, behind Antony’s ear, a small letter P, likely an engraver’s signature, is hidden within the hair line. This coin was struck in Athens in 32 BCE, while Antony and Cleopatra lived extravagantly among the Greeks. The coin’s inscription refers to a designated third consulship that Antony was supposed to share with Octavian in 31 BCE. Around the time this coin was minted, Antony notified his wife, Octavia (Octavian’s sister), in Rome that he was divorcing her. Octavian was outraged. Cleopatra’s growing influence over Antony was soon used by Octavian as progaganda to unite Italy and the West against Antony. Thus, the designated third consulship referenced on this coin never occurred, as the designated consuls went to war instead, ending with Antony’s naval defeat at Actium in September 31 BCE.
5 commentsCarausius
AntonyAugurCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, AR Denarius - Crawford 533/218 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius. 43 BCE.
AR Denarius (4.07g; 18mm).
Military mint in Athens, Summer 38 BCE.

Obverse: M ANTONIVS M F M N AVGVR IMP TER; Antony in the priestly robes of an augur, standing right and holding lituus.

Reverse: III VIR R P C COS DESIG ITER ET TERT; Radiate head of Sol facing right.

References: Crawford 533/2; HCRI 267; Sydenham 1199; BMCRR (East) 141; Antonia 80.

Provenance: Ex Kentfield Coll. [Heritage Auction 3067 (9 Jun 2018) Lot 33340]; Michele Baranowski Auction (25 Feb 1931), Lot 1274.

In 50 BCE, Antony was appointed to the College of Augurs, an important group whose job was divining the will of the gods by interpreting auspices (birds and such) and providing advice based on these divinations. Antony was particularly proud of this appointment and referred to it frequently on his coinage, perhaps as a means of highlighting his traditional republican sensibilities. On this coin, he is depicted in full augur regalia. Sol on the reverse is a reference to The East, which Antony controlled per the renewal of the Second Triumvirate several months earlier. The inscriptions reference his augurship, second imperatorial acclamation, and designated second and third consulships. The coin was likely struck in Athens where Antony and Octavia were living after their marriage.
2 commentsCarausius
Mark_Antony_AR_Denarius_Silanus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, Mark Antony, AR Denarius, Athens 32 B.C,79 viewsSear 1477

ANTON AVG IMP III COS DES III III VRPC, bare head of Mark Antony to right; reverse M SILANVS AVG/Q PRO COS.
4 commentsOptimus
Hekatomnos.jpg
Satraps OF Caria. Hekatomnos (Circa 392/1-377/6 BC)17 viewsAR Tetradrachm

25 mm, 14.90 g

Obverse: Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding labrys over his right shoulder and long scepter in his left.

Reverse: EKATOMNΩ, Lion at bay to right.

Hecatomnus 16. Karl 3. SNG von Aulock 2354.

Hecatomnos was t