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Search results - "Antonius"
artid975_combined.jpg
26 viewsJudaea, Procurators. Antonius Felix. 52-59 CE. in the name of Britannicus Caesar (BPIT).
Æ Prutah (16mm, 2.64 gm.). Jerusalem mint. Dated RY 14 of Claudius (54 CE). Two crossed shields / Palm tree.

Ref : Hendin 1348
Meshorer TJC 340
RPC I 4971
GIC 5626
R. Smits, Numismatist for Numismall
Elagabalus_Moushmov_644.jpg
29 Elagabalus24 viewsELAGABALUS
AE 30 Pentassarion. Markianopolis, Moesia Inferior.
Legate: Julius Antonius Seleucus,

AVT K M AVRHLIOC ANTWNEINOC, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right. / VP IOVL ANT CELEUKOU MARKIANOPOLITWN, Nemesis-Aequitas st. l., holding scales and parazonium, wheel at foot.

Moushmov 644; Varbanov 1578
Sosius
IMG_2850.JPG
Antonius pius caesarea maritima mint 85 viewsObv.: laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev.:COL PRIMA FL AVG CAESAR, Apollo, nude standing to front looking left holding in right bow (?) leaning with left on tripod-lebes which is encircled by serpent. Rare. Very fine.
1 commentsMaritima
coins54.JPG
Laodicea ad Mare; Antonius Pius17 viewsAntoninus Pius Æ 25mm of Laodicea ad Mare. Dated year 188=140-141 AD. AVTO KAI TI AILI ADPI ANTWNEINOC CEB, laureate & draped bust left / IOVLIEWN TWN KAI LAODIKEWN, bust of Tyche as city goddess left, wearing headdress of gateway, turret, lighthouse and walls; KO to left, HP P to right (date).ecoli
elagab_homonia_res2.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS30 views218 - 222 AD
AE 26.5 mm 11.32 g
O: AVT K M AV R ANTWNINOC Laureate bust right, from behind
R: [VP IOVL AN]T CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLITWN Homonoia standing left holding patera and cornucopia
Consular Legate: Julius Antonius Seleucus
Markianopolis
laney
elagab_maesa_hermes_mark.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS & JULIA MAESA43 views218 - 222 AD
AE Pentassarion 27 mm, 11.85 g
(Julius Antonius Seleucus, consular legate)
O: AVT K M AVP ANTΩNEINOC AVΓ IOVΛIA MAICA AVΓ.
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Elagabal right, facing draped bust of Julia Maesa left. (confronted busts)
d.s.
R: YΠ IOYΛ ANT CEΛEYKOY MAPKIANOΠOΛITΩN.
Hermes standing left, holding purse and caduceus, resting with elbow on column; E in right field.
MOESIA INFERIOR. Marcianopolis; cf. Varbanov 1612
d.s.
1 commentslaney
elagab_maesa_hera_2.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS & JULIA MAESA11 views218-222 AD (Antonius Seleucus, consular legate)
AE 29 mm, 11.25 g
O: Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust of Elagabalus right vis à vis draped bust of Julia Maesa left
R: Hera standing left, holding patera and scepter, E in right field
Moesia Inferior, Markianopolis. cf. Mouchmov 688; Varbanov 1626
laney
elagab_maesa_salus_r.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS (with Julia Maesa)11 viewsAD 218-222. (Julius Antonius Seleucus, consular legate)
Æ Pentassarion 27 mm; 10.92 g
O: Laureate head of Elagabalus right vis à vis diadmed and draped bust left of Maesa
R: Hygieia (Salus) standing right, feeding serpent held in arms; E (denomination) to left.
MOESIA INFERIOR, Marcianopolis. AMNG I 959; Hristova & Jekov 6.28.21.2; Varbanov 1636
laney
elagab_maesa_zeus_r.jpg
(0218) Elagabalus, with Julia Maesa11 viewsAD 218-222. (Julius Antonius Seleucus, legatus consularis)
AE Pentassarian 27 mm, 8.95 g
O: Confronted busts of Elagabalus right, laureate, draped, and cuirassed, and Maesa left, draped and wearing stephane
R: Zeus standing left, holding patera and scepter; E (mark of value) to right.
MOESIA INFERIOR, Marcianopolis. ref. a) AMNG I/1, 936
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1642
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.28.1.2 var. (E in right field)
laney
Antonius_Pius.jpg
*SOLD*17 viewsAntoninus Pius AE/As

Attribution: RIC III, 1024
Date: AD 158-159
Obverse: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TR P XXII, laureate head r.
Reverse: FORTVNA OBSEQENS, Fortuna standing l. holding patera and rudder set on a prow in r. hand cornucopia in l., S-C across fields, COS IIII in exergue
Size: 23 mm
Weight: 10.21 grams
Noah
Marcus-Antonius_LEG-XII_Before-and-After_.jpg
001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), AR-denarius, Crawf 544-26, LEG-XII, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, praetorian galley right, Before and After the Cleaning125 views001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), AR-denarius, Crawf 544-26, LEG-XII, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, praetorian galley right,
avers:- LEG-XII, legionary eagle (aquila) between two standards.
revers:- ANT-AVG-III-VIR•R•P•C•, praetorian galley right.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-18,5mm, weight: 3,39g, axes: 5h,
mint: Legionary Denarius, date: 32-31 B.C., ref: Crawford-544/26, Sydneham-1230, RSC-41,
Before and After the Cleaning
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Marcus-Antonius_AR-Den_LEG-II_ANT-AVG-III__VIR_R_P_C__Crafw-_Syd-_RSC-_Q-001_5h_17,5mm_3,29ga-s.jpg
001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-14, AR-denarius, LEG-II, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,68 views001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-14, AR-denarius, LEG-II, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,
avers:- LEG-II, legionary eagle (aquila) between two standards.
revers:- ANT-AVG-III-VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley sailing right, mast with banners at prow.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5mm, weight: 3,29g, axes: 5h,
mint: Legionary Denarius, date: 32-31 B.C., ref: Crawford-544/14, Sydneham-1216, RSC-27, BMCRR East 185-225; Babelon: Antonia 101; Sydenham 1212 ; Catalli 2001,886.
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Marcus-Antonius_AR-Den_LEG-III_ANT-AVG-III__VIR_R_P_C__Crafw-_Syd-_RSC-_Q-001_9h_18,5-20mm_2,89g-s.jpg
001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-15, AR-denarius, LEG-III, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,77 views001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-15, AR-denarius, LEG-III, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,
avers:- LEG-III, legionary eagle (aquila) between two standards.
revers:- ANT-AVG-III-VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley sailing right, mast with banners at prow.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-20mm, weight: 2,89g, axes: 9h,
mint: Legionary Denarius, date: B.C., ref: Crawford- 544/15, Sydneham-1217, RSC-28,
Q-001
quadrans
Marcus-Antonius_AR-Den_LEG-IV_ANT-AVG-III__VIR_R_P_C__Crafw-544-17_Syd-1219_RSC-30_Q-001_7h_17-18mm_3,36gx-s.jpg
001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-17, AR-denarius, LEG-IV, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,101 views001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-17, AR-denarius, LEG-IV, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,
avers:- LEG-IV, legionary eagle (aquila) between two standards.
revers:- ANT-AVG-III-VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley sailing right, mast with banners at prow.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-18mm, weight: 3,36g, axes: 7h,
mint: Legionary Denarius, date: B.C., ref: Crawford- 544/17, Sydneham-1219, RSC-30,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Marcus-Antonius_AR-Den_LEG-VI_ANT-AVG-III__VIR_R_P_C__Crafw-544-19_Syd-1223_RSC-33_Q-001_5h_17,5-18mm_3,35g-s.jpg
001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-19, AR-denarius, LEG-VI, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,143 views001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-19, AR-denarius, LEG-VI, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,
avers:- LEG-VI, legionary eagle (aquila) between two standards.
revers:- ANT-AVG-III-VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley sailing right, mast with banners at prow. Nice Countermark above the galley.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-18mm, weight: 3,35g, axes: 5h,
mint: Legionary Denarius, date: B.C., ref: Crawford- 544/19, Sydneham-1223, RSC-33,
Q-001
quadrans
Marcus-Antonius_AR-Den_LEG-VIII_ANT-AVG-III__VIR_R_P_C__Crafw-_Syd-_RSC-_Q-001_10h_17,5mm_3,47ga-s.jpg
001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-21, AR-denarius, LEG-VIII, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,70 views001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-21, AR-denarius, LEG-VIII, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,
avers:- LEG-VIII, legionary eagle (aquila) between two standards.
revers:- ANT-AVG-III-VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley sailing right, mast with banners at prow.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5mm, weight: 3,47g, axes: 10h,
mint: Legionary Denarius, date: B.C., ref: Crawford-544/21, Sydneham-1225, RSC-35,
Q-001
quadrans
Marcus-Antonius_AR-Den_LEG-XI_ANT-AVG-III__VIR_R_P_C__Crafw-_Syd-_RSC-_Q-001_5h_17,5mm_3,29g-s.jpg
001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-25, AR-denarius, LEG-XI, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,62 views001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-25, AR-denarius, LEG-XI, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,
avers:- LEG-XI, legionary eagle (aquila) between two standards.
revers:- ANT-AVG-III-VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley sailing right, mast with banners at prow.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5mm, weight: 3,29g, axes: 5h,
mint: Legionary Denarius, date: B.C., ref: Crawford-544/25, Sydneham-1229, RSC-39,
Q-001
quadrans
Marcus-Antonius_AR-Den_LEG-XII_ANT-AVG-III__VIR_R_P_C__Crafw-544-26_Syd-1230_RSC-41_Q-001_5h_17-18,5mm_3,39-s.jpg
001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-26, AR-denarius, LEG-XII, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,88 views001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-26, AR-denarius, LEG-XII, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,
avers:- LEG-XII, legionary eagle (aquila) between two standards.
revers:- ANT-AVG-III-VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley sailing right, mast with banners at prow.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-18,5mm, weight: 3,39g, axes: 5h,
mint: Legionary Denarius, date: 32-31 B.C., ref: Crawford-544/26, Sydneham-1230, RSC-41,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Marcus-Antonius_AR-Den_LEG-XII_ANT-AVG-III__VIR_R_P_C__Crafw-544-26_Syd-1230_RSC-41_Q-001_5h_17-18,5mm_3,39ga-s.jpg
001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-26, AR-denarius, LEG-XII, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,173 views001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-26, AR-denarius, LEG-XII, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,
avers:- LEG-XII, legionary eagle (aquila) between two standards.
revers:- ANT-AVG-III-VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley sailing right, mast with banners at prow.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-18,5mm, weight: 3,39g, axes: 5h,
mint: Legionary Denarius, date: 32-31 B.C., ref: Crawford-544/26, Sydneham-1230, RSC-41,
After Cleaning
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Marcus-Antonius_AR-Den_LEG-XV_ANT-AVG-III__VIR_R_P_C__Crafw-544-30_Syd-1235_RSC-30_Q-001_5h_16,8-17mm_2,72g-s.jpg
001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-30, AR-denarius, LEG-XV, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,129 views001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-30, AR-denarius, LEG-XV, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,
avers:- LEG-XV, legionary eagle (aquila) between two standards.
revers:- ANT-AVG-III-VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley sailing right, mast with banners at prow.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 16,8-17mm, weight: 2,72g, axes: 5h,
mint: Legionary Denarius, date: 32-31 B.C., ref: Crawford-544/30, Sydneham-1235, RSC-47,
Q-001
"Legion XV Apollinaris was raised by Caesar in Gallia Cisalpina in 53 BC. In the time of Augustus-Tiberius the legion was stationed in Ljubljana, then in Carnuntum and later in Alexandria and took part in the Jewish War and the capture of Jerusalem. In the 2nd and 3rd century the legion fought mainly in the East against the Parthians."
1 commentsquadrans
Marcus-Antonius_AR-Den_LEG-XIX_ANT-AVG-III__VIR_R_P_C__Crafw-544-35_Syd-1242_RSC-55_Q-001_5h_18mm_3,44-s.jpg
001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-35, AR-denarius, LEG-XIX, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,120 views001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), Crawf 544-35, AR-denarius, LEG-XIX, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley right,
avers:- LEG-XIX, legionary eagle (aquila) between two standards.
revers:- ANT-AVG-III-VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley sailing right, mast with banners at prow.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,44g, axes: 5h,
mint: Legionary Denarius, date: 32-31 B.C., ref: Crawford-544/35, Sydneham-1242, RSC-55,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
1_Antonius_Pius_.jpg
009.Antonius Pius 138 - 161 AD28 viewsAR Denarius
Mint: Rome, Date: 151-152 AD
Obv: IMP CAES T AEL HADR ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP- Laureate head right.
Rev: TR POT XV COS IIII - Pax standing left with a branch in right hand & a scepter in left,left leg exposed.
Size: 19mm; 3.5gms
Ref: RIC III-216a
To shiny for the scan.
2 commentsbrian l
Antonius_Felix_procurator,_AE-16,_Prutah__Jerusalems_Israel_Palm_Hedin-652,_54_AD_Q-001_0h,_2,28_g_,_16_mm-s~0.jpg
012p Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), Judaea, Antonius Felix Procurator, under Claudius, (52-60 A.D.), AE-16(Prutah), Hedin 652, BRIT, Six branched palm tree,93 views012p Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), Judaea, Antonius Felix Procurator, under Claudius, (52-60 A.D.), AE-16(Prutah), Hedin 652, BRIT, Six branched palm tree,
avers:- NEPΩ KΛAV KAICP, Two crossed shields and spears.
revers:- BRIT, Six branched palm tree bearing two bunches of dates, L-IΔ, K-AI across field.
exerg: L/IΔ//K/AI, diameter: 16,0mm, weight: 2,28g, axes: 0h,
mint: Judaea, date: Dated Year of Claudius (Year 14 = 54 A.D.) ref: Hedin 652,
Q-001
quadrans
M-Antony-Syd-1246.jpg
017. Marcus Antonius.77 viewsDenarius, 32-31 BC.
Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C / Galley with rowers, standard at prow.
Reverse: LEG XXIII / Legionary eagle between two standards.
3.62 gm.. 17 mm.
Syd. #1246; RSC #60; Sear unlisted.

Mark Antony minted a long series of legionary coins for the use of the army and navy prior to the Battle of Actium (Sept. 2, 31 BC). The legion depicted on this coin - Legion XXIII - is one that we know nothing about.
1 commentsCallimachus
Marc-Aurelius_AR-Den_AVRELIVS-CAE-SAR-AVG-P-II-F-COS_IVVENTAS_RIC-423a-A-Pius_C-_Rome-140-44-AD_Q-001_0h_16,5-18mm_3,45ga-s.jpg
037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0423a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, IVVENTAS, Iuventas standing facing, 100 views037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0423a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, IVVENTAS, Iuventas standing facing,
avers:- AVRELIVS-CAE-SAR-AVG-P-II-F-COS, Bare-headed, draped bust right. (bust type not in RIC !!!).
revers:- IVVEN-TAS, Iuventas standing facing, head left, right hand dropping a grain of incense onto candelabrum-altar, and holding patera.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5-18mm, weight: 3,45g, axis:0h,
mint: Rome, date: 140-144 A.D., ref: RIC-423a, p- Antonius Pius, C-,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
037a_Marc-Aurelius_RIC-424a_AR-Den_AVRELIVS-CAE-SAR-AVG-P-II-F-COS_PIETAS-AV-G_A-Pius_C-451_Rome-140-44-AD_Q-001_1h_17-19mm_3,28ga-s.jpg
037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0424a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, PIETAS AVG, Sacrificial implements, #177 views037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0424a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, PIETAS AVG, Sacrificial implements, #1
avers: AVRELIVS-CAE-SAR-AVG-P-II-F-COS, bare head right.
revers: PIETAS-AV-G, Sacrificial implements.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-19mm, weight: 3,28g, axis:1h,
mint: Rome, date: 140-144 A.D., ref: RIC-424a, p-79 Antonius Pius, C-451,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
037a_Marc-Aurelius_RIC-424a_AR-Den_AVRELIVS-CAES-AR-AVG-P-II-F-COS_PIETAS-AV-G_A-Pius_C-451_Rome-140-44-AD_Q-002_1h_17-18,5mm_3,25g-s.jpg
037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0424a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, PIETAS AVG, Sacrificial implements, #262 views037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0424a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, PIETAS AVG, Sacrificial implements, #2
avers: AVRELIVS-CAES-AR-AVG-P-II-F-COS, bare head right.
revers: PIETAS-AV-G, Sacrificial implements.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-18,5mm, weight: 3,25g, axis:1h,
mint: Rome, date: 140-144 A.D., ref: RIC-424a, p-79 Antonius Pius, C-451,
Q-002
quadrans
037a_Marc-Aurelius_RIC-424a_AR-Den_AVRELIVS-CAESA-R-AVG-P-II-F-COS_PIETAS-AV-G_A-Pius_C-451_Rome-140-44-AD_Q-003_7h_17,5-18,0mm_3,08g-s.jpg
037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0424a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, PIETAS AVG, Sacrificial implements, #367 views037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0424a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, PIETAS AVG, Sacrificial implements, #3
avers: AVRELIVS-CAESA-R-AVG-P-II-F-COS, bare head right.
revers: PIETAS-AV-G, Sacrificial implements.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-18,0mm, weight: 3,08g, axis:1h,
mint: Rome, date: 140-144 A.D., ref: RIC-424a, p-79 Antonius Pius, C-451,
Q-003
2 commentsquadrans
Marc-Aurelius_AR-Den_AVRE(L)IVS-CAE-SAR-AVG-P-II-F_COS-II_RIC-429a-A-Pius_C-110_Rome_145-47-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_17,5-18mm_3,03g-s.jpg
037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0429a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, COS II, Honos standing facing,76 views037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0429a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, COS II, Honos standing facing,
avers:- AVRE(L)IVS-CAE-SAR-AVG-P-II-F, bare head right. (Legend error "L" missing !!!)
revers:- COS-II, Honos standing facing, head left, holding branch and cornucopiae.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-18mm, weight: 3,03g, axis:6h,
mint: Rome, date: 145-147 A.D., ref: RIC-429a, p-79 Antonius Pius, C-110,
Q-001
quadrans
c3947.JPG
040 Claudius39 viewsClaudius Æ As. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, bare head left / LIBERTAS AVGVSTA S-C, Libertas standing facing, with pileus and extending left hand. Cohen 47.




"Claudius was born at Lugdunum, in the consulship of Iullus Antonius and Fabius Africanus, on August 1st, 10 B.C., the very day when the first altar was dedicated there to Augustus the God; and he was given the name Tiberius Claudius Drusus. Subsequently he assumed the surname Germanicus after his brother had been admitted into the Julian House as Tiberius's adopted son."
Randygeki(h2)
coin325.JPG
104. Antonius Pius16 viewsAntoninus Pius AE As. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P IMP II, laureate head right / TR POT XIX COS IIII S-C in wreath. Cohen 999. Ric 958

ecoli
coin349.JPG
104. Antonius Pius17 viewsecoli
ConsecratioPanoramaBlack.jpg
15 Marcus Aurelius for Divus Antoninus Pius RIC 43647 viewsAntonius Pius. Ar Denarius. Marcus Aurelius for Divus Antoninus Pius. Rome mint. 161 AD. Obv: Obv.: DIVVS ANTONINVS, Bare head of Divus Antoninus Pius right. Rev: CONSECRATIO, Decorated funeral pyre (pyra) of four storeys, decorated with hangings and garlands, surmounted by quadriga.
C 164; RIC 436

Very diffcult coin to photograph, but it turned out decent enough.
Paddy
0023-070np_noir.jpg
1641 - Mark Antony and Lucius Antonius, Denarius236 viewsDenarius minted in Ephesus in 41 BC
M ANT IMP AVG III VIR RPCM NERVA PROQ P, Bare head of Mark Antony right
L ANTONIUS COS, Bare head of Lucius Antonius right
3.58 gr
Ref : HCRI # 246, RCV #1509, Cohen #2
Following description taken from NAC auction 40, #617, about an other example of the same coin :
"This denarius, depicting the bare heads of Marc Antony and his youngest brother Lucius Antony, is a rare dual-portrait issue of the Imperatorial period. The family resemblance is uncanny, and one wonders if they truly looked this much alike, or if it is another case of portrait fusion, much like we observe with the dual-portrait billon tetradrachms of Antioch on which the face of the Egyptian queen Cleopatra VII takes on the square dimensions of Marc Antony. When Antony fled Rome to separate himself from Octavian and to take up his governorship in Gaul, Lucius went with him, and suffered equally from the siege of Mutina. This coin, however, was struck in a later period, when Lucius had for a second time taken up arms against Octavian in the west. Marc Antony was already in the east, and that is the region from which this coinage emanates. Since Lucius lost the ‘Perusine War’ he waged against Octavian, and was subsequently appointed to an office in Spain, where he died, it is likely that he never even saw one of his portrait coins."
3 commentsPotator II
FulviaQuinariusLion.jpg
1ae2 Fulvia45 viewsFirst wife of Marc Antony

ca 83-40 BC

AR Quinarius
Bust of Victory right with the likeness of Fulvia, III VIR R P C
Lion right between A and XLI; ANTONI above, IMP in ex

RSC 3, Syd 1163, Cr489/6

Fulvia was the first Roman non-mythological woman to appear on Roman coins. She gained access to power through her marriage to three of the most promising men of her generation, Publius Clodius Pulcher, Gaius Scribonius Curio, and Marcus Antonius. All three husbands were politically active populares, tribunes, and supporters of Julius Caesar. Fulvia married Mark Antony in 47 or 46 BC, a few years after Curio's death, although Cicero suggested that Fulvia and Antony had had a relationship since 58 BC. According to him, while Fulvia and Antony were married, Antony once left a military post to sneak back into Rome during the night and personally deliver a love letter to Fulvia describing his love for her and how he had stopped seeing the famous actress Cytheris. Cicero also suggested that Antony married Fulvia for her money. At the time of their marriage, Antony was an established politician. He had already been tribune in 49 BC, commanded armies under Caesar and was Master of the Horse in 47 BC. As a couple, they were a formidable political force in Rome, and had two sons together, Marcus Antonius Antyllus and Iullus Antonius.

Suetonius wrote, "[Antony] took a wife, Fulvia, the widow of Clodius the demagogue, a woman not born for spinning or housewifery, nor one that could be content with ruling a private husband, but prepared to govern a first magistrate, or give orders to a commander-in-chief. So that Cleopatra had great obligations to her for having taught Antony to be so good a servant, he coming to her hands tame and broken into entire obedience to the commands of a mistress. He used to play all sorts of sportive, boyish tricks, to keep Fulvia in good-humour. As, for example, when Caesar, after his victory in Spain, was on his return, Antony, among the rest, went out to meet him; and, a rumour being spread that Caesar was killed and the enemy marching into Italy, he returned to Rome, and, disguising himself, came to her by night muffled up as a servant that brought letters from Antony. She, with great impatience, before received the letter, asks if Antony were well, and instead of an answer he gives her the letter; and, as she was opening it, took her about the neck and kissed her."

After Julius Caesar was assassinated, Antony became the most powerful man in Rome. Fulvia was heavily involved in the political aftermath. After Caesar's death, the senate realized his popularity and declared that they would pass all of Caesar's planned laws. Antony had attained possession of Caesar's papers, and with the ability to produce papers in support of any law, Fulvia and Antony made a fortune and gained immense power. She allegedly accompanied Antony to his military camp at Brundisium in 44 BC. Appian wrote that in December 44 and again in 41 BC, while Antony was abroad and Cicero campaigned for Antony to be declared an enemy of the state, Fulvia attempted to block such declarations by soliciting support on Antony's behalf.

Antony formed the second triumvirate with Octavian (the future emperor Augustus) and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus on 43 BC and began to conduct proscriptions. To solidify the political alliance, Fulvia's daughter Clodia was married to the young Octavian. Appian and Cassius Dio describe Fulvia as being involved in the violent proscriptions, which were used to destroy enemies and gain badly needed funds to secure control of Rome. Antony pursued his political enemies, chief among them being Cicero, who had openly criticized him for abusing his powers as consul after Caesar's assassination. Though many ancient sources wrote that Fulvia was happy to take revenge against Cicero for Antony's and Clodius' sake, Cassius Dio is the only ancient source that describes the joy with which she pierced the tongue of the dead Cicero with her golden hairpins, as a final revenge against Cicero's power of speech.

In 42 BC, Antony and Octavian left Rome to pursue Julius Caesar's assassins, Marcus Junius Brutus and Gaius Cassius Longinus. Fulvia was left behind as the most powerful woman in Rome. According to Cassius Dio, Fulvia controlled the politics of Rome. Dio wrote that "the following year Publius Servilius and Lucius Antonius nominally became consuls, but in reality it was Antonius and Fulvia. She, the mother-in‑law of Octavian and wife of Antony, had no respect for Lepidus because of his slothfulness, and managed affairs herself, so that neither the senate nor the people transacted any business contrary to her pleasure."

Shortly afterwards, the triumvirs then distributed the provinces among them. Lepidus took the west and Antony went to Egypt, where he met Cleopatra VII. When Octavian returned to Rome in 41 BC to disperse land to Caesar's veterans, he divorced Fulvia's daughter and accused Fulvia of aiming at supreme power. Fulvia allied with her brother-in-law Lucius Antonius and publicly endorsed Mark Antony in opposition to Octavian.

In 41 BC, tensions between Octavian and Fulvia escalated to war in Italy. Together with Lucius Antonius, she raised eight legions in Italy to fight for Antony's rights against Octavian, an event known as the Perusine War. Fulvia fled to Greece with her children. Appian writes that she met Antony in Athens, and he was upset with her involvement in the war. Antony then sailed back to Rome to deal with Octavian, and Fulvia died of an unknown illness in exile in Sicyon, near Corinth, Achaea.
Blindado
ClaudiusAsLibertas.jpg
1ap Claudius29 views41-54

As
Bare head, left, TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP
Libertas, LIBERTAS AVGVSTA SC

RIC 97

According to Suetonius: Claudius was born at Lugdunum (Lyon) on the 1st of August 10BC in the consulship of Iullus Antonius and Fabius Africanus, on the day when the very first altar to Augustus was dedicated there, the child being given the name Tiberius Claudius Drusus. When his elder brother Germanicus was adopted into the Julian family (in 4 AD), he added the name Germanicus also. He lost his father when still an infant (in 9 BC), and throughout his childhood and youth was severely afflicted by various stubborn ailments so that his mind and body lacked vigour, and even when he attained his majority he was not considered capable of a public or private career.

Nevertheless, he applied himself to liberal studies from his earliest youth, and often published examples of his proficiency in each area, though even so he was excluded from public office and failed to inspire any brighter hopes for his future. His mother Antonia the Younger often condemned him as an unfinished freak of Nature, and when accusing someone of stupidity would say: ‘He’s a bigger fool than my son Claudius.’ His grandmother Augusta (Livia) always treated him with utter contempt, and rarely even spoke to him, admonishing him, when she chose to do so, in brief harsh missives, or via her messengers. When his sister Livilla heard the prophecy that he would be Emperor some day, she prayed openly and loudly that Rome might be spared so cruel and unmerited a fate.

Having spent the larger part of his life in such circumstances, he became emperor at the age of fifty (in AD41) by a remarkable stroke of fate. Caligula’s assassins had dispersed the crowd on the pretext that the Emperor wished for solitude, and Claudius, shut out with the rest, retired to a room called the Hermaeum, but shortly afterwards, terrified by news of the murder, crept off to a nearby balcony and hid behind the door-curtains. A Guard, who was wandering about the Palace at random, spotting a pair of feet beneath the curtain where Claudius was cowering, dragged the man out to identify him, and as Claudius fell to the ground in fear, recognised him, and acclaimed him Emperor.

Eutropius summarizes: His reign was of no striking character; he acted, in many respects, with gentleness and moderation, in some with cruelty and folly. He made war upon Britain, which no Roman since Julius Caesar had visited; and, having reduced it through the agency of Cnaeus Sentius and Aulus Plautius, illustrious and noble men, he celebrated a magnificent triumph. Certain islands also, called the Orcades, situated in the ocean, beyond Britain, he added to the Roman empire, and gave his son the name of Britannicus. . . . He lived to the age of sixty-four, and reigned fourteen years; and after his death was consecrated3 and deified.

This was the first "good" coin I ever bought and therefore marks the begiining of an addiction.
Blindado
HadrianSestFortuna.jpg
1be Hadrian44 views117-138

Sestertius
Laureate head, right, HADRIANVUS AVG COS III PP
Fortuna standing left with rudder on globe and cornucopia, FORTVNA AVG

RIC 759

According to the Historia Augusta, "Bereft of his father at the age of ten, he became the ward of Ulpius Trajanus, his cousin, then of praetorian rank, but afterwards emperor, and of Caelius Attianus, a knight. He then grew rather deeply devoted to Greek studies, to which his natural tastes inclined so much that some called him 'Greekling. . . .' In the 105-106 second Dacian war, Trajan appointed him to the command of the First Legion, the Minervia, and took him with him to the war; and in this campaign his many remarkable deeds won great renown. . . . On taking possession of the imperial power
Hadrian at once resumed the policy of the early emperors and devoted his attention to maintaining peace throughout the world. . . . [I]n this letter to the Senate he apologized because he had not left it the right to decide regarding his accession, explaining that the unseemly haste of the troops in acclaiming him emperor was due to the belief that the state could not be without an emperor. . . . He was, in the same person, austere and genial, dignified and playful, dilatory and quick to act, niggardly and generous, deceitful and straightforward, cruel and merciful, and always in all things changeable. . . . Hadrian's memory was vast and his ability was unlimited ; for instance, he personally dictated his speeches and gave opinions on all questions. He was also very witty. . . ."

After this Hadrian departed for Baiae, leaving Antoninus at Rome to carry on the government. But he received no benefit there, and he thereupon
sent for Antoninus, and in his presence he died there at Baiae on the sixth day before the Ides of July.

According to Eutropius: After the death of Trajan, AELIUS HADRIAN was made emperor, not from any wish to that effect having been expressed by Trajan himself, but through the influence of Plotina, Trajan's wife; for Trajan in his life-time had refused to adopt him, though he was the son of his cousin. He also was born at Italica in Spain. Envying Trajan's glory, he immediately gave up three of the provinces which Trajan had added to the empire, withdrawing the armies from Assyria, Mesopotamia, and Armenia, and deciding that the Euphrates should be the boundary of the empire. When he was proceeding, to act similarly with regard to Dacia, his friends dissuaded him, lest many Roman citizens should be left in the hands of the barbarians, because Trajan, after he had subdued Dacia, had transplanted thither an infinite number of men from the whole Roman world, to people the country and the cities; as the land had been exhausted of inhabitants in the long war maintained by Decebalus.

He enjoyed peace, however, through the whole course of his reign; the only war that he had, he committed to the conduct of a governor of a province. He went about through the Roman empire, and founded many edifices. He spoke with great eloquence in the Latin language, and was very learned in the Greek. He had no great reputation for clemency, but was very attentive to the state of the treasury and the discipline of the soldiers. He died in Campania, more than sixty years old, in the twenty-first year, tenth month, and twenty-ninth day of his reign. The senate was unwilling to allow him divine honours; but his successor Titus Aurelius Fulvius Antonius, earnestly insisting on it, carried his point, though all the senators were openly opposed to him.
1 commentsBlindado
22058.jpg
22058 Marcus Aurelius from Antonius Pius7 viewsMarcus Aurelius from Antonius Pius
Obv: AVRELIVS CAES ANTON AVG PII F
Head of Marcus Aurelius, bare, right
Rev: TR POT X COS II S C
Fortuna, draped, standing, front, head right, with right hand at side drawing out fold of skirt, and holding rudder, set on ground, in left
Mint:Rome 32.7mm 26.3g
RIC III Antoninus Pius 1329A
Blayne W
22088.jpg
22088 Antonius Pius/Providentia8 viewsAntoninus Pius/Providentia
AE Dupondius. 156-157 AD.
Obv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP IMP II,
radiate head right
Rev: TR POT XIX COS IIII S-C,
Providentia, standing left, pointing with right hand at large globe and holding scepter
Mint: Rome
Believe similar to Philoromaos on Forums Gallery reverse.
RIC 953, Cohen 978.
Blayne W
Nicest__black.jpg
364/1d Q. Antonius Balbus27 viewsQ. Antonius Balbus. Ar Serrate Denarius. Rome Mint. 83-82 BC. (3,89 g) Obv: Laureate head of Jupiter right; S•C behind. Rev: Victory in quadriga right; H below; in exergue, Q·ANTO·BALB / PR.
Syd 742 b; Bab. 1; BMC 2757; Crawford 364/1d

Antonius Balbus was a member of the Marian party, and in 82 BC was appointed praetor in Sardinia. Before leaving for Sardinia, this issue was struck by order of the Senate which was dominated by members of the Marian party to pay the army preparing to resist the return of Sulla. The reverse imagery reflects the expectations of Q. Antonius Balbus. Sulla was victorius, and in 82 BC, Q. Antonius Balbus was removed from from his seat as praetor by L. Philippus and slain.
1 commentsPaddy
160-agrippa as.jpg
37-41 AD - AGRIPPA memorial AE dupondius - struck under Caligula (by RIC)47 viewsobv: M AGRIPPA LF COS III (head left wearing rostral crown)
rev: Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left. / S.C.
ref: RIC58(Gaius), BMC(Tib)161
mint: Rome
11.10gms, 28mm

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was a boyhood friend of Augustus and a renowned military commander on land and sea, winning the famous battle of Actium against the forces of Marcus Antonius and Cleopatra. Declared Augustus' successor, Agrippa's brilliant career ended when he predeceased Augustus in 12 B.C.
berserker
Augustus_thunderbolt.jpg
40 BC Octavian denarius164 viewsC CAESAR III VIR R P C
Bare haed of Octavian right

Q SALVIVS IMP COS DESIG
thunderbolt

Italy early 40 BC
3.43g

Sear 1541

SOLD!

David Sear says that this Q Salvius may be Quintus Salvius Salvidienus Rufus who was the boyhood friend and confidant of Octavian. In 42 BC Octavian made him admiral of his fleet and instructed him to attack Sextus Pompey in Sicily. Despite being beaten by Sextus he was granted the title of Imperator which appears on this coin.

After the battle of Philippi Salvidienus was given command of 6 Legions an sent to Spain however he quickly had to return to Italy to confront Fulvia (Antony's wife) and Lucius Antonius (Antony's brother). Salvidienus captured and destroyed the city of Sentinum and then moved on to Perusia with Agrippa to besiege Lucius Antony. At the end of the Perusian War Octavian sent Salvidienus to Gallia as Governor, with eleven legions. He was also designated as consul for 39 BC, although he had not reached senatorial rank.

Salvidienus proved to be unworthy of Octavian's trust and entered into secret negotiations with Mark Antony thinking that Antony would prevail. Unfortunately for Salvidienus, Antony and Octavian were reconciled and Antony informed Octavian of Salvidienus treachary. Antony's decision to inform on Salvidienus has been used to show his desire to settle the differences with Octavian. The senate declared Salvidienus a public enemy and shortly after he was killed, either by his own hand or by execution.
Jay GT4
pergamum_RPC_2374.jpg
41-60 AD - Semi-Autonomous AE15 of Pergamum - struck under the time of the Claudians75 viewsobv: PEON CYNKLHTON (youthful draped bust of the Roman Senate right)
rev: PEAN PWMHN (turreted and draped bust of Roma right)
ref: RPC 2374, SNG BN Paris 1964
mint: Pergamum, Mysia (40-60 AD)
4.03gms, 15mm
Rare

Pergamum was not conquered by the Romans. In 133 B.C. Attalus III, its last king, bequeathed Pergamum to the Romans and this granted to the city and its inhabitants the continued benevolence of the new rulers (with the only exception being Marcus Antonius who deprived the Library of Pergamum of many of its volumes to replenish that of Alexandria, which had been damaged by Julius Caesar).
berserker
Scipio.jpg
47-46 BC Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius Scipio68 viewsQ METEL SCIPIO IMP
head of Africa right, laur. and clad in elephant's skin, corn-ear before, plough below

EPPIVS LEG F C

Naked Hercules standing facing right, hand on hip resting on club set on rock

North Africa
47-46 BC

Sear 1380/1

Born Publius Cornelius Scipio Nasica. He was adopted by his uncle by marriage and father's second cousin Quintus Caecilius Metellus Pius. He married Aemilia Lepida, daughter of Mamercus Aemilius Lepidus Livianus (son of the Censor Marcus Livius Drusus and wife Cornelia Scipio and adopted by Mamercus Aemilius Lepidus) and wife Claudia (sister of Appius Claudius Pulcher (Senior)), and was the father in law of Pompey the Great, married to his daughter Cornelia Metella, called Quinta Pompeia for being his fifth wife.

He was Tribune in 59 BC and became Consul with Pompey the Great in 52 BC. During Caesar's civil war, he served the party of Pompey and fought against Caesar and Marcus Antonius. In 49 BC he was sent as Proconsul to Syria and the following year he took part in the Battle of Pharsalus, where he commanded the center of the Republican battleline. After Pharsalus he fled to Africa were he commanded an army with Cato the Younger, losing in the Battle of Thapsus. After the defeat he tried to escape but was cornered by the fleet of Publius Sittius when he wrecked the ship as he tried to escape to the Iberian Peninsula, to continue to fight from there. He committed suicide by stabbing himself so he would not fall at the hands of his enemies.

SOLD to Calgary Coin June 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
coin399.JPG
515a. Aelia Flacilla33 viewsEmpress, wife of Theodosius the Great, died c. A. D. 385 or 386. Like Theodosius himself, his first wife, Ælia Flaccilla, was of Spanish descent. She may have been the daughter of Claudius Antonius, Prefect of Gaul, who was consul in 382. Her marriage with Theodosius probably took place in the year 376, when his father, the comes Theodosius, fell into disfavour and he himself withdrew to Cauca in Gallæcia, for her eldest son, afterwards Emperor Arcadius, was born towards the end of the following year. In the succeeding years she presented two more children to her husband Honorius (384), who later became emperor, and Pulcheria, who died in early childhood, shortly before her mother. Gregory of Nyssa states expressly that she had three children; consequently the Gratian mentioned by St. Ambrose, together with Pulcheria, was probably not her son. Flaccilla was, like her husband, a zealous supporter of the Nicene Creed and prevented the conference between the emperor and the Arian Eunomius (Sozomen, Hist. eccl., VII, vi). On the throne she was a shining example of Christian virtue and ardent charity. St. Ambrose describes her as "a soul true to God" (Fidelis anima Deo. — "De obitu Theodosii", n. 40, in P. L., XVI, 1462). In his panegyric St. Gregory of Nyssa bestowed the highest praise on her virtuous life and pictured her as the helpmate of the emperor in all good works, an ornament of the empire, a leader of justice, an image of beneficence. He praises her as filled with zeal for the Faith, as a pillar of the Church, as a mother of the indigent. Theodoret in particular exalts her charity and benevolence (Hist. eccles., V, xix, ed. Valesius, III, 192 sq.). He tells us how she personally tended cripples, and quotes a saying of hers: "To distribute money belongs to the imperial dignity, but I offer up for the imperial dignity itself personal service to the Giver." Her humility also attracts a special meed of praise from the church historian. Flaccilla was buried in Constantinople, St. Gregory of Nyssa delivering her funeral oration. She is venerated in the Greek Church as a saint, and her feast is kept on 14 September. The Bollandists (Acta SS., Sept., IV, 142) are of the opinion that she is not regarded as a saint but only as venerable, but her name stands in the Greek Menæa and Synaxaria followed by words of eulogy, as is the case with the other saints

Wife of Theodosius. The reverse of the coin is very interesting; a nice bit of Pagan-Christian syncretism with winged victory inscribing a chi-rho on a shield.
1 commentsecoli
Anthony_Octavian.jpg
517/2 Octavian and Antony106 viewsMarcus Antonius and Octavian. AR Denarius. Ephesus Mint, Spring-Summer 41 B.C. (3.42g, 19.1m, 0h)). Obv: M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R PC M BARBAT Q P, bare head of Antony r., Rev: CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR [R P C], bare head of Octavian r. Craw. 517/2, RSC 8a, RCV 1504.

A duel portrait of two of the three triumvirs. This example has fairly complete legends, and high relief portraits. This coin was minted before the Treaty of Brundisium, where the empire was apportion between the triumvirs.
1 commentsLucas H
Heliogabalo_Marcianopolis_Homonoia.jpg
53 - 5 - 1 - HELIOGABALO (218 - 222 D.C.)63 viewsMARCIANOPOLIS Moesia Inferior
Legado Consular Julius Antonius SELEUCUS

AE 26 mm 8.3 gr

Anv: ”AV K M AVPHΛIOC [ANTΩNINOC]” – Busto laureado, vistiendo coraza y paludamentum sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: ”VΠ IOVΛ ANT CEΛEV[KOV MARKIANOΠO] - ΛITΩN en exergo – Homonoia/Concordia estante a izquierda, portando pátera en mano derecha y cornucopia en izquierda.

Acuñada: 218 - 222 D.C.

Referencias: Moushmov #633 - Hristova/Jekov No.6.26.36.5 var. - Not in AMNG.
Rev. es AMNG I/1 850 var. (Tiene diferente quiebre en la leyenda CEL - EVKOV, no CELE -como en este caso)
Anv. es AMNG I/1 850 por el busto, y AMNG I/1 852 por la leyenda.
Varbanov (Ingles) #1552 pero no menciona quiebres en las leyendas ni leyendas en el exergo.
2 commentsmdelvalle
Varbanov_1522_MARCIANOPOLIS_Heliogabalo.jpg
53-50 - Marcianopolis - HELIOGABALO (218 - 222 D.C.)16 viewsMARCIANOPOLIS Moesia Inferior
Legado Consular Julius Antonius SELEUCUS

AE Tetrasarión
26 mm 8.3 gr

Anv: ”AV K M AVPHΛIOC [ANTΩNINOC]” – Busto laureado, vistiendo coraza y paludamentum sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: ”VΠ IOVΛ ANT CEΛEV[KOV MARKIANOΠO] - ΛITΩN en exergo – Homonoia/Concordia estante a izquierda, portando pátera en mano derecha y cornucopia en izquierda.

Acuñada: 218 - 222 D.C.

Referencias: Moushmov #633 - Hristova/Jekov No.6.26.36.5 var. - Not in AMNG.
Rev. es AMNG I/1 850 var. (Tiene diferente quiebre en la leyenda CEL - EVKOV, no CELE -como en este caso)
Anv. es AMNG I/1 850 por el busto, y AMNG I/1 852 por la leyenda.
Varbanov (Ingles) #1552 pero no menciona quiebres en las leyendas ni leyendas en el exergo.
mdelvalle
Antony,_IV.jpg
544/17 Marc Antony, Legion IV, Scythica116 viewsMarcus Antonius (Marc Antony). AR Denarius. Struck 32-31 BC. Obv: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, praetorian galley. Rev: LEG IV, eagle between standards. 17mm, 3.7g. Crawford 544/17.

In his youth, future emperor Vespasian served in this legion.
1 commentsLucas H
Plancia.jpg
55 BC Gn. Plancius150 viewsCN PLANCIVS AED CVR SC
Head of Macedonia right, wearing causia

Cretan goat standing right, bow and quiver behind
IIZ (old museum number?) in Ex.

Rome 55 BC
3.46g

Sear 396, RRC 432/1

Ex-Canadian Coin

Gnaeus Plancius was a friend of Cicero and strikes this coin as curule aedile. The type recalls his military service in Crete under the Proconsul Q. Metellus. He was also a military tribune under C. Antonius. He later returned to Macedonia as questor under the Propraetor L. Appuleius Saturninus. While serving as Questor in Thessalonia Plancius courageously took in Cicero as a guest in his official residence. Earlier that year (January or Early February of 58 BC.) Cicero was exiled from Italy and Rome because of the Tribune Clodius' legislation which confiscated Cicero's property and forced him to stay 400 miles out of the city of Rome. Clodius was eventually killed along the Appian Way by his rival Milo. Cicero took up the case for the defense of Milo unsuccessfully. In 54 BC Cicero defended Gn. Plancius in a court case (Pro Plancio) in which A. Laterensis accused Plancius of illegally organizing voting clubs (Colegia) to sway the elections and of bribery. Cicero was able to get Plancius acquitted and wrote his Pro Plancio which outlined his speeches and lines of questioning.
7 commentsJay GT4
Elagabalus-AE26.jpg
64. Elagabalus.28 viewsAE 26, Marcianopolis, Moesia.
Obverse: AVT K M AVPHΛI - ANTΩNEINOC - / Bust of Elagabalus.
Reverse: VΠ IOVΛ ANT CEΛEVKOV MAPKIANOΠOΛiTΩN / Homonoia (Concordia) standing, holding patera and cornucopiae.
11.45 gm., 26 mm.
Mushmov #633 (?).

The reverse legend indicates this coin was minted while Julius Antonius Seleucus was magistrate.
1 commentsCallimachus
Elagab-Maesa-AE27-Marcian.jpg
65. Elagabalus & Julia Maesa.14 viewsAE27, Marcianopolis, Moesia.
Obverse: AVT K MAVP ANTΩNEINOC AVΓ IOVΛIA MAICA AVT / Busts of Elagabalus and Julia Maesa facing each other.
Reverse: VΠ IVOΛ ANT CEΛEVKOV MAPKIANOΠOΛITΩN / Jupiter standing, holding patera and staff. E in field to left.
13.5 gm., 28 mm.

The reverse legend indicates this coin was minted while Julius Antonius Seleucus was magistrate.

Callimachus
VitelliusARdenariusVesta.jpg
709a, Vitellius, 2 January - 20 December 69 A.D.42 viewsVITELLIUS AR silver denarius. RSC 72, RCV 2200. 19mm, 3.2 g. Obverse: A VITELLIVS GERM IMP AVG TR P, laureate head right; Reverse - PONT MAXIM, Vesta seated right, holding scepter and patera. Quite decent. Ex. Incitatus Coins. Photo courtesy of Incitatus Coins.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Vitellius (69 A.D.)

John F. Donahue
College of William and Mary


It is often difficult to separate fact from fiction in assessing the life and reign of Vitellius. Maligned in the ancient sources as gluttonous and cruel, he was also a victim of a hostile biographical tradition established in the regime of the Flavians who had overthrown him. Nevertheless, his decision to march against Rome in 69 was pivotal, since his subsequent defeat signalled the end of military anarchy and the beginning of an extended period of political stability under Vespasian and his successors.

Early Life and Career

Aulus Vitellius was born in September, 15 AD, the son of Lucius Vitellius and his wife Sestilia. One of the most successful public figures of the Julio-Claudian period, Lucius Vitellius was a three-time consul and a fellow censor with the emperor Claudius. Aulus seems to have moved with equal ease in aristocratic circles, successively winning the attention of the emperors Gaius, Claudius, and Nero through flattery and political skill.

Among his attested public offices, Vitellius was a curator of public works, a senatorial post concerned with the maintenance and repair of public buildings in Rome, and he was also proconsul of North Africa, where he served as a deputy to his brother, perhaps about 55 A. D. In addition, he held at least two priesthoods, the first as a member of the Arval Brethren, in whose rituals he participated from 57 A.D., and the second, as one of the quindecemviri sacris faciundis, a sacred college famous for its feasts.

With respect to marriage and family, Vitellius first wed a certain Petroniana, the daughter of a consul, sometime in the early to mid thirties A.D. The union produced a son, Petronianus, allegedly blind in one eye and emancipated from his father's control as a result of being named his mother's heir. Tradition records that Vitellius killed the boy shortly after emancipation amid charges of parricide; the marriage soon ended in divorce. A second marriage, to Galeria Fundana, daughter of an ex-praetor, was more stable than the first. It produced another son, who was eventually killed by the Flavians after the overthrow of Vitellius, as well as a daughter. Galeria is praised by Tacitus for her good qualities, and in the end it was she who saw to Vitellius' burial.

Rise to Power and Emperorship

Without doubt, the most fortuitous moment in Vitellius' political career was his appointment as governor of Lower Germany by the emperor Galba late in 68. The decision seemed to have caught everybody by surprise, including Vitellius himself, who, according to Suetonius, was in straitened circumstances at the time. The choice may have been made to reduce the possibility of rebellion by the Rhine armies, disaffected by Galba's refusal to reward them for their part in suppressing the earlier uprising of Julius Vindex. Ironically, it was Vitellius' lack of military achievement and his reputation for gambling and gluttony that may have also figured in his selection. Galba perhaps calculated that a man with little military experience who could now plunder a province to satisfy his own stomach would never become disloyal. If so, it was a critical misjudgement by the emperor.

The rebellion began on January 1, 69 ("The Year of the Four Emperors"), when the legions of Upper Germany refused to renew their oath of allegiance to Galba. On January 2, Vitellius' own men, having heard of the previous day's events, saluted him as emperor at the instigation of the legionary legate Fabius Valens and his colleagues. Soon, in addition to the seven legions that Vitellius now had at his command in both Germanies, the forces in Gaul, Britain, and Raetia also came over to his side. Perhaps aware of his military inexperience, Vitellius did not immediately march on Rome himself. Instead, the advance was led by Valens and another legionary general, Aulus Caecina Alienus, with each man commanding a separate column. Vitellius would remain behind to mobilize a reserve force and follow later.

Caecina was already one hundred fifty miles on his way when news reached him that Galba had been overthrown and Otho had taken his place as emperor. Undeterred, he passed rapidly down the eastern borders of Gaul; Valens followed a more westerly route, quelling a mutiny along the way. By March both armies had successfully crossed the Alps and joined at Cremona, just north of the Po. Here they launced their Batavian auxiliaries against Otho's troops and routed them in the First Battle of Bedriacum. Otho killed himself on April 16, and three days later the soldiers in Rome swore their allegience to Vitellius. The senate too hailed him as emperor.

When Vitellius learned of these developments, he set out to Rome from Gaul. By all accounts the journey was a drunken feast marked by the lack of discipline of both the troops and the imperial entourage. Along the way he stopped at Lugdunum to present his six-year-old son Germanicus to the legions as his eventual successor. Later, at Cremona, Vitellius witnessed the corpse-filled battlefield of Otho's recent defeat with joy, unmoved by so many citizens denied a proper burial.

The emperor entered Rome in late June-early July. Conscious of making a break with the Julio-Claudian past, Vitellius was reluctant to assume the traditional titles of the princes, even though he enthusiastically made offerings to Nero and declared himself consul for life. To his credit, Vitellius did seem to show a measure of moderation in the transition to the principate. He assumed his powers gradually and was generally lenient to Otho's supporters, even pardoning Otho's brother Salvius Titianus, who had played a key role in the earlier regime. In addition, he participated in Senate meetings and continued the practice of providing entertainments for the Roman masses. An important practical change involved the awarding of posts customarily held by freedmen to equites, an indication of the growth of the imperial bureaucracy and its attractiveness to men of ambition.

In other matters, he replaced the existing praetorian guard and urban cohorts with sixteen praetorian cohorts and four urban units, all comprised of soldiers from the German armies. According to Tacitus, the decision prompted a mad scramble, with the men, and not their officers, choosing the branch of service that they preferred. The situation was clearly unsatisfactory but not surprising, given that Vitellius was a creation of his own troops. To secure his position further, he sent back to their old postings the legions that had fought for Otho, or he reassigned them to distant provinces. Yet discontent remained: the troops who had been defeated or betrayed at Bedriacum remained bitter, and detachments of three Moesian legions called upon by Otho were returned to their bases, having agitated against Vitellius at Aquileia.

Flavian Revolt

The Vitellian era at Rome was short-lived. By mid-July news had arrived that the legions of Egypt under Tiberius Julius Alexander had sworn allegiance to a rival emperor, Titus Flavius Vespasianus, the governor of Judaea and a successful and popular general. Vespasian was to hold Egypt while his colleague Mucianus, governor of Syria, was to invade Italy. Before the plan could be enacted, however, the Danube legions, former supporters of Otho, joined Vespasian's cause. Under the leadership of Antonius Primus, commander of the Sixth legion in Pannonia, and Cornelius Fuscus, imperial procurator in Illyricum, the legions made a rapid descent on Italy.

Although his forces were only half of what Vitellius commanded in Italy, Primus struck first before the emperor could muster additional reinforcements from Germany. To make matters worse for the Vitellians, Valens was ill, and Caecina, now consul, had begun collaborating with the Flavians. His troops refused to follow his lead, however, and arrested him at Hostilia near Cremona. They then joined the rest of the Vitellian forces trying to hold the Po River. With Vitellius still in Rome and his forces virtually leaderless, the two sides met in October in the Second Battle of Bedriacum. The emperor's troops were soundly defeated and Cremona was brutally sacked by the victors. In addition, Valens, whose health had recovered, was captured while raising an army for Vitellius in Gaul and Germany; he was eventually executed.

Meanwhile, Primus continued towards Rome. Vitellius made a weak attempt to thwart the advance at the Apennine passes, but his forces switched to the Flavian side without a fight at Narnia in mid-December. At Rome, matters were no better. Vespasian's elder brother, Titus Flavius Sabinus, the city prefect, was successful in an effort to convince Vitellius to abdicate but was frustrated by the mob in Rome and the emperor's soldiers. Forced to flee to the Capitol, Sabinus was set upon by Vitellius' German troops and soon killed, with the venerable Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus set ablaze in the process. Within two days, the Flavian army fought its way into Rome. In a pathetic final move, Vitellius disguised himself in dirty clothing and hid in the imperial doorkeeper's quarters, leaning a couch and a mattress against the door for protection. Dragged from his hiding place by the Flavian forces, he was hauled off half-naked to the Forum, where he was tortured, killed, and tossed into the Tiber. The principate could now pass to Vespasian.

Assessment

Vitellius has not escaped the hostility of his biographers. While he may well have been gluttonous, his depiction as indolent, cruel, and extravagant is based almost entirely on the propaganda of his enemies. On the other hand, whatever moderating tendencies he did show were overshadowed by his clear lack of military expertise, a deficiency that forced him to rely in critical situations on largely inneffective lieutenants. As a result he was no match for his Flavian successors, and his humiliating demise was perfectly in keeping with the overall failure of his reign.

Copyright (C) 1999, John Donahue.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
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82-83 BC* Q ANTONIUS BALBUS102 viewsLaureate head of Jupiter right; S•C behind

Victory in quadriga right; I below horses, Q ANTO BALB/PR in two lines in exergue.

Rome, 83 BC

3.99g

Crawford 364/1d; Sydenham 742b; Antonia 1. Sear 279

Lustrous Choice VF. Slight Flan flaw (weight reduction) on obverse in field.

ex-ANE

Anti Sullan Issue Struck by Order of the Senate SC.
Q. Antonius Balbus was a member of the Marian party, and in 82 BC was appointed praetor of Sardinia. Before leaving for Sardinia, this issue was struck by order of the Senate which was dominated by members of the Marian party to pay the army preparing to resist the return of Sulla. The reverse imagery reflects the expectations of Q. Antonius Balbus. Sulla was victorius in the battle of the Colline gate, and in 82 BC, Q. Antonius Balbus was removed from his position as praetor by L. Philippus and killed.

New photo of the very first denarius I bought.


5 commentsJay GT4
Aelia_Flaccilla~0.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla 226 viewsAelia Flaccilla AE2. Struck 383 AD, Constantinople mint.

AEL FLACCILLA AVG, mantled bust right in elaborate headdress & necklace / SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, inscribing a christogram on shield resting on small column. T in right field, mintmark CON Epsilon. RIC 81 var (RIC lists T in left field only).

FLACILLA (Aelia), the first wife of Theodosius the Great; born in Spain, daughter of Antonius, prefect of Gaul, she was celebrated for her piety, and for her benevolence to the poor. Arcadius and Honorius were her sons by the above named emperor, who married her before his accession to the imperial throne.

She died in Thrace, A. D. 388. Her brass coins are of the lowest degree of rarity, her gold and silver most rare.

A half aureus of this empress's, on which she is styled AEL FLACILLA AVG, bears her head crowned with a diadem enriched with precious stones. - SALVS REIPVBLICAE is the legend, and a victory inscribing on a shield the monogram of Christ, is the type of the reverse.
2 commentssuperflex
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Antonia 16 viewsQ Antonius Balbus AR Serrate Denarius. 83-82 BC. Laureate head of Jupiter right; SC behind and (letter)(•) before
Victory in quadriga right, Q ANTO BALB below, PR in ex. Cr364/1c; Syd 742a.
Britanikus
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Antonia22 views
Q Antonius Balbus AR Serrate Denarius. 83-82 BC. Laureate head of Jupiter right; SC behind and (letter)(•) before / Victory in quadriga right, Q ANTO BALB below, PR in ex. Cr364/1c; Syd 742a.
Britanikus
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ANTONIA 133 viewsQ. Antonius Balbus (c. BC 83-2)Rugser
Antonia1R1D+R.jpg
ANTONIA 124 viewsQ. Antonius Balbus (c. BC 83/82)Rugser
Antonia~0.jpg
Antonia Augusta 66 viewsANTONIA AVGVSTA

Rev. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP SC
Cladius veiled and togate stg left holding simpulum

Sear 1902

Antonia was the younger daughter of Mark Antony and Octavia and was born on January 31st 36B.C. She was married at age 20 to Tiberius' younger brother Nero Claudius Drusus and had two sons, the great Germanicus and the future emperor Claudius. She was widowed in 9 BC and refused to marry again and devoted her life to her families interests. Her wealth and status made her very influencial during Tiberius' reign and it was she who brought about the downfall of Sejanus.

On the accession of her grandson Caligula in 37 AD she received many honours but died later that year at the age of 73. She did not receive postumous honours until the reign of her son Claudius in 41 AD and all of the coinage in Antonia's name was issued by Claudius.

SOLD
Titus Pullo
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Antoninus Felix, Roman Procurator under Claudius 52 - 60 A.D. Hendin 6514 viewsJudaea, Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator under Claudius, 52 - 60 A.D. Bronze prutah, Hendin 651, Meshorer TJC 342, aF, Caesarea mint, 2.921g, 18.2mm, 0o, 54 A.D.; obverse “ΙΟΥ/ΛΙΑ ΑΓ/ΡΙΠΠΙ/ΝΑ” (Julia Agrippina - wife of Claudius), within a wreath tied at the bottom with an X; reverse , TI K“ΛΑΥΔ”IOC KAICAP “Γ”EPM (Tiberius Claudius Caesar Germanicus), two crossed palm fronds, L I“D” below (year 14). Ex FORVMPodiceps
antonius_pius.jpg
Antoninus Pius26 viewsANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TRP XVII, laureate head right / ANNONA AVG COS IIII S-C, Annona standing right holding modius on cippus and branch above a basket of fruit. mestreaudi
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Antoninus Pius 7 viewsAntoninus Pius Sestertius temple of Augustus and Livia
Catalog: Temple of Divus Augustus
weight 28,6gr. | bronze Ø 32mm.
obv. Laureate head right ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TR P XXII
rev. Octastyle temple of Divus Augustus, containing cult-statues of Augustus
and Livia TEMPLVM DIVI AVG REST COS IIII S C

The Temple of Divus Augustus was a major temple originally built to commemorate the deified first Roman emperor, Augustus. It was built between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia, on the site of the house that Augustus had inhabited before he entered public life in the mid-1st century BC. The temple′s construction took place during the 1st century AD, having been vowed by the Roman Senate shortly after the death of the emperor in AD 14. It is known from Roman coinage that the temple was originally built to an Ionic hexastyle design. However, its size, physical proportions and exact site are unknown. During the reign of Domitian the Temple of Divus Augustus was destroyed by fire but was rebuilt and rededicated in 89/90 with a shrine to his favourite deity, Minerva. The temple was redesigned as a memorial to four deified emperors, including Vespasian and Titus. It was restored again in the mid 150s by Antonius Pius, and that was the reason for this coinage. The last known reference to the temple was on 27 May 218 | at some point thereafter it was completely destroyed and its stones were presumably quarried for later buildings. Its remains are not visible and the area in which it lay has never been excavated.

Cohen 805 | RIC 1004 | BMC 2063 | Sear 4235 R
vf
1 commentsAncient Aussie
Antoninus_Pius_Pius_Jupiter.jpg
Antoninus Pius S C Jupiter27 viewsAntoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

Obverse:
laureate bust right, very slight drapery on left shoulder

ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III

ANTONINVS: Antonius
AVG: Augustus, emperor
PIVS: PIUS
P P: PP: Pater Patria, father of the country
TR P: Tribunicia Potestate. The tribunician power, the emperor as civil head of the state.
COS. III: Consul for the third time. One of the two chief magistrates of the Roman state, and often the emperor was one.

Reverse:

S C: Senatus Consulto, by Decree of the Senate

DES IIII
COS DES IIII indicating the Emperor had been designated to serve his fourth consulship starting on the first day of the new year

DES:
IIII:

Jupiter seated left on a facing throne, thunderbolt in right, long scepter vertical in left

Domination: Copper AS, size 25 mm

Mint: Rome mint, very end of 144 A.D
John S
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Antoninus Pius Denarius 151-152172 viewsOb. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XV, laureate head right
Rev. COS IIII, Vesta standing left, holding simpulum and palladium

Ref. RIC 203 (.?)

ANTONIUS AUGUSTUS PIUS PATER PATRIAE TRIBUNICIA POTESTAS XV
Antonius Augustus Pius, Father of the country, Tribune of the People for the fifteenth time
CONSUL IIII - Consul for the fourth time


-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
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Antoninus Pius Denarius 155AD76 viewsObv. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XVIII - Laureate head right
Rev. COS IIII - Annona standing left holding corn ears and placing left hand on modius set upon prow of galley
Mint Rome

Ref. RIC III, 239, BMCRE 810 var.; RSC 292

ANTONIUS AUGUSTUS PIUS PATER PATRIAE TRIBUNICIA POTESTAS XI
Antonius Augustus Pius, Father of the country, Tribune of the People for the eighteenth time
CONSUL IIII - Consul for the fourth time


-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
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Antoninus Pius Didrachm Caesarea40 viewsAntoninus Pius, Silver Didrachm, Caesarea (Capadoccia) 138 - 161 AD, Struck 139 AD, 5.2g, Metcalf 124, Sydenham 301,
OBV: AYTOKP ANTWNEI-NOC CEBACTOC, Laureated bust of Antonius Pius right
REV: YPAT B PAT PATR, Mount Argaeus surmounted by Helios holding globe and scepter
Romanorvm
Aelia Capitolina-Antonius Pius.jpg
Antoninus Pius, (138-161 CE), Æ, city coin of Aelia Capitolina69 viewsBronze of Antoninus Pius. 138-161 CE. 7.44 g, 23mm, minted in Jerusalem (Aelia Capitolina) in Judea.

Obverse: IMP ANTONINVS AVG PPP; Laureate draped bust right
Reverse: CO(olony) AE(lia) CA(pitolina);Turreted bust of Tyche right, wearing calathus.

Reference: Meshorer, Aelia 21; Rosenberger 11, SNG ANS 600.

Added to collection: July 29, 2006
Daniel Friedman
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Antoninus Pius, sestertius21 viewsAntoninus Pius, sestertius
32mm, 24.72 g.
Obv. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XVII / Laureate head right.
Rev. INDVLGENTIA AVG COS IIII / S C / Indulgentia seated left with sceptre, extending right hand.
RIC 914.
1 commentsMarsman
RRC544_(2).jpg
Antonius - Legionary Coinage, Legio V Alaudae52 viewsObv. [ANT AVG] IIIVIR RPC, galley right, mast with banners at prow;
Rev. LEG V, legionary eagle between two standards;
18mm, 3,40 gr.
Patrae, military mint of Antony, 31 B.C.
References: RRC544, RSC 32, Sear 1479

Legio V Alaudae was the first legion to be raised from non-Romans. These men were transalpine Gauls, enrolled by Caesar in 52 B.C, and took to wearing lark's feathers on their helmets - hence their epithet, Alaudae, "the Larks". The Fifth was long believed to have been destroyed in, or dissolved after the Batavian Revolt of 69/70 AD, where they participated with the rest of the Rhine legions and the Treveri and Lingones in the uprising. However, epigraphic material now indicates the presence of the Fifth on the Danube in Flavian times. Records disappear again soon afterward, and it may have been lost in the Dacian Wars under Domitian.
Syltorian
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Antonius - Legionary Coinage, Unknown Legion)36 viewsObv. [ANT AVG IIIVIR RPC], galley right, masts with banners at prow.
Rev. [LEG ?], legionary eagle between standards,
16 mm; 3,13 g
Patrae, mint moving with Antony, 31 B.C.,
References: RRC544, RSC 32, Sear 1479

On this coin: the number of the legion can no longer be distinguished, though it begins with a V or the upper parts of an X. The obverse features three control punches made by bankers to test the silver.


Syltorian
Antonius_Felix_Prutah.jpg
Antonius Felix8 viewsOBV: NEPW KLAV KAICAP (Nero Claudius Caesar),
two oblong shields and two spears crossed
REV: BPIT (Brittanicus), six-branched palm bearing
two bunches of dates, L ID KAI (year 14 of Caesar)
AJC II, Supp. V,29. Hendin-652
A.D. 54 18mm 3.01g
goldenancients
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Antonius Felix5 viewsOBV: IOY/LIAA/PIPPI/NA, (Julia Agrippina - wife of Claudius)
within a wreath tied at bottom with an X.
REV: Two crossed palm branches, around, TI KLAVDIOC KAICAP GEPM.
(Tiberius Claudius Caesar Germanicus) Date Below (LIA - A.D. 54)
Hendin-651; AJC II Supp. 5, 32
A.D. 54 3.08gm 18mm
goldenancients
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Antonius Felix (AD 52-59/60). Prutah.20 viewsObv. NEPW KΛAY KAICAP, two oblong shields and spears crossed.
Rev. BPIT, LIΔ KAI, six-branched palm tree bearing two bunches of dates.
References: Hendin 1348; Meshorer TJC 340; RPC 4971.
Prefect under Claudius, year 14 = 54 C.E..
16mm, 2.06grams.
Canaan
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Antonius Felix, procurator under Claudius, Æ Prutah, 52-59 CE106 viewsBronze prutah of Antonius Felix, procurator under Claudius, 52-59 CE, 2.50g, 17mm.

Obverse: TI KΛAVΔIOC KAICAP ΓEPM. Two crossed palm-branches; around, legend (Tiberius Claudius Caesar Germanicus); date below, LIΔ = Year 14 = 54 C.E.
Reverse: IOY/ΛIAAΓ/PIΠΠI/NA (Julia Agrippina - wife of Claudius) within a wreath tied at bottom with an X.

Reference: Hendin 651, Treasury of Jewish Coins 342. AJC II, Supp. V, 32

Added to collection: November 17, 2005
1 commentsDaniel Friedman
J12O-Felix H-652.jpg
Antonius Felix, procurator under Claudius, Æ Prutah, 52-59 CE48 viewsBronze Prutah of Antonius Felix procurator under Claudius, 52-59 CE, 2.7g, 18 mm. Struck 54 C.E.

Obverse: Two oblong shields and two spears crossed, surrounded by legend NEPW KLAY KAICAP (Nero Claudius Caesar - son of Claudius)
Reverse: Six-branched palm tree bearing two bunches of dates, BPIT above (="Britanicus" - second son of Claudius), K-AI (= "Caesar") and date below L-ΙΔ (= Year 14 of Caesar = 54 CE.)

Reference: Hendin 652, SearGIC 5626, TJC 340, AJC II, Supp. V, p. 283, #29, Madden R136, RPC 4971.

Added to collection: April 21, 2006
Daniel Friedman
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Antonius Felix, prutah, Hendin 6512 viewsJudaea, Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator under Claudius, 52 - 60 A.D. Bronze prutah, Hendin 651, over struck on earlier prutah, probably Agrippa I, Hendin 651, F, Caesarea mint, 0.952g, 14.9mm, 0o, 54 A.D.; obverse “ΙΟΥ/ΛΙΑ ΑΓ/ΡΙΠΠΙ/ΝΑ” (Julia Agrippina - wife of Claudius), within a wreath tied at the bottom with an X; reverse , TI K“ΛΑΥΔ”IOC KAICAP “Γ”EPM (Tiberius Claudius Caesar Germanicus), two crossed palm fronds, L I“Δ” below (year 14). Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Antonius_Pius.jpg
Antonius Pius23 viewsObverse: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TRP COS III
Reverse: TRANQVILLITAS AVG, Tranquillitas, wearing towered head-dress, standing right, holding rudder and grain ears
Size: 18.5 mm, 3.26 gm
ID#: Cohen 829,
Minted: 140-143 AD, Rome
ickster
Pius.jpg
Antonius Pius8 viewsarash p
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Antonius Pius 138-161 denarius60 viewsOb. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P laureate head right
Rev. COS IIII, Clasped hands holding grain ears & caduceus
Ref. RIC 136, RSC 344, BMC 530

ANTONINVS AVGVSTS PIVS PATER PATRIAE Antonius Pius is your emperor and augustus, father of the country
CONSUL IIII Consul for the forth time


-:Bacchus:-
1 commentsBacchus
Antonius_Pius.JPG
ANTONIUS PIUS AE2346 viewsOBVERSE: [AVT]O KAI TI AIΛ AΔ[ ] (retrograde)
Laureate head left
REVERSE: ZEVΓMATEWN,
Tetrastyle temple with peribolos containing grove and having a colonnade (only roof slabs shown) to left and right, and in front a portico or panelled wall of two storeys; all within wreath
Struck at Commagene Zeugma Syria, 138-161AD
8.80g, 23mm
BMC 3, GIC 1492v
1 commentsLegatus
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Antonius Pius AR Didrachm Syd 301c var, Mt. Argaeus46 viewsOBV: ANTWNEI-NOC CEBACTOC, laureate head right
REV: YPAT B PAT PATR, Helios, holding globe and sceptre, standing atop Mt. Argaeus; * in exergue


Minted at Caesaria, Cappadocia, 139 AD
Legatus
Antonius Pius Den.jpg
Antonius Pius Denarius21 views16 mm, Rome, 157/158 A.D.
Obv: Antoninus Aug Pius PP Imp II
Rev: Tr Pot XX Cos IIII
Ref: Carlos Castan, LMIRB, p.222/223 # 480 (D)
Jean Paul D
Antonius_Pius_1.jpg
ANTONIUS PIUS Denarius RIC 203, Vesta21 viewsOBV: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XV, laureate head right
REV: COS IIII, Vesta standing left, holding simpulum and palladium
2.7g, 16mm

Minted at Rome, 152 AD
Legatus
Antonius_Pius_3.jpg
ANTONIUS PIUS Denarius RIC 249, Annona28 viewsOBV: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P IMP II, laureate head right
REV: TR POT XIX COS IIII, Annona standing left with corn ears & modius set on prow
3.1g, 17mm

Minted at Rome, 155-6 AD
Legatus
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Antonius Pius drachm, Förschner #64237 viewsAlexandria mint, Antonius Pius drachm, 149-150 A.D. AE, 34mm 23.46g, Förschner #642, Dattari - , cf. 2754 (obv. diff. legend); SNG Copenhagen -, cf. 506 (year 16); Geissen 1638
O: AVTKTAIΛAΔP ANTΩNINOC CEB EVC, laureate bust r.,
R: TPICKAI, in front L, Nilus recumbent l., crowned with lotus, wears himation over lower limbs and left arm, holds cornucopiae, from which springs infant genius, offering him wreath, and in left, reed; beneath, crocodile right; above Iς
* Iς (16) is the desirable height of the river Nile
3 commentscasata137ec
Antonius_Pius_2.jpg
ANTONIUS PIUS Sestertius RIC 1266 (Marcus Aurelius), CONSECRATIO24 viewsOBV: DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head right
REV: CONSECRATIO, four tiered funeral pyre surmounted by Antoninus in a quadriga, SC in ex.
25g, 31mm

Minted at Rome, 169 AD
Legatus
Antonius_Pius_6.jpg
Antonius Pivs AE20 Syd 310 var, Mt. Argaeus20 viewsOBV: AYTOC ANTWNEUNOC CEBACTOC, laureate, draped bust right
REV: KAICAREW N T P ARGAI, Mt. Argaeus culminating in tall pyramidal top (baetyl?), ET Q in ex.
7.4g, 20mm

Struck at Caesaria, Cappadocia, 145-6 AD
Legatus
12_Caesar_portraits.jpg
Antony & The 12 Caesars257 viewsA variation on my other virtual coin trays. This one includes a lifetime portrait of Julius Caesar. It's difficult choosing which coin to include in this set, in some cases I only had one (Galba, Otho) but others I had many more to choose from. I do have better portraits of some but I thought these had more interesting reverse types or portrait styles:

Marcus Antonius denarius
Julius Caesar denarius
Augustus denarius
Tiberius denarius
Caligula AE As
Claudius AE As
Nero Dupondius
Galba AE As
Otho Tetradrachm
Vitellius denarius
Vespasian denarius
Titus denarius
Domitian denarius

Image is clickable for larger size.
To see the coins individually see them in my gallery.
9 commentsJay GT4
ANTKAI.jpg
Antony and Octavian 296 viewsAntony and Octavian

Α Γ Ω N Ο Θ Ε Σ Ι Α
Bust of Agonotheseia right

ANT KAI within wreath

Æ 22 mm.
11.07g
RPC I, 1552. SNG ANS 819. SNG Copenhagen 375. BMC 64.

Ex-Aegean

Refers to the establishment of Games to commemorate Antony & Octavian's victory over Cassius & Brutus at Philipi in 42 B.C. The cheif organizers of these games were known as Agonothetes; Agonotheseia, who appears on the obverse, was the personification of the Games.

Rare, historical
1 commentsJay GT4
r-p-augustus-philipi.jpg
Augustus, Macedon, Philippi, AE 19mm (Semis). 31 AD17 viewsRoman Provincial, Augustus, Macedon, Philippi, AE 19mm (Semis). (31 AD), 4.7g, 19mm

Obverse: VIC - AVG, Victory standing left on base holding wreath and palm.

Reverse: COHOR PRAE PHIL, Three standards in honor of the Praetorian Guard's battle between Augustus and Marcus Antonius.

Reference: RPC I 1651, SGICV 32, SNG Cop 305, BMC 23, SNG ANS 677
Gil-galad
Caesar_Lf.jpg
Caesar: Grandfather of Mark Antony 132 viewsCAESAR
Head of young Mars left wearing a crested helmet

Rev.
L IVLI L F
Venus Genetrix in Biga left drawn by two cupids, before them a lyre

Rome 103 BC

Sear 198

ex-Harlan J. Berk

Lucius Julius Caesar was Mark Antony's grandfather and Gaius Julius Caesar's cousin. He was moneyer in 103 BC and tried in vain to obtain the quaestorship. However he was praetor in 94 and then became the proconsul of Macedonia. Finally he gained the Consulship in 90 BC the same year his younger brother Gaius was aedile.

In 90 BC Lucius Julius Caesar as consul defeated the Samnites and proposed the Lex Julia which offered citizenship to all communities in Italy that were not in revolt. In the following year 89, the Lex Plautia Papiria extended citizenship to those who gave up the fight by a certain date. Lucius Julius Caesar was now made censor along with Publius Licinius Crassus (father of the triumvir). But it was a time of unrest.

In 87 Marius returned to Rome with Cinna and captured the city. Lucius and Gaius were killed during the fighting and according to Livy their heads were exposed on the speakers platform.
1 commentsTitus Pullo
car5.jpg
Caracalla 198-217 denarius75 viewsOb. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM Head Right
Rev. P M TR P XVIII COS IIII P P Pax left holding branch

Ref. RIC 268, RSC 314, BMC 147
Year 215AD

ANTONIUS PIUS AUGUSTUS GERMANICUS - Antonius Pius is your Emperor and Augustus and has conquered the Germans
PONTIFEX MAXIMUS TRIBUNICIA POTESTAS XVIII CONSUL IIII PATER PATRIAE - High priest, Tribune of the People for the eighteenth time, Consul for the fourth time and father of the country

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
car4.jpg
Caracalla 198-217 denarius66 viewsOb. ANTONINUS PIVS AVG GERM Head right
Rev. P.M.TR.P.XVII.COS.IIII.P.P. Apollo seated left resting hand on lyre
Ref. Sear 1835
Year 214AD

ANTONIUS PIUS AUGUSTUS GERMANICUS - Antonius Pius is your Emperor and Augustus and has conquered the Germans
PONTIFEX MAXIMUS TRIBUNICIA POTESTAS XVII CONSUL IIII PATER PATRIAE - High priest, Tribune of the People for the seventeenth time, Consul for the fourth time and father of the country

-:Bacchus:-
1 commentsBacchus
car6.jpg
Caracalla 198-217 denarius53 viewsOb. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM Head Right
Rev. P M TR P XVIII COS IIII P P Pax left holding branch and scepter
Ref. RIC 268, RSC 314, BMC 147
Year 215AD

ANTONIUS PIUS AUGUSTUS GERMANICUS - Antonius Pius is your Emperor and Augustus and has conquered the Germans
PONTIFEX MAXIMUS TRIBUNICIA POTESTAS XVIII CONSUL IIII PATER PATRIAE - High priest, Tribune of the People for the eighteenth time, Consul for the fourth time and father of the country

-:Bacchus:-
1 commentsBacchus
x5.jpg
Caracalla 198-217 denarius57 viewsOb. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM Head Right
Rev. P M TR P XVIII COS IIII P P Fides standing left holding two standards
Ref. Sear 1837, RIC 266, RSC 315, BMC 143
Year 215AD

ANTONIUS PIUS AUGUSTUS GERMANICUS - Antonius Pius is your Emperor and Augustus and has conquered the Germans
PONTIFEX MAXIMUS TRIBUNICIA POTESTAS XVIII CONSUL IIII PATER PATRIAE - High priest, Tribune of the People for the eighteenth time, Consul for the fourth time and father of the country

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
x4.jpg
Caracalla 198-217 denarius45 viewsOb. ANTONIVS AVGSTVS Laureate head right
Rev. PONTIF TR P III Caracalla standing naked holding globe and spear
Ref. Sear 1840, RIC 30a, BMC 179

ANTONIVS AVGVSTVS Antonius is your emperor and augustus
PONTIF TRIBUNICIA POTESTAS III Priest of the temple and Tribune of the People for the third time

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
x3.jpg
Caracalla 198-217 denarius40 viewsOb. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate draped bust right
Rev. VIRTVS AVGG, Virtus standing left, holding Victory & scepter.
Ref. RIC 149, RSC 665a, BMC 300
Year 203

ANTONINVS PIVS AVG Antonius Pius is your Emperor and Augustus
VIRTVS AVGG The virtue of Caracalla and Geta - joint emperors

Virtus is a female personification of courage or bravery. She is usually shown with a spear, shield and small Victory and sometimes a parazonium (a type of baton). In this example she just has the usual Victory. (She is often erroneously thought of as male particually when the legend is combined with the Mars type)

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
x2.jpg
Caracalla 198-217 denarius64 viewsOb. ANTONINUS PIVS AVG GERM Head right
Rev. P M TR P XVII COS IIII P P. Jupiter left, holding thunderbolt and sceptre; at feet, eagle.
Ref. RIC240, BMC94
Rome mint

ANTONIUS PIUS AUGUSTUS GERMANICUS - Antonius Pius is your Emperor and Augustus and has conquered the Germans
PONTIFEX MAXIMUS TRIBUNICIA POTESTAS XVII CONSUL IIII PATER PATRIAE - High priest, Tribune of the People for the seventeenth time, Consul for the fourth time and father of the country

Jupiter was the father of the gods and is normally shown with a scepter and thunderbolt. He may be standing or seated. He can be accompanied with an eagle (as here) or a small Victory.

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
x8.jpg
Caracalla 198-217 denarius45 viewsOb. ANTONINVS AVGVSTVS laureate, draped & cuirrassed bust right
Rev. RECTOR ORBIS Sol standing front, head left, holding globe and spear reversed.
Ref. RIC 39b
Rome mint
Year 199-200

ANTONINVS AVGVSTVS Antonius is your Emperor and Augustus
RECTOR ORBIS Master of the world

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
x7.jpg
Caracalla 198-217 denarius36 viewsOb. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG laureate & draped bust right
Rev. PONTIF TR P VII COS II Mars, with cloak, foot on helmet, holding branch and spear
Ref. Sear 1841, RIC 80b RSC 420a, BMC 481
Mint Rome
Year 205

ANTONIUS PIUS AUGUSTUS - Antonius Pius is your Emperor and Augustus
PONTIF TRIBUNICIA POTESTAS VII CONSUL II - Priest and Tribune of the People for the seventh time, Consul for the second time

Mars (god of war) is usually depicted naked with a cloak and helmet (as here) or in full armor. He normally has a shield, spear and trophy, though here he has his foot on a helmet, indicating military prowess, and a branch possibly indicating he is willing to extend the olive branch to those he has pacified.


-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
x9.jpg
Caracalla 198-217 denarius42 viewsOb. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head right
Rev. P M TR P XVIIII COS IIII P P, Jupiter enthroned left, holding Victory & scepter, eagle at foot left.
Ref. RSC 343, RIC 277c
Rome mint
Year 216

ANTONIUS PIUS AUGUSTUS GERMANICUS - Antonius Pius is your Emperor and Augustus and has conquered the Germans
PONTIFEX MAXIMUS TRIBUNICIA POTESTAS XVIII CONSUL IIII PATER PATRIAE - High priest, Tribune of the People for the eighteenth time, Consul for the fourth time and father of the country

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
x11.jpg
Caracalla 198-217 denarius38 viewsOb. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG BRIT, laureate head right
Rev. PM TR P XV COS III PP, Serapis standing left holding right hand high & transverse scepter.
Ref. RSC 195, RIC 193
Mint Rome

ANTONIUS PIUS AUGUSTUS BRITANNUS - Antonius Pius is your Emperor and Augustus and has conquered the Britains
PONTIFEX MAXIMUS TRIBUNICIA POTESTAS XV CONSUL III PATER PATRIAE - High priest, Tribune of the People for the fiftheenth time, Consul for the third time and father of the country

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
cara33.jpg
Caracalla 198-217 denarius40 viewsOb. ANTONINUS PIVS AVG GERM Laureate bust right
Rev. P.M.TR.P.XVIII.COS.IIII.P.P. Aeskulapis standing, Globe on ground
Ref. RIC 253
Year 215AD

ANTONIUS PIUS AUGUSTUS GERMANICUS - Antonius Pius is your Emperor and Augustus and has conquered the Germans
PONTIFEX MAXIMUS TRIBUNICIA POTESTAS XVIII CONSUL IIII PATER PATRIAE - High priest, Tribune of the People for the eighteenth time, Consul for the fourth time and father of the country

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
car112.jpg
Caracalla 198-217 denarius57 viewsOb. ANTONINUS PIVS AVG GERM Head right
Rev. P M TR P XVII COS IIII P P. Jupiter left, holding thunderbolt and sceptre; at feet, eagle. Rome mint
Ref. RIC 240

ANTONIUS PIUS AUGUSTUS GERMANICUS - Antonius Pius is your Emperor and Augustus and has conquered the Germans
PONTIFEX MAXIMUS TRIBUNICIA POTESTAS XX CONSUL IIII PATER PATRIAE - High priest, Tribune of the People for the seventeenth time, Consul for the fourth time and father of the country

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
ant11.jpg
Caracalla Antoninianus Serapis60 viewsOb. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, radiate, draped bust right
Rev. P M TR P XX COS IIII P P, Serapis standing left, wearing polos & holding wreath of corn ears & transverse scepter

Ref. RIC 289d, RSC 383b
Weight 4.9g

ANTONIUS PIUS AUGUSTUS GERMANICUS - Antonius Pius is your Emperor and Augustus and has conquered the Germans
PONTIFEX MAXIMUS TRIBUNICIA POTESTAS XX CONSUL IIII PATER PATRIAE - High priest, Tribune of the People for the twentieth time, Consul for the fourth time and father of the country

-:Bacchus:-
1 commentsBacchus
Cilicia.JPG
Cilicia13 viewsCilicia Trachea became the haunt of pirates, who were subdued by Pompey in 67 BC following a Battle of Korakesion (modern Alanya), and Tarsus was made the capital of the Roman province of Cilicia. Cilicia Pedias became Roman territory in 103 BC first conquered by Marcus Antonius Orator in his campaign against pirates, with Sulla acting as its first governor, foiling an invasion of Mithridates, and the whole was organized by Pompey, 64 BC, into a province which, for a short time, extended to and included part of Phrygia. It was reorganized by Julius Caesar, 47 BC, and about 27 BC became part of the province Syria-Cilicia Phoenice. At first the western district was left independent under native kings or priest-dynasts, and a small kingdom, under Tarcondimotus, was left in the east; but these were finally united to the province by Vespasian, AD 72. It had been deemed important enough to be governed by a proconsul.

ancientone
Roma484.jpg
Cr 364/1b AR Denarius Serratus Q. Antonius Balbus 11 viewsRome, 82 BCE (3.71g, 20mm, 11h)
o: Laureate head of Jupiter right; S•C behind, O below
r: Victory driving quadriga right, holding reins, wreath, and palm frond; Q•ANTO•BALB PR in two lines in ex
Crawford 364/1b. Antonia 1a
Banker's mark near chin obverse
Striking as Praetor, he was a Marian who was slain after the Sullan victory.
PMah
822KMK544503.jpg
Cr 489/6 AR Quinarius M. Antonius6 viewsQuinarius, Lugdunum ? 42 BCE 1.78 gm
o: [III·VIR·] R·P·C around head of Victory (with features of Fulvia?)
r: [A]NTONI Lion walking r.; at sides, [A] – XL[I]. In exergue, IMP.
Usually said to be Antony's third wife, Fulvia and as giving his age of 41. The idea that the portrait is Fulvia is a bit of a stretch, and Crawford does not mention or attribute it as such in RRC. Nor is "Victoria" obvious, as the wings, if that is what is visible in FDC examples, are tiny even compared to full statuette forms. In every example I have seen, the portrait is poorly-executed and hardly a tribute to either Victory or Fulvia herself. Fulvia seems to have been a formidable person, and so the non-standard style would be perhaps consistent, but the uninspired portrait would then have been a significant failure.
The attribution of Antony's age as "41", which certainly fits some chronologies, nonetheless does not have a better explanation than that it seems that Julius Caesar put his age at "52" on a coin. There is debate about the dating and meaning of such age references, but, from my perspective, neither age matters as an absolute number -- both Antony and particularly Caesar had already legally been through the cursus, including Consul. Antony was Consul for 44 BCE. (Otherwise, as to Antony, we would have heard from Cicero at excruciating length.) Perhaps these are "birthday" issues, but a sad, lonely and pathetic birthday it would reflect. Antony's later coins with Octavia are more persuasive.
Antonia 32. Sydenham 1163. Sear Imperators 126.
PMah
Marc_Anthony_Caesar.jpg
Cr. 488/1, Mark Antony and Julius Caesar 34 viewsMarcus Antonius
AR-Denar, ca. 43 v.C.
mint in Gallia
Obv: M ANTON IMP Head of Marcus Antonius r., lituus behind
Rev: CAESAR DIC Laureate head of Julius Caesar r., jug behind
Ag, 3.81g, 18mm
Ref: Cr.: 488/1, Sydenham: 1165, Sear 118
shanxi
Fulvia_01.jpg
Cr. 489/5, Fulvia, Lion, Quinarius59 viewsFulvia (83 BC – 40 BC)
Powerful aristocratic woman, wife of Publius Clodius Pulcher (62-52 BC), Gaius Scribonius Curio (52-51 BC) and Marcus Antonius (47-40 BC).
AR Quinarius, Late 43-42 BC
Obv.: Winged bust of Fulvia as Victory
Rev.: [LVGV] DVNI [A] XL, Lion advancing right
Ag, 1.66g, 13.2mm
Ref.: Craw. 489/5, RPC 512, Syd. 1160
3 commentsshanxi
Octavian_Antoninus_R695_fac.jpg
Cr. 517/2, Octavian, Mark Antony17 viewsOctavian and Mark Antony
Denarius 41 BC
Obv.: CAESAR·IMP·PONT·III·VIR·R·P·C: Head of Octavian right, bearded; around, inscription. Border of dots.
Rev.: M·ANT·IMP·AVG·III·VIR·R·P·C·M·BARBAT·Q·P: Head of M. Antonius right; around, inscription. Border of dots.
Ag, 3.81g, 18.1mm
Ref.: Crawford 517/2
Ex Christoph Gärtner 44. Auktion Numismatik, Lot 4055 D
4 commentsshanxi
MAntDeL14.jpg
Crawford 544/29, Marc Antony, for Legio XIV, Denarius, 32-31 BC.84 viewsMarc Antony, for Legio XIV (Gemina Martia Victrix), Patras mint (?), 32-31 BC.,
Denarius (16-17 mm / 3,63 g),
Obv.: above: [AN]T AVG , below: [III VI]R R P C , under oar right, filleted scepter or mast with fluttering banners on prow.
Rev.: LEG - XIV , Aquila (legionary eagle) between two military standards.
Crawf. 544/29 ; Bab. (Antonia) 123 ; BMC 208 ; Sear 369 ; Syd. 1234 .

Die Legio XIV wurde 41 v. Chr. von Augustus aufgestellt. Sie war seit 9 n. Chr. in Moguntiacum (Mainz) stationiert und kämpfte später unter Claudius in Britannien, wo sie 60 oder 61 n. Chr. half, Boudicca niederzuwerfen. Später war die Legion u. a. in Vindobona (Wien) und Carnuntum stationiert. Sie war an den Usurpationen des Saturninus und Regalianus beteiligt.

Legio XIV Gemina Martia Victrix was a legion of the Roman Empire, levied by Octavian after 41 BC. The cognomen Gemina (twin in Latin) suggests that the legion resulted from fusion of two previous ones, one of them possibly being the Fourteenth legion that fought in the Battle of Alesia. Martia Victrix (martial victory) were cognomens added by Nero following the victory over Boudica. The emblem of the legion was the Capricorn, as with many of the legions levied by Augustus.
Invasion of Britain
Stationed in Moguntiacum, Germania Superior, since AD 9, XIIII Gemina Martia Victrix was one of four legions used by Aulus Plautius and Claudius in the Roman invasion of Britain in 43, and took part in the defeat of Boudicca in 60 or 61. In 68 it was stationed in Gallia Narbonensis.
Rebellion on the Rhine
In 89 the governor of Germania Superior, Lucius Antonius Saturninus, rebelled against Domitian, with the support of the XIVth and of the XXI Rapax, but the revolt was suppressed.
Pannonian defense
When the XXIst legion was lost, in 92, XIIII Gemina was sent in Pannonia to substitute it, camping in Vindobona (Vienna). After a war with the Sarmatians and Trajan's Dacian Wars (101-106), the legion was moved to Carnuntum, where it stayed for three centuries. Some subunits of Fourteenth fought in the wars against the Mauri, under Antoninus Pius, and the legion participated to the Parthian campaign of Emperor Lucius Verus. During his war against the Marcomanni, Emperor Marcus Aurelius based his headquarters in Carnuntum.
In support of Septimius Severus
In 193, after the death of Pertinax, the commander of the Fourteenth, Septimius Severus, was acclaimed emperor by the Pannonian legions, and above all by his own. XIIII Gemina fought for its emperor in his march to Rome to attack usurper Didius Julianus (193), contributed to the defeat of the usurper Pescennius Niger (194), and probably fought in the Parthian campaign that ended with the sack of the capital of the empire, Ctesiphon (198).
In support of imperial candidates
In the turmoil following the defeat of Valerian, tXIIII Gemina supported usurper Regalianus against Emperor Gallienus (260), then Gallienus against Postumus of the Gallic empire (earning the title VI Pia VI Fidelis — "six times faithful, six times loyal"), and, after Gallienus death, Gallic Emperor Victorinus (269-271).
5th century
At the beginning of the 5th century, XIIII Gemina still stayed at Carnuntum. It probably dissolved with the collapse of the Danube frontier in 430s. The Notitia Dignitatum lists a Quartodecimani comitatensis unit under the Magister Militum per Thracias; it is possible that this unit is XIV Gemina.

my ancient coin database
1 commentsArminius
U3141F1METMNPEN.JPG
Denarius Serratus, Q Antoninus Balbus26 viewsSilver-plated (Subaeratus) Denarius Serratus of Q Antonius Balbus 83-82 BCE.

Laureate head of Jupiter right, S C behind. E in ex./ Victory in quadriga right, control letter below, Q ANT BALB P R in ex.

Cr364/1; Syd 742.
Belisarius
Balbus_CNG_obv.png
Denarius Serratus: Q. Antonius Balbus 83-2 B.C., obverse23 views1 commentsLarry M2
Picture_6.png
Denarius Serratus: Q. Antonius Balbus 83-2 B.C., obverse21 viewsQ. Antonius Balbus 83-2 B.C., Serrate Denarius
3.84g, 8h, Rome Mint.
Laureate Head of Jupiter right, SC behind.
Crawford 364/1dSydenham 742b, Antonia 1.
VF. Reverse struck off center.
1 commentsLarry M2
Picture_8.png
Denarius Serratus: Q. Antonius Balbus 83-2 B.C., reverse15 viewsLarry M2
Picture_7.png
Denarius Serratus: Q. Antonius Balbus 83-2 B.C., reverse19 viewsQ. Antonius Balbus 83-2 B.C., Serrate Denarius
3.84g, 8h, Rome Mint.
Jupiter driving quadriga, holding reins, palm frond and wreath. X below.
Crawford 364/1dSydenham 742b, Antonia 1.
VF. Reverse struck off center.
Larry M2
2011-09-014.jpg
Diadumenians, Antonius27 viewsObverse: bare head right, seen from behind.
Reverse: staff of Aesklepios" Roman cult of healing
Mint: Nikopolis on river Istrus
Date: 217-218 CE
Reference- Varbanov 3599
wileyc
Domitian_Adlocutio.jpg
Domitian Sestertius, Adlocutio, RIC 288140 viewsDomitian. A.D. 81-96. Æ sestertius (33 mm, 22.94 g). Rome, A.D. 85. Laureate bust right, wearing aegis / Domitian standing right, clasping hands with general over altar; two soldiers behind. RIC 288; Cohen 497. BMCRE 344, RCV 2775, Kampmann 24.129 Near VF. F500 VF2500

The representation on the rev. of this issue is a very controversial one. For some it depicts the arrival in Rome of the general Agricola due to the fact that the scene is first shown in the same year in which Domitian had to recall the British general. In reality the theme has a much more general meaning: in ca. AD 85 the Daci started to invade the Roman province of Moesia. The Roman army was seriously defeated, comparable to the defeats of P. Quinctilius Varus in AD 9. From all over the empire troops were sent to Moesia, in the end 9 legions were stationed against the Daci. In this context the Concordia between the emperor and his army is seen, the handshake over the burning altar remembers the oath of allegiance. By how important the harmony in the army was, is shown by the defection of Antonius Saturninus, legate for the Upper Rhine. This defection forced Domitian in AD 89 to agree to an unsatisfactory peace agreement with the Daci; but this agreement would not last for more than a couple of years.
3 commentsmattpat
EB0251b_scaled.JPG
EB0251 Crossed Shields / Palm tree7 viewsJUDAEA, ANTONIUS FELIX, 52-60 AD, AE 16.5 Prutah, Year 14 = 54 AD.
Obverse: NERW KLAV KAICP, two crossed shields and spears.
Reverse: BRIT, six branched palm tree bearing two bunches of dates; L-ID K-AI across field.
References: Hendin 652.
Diameter: 16.5mm, Weight: 2.07g.
1 commentsEB
lg_elag_markianopoli.jpg
Elagabalus & Julia Maesa, Moesia Inferior, Markianopolis32 viewsElagabalus & Julia Maesa
Moesia Inferior, Markianopolis
AE 9.52g / 28.5mm / -
ΑVΤ Κ Μ ΑVΡΗ ΑΝΤΩΝΕΙΝΟC ΙΟVΛΙΑ ΜΑΙCΑ ΑVΓΟVC - Laureate head of Elagabalus r., facing bust of Maesa l.
VΠ ΙΟVΔ ΑNΤ CΕΛΕΥΚΟV ΜΑΡΚΙΑΝΟ - Athena standing facing head left, holding owl in her extended right hand and spear in left; shield at her side, E in field to right
Exergue: ΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ
(218-222 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis:
References: ANS 1997.32.53; Moushmov 666 var. like Plate VI 33; AMNG I, 1, no. 946

Issued by Julius Antonius Seleucus
1 commentsScotvs Capitis
elg1.jpg
Elagabalus 218-222 denarius22 viewsOb. IMP.ANTONINVS PIVS AVG.Laureate bust of Elagabalus right.
Rev. SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG.Elagabalus standing left, sacrificing over tripod-altar and holding branch, star in field to left above altar

Ref. Sear 2020, RIC 146, RSC 276, BMC 232
Year 221/222 AD

IMPERATOR ANTONINVS PIVS AVGVSTVS supreme commander of the army Antonius Pius is your Emperor and Augustus
SVMMVS SACERDOS AVGVSTVS Highest prince Augustus

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
egal1.jpg
Elagabalus 218-222 denarius16 viewsOb. IMP.ANTONINVS PIVS AVG.Laureate bust of Elagabalus right.
Rev. FIDES MILITVM Fides standing left, holding tessera and vexillum
Ref. RIC 73, RSC 38a, BMC 133

Weight 3.25
17mm
0o rotation


IMPERATOR ANTONINVS PIVS AUGUSTUS Emperor and supreme commander of the Roman Army Antonius Pius.
FIDES MILITVM The fidelity and honesty of the army

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
1.jpg
Elagabalus AE26 Tetrassarion of Marcianopolis.43 viewsAVT K M AVP H LI ANTWNEINOC, laureate head right,

VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MAPKIANOPOLITWN, Victory advancing left,

Issued under the Consular Legate Julius Antonius Seleucus, Governor of Moesia between AD218-222. A 5th century historian Polemius Silvius, mentions a usurper by the name of Seleucus during Elagabal's reign. Whether or not this usurper is our Legate or another Consul (AD 221) by the name of M. Flavius Vitellius Seleucus, is unknown. What is known is that Seleucus was succeeded by Sergius Titianus in AD 222, the year of Elagabal's murder.

AMNG Vol.I No.824, Pg.254

ex-Gitbud & Naumann Münzhandlung München
2 commentsWill Hooton
ElagMarkDemeter.JPG
Elagabalus, AE 2756 viewsAVT K M AVRHLIOC ANTWNEINOC
Bust laureate, draped, cuirassed, right, seen from behind
VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOPO/LITWN
Demeter standing facing, head left and veiled, holding two grain ears before, long torch behind
AMNG 819 (courtesy of Steve Minnoch)
Varbanov (Eng.) I, 1560 (same dies as illustrated)
Hristova & Jekov 6.26.5.6
1 commentswhitetd49
GI_071k_img.jpg
Elagabalus, AE26, Markianopolis, AMNG I 85617 viewsAE26
Obv:- AVT K M AVP ANTW(NE)INOC, laureate head right
Rev:– VΠ Ι(ΟV)Λ ANT CEΛΕVK(OV) Μ(ΑΡ)ΚΙΑΝΟΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ, Homonoia standing left, holding patera & cornucopia
Minted in Markianopolis, under Julius Antoninus Seleucus
Reference:– AMNG I page 259, 856. Not in Varbanov (engl.). Hristova(Jekov) (2014) No. 6.26.36.25 (same dies). Not in Pfeiffer 2013

Iulius Antonius Seleucus was legatus Augusti pro praetore governor of the province and supreme commander of the Roman legions.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Elagabalus_Markianopolis_Abundantia~0.jpg
Elagabalus, Markianopolis, Abundantia, AE2733 viewslegate Julius Antonius Seleucus
8.9 g
obv.: laureate and draped bust right
rev.: Abundantia or Annona, standing left, holding corn-ears and cornucopiae

AMNG 861

Thanks to Jochen for the attribution!
1 commentsareich
coin350.JPG
Elagabalus; Markianopolis, Moesia Inferior17 viewsElagabalus AE25 of Markianopolis. Laureate bust right / Homonoia enthroned left with patera & cornucopiae.
Moushmov 634

Consular legate Julius Antonius Seleucus
1 commentsecoli
faustinaII_695.jpg
Faustina Filia RIC III, 69523 viewsFaustina Filia, died AD 175, wife of Marcus Antonius, daughter of Antoninus Pius
AR - Denarius, 3.08g, 18mm
Rome, AD 161-175
obv. FAVSTINA - AVGVSTA
Bust, drsped and diademed, r.
rev. IVNONI - REGINAE
Iuno, in girded double chiton and veiled, stg. facing, head l., resting with raised r. hand on sceptre and
holding in extended r. hand patera; at her feet the peacock stg. l., head turned r.
ref. RIC III, 695; C. 140; BMCR 121, pl. 55, 13
VF/F+

Interesting detail on her decollete
1 commentsJochen
Faustina_Junior.jpg
Faustina Junior – RIC-507a (Pius)43 viewsFaustina Jr d. 175, Denarius (2.96g) Rome 148-152 AD Daughter of Antonius Pius and Faustina I, Wife of Marcus Aurelius and mother of Commodus. Head of Faustina Jr right. Her hair in a diadem "FAVSTINA AVG PII" Puducitia veiled standing front, head left drawing out her robe in front of her face, and gathering up her skirt. RIC 507a, RSC 176a, BMC 1051, RCV 47061 commentsBud Stewart
Fulvia.jpg
Fulvia Second wife of Mark Antony198 viewsBust of Fulvia as Victory right

Lion right between A and XL (year 40) LVGV in ex DVNI above

Lugdunum, autumn 43 BC

1.37g

Sear 1518
RSC 4

Antony's name is not mentioned on the coin but the date-numeral A XL (year 40) refers to his age at the time of the issue. A similar type was struck the following year which includes Antony's name and titles and recods his age as 41.

Silver Quinarius fouree 1.36gm
ex CNG 9/98 #1358


LOST
Titus Pullo
Julius_Caesar.jpg
Gaius Julius Caesar207 viewsFebruary-March 44 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.90 g, 5h). Rome mint. P. Sepullius Macer, moneyer. Laureate and veiled head right / Venus standing left, holding Victory and scepter; shield at base of scepter. Crawford 480/13; CRI 107d; Sydenham 1074; RSC 39. From the Jörg Müller Collection.

Alföldi arranges Crawford 480 series coins in (44 BC) month order as follows:

RRC 480/1, Buca - January
RRC 480/2, DICT QVART - early February
RRC 480/3/4/5, CAESAR IMP - late February
RRC 480/6/7/8/9/10/11/12/13/14, DICT PERPETVO - early to mid March
RRC 480/17/18, CAESAR IMPER - late March
RRC 480/19/20, PARENS PATRIAE - April
RRC 480/15/16, MARIDIANVS - April
RRC 480/21/22, CLEMENTIAE CAESARIS and Mark Antony - April

"Iconography, historical meaning:

The rev. can be understand easily: The Iulians ascribed their gens back to Aeneas who was the son of Venus (Aphrodite) and Anchises.Venus was the tutelary goddess of the gens Iulia and hence of Caesar. 46 BC Caesar has consecrated together with his new built forum also the temple of Venus Genetrix, the ancestress of his gens. On this denarius with Victory, spear and shield it is rather Venus Victrix.

The portrait on obv. is imposing by its realistic depiction. It was for the first time that a living ruler was pictured on a Roman coin. This too raised suspicion that Caesar - even if he wasn't acclaimed king - would behave as such.

Caesar's portrait attracts attention by the wreath he is wearing. It protrudes notable wide beyond his forehead. Furthermore it is padded and very ragged. This characteristic received too little attention until now. There is every indication that it is not a usual wreath but a corona graminea, a Grass or Blockade crown. This crown was dedicated by the army to that commander who has freed them from an encirclement and saved them from certain death. The crown was composed from flowers and tuft of grass which was plucked at the location of their liberation. This crown was regarded as the highest of all crowns! Pliny (nat. 22, 6) has known only of 8 persons with this honour:
1. Lucius Siccius Dentatus, tribunus plebis 454 BC
2. Publius Decius Mus, 343 BC, 1st Samnite War, dedicated even by 2 armies!
3. Marcus Calpurnius Flamma, 258 BC, at Carmina on Sicily
4. Quintus Fabius Maximus, after the departure of the Carthaginians from Italy, 203 BC
(dedicated by the Senate and the people of Rome, possibly posthumous)
5. Scipio Aemilianus Africanus
6. Gnaeus Petreius Atinas, centurio during the war against the Cimbri
7. Lucius Cornelius Sulla, during the Allied War at Nola 89 BC
8. Quintus Sertorius, 97 BC aa military tribune in Spain under Titu Ddius.
To Caesar and Augustus the crown was dedicated by the Senate!

The veil Caesar is wearing as Pontifex Maximus for lifetime.

DICTATOR PERPETVVS

During Republican times a dictator was designated when the state was in an emergency situation. His position was always temporally limited, yes, sometimes designated only for a single task. In the beginning Caesar too was dictator limited to 1 year and had to be designated again for the next year. Already 46 BC Caesar has been nominated dictator for 10 years but the title had to be renewed each year. So we know of coins with DICT, DICT ITER (= again, for the second time), IC TER (for the third time) and DICT QVART.

Since the proclamation as king has failed the title dictator disappeared from the denarii and were replaced by IMP. But soon behind Caesar's head appeares a star, a crescent, or Victory's spear stands on a star. These celestial signs - and that was understod by all - stand for divinity and should raise Caesar high above all Romans. Incompatible with the idea of a republican constituted Rome.

The point of culmination in this series is the legend DICT PERPETVO of this coin. Now the title of dictator was no more temporally limited but was valid like his office as Pontifex Maximus for all his life and it no more was necessary to confirm the title each year. That actually was a spectacular violation of the Roman constitution! The fact that he appeared at the Lupercalia on February 15. 44 BC in the ancient robe of kings strengthened the suspicion that he was looking for the kingship. In fact he has publicly
refused the royal crown that was offered to him by Marcus Antonius, but his authority to exert power was equal a king even without bearing the title of king. That was the most hateful title of the Roman Republic.

Now he has passed a line that his republican enimies couldn't tolerate any more if they still wanted to be taken seriously. So this coin actually led to his murder by the conspirators. So "The coin that kills Caesar" is by no means an exaggeration.

The planned Parthian War:

Caesar has planned a war against the Parthians. In March 44 BC he wanted to start for a campaign to the east. His assassination inhibited this intention. In science disputed are the goals which Caesar has had in mind with his war. They are reaching from a boundary adjustment, as Mommsen suggested, to world domination like Alexander the Great, as Plutarch is writing: According to him Caesar after the submission of the Parthians would go across Hyrcania at the Caspian Sea, then round the Black Sea via the Caucasus, invade the land of the Scyths, attack Germania and would finally return to Italy through the land of the Celts. In this way he would have conquered the world known to the Ancients and his limits were only the shores of the surrounding Okeanos.

Probably Sueton who was sitting directly at the sources was more realistic. And we know of the campaigns of Marcus Antonius and Augustus who surely have known Caesar's plans and have used them for their own purposes. It's clear that Caesar doesn't want to repeat the errors of Crassus who perished at Carrhae, and has tried to avoid he Parthian cavalry units. Therefore a route through Lesser Armenia is most probable. And there was hope that the Mesopotamian cities would raise against the Parthians. Caesar had gathered an army of 16(!) legions, a huge power that alone by its mere bigness would ensure the victory. Caesar was no gambler, rather a cautious and prudential commander.The famous "veni, vidi, vici" doesn't exist longer. What he actually had in mind we don't know. It's speculative. But there is every indication that it was a reorganisation of the east. And that rather by establishing client-kingdoms than creating new Roman provinces.

Probably the conspirators were afraid of Caesar's Parthian War, because a victory, which was possible or even probable, would have strengthen Caesar's position and has made him practically invulnerable." - Jochen
4 commentsNemonater
temp_06a2cea6b4f31e479ec7f77328248356.jpg
Galilaea, Sepphoris; Antonius Pius6 viewsJUDAEA, Sepphoris (Diocaesarea). Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Æ (12mm, 1.67 g, 12h). Laureate head right / Radiate and draped bust right of Helios. RPC IV Online –; Rosenberger 10; Sofaer 12.ecoli
GordianIAfr.jpg
Gordian I Africanus / Athena61 viewsGordian I Africanus, Egypt, Alexandria. A.D. 238. BI tetradrachm (22 mm, 12.47 g, 12 h). RY 1.
O: A K M AN ΓOPΔIANOC CЄM AΦ ЄVCЄB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian I right
R: Athena seated left, holding Nike and spear; in left field, date (L A).
- Köln 2600; cf. Dattari (Savio) 4656 (legend); Kampmann & Ganschow 68.6., Ex Coin Galleries (16 July 2003), 264.

Perhaps the most reluctant of Emperors, Gordian I (Marcus Antonius Gordianus Sempronianus Romanus Africanus Augustus) was Roman Emperor for one month with his son Gordian II in 238, the Year of the Six Emperors. Caught up in a rebellion against the Emperor Maximinus Thrax, he was defeated by forces loyal to Maximinus before committing suicide.

According to Edward Gibbon:

"An iniquitous sentence had been pronounced against some opulent youths of [Africa], the execution of which would have stripped them of far the greater part of their patrimony. (…) A respite of three days, obtained with difficulty from the rapacious treasurer, was employed in collecting from their estates a great number of slaves and peasants blindly devoted to the commands of their lords, and armed with the rustic weapons of clubs and axes. The leaders of the conspiracy, as they were admitted to the audience of the procurator, stabbed him with the daggers concealed under their garments, and, by the assistance of their tumultuary train, seized on the little town of Thysdrus, and erected the standard of rebellion against the sovereign of the Roman empire. (...) Gordianus, their proconsul, and the object of their choice [as emperor], refused, with unfeigned reluctance, the dangerous honour, and begged with tears that they should suffer him to terminate in peace a long and innocent life, without staining his feeble age with civil blood. Their menaces compelled him to accept the Imperial purple, his only refuge indeed against the jealous cruelty of Maximin (...)."

Because of the absence of accurate dating in the literary sources, the precise chronology of these events has been the subject of much study. The present consensus among historians assigns the following dates (all in the year 238 A.D.) to these events: March 22nd Gordian I, II were proclaimed Emperors in Africa; April 1st or 2nd they were recognized at Rome; April 12th they were killed (after reigning twenty days); April 22nd Pupienus and Balbinus were proclaimed Emperors; June 24th Maximinus and his son were assassinated outside of Aquileia; July 29th Pupienus and Balbinus were assassinated and Gordian III proclaimed as sole Augustus.
3 commentsNemonater
GordII.jpg
Gordian II Africanus / Victory62 viewsGordian II Africanus. Silver Denarius, AD 238. Rome.
O: IMP M ANT GORDIANVS AFR AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian II right.
R: VICTO-RIA AVGG, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm.
- RIC 2; BMC 28; RSC 12.

Gordian II (Marcus Antonius Gordianus Sempronianus Romanus Africanus Augustus), was Roman Emperor for one month with his father Gordian I in 238, the Year of the Six Emperors. The double "GG" in "AVGG" (Augustus) on the reverse was to show that power was shared between the two men although Gordian II did not receive the additional title of high priest or Pontifex Maximus. He died in battle outside of Carthage.

Confronted by a local elite that had just killed Maximinus's procurator, Gordian's father (Gordian I) was forced to participate in a full-scale revolt against Maximinus in 238 and became Augustus on March 22.

Due to his advanced age, Gordian I insisted that his son, Marcus Antonius Gordianus (Gordian II), be associated with him. A few days later, Gordian entered the city of Carthage with the overwhelming support of the population and local political leaders. Meanwhile in Rome, Maximinus' praetorian prefect was assassinated and the rebellion seemed to be successful. Gordian in the meantime had sent an embassy to Rome, under the leadership of Publius Licinius Valerianus, to obtain the Senate’s support for his rebellion. The senate confirmed the new emperor on 2 April and many of the provinces gladly sided with Gordian.

Opposition would come from the neighboring province of Numidia. Capelianus, governor of Numidia, loyal supporter of Maximinus Thrax, and who held a grudge against Gordian, renewed his alliance to the former emperor and invaded Africa province with the only legion stationed in the region, III Augusta, and other veteran units. Gordian II, at the head of a militia army of untrained soldiers, lost the Battle of Carthage and was killed, and Gordian I took his own life by hanging himself with his belt. The Gordians had reigned only twenty-two days.
3 commentsNemonater
Gordian III Moesia .JPG
Gordian III- Moesia 40 viewsGordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Viminacium, Moesia

Obverse:
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right

IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG

IMP: Imperator, leader of the army
CAES: Caesar
M: Marcus
ANT: Antonius
GORDIANVS: Gordianus
AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
P M S COL VIM AN I

PMS: Provincia Moesia Superios
COL: Colonial, Colony
VIM: Viminacium
AN I: Anno 1, year 1 = 238 AD

Moesia standing facing, head left, extending hands to bull and lion standing at feet on either side

Domination: Copper AE3, size 17 mm

Mint: Nicaea, 238 - 244 A.D

Comment: Gordian III, Nicaea, Bithynia. This three standards reverse is the commonest Provincial coin there is, closely followed by that other coin from Viminacium
John S
Gordian III- MOESIA.jpg
Gordian III- MOESIA49 viewsGordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

Obverse:
Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder;

IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG

IMP: Imperator, army leader
CAES: Ceasar
M: Marcus
ANT: Antonius
GORDIANVS: Gordianus
AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
P M S COL VIM ANIIII

PMS: Provincia Moesia Superios
COL: COLonia
VIM: VIMinacium
ANIIII: Anno 4, year 4 (after the founding of the colonia of Viminacium).

The translation, then, would be "The Province of Upper Moesia. The Colony Viminacium."




Moesia standing facing, head left, extending hands to bull and lion standing at feet on either side

Domination: Bronze provincial sestertius, 29 mm

Mint: Viminacium, 242 - 243 A.D.

Comment Cutis Clay:
Here is what Pick says, AMNG p. 23, note 5: The inscription is usually expanded Provinciae Moesiae Superioris Colonia Viminacium (The Colony Viminacium of the Province of Upper Moesia; I think this is what Lars intended), but that is bad Latin and contrary to the language one normally finds in inscriptions and on coins. The two parts of the legend, Provincia Moesia Superior and Colonia Viminacium, probably stand side by side without any grammatical connection.

The translation, then, would be "The Province of Upper Moesia. The Colony Viminacium."

I don't know what others have said about Pick's suggestion since he published it in 1898!
John S
Gordian III three legionary standards.JPG
Gordian III- Three legionary standards37 viewsGordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Nicaea, Bithynia, N.W. Asia Minor

Obverse:
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right

M ANT ΓOPΔIANOC AVΓ

M: Marcus
ANT: Antonius
ΓOPΔIANOC: Gordianus
AV: AVG, Agustus, emperor

Reverse:
NIKAIE ΩΝ

NIKAIE: Nicaea
ΩΝ:Omega and NU, stands for ?

Three legionary standards

Domination: Bronze AE17 or Copper AE3, size 19 mm

Mint: Nicaea, 238 - 244 A.D
John S
Gordian III two legionary eagles between two standards 1a .JPG
Gordian III- Two legionary eagles between two standards 25 viewsGordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Nicaea, Bithynia, N.W. Asia Minor

Obverse:
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right

M ANT ΓOPΔIANOC AVΓ

M: Marcus
ANT: Antonius
ΓOPΔIANOC: Gordianus AVG, Augustus, emperor
AVΓ, AVG, Augustus, emperor Epsilon- W ?-NU

Reverse:
NIKAI / EWΝ

NIKAI: Nicaea
EWΝ: Epsilon- W ?-NU

Two legionary eagles between two standards

Domination: Bronze AE 17 or Copper AE3, size 18 mm

Mint: Nicaea
John S
Gordian III two legionary eagles between two standards.JPG
Gordian III- Two legionary eagles between two standards 1a48 viewsGordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Nicaea, Bithynia, N.W. Asia Minor

Obverse:
Radiate and draped bust right

M ANT ΓOPΔIANOC AVΓ

M: Marcus
ANT: Antonius
ΓOPΔIANOC: Gordianus
AVΓ: AVG, Agustus, emperor

Reverse:
NIKAIE/ ΩOΝ

NIKAIE: Nicaea
ΩΝ: Omega and NU, stands for ?

Two legionary eagles between two standards

Domination: Bronze AE 20, size 19 mm

Mint: Nicaea, 238 - 244 A.D
Comment: Gordian III, Nicaea, Bithynia. This three standards reverse is the commonest Provincial coin there is, closely followed by that other coin from Viminacium
John S
Gordian_III_(2).jpg
Gordian(us) III73 viewsRIC 6, RSC 383.
Gordian III, antoninianus.
22 mm 4,82g.
Obv. IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right .
Rev. VIRTVS AVG, Virtus standing facing in military dress, head left, with shield & spear.

Marcus Antonius Gordianus Pius (January 20, 225 – February 11, 244), known as Gordian III, was Roman Emperor from 238 to 244. In Roman mythology, Virtus was the deity of bravery and military strength, the personification of the Roman virtue of virtus.

I don't collect this period in Roman history, but I simply couldn't resist this coin. Such a nice coin with so much detail for so little money!
1 commentsmars1112
23345430.jpg
Greece, Philippi201 viewsPhilippi is site of famous battle. Marcus Antonius and Octavius defeated Brutus and Cassius.
Philippi is also the first place in Europe where St. Paul evangelized. He was kept in prison there too.
Johny SYSEL
Hadrian_Ionia_Smyrna_Zeus_AE33_27_32g.jpg
Hadrian, Ionia, Smyrna, Zeus, AE3325 views134/5 AD, M. Antonius Polemos, strategos
33mm, 27.32g
obv: [AVT KAIC TPAI AΔPIANOC]; laureate head right, slight drapery on far shoulder
rev: ΠOΛEMΩV CTPATEΓOV AVE HXE CMYP; Zeus seated right holding scepter
Klose 19-25 (V8/R-, unlisted rev. die); BMC 328 (same obv. die); SNG Copenhagen 1362; SNG von Aulock 2210

From the J.P. Righetti Collection, 7162
1 commentsareich
Antonius_Felix,_h_1348.jpg
Hendin 1348 Antonius Felix, Crossed Sheilds128 viewsAntonius Felix. AE Prutah. 54 A.D.. Caesarea Mint. Obverse: (Nero Claudius Caesar), two oblong shields and spears crossed. Reverse: (Britannicus) above, (year 14 of Caesar), six-branched palm tree bearing two bunches of dates. Ex Amphora.

Acts 24:24. Paul appeared before Felix during his imprisonment in Caesarea.
1 commentsLucas H
H651.JPG
Hendin-65147 viewsAntonius Felix - prutah (year 14 = 54AD)
2.48 grams
cmcdon0923
H651_[02].JPG
Hendin-651 [02]33 viewsAntonius Felix - prutah (year 14 = 54AD)
2.74 grams
3 commentscmcdon0923
H652.JPG
Hendin-652118 viewsAntonius Felix - prutah (year 14 = 54AD)
3.08 grams
2 commentscmcdon0923
H652_[02].JPG
Hendin-652 [02]18 viewsAntonius Felix - prutah (year 14 = 54AD)
2.78 grams
2 commentscmcdon0923
lg2_quart_sm.jpg
IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG / P M S COL VIM / Ӕ30 (239-240 AD)18 viewsIMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right / P M S CO - L VIM, personification of Moesia standing facing, head left, arms outstretched over a lion (right) and a bull (left). AN • I • in exergue.

Ӕ, 29-30+mm, 16.75g, die axis 1h (slightly turned medal alignment), material: looks like red copper.

IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG = Imperator Caesar Marcus Antonius Gordianus Augustus, P M S COL VIM = Provinciae Moesiae Superioris Colonia Viminacium = Colony of Viminacium, in the province of Upper Moesia, AN•I• = the first year. 238 AD was the infamous "year of the 6 emperors", so 239-240 was the first sole ruling year of Gordian III. The bull is the symbol of Legio VII Claudia, based in the capital of Moesia Superior, Viminacium itself, and the lion is the symbol of Legio IV Flavia Felix based in another city of Moesia Superior, Singidunum (modern Belgrade). Due to size this is most probably a sestertius, but large dupondius is another possibility, since it is clearly made of red copper and sestertii were typically made of expensive "gold-like" orichalcum, a kind of brass (but in this time of civil strife they could have used a cheaper replacement). Literature fails to clearly identify the denomination of this type.

A straightforward ID due to size and clear legends, this is AMNG 71; Martin 1.01.1 minted in Viminacium, Moesia Superior (Kostolac, Serbia).

Gordian III was Roman Emperor from 238 AD to 244 AD. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. Antonia Gordiana was the daughter of Emperor Gordian I and younger sister of Emperor Gordian II. Very little is known of his early life before his acclamation. Gordian had assumed the name of his maternal grandfather in 238 AD.

In 235, following the murder of Emperor Alexander Severus, Maximinus Thrax was acclaimed Emperor. In the following years, there was a growing opposition against Maximinus in the Roman senate and amongst the majority of the population of Rome. In 238 (to become infamous as "the year of six emperors") a rebellion broke out in the Africa Province, where Gordian's grandfather and uncle, Gordian I and II, were proclaimed joint emperors. This revolt was suppressed within a month by Cappellianus, governor of Numidia and a loyal supporter of Maximinus Thrax. The elder Gordians died, but public opinion cherished their memory as peace-loving and literate men, victims of Maximinus' oppression.

Meanwhile, Maximinus was on the verge of marching on Rome and the Senate elected Pupienus and Balbinus as joint emperors. These senators were not popular and the population of Rome was still shocked by the elder Gordians' fate, so the Senate decided to take the teenage Gordian, rename him Marcus Antonius Gordianus like his grandfather, and raise him to the rank of Caesar and imperial heir. Pupienus and Balbinus defeated Maximinus, mainly due to the defection of several legions, particularly the II Parthica, who assassinated Maximinus. However, their joint reign was doomed from the start with popular riots, military discontent and an enormous fire that consumed Rome in June 238. On July 29, Pupienus and Balbinus were killed by the Praetorian Guard and Gordian proclaimed sole emperor.

Due to Gordian's age, the imperial government was surrendered to the aristocratic families, who controlled the affairs of Rome through the Senate. In 240, Sabinianus revolted in the African province, but the situation was quickly brought under control. In 241, Gordian was married to Furia Sabinia Tranquillina, daughter of the newly appointed praetorian prefect, Timesitheus. As chief of the Praetorian Guard and father in law of the Emperor, Timesitheus quickly became the de facto ruler of the Roman Empire.

In the 3rd century, the Roman frontiers weakened against the Germanic tribes across the Rhine and Danube, and the Sassanid Empire across the Euphrates increased its own attacks. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243). The campaign was a success and Gordian, who had joined the army, was planning an invasion of the enemy's territory, when his father-in-law died in unclear circumstances. Without Timesitheus, the campaign, and the Emperor's security, were at risk.

Gaius Julius Priscus and, later on, his own brother Marcus Julius Philippus, also known as Philip the Arab, stepped in at this moment as the new Praetorian Prefects and the campaign proceeded. Around February 244, the Persians fought back fiercely to halt the Roman advance to Ctesiphon. Persian sources claim that a battle occurred (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. Roman sources do not mention this battle and suggest that Gordian died far away from Misiche, at Zaitha (Qalat es Salihiyah) in northern Mesopotamia. Modern scholarship does not unanimously accept this course of the events. One view holds that Gordian died at Zaitha, murdered by his frustrated army, while the role of Philip is unknown. Other scholars have concluded that Gordian died in battle against the Sassanids.
Philip transferred the body of the deceased emperor to Rome and arranged for his deification. Gordian's youth and good nature, along with the deaths of his grandfather and uncle and his own tragic fate at the hands of the enemy, earned him the lasting esteem of the Romans.
Yurii P
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum and the temple of Venus and Roma.jpg
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum and the temple of Venus and Roma42 viewsThe Temple of Venus and Roma (Templum Veneris et Romae in Latin) was the largest temple in Ancient Rome. It was located at the far east side of the Forum Romanum, near the Colosseum. It was dedicated to the goddesses Venus Felix (Venus the Happy) and Roma Aeterna (Eternal Rome). The designer was emperor Hadrian. Construction works on the temple started in 121 AD and though it was inaugurated by Hadrian in 135 AD, the building was finished in 141 AD under Antonius Pius.

The building measured 110 meters in length and 53 meters in width. It was placed on a stage measuring 145 meters in length and 100 meters in width. The temple itself consisted of 2 main chambers (cellae), where the cult statue of the god was, in this case the statues of Venus, the goddess of love, and Roma, the goddess of Rome, both of them seated on a throne. The cellae were placed symmetrically back-to-back. Roma's cella was faced west, looking out over the Forum Romanum, Venus' cella was faced east, looking out over the Colosseum. Each cella had its own line of 4 columns at the entrance. At the west and east sides of the temple (the short sides), 10 white columns were placed and at the south and north sides of the temple (the long sides) 18 white columns were placed. All of these columns measured 1.8 meters in width, making the temple very imposing to see.

Within Venus' cella, there was another altar where newly wed couples could make sacrifices. Right next to this altar stood gigantic, silver statues of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina.

In order to build the temple, which is placed on the remains of Nero's Domus Aurea, the statue of Nero, the Colossus, had to be moved. They placed it near the amphitheatre, which became known as the Colosseum shortly afterwards.

Hadrian's most brilliant architect, Apollodorus, wasn't impressed by his emperor's architectural skills. He made a scornful remark on the size of the statues within the cellae. He said that they'd surely hurt their heads if they tried to stand up from their thrones. He was banned and executed not long after this.

A serious fire in 307 AD caused major damage to the temple. It was restored by emperor Maxentius. Unfortunately, a gigantic earthquake at the beginning of the 9th century destroyed the temple once again. Around 850 though, Pope Leo IV ordered the building of a new church, the Santa Maria Nova, on the ruins of the temple. After a major rebuilding in 1612 this church was renamed the Santa Francesca Romana. This church has incorporated Roma's cella as the belltower.

Over the years, most of the columns around the temple have disappeared. Nowadays, only a few are still standing where they used to be, others that have gone missing have been replaced by buxus trees.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_of_Venus_and_Roma"
John Schou
Antonius_Felix_procurator,_AE-16,_Prutah__Jerusalems_Israel_Palm_Hedin-652,_54_AD_Q-001_0h,_2,28_g_,_16_mm-s.jpg
Judaea, Antonius Felix Procurator, under Claudius, (52-60 A.D.), AE-16(Prutah), Hedin 652, BRIT, Six branched palm tree,96 viewsJudaea, Antonius Felix Procurator, under Claudius, (52-60 A.D.), AE-16(Prutah), Hedin 652, BRIT, Six branched palm tree,
avers: NEPΩ KΛAV KAICP, Two crossed shields and spears.
reverse: BRIT, Six branched palm tree bearing two bunches of dates, L-IΔ, K-AI across the field.
exergue: L/IΔ//K/AI, diameter: 16,0mm, weight: 2,28g, axes: 0h,
mint: Judaea, date: Dated Year of Claudius (Year 14 = 54 A.D.) ref: Hedin 652,
Q-001
quadrans
prutah_3.jpg
Judaea, Antonius Felix, Procurator under Claudius27 viewsAE Prutah, 19mm, 3.4g, 5h; Jerusalem, AD 54.
Obv.: TI KΛAYΔIOC KAICAP ΓEPM (Tiberius Claudius Caesar Germanicus); Two crossed palm branches / L IΔ (year 14)
Rev.: Inscription in wreath IOY/ ΛIA AΓ/ PIΠΠI/ NA (Julia Agrippina).
Reference: Hendin 1347.
Notes: ex-Zuzim, electronic sale 3/16/15, 46.
1 commentsJohn Anthony
20171212_120830.jpg
Judaea, Procuratorial. Antonius Felix. 52-59 B.C. Æ prutah. Prefect under Claudius, Dated year 14 = 54 C.E.. 18 viewsObv. IOY ΛIA AΓ PIΠΠI NA, legend within wreath tied at bottom with X.
Rev. TI KΛAYΔIOC KAICAP ΓEPM, LIΔ beneath two crossed palm branches.
References: Hendin 1347; Meshorer TJC 342; RPC 4970.
17mm, 1.78 grams.
Canaan
c6~1.jpg
JUDAEA, Roman Procurators, Antonius Felix15 viewsJUDAEA, Roman Procurators, Antonius Felix (under Claudius). 54 CE. Æ prutah.

Crossed palm branches / Julia Agrippina (wife of Claudius) within wreath. Hendin 651.
ecoli
judaea-claudius-britannicus-antonius-felix.jpg
Judaea, Under Claudius I, Nero Claudius Caesar, Britannicus by Antonius Felix (54 AD), AE Prutah, Year 1417 viewsRoman Provincial, Judaea, Under Claudius I, Nero Claudius Caesar, Britannicus by Antonius Felix (54 AD), AE Prutah, Year 14

Obverse: NƐPW KΛAY KAICAP, Two shields, two spears crossed, within dotted circle border, off-center.

Reverse: BPIT, L-[IΔ], K[AI], Six branched palm tree bearing two bunches of dates, within dotted circle border.

Reference: Hendin 1348, RPC I 4971, TJC 340, GBC 1348, Meshorer 34o

Ex: VCoins - Holyland Ancient Coin Corporation - Musa Ali
1 commentsGil-galad
anton_felix.jpg
JUDAEA--ANTONIUS FELIX 9 views JUDAEA--ANTONIUS FELIX (Procurator of Judaea under Claudius)
52-59 AD
AE Prutah 16 mm, 1.84 g
OBV:two oblong shields and two spears crossed
REV:six-branched palm bearing two bunches of dates
laney
antonius_felix_judaean_resb.jpg
JUDAEA--ANTONIUS FELIX (Procurator of Judaea under Claudius)14 views52 - 59 AD
Struck 54 AD (Year 14)
AE Prutah 16.5 mm 2.39 g
O: TI KΛAΥΔIOC KAICAP ΓEPM (Tiberius Claudius Caesar Germanicus), two crossed palm fronds, L IΔ below (year 14)
R: IOΥ/ΛIA AΓ/ΡIΠΠI/NA (refers to Julia Agrippina - wife of Claudius), within a wreathreverse TI KΛAΥΔIOC KAICAP ΓEPM (Tiberius Claudius Caesar Germanicus), two crossed palm fronds, L IΔ below (year 14);
Judaea, Caesarea mint
laney
antonius_felix.jpg
JUDAEA--ANTONIUS FELIX (Procurator of Judaea under Claudius)8 views52-59 AD
AE Prutah 16 mm, 2.06 g
OBV:two oblong shields and two spears crossed
REV:six-branched palm bearing two bunches of dates
laney
JUD_Antonius_Felx_Hendin_652.JPG
Judaea. Antonius Felix (52-59 A.D.), procurator under Claudius10 viewsHendin 652 Meshorer TJC 340, Meshorer AJC II, Supp. V, 29.

AE Prutah, year 14 of Claudius (54 A.D.) 16-18 mm.

Obv: Two oblong shields and two spears, crossed, surrounded by NEPW KΛΑY KAICAP (Nero Claudius Caesar [the son of Claudius]).

Rev: Palm tree bearing two bunches of dates, BPIT (Britannicus [the younger son of Claudius]) above, flanked by LIΔ (with the IΔ looking like a K)—AI (date).
Stkp
HEN652.jpg
JUDEA - ANTONIUS FELIX30 viewsAE Prutah - Hendin #652. 54 A.D. NERW KLAV KAICAPOS /BRIT LID/KAIdpaul7
HEN651.jpg
JUDEA - ANTONIUS FELIX29 viewsAE Prutah. 54 A.D. Hendin #651. IOYLIA AGRIPIPNA TI KLAUDIOS KAICAP GERM -- LI(DELTA). dpaul7
tarkondimotosI_SNGaulock5413.jpg
Kingdom of Cilicia, Tarkondimotos I, SNG von Aulock 541319 viewsKingdom of Cilicia, Tarkondimotos I, 39-31 BC
AE 20, 7.93g, 20.29mm, 300°
Hieropolis-Kastabala
obv. head, diademed, r.
rev. Zeus Nikephoros, in himation, enthroned l., resting with raised l. hand on sceptre and
holding in extended r. hand small Nike holding wreath
in r. and l. field (both top down) BASILEWS - TARKONDIMO / TOV
beneath FILANTWNIOV
ref. SNG von Aulock 5413; BMC Cilicia p.37, 1; RPC I, 3871; SGIC 5682; not in SNG
Copenhagen
F+, blue-green patina

Tarkondimotos was a dreaded Cilician pirate and then made ruler of Amanos by Pompejus. He was follower of Julius Caesar, then of his murderer Cassius and finally of Marcus Antonius. Marcus Antonius crowned him as king and he took the cognomen Philantonius, friend of Antonius. He died in the battle of Actium.
Jochen
Mark_Antony_-_LEG_IIII_-_Cr_544-16.jpg
LEG IIII47 viewsM. Antonius. Denarius mint moving with Antonius, 32-31, AR 18mm., 3.23g. Galley r., with sceptre tied with fillet on prow; above, ANT AVG; below, III VIR R P C. Rev. Aquila between two standards; below, LEG – IIII. Crawford 544/16.

Ex-Gutierrez Ruesga Spain, Ex- Jay GT4.

Photo courtesy of Jay GT4.

3 commentsAldo
Antony_LEG_IX_-_Cr544-23_NavN_pic.jpg
LEG IX28 viewsMarcus Antonius. Denarius mint moving with M. Antony circa 32-31, AR 17mm., 3.54g. ANT AVG – III·VIR·R·P·C Galley r., with sceptre tied with fillet on prow. Rev.
LEG – IX Aquila between two standards. Crawford 544/23.
From the J.P. Rosen collection and from the E.E. Clain-Setfanelli collection.
1 commentsAldo
marcus_antonius.jpg
LEG V?13 viewsMarcus Antonius, Silver denarius, obverse ANT•AVG / III VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - V?, legionary eagle between two standardsPodiceps
Mark_Antony_-_LEG_XIV_-_Cr_544-28_NN.jpg
LEG XIV51 viewsMarcus Antonius. Denarius mint moving with M. Antony circa 32-31, AR 19mm., 3.63g. ANT AVG – III·VIR·R·P·C Galley r., with sceptre tied with fillet on prow. Rev.
LEG – XIV Aquila between two standards. Crawford 544/29.

From the E E Clain-Stefanelli Collection
5 commentsAldo
Antony_LEG_XIX_-_Cr544-35_NavN_pic.jpg
LEG XIX17 viewsMarcus Antonius. Denarius mint moving with M. Antony circa 32-31, AR 17mm., 3.78g. ANT AVG – III·VIR·R·P·C Galley r., with sceptre tied with fillet on prow. Rev.
LEG – XIX Aquila between two standards. Crawford 544/35.
From the E.E. Clain-Stefanelli collection.
Aldo
Antony_LEG_XVIII_LYBICAE_-_Cr544-11_NavN_pic.jpg
LEG XVIII LYBICAE41 viewsMarcus Antonius. Denarius mint moving with M. Antony circa 32-31, AR 18mm., 3.61g. ANT AVG – III·VIR·R·P·C Galley r., with sceptre tied with fillet on prow. Rev.
LEG·XVIII·LYBICAE Aquila between two standards. Crawford 544/11.

From the E.E. Clain-Stefanelli collection.
5 commentsAldo
Mark_Antony_-_LEG_XXI_-_CR544-37.jpg
LEG XXI29 viewsM. Antonius. Denarius mint moving with Antonius, 32-31, AR 18mm., 3.71g. Galley r., with sceptre tied with fillet on prow; above, ANT AVG; below, III VIR R P C. Rev. Aquila between two standards; below, LEG – XXI. Babelon Antonia 136. Sydenham 1244. RBW –. Crawford 544/37.

From the E.E. Clain Stefanelli collection
1 commentsAldo
III.jpg
LEGIO III21 viewsMarcus Antonius, Marc Anthony, Silver denarius, Crawford 544/15, Sydenham 1217, BMCRR 193, RSC I 28, EF, but poorly struck, Patrae? mint, 3.527g, 21.7mm, 315o, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANT•AVG / III VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots; reverse LEG - III, legionary eagle between two standards, border of dots. This legion was probably Caesar's old III Gallica, which fought for Antony. Another possibility is III Cyrenaica, which was perhaps taken over from Lepidus. The III Augusta was probably an Octavian legion. ex FORVMPodiceps
antonius.jpg
LEGIO XII29 viewsMarcus Antonius obv: Denarius. 32-1 BC. Praetorian galley travelling right; rev: LEG XII, legionary Eagle between two standards. Sear RCV I 14791 commentskaitsuburi
Antony_-_Cr_544-38_v3.jpg
Legion XXII16 viewsMarcus Antonius. Denarius mint moving with M. Antony circa 32-31, AR 18mm., 3.61g. ANT AVG – III·VIR·R·P·C Galley r., with sceptre tied with fillet on prow. Rev.
LEG – XXII Aquila between two standards. Crawford 544/38.
Aldo
Saturninus_P.jpg
Lucius Appuleius Saturninus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²101 BC
¹104 BC
helmeted head of Roma left
Saturn in quadriga right holding harpa and reins
.
·P
L·SATVRN
¹Crawford 317/3a, SRCV I 193, Sydenham 578, RSC I Appuleia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,66g 19-17mm

According Richard Schaefer it's the first known example of these dies. Dies differ from ·P thus there, most probably, is dot above P although unfortunately off flan.

As quaestor Saturninus superintended the imports of grain at Ostia, but had been removed by the Roman Senate (an unusual proceeding), and replaced by Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, one of the chief members of the Optimates. Standard view is that injustice of his dismissal drove him into the arms of the Populares. In 103 BC he was elected tribune. Marius, on his return to Rome after his victory over the Cimbri, finding himself isolated in the senate, entered into a compact with Saturninus and his ally Gaius Servilius Glaucia, and the three formed a kind of triumvirate, supported by the veterans of Marius and many of the common people. By the aid of bribery and assassination Marius was elected (100 BC) consul for the sixth time, Glaucia praetor, and Saturninus tribune for the second time. Marius, finding himself overshadowed by his colleagues and compromised by their excesses, thought seriously of breaking with them, and Saturninus and Glaucia saw that their only hope of safety lay in their retention of office. Saturninus was elected tribune for the third time for the year beginning December 10, 100, and Glaucia, although at the time praetor and therefore not eligible until after the lapse of 2 years, was a candidate for the consulship. Marcus Antonius Orator was elected without opposition; the other Optimate candidate, Gaius Memmius, who seemed to have the better chance of success, was beaten to death by the hired agents of Saturninus and Glaucia, while the voting was actually going on. This produced a complete revulsion of public feeling. The Senate met on the following day, declared Saturninus and Glaucia public enemies, and called upon Marius to defend the State. Marius had no alternative but to obey. Saturninus, defeated in a pitched battle in the Roman Forum (December 10), took refuge with his followers in the Capitol, where, the water supply having been cut off, they were forced to capitulate. Marius, having assured them that their lives would be spared, removed them to the Curia Hostilia, intending to proceed against them according to law. But the more impetuous members of the aristocratic party climbed onto the roof, stripped off the tiles, and stoned Saturninus and many others to death. Glaucia, who had escaped into a house, was dragged out and killed. (wikipedia)
Johny SYSEL
Saturninus_T~0.jpg
Lucius Appuleius Saturninus - AR denarius18 viewsRome
²101 BC
¹104 BC
helmeted head of Roma left
Saturn in quadriga right holding harpa and reins
·T·
L·SATVRN
¹Crawford 317/3a, SRCV I 193, Sydenham 578, RSC I Appuleia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,44g 19,5-18,5mm

As quaestor Saturninus superintended the imports of grain at Ostia, but had been removed by the Roman Senate (an unusual proceeding), and replaced by Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, one of the chief members of the Optimates. Standard view is that injustice of his dismissal drove him into the arms of the Populares. In 103 BC he was elected tribune. Marius, on his return to Rome after his victory over the Cimbri, finding himself isolated in the senate, entered into a compact with Saturninus and his ally Gaius Servilius Glaucia, and the three formed a kind of triumvirate, supported by the veterans of Marius and many of the common people. By the aid of bribery and assassination Marius was elected (100 BC) consul for the sixth time, Glaucia praetor, and Saturninus tribune for the second time. Marius, finding himself overshadowed by his colleagues and compromised by their excesses, thought seriously of breaking with them, and Saturninus and Glaucia saw that their only hope of safety lay in their retention of office. Saturninus was elected tribune for the third time for the year beginning December 10, 100, and Glaucia, although at the time praetor and therefore not eligible until after the lapse of 2 years, was a candidate for the consulship. Marcus Antonius Orator was elected without opposition; the other Optimate candidate, Gaius Memmius, who seemed to have the better chance of success, was beaten to death by the hired agents of Saturninus and Glaucia, while the voting was actually going on. This produced a complete revulsion of public feeling. The Senate met on the following day, declared Saturninus and Glaucia public enemies, and called upon Marius to defend the State. Marius had no alternative but to obey. Saturninus, defeated in a pitched battle in the Roman Forum (December 10), took refuge with his followers in the Capitol, where, the water supply having been cut off, they were forced to capitulate. Marius, having assured them that their lives would be spared, removed them to the Curia Hostilia, intending to proceed against them according to law. But the more impetuous members of the aristocratic party climbed onto the roof, stripped off the tiles, and stoned Saturninus and many others to death. Glaucia, who had escaped into a house, was dragged out and killed. (wikipedia)
Johny SYSEL
Marcus__Antonius_1_OBV_REV.jpg
M. ANTONIUS Legionary Denarius, RSC 2756 viewsOBV: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REV: LEG XI, eagle between standards
3.1g, 16mm

Minted at Patrae, 32-31 BC
3 commentsLegatus
134_web.jpg
M. Antonius, Denarius5 viewsM. Antonius, Denarius

RRC: 554/19
32 b.c.
3,35 gr

Av: Ship r., with sceptre tied fillet on prow; above, ANT AVG; below, III VIR R P C
Rv: Aquila between two standards; below, LEG - VI

Ex Bertolami, Auct 37, lot 449, 19/20.07.2017
(reportedly ex Schulten, Auction of 31 March 1981, lot 205. and wrongly attrbuted as Leg IV)
Norbert
100_0729.JPG
Marc Antony22 viewsRef Marc Antony RSC 32 denarius
Marc Antony AR Denarius. 32-1 BC. Praetorian galley travelling right / LEG V, legionary Eagle between two standards. Cr544/18, Syd 1221.

Legion V was founded in transalpine Gaul in 52 BCE by Julius Caesar. It was the first legion to be recruited in the provinces, and Caesar paid the soldiers from his private purse. After playing key roles in Caesar's conquest of Gaul , the Fifth Alauda was also with Caesar when he crossed the Rubicon in 49BC. It then went on to fight the Republicans in the African campaign (46BC).

After Caesar's assassination in 44BC, the Fifth Alauda sided with Antonius, and participated in Antonius' ill-fated war against the Parthians. From there, the Fifth Alauda fought against Marcus Agrippa at the battle of Actium, and after Antonius' defeat, Octavian assumed control of the legion and transferred it to Merida .
simmurray
coin7.jpg
Marc Antony 18 viewsRef Marc Antony RSC 32 denarius
Marc Antony AR Denarius. 32-1 BC. Praetorian galley travelling right / LEG V, legionary Eagle between two standards. Cr544/18, Syd 1221.

Legion V was founded in transalpine Gaul in 52 BCE by Julius Caesar. It was the first legion to be recruited in the provinces, and Caesar paid the soldiers from his private purse. After playing key roles in Caesar's conquest of Gaul , the Fifth Alauda was also with Caesar when he crossed the Rubicon in 49BC. It then went on to fight the Republicans in the African campaign (46BC).

After Caesar's assassination in 44BC, the Fifth Alauda sided with Antonius, and participated in Antonius' ill-fated war against the Parthians. From there, the Fifth Alauda fought against Marcus Agrippa at the battle of Actium, and after Antonius' defeat, Octavian assumed control of the legion and transferred it to Merida .
simmurray
Marcus_Antonius.jpg
Marc Antony33 viewsMarc Antony, denarius
17 mm 3,72 g.
Obv. ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, Praetorian galley sailing right, mast with banners at prow.
Rev. LEG II, legionary eagle (aquila) between two standards.
Crawford-544/14
2 commentsMarsman
legio_x.jpg
Marc Antony Legio X21 viewsMarcus Antonius AR silver Legionary Denarius.
Struck 32-31 BC. 18mm, 3.2g.
Obverse- ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley.
Reverse- LEG X, eagle between standards.
b70
RPC_Markianapolis_Elagabalus_SNG_Cop__239.JPG
Marcianapolis (Moesia Inferior). Elagabalus (218-222 A.D.) (Marcus Aurelius Antonius) 23 viewsPick 905, SNG Cop. 239, Moushmov 625 & Plate VIII, 10.

AE assaria, 20 mm., die alignment 0°

Obv: AVT K M AVP – ANTWNEINOC, Laureate bust right.

Rev: MAPKIANO—POL[ITWN], Aequitas (= Dikaeosyne) standing left holding scales and cornucopia.
Stkp
RP_Marcianopolis_Diadumenian.jpg
Marcianapolis (Moesia Inferior/now Devnya, Bulgaria). Diadumenian (Caesar, 217-218 A.D.; Augustus, May-June 218 A.D.) (Marcus Opellius Antoninus Diadumenianus)9 viewsHristova/Jekov 6.25.20.3 (r5); AMNG I 804, p.252; Varbanov (Eng.) Vol.1. No. 1354

AE assarion; 2.74 g., 17.76 mm. max., 0°

Obv.: [M] OΠΠΛΛIOC ANTΩNINOC (=Marcus Opellius Antonius), bare headed and draped bust right, seen from behind.

Rev.: MAPKIANO ΠOΛEITΩN (=(coin) of the people of Markianopolis, Good health to you all), staff of Aesklepios with serpent entwining, facing right.
Stkp
2180334.jpg
Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior. Elagabalus.32 viewsMOESIA INFERIOR, Marcianopolis. Elagabalus. AD 218-222. Æ 24mm (9.74 g, 6h). Julius Antonius Seleucus, consular legate. Laureate and cuirassed bust right / Nemesis-Aequitas standing left, holding scales and scepter; wheel at feet to left. Hristova & Jekov 6.26.35.5 var. (bust type); Mouchmov 642. VF, green patina.

Ex-CNG ESale 218 lot 334

46/75
1 commentsecoli
syd1168.jpg
Marcus Antonius37 viewsMarcus Antonius
42 BC
Greek mint
3.77 g
19 mm
--- M ANTONI IMP (Marcus Antonius Imperator)
Bare head of Mark Antony.
--- III VIR R P C (Triumviri Rei Publicæ Constituandæ)
Head of Sol in a temple.
Sydenham 1168 - Crawford 496/1
Argentoratum
syd1224.jpg
Marcus Antonius42 viewsMarcus Antonius
32 - 31 BC
Patras
3.70 g
19 mm
--- ANT AVG III VIR R P C (Antonius Augurus Triumviri Rei Publicæ Constituandæ)
Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow.
--- LEG VII (Legio VII)
Eagle between two standards.
Sydenham 1224 - Crawford 544/20
1 commentsArgentoratum
Marc_Antony.jpg
Marcus Antonius255 viewsMark Antony 32-31 BC. AR Legionary Denarius (3.33 gm). Praetorian galley right / LEG XIII, legionary eagle between two standards. Crawford 544/27, Sydenham 1232a, RSC 427 commentsBud Stewart
Marcus_Antonius__4.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS Denarius, RSC 27, LEG VI14 viewsOBV: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REV: LEG VI, eagle between standards
3.3G, 16MM

Minted at Patrae, 32-31 BC
Legatus
rr-marcus-antonius-denarius.jpg
Marcus Antonius (32-31 BC) AR Legionary Denarius29 viewsRoman Republic, Marcus Antonius (32-31 BC) AR Legionary Denarius

Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley rowing right, scepter tied with fillet on deck above.

Reverse: LEG XIV, Aquila standard and two legionary standards.

Reference: RSC 44; Cr 544/29; Syd 1234

Ex: Kayser-i Rum Numismatics
Gil-galad
Marcus_Antonius_X.jpg
Marcus Antonius - AR legionary denarius37 views32-31 BC
moving mint in Greece (maybe Patrae?)
galley right, mast with banners at prow
ANT·AVG / III ·VIR·R·P·C
legionary aquila between two standards
LEG X?
Crawford 544/?
3,52g 17,5-16,5 mm
Johny SYSEL
Marcus_Antonius_II.jpg
Marcus Antonius - AR legionary denarius42 views32-31 BC
moving mint in Greece (maybe Patrae?)
galley right, mast with banners at prow
ANT·AVG / III ·VIR·R·P·C
legionary aquila between two standards
LEG_II ?
Crawford 544/14?
2,9g 18mm
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
syd1181.jpg
Marcus Antonius and Augustus45 viewsMark Antony and Octavian (Augustus)
Spring or summer 41 BC
Ephesus
3.72 g
22 mm
--- M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P.
Bare head of Mark Antony, right.
--- CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C.
Bare head of Octavian, right.
Sydenham 1181 - Crawford 517/2
2 commentsArgentoratum
Marcus_Antonius__2.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS and OCTAVIA Ionia Silver cistophoric tetradrachm43 viewsOBV: M ANTONIVS IMP COS DESIG ITER ET TERT, head of Antony right, wreathed in ivy, lituus below, all within wreath of ivy and grapes
REV: III VIR R P C, bust of Octavia right on cista flanked by snakes
ancient scraches, nice dark toning

11.8gm, 26mm
3 commentsLegatus
1486_Thessalonica~7.jpg
Marcus Antonius and Octavian Caesar - Thessalonica4 views37 BC
head of Agonothesia right
AΓΩNOΘEΣIA
legend within wreath
ANT / KAI
RPC I 1552; SNG Copenhagen 375
12,5g 23mm
Johny SYSEL
AntonyOctavian.jpg
Marcus Antonius and Octavian Denarius211 viewsM ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P (MP and AV in monogram)
Bare hd of Mark Antony right

Rev
CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C
Bare head of Octavian right

Ephesus spring/summer 41 BC

3.54g

Sear 1504

This series of coins commemorates the establishment of the second Triumvirate of November 43 B.C. between Antony, Octavian and Lepidus. Both sides bear the inscription "III VIR R P C", meaning "One of Three Men for the Regulation of the Republic. Within a few years Antony would depart Italy for the Eastern provinces.

The moneyer for this coin is M. Barbatius Pollio who was also a Questor in 41 BC. Barbatius bears the title of "Quaestor pro praetore" abbreviated to QP a distinction shared by his colleague L. Gelllius.

From the Enrico collection
6 commentsJay GT4
Marcus_Antonius_CHORTIS_SPECVLATORVM.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legionary Denarius 28 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: CHORTIS SPECVLATORVM, three legionary standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.52g, 18.mm
Cr544/12; Syd 1214
ex. Marti Classical Numismatics
3 commentsLegatus
Marcus_Antonius_Chortivm_Praetoria.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR CHORTIVM PRAETORIARVM Denarius6 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: CHORTIVM PRAETORIARVM, aquila right between two signa
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.58g, 18.mm
Crawford 544/8; CRI 385; Sydenham 1213; RSC 7
ex. Roma Numismatics
Legatus
Lucius_Antony.jpg
Marcus Antonius AR Cistophorus89 viewsBowcase flanked by two serpents, heads confronted, monogram above, serpent twined around thyrsus to right, Q to left.

Cista mystica with serpent, all within ivy wreath

Pergamum
Ca. 133-56 BC.

BMC Ionia 176 (under M. Antonius M.f.)

12.34 g

These "anonymous" issues were struck in Pergamum by Roman Quaestors between ca. 100-56 BC. They are called anonymous because the monograms are not easily identifiable. This issue is commonly attributed to be either Mark Antony or his brother Lucius Antony who both served as Quaestors in the east. However it is more likely that the Quaestor was in fact Marcus Antonius the orator who was Marcus and Lucius Grandfather. He served as Consul in 99 BC and as a Quaestor in Asia in 113/112 BC
1 commentsJay GT4
20181116_102757a.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Denarii33 views2 commentsLegatus
marcus_antonius_Leg_IX.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Denarius16 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG IX, eagle between standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.44g, 18.39mm
RSC 27
Ex Agora Auctions, Sale 62, Lot 156
Legatus
Desktop836b.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Denarius 17 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG VIII, eagle between standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.2g, 17mm
RSC 27
Legatus
marcus_antonius_Leg_XXII.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Denarius32 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG XXII, eagle between standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.6g, 20mm
RSC 27
2 commentsLegatus
Marcus_Antonius_Leg_III.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Denarius51 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG III. Legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.19g, 17mm
RSC 27
ex. J. Grande collection
4 commentsLegatus
MARCUS_ANTONIUS_Legion_XXIII.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Denarius 17 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG XXIII. Legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.19g, 17mm
Crawford 544/30; RSC I 47; CRI 371
ex. Civitas Galleries
1 commentsLegatus
MARCUS_ANTONIUS_Legion_XV.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Denarius11 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG XV. Legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.19g, 17mm
Crawford 544/30; RSC I 47; CRI 371
ex. Civitas Galleries
Legatus
MARCUS_ANTONIUS_Legion_XII.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Denarius17 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG XII. Legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.19g, 17mm
Crawford 544/30; RSC I 47; CRI 371
ex. Civitas Galleries
1 commentsLegatus
Marcus_Antonius__LEG_XVIII.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Denarius12 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG XVIII. Legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.22g, 17mm
Crawford 544/33; Syd 1239
ex. Albert DeCrescenzo; ex Harlan J. Berk
Legatus
Marcus_Antonius_Leg_XVII_Classicae.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Denarius Legio XVII Classicae 8 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG XVII Classicae, legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.3g, 16.5mm
Cr 544/32; Sear,
RRC 1238. Cr 544/10, RSC 50
Legatus
Marcus_Antonius9.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Denarius RSC 32, Legionary Standards57 viewsOBV: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REV: LEG V, eagle between standards


Minted at Patrae, 32 BC
1 commentsLegatus
marcus-antonius-denarius.jpg
Marcus Antonius AR denarius-3,93 grams- 18 mm-itinerary mint- 42 b.C. 211 viewsobverse: M.ANTONI IMP, bust of Marcus Antonius right
reverse: III VIR RPC, radiate & draped bust of Sol facing on a disk within distyle temple

Crawford 496/1- Cohen 12 (5fr.)- Sear 1467

This coin was minted during Antony's military campaign against Brutus and Cassius in Greece.

The tyrannicide Cassius gained some notoriety for robbing the temple of Helios in the city of Rhodes; he was said to have left untouched only the chariot of the sun. This type of Antonius reproaches Cassius for that robbery and constitutes a promise to avenge the god of the sun (see F. X. Ryan, SNR 84, 2005, 84–86).
4 commentsL.e.
Marcus_Antonius_Leg_II_2.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legio II Denarius14 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG II, legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.58g, 19mm
Crawford 544/14; CRI 349; RSC 27
Ex Roma Numismatics Auction 4; private European Collection
1 commentsLegatus
Marc_Antony__Leg_III_(2)_Denarius.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legio III Denarius17 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG III. Legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.19g, 17mm
RSC 27
1 commentsLegatus
Marcus_Antonius__Leg_IIII.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legio IIII Denarius22 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG IIII, legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.3g, 17mm
RSC 29; Syd 1220, Cr544/16
2 commentsLegatus
Marcus_Antonius_Leg_IV.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legio IV Denarius26 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG IV, legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.8g, 17mm
Cr 544/17; Syd 1219
2 commentsLegatus
Marcus_Antonius_Leg_VII.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legio VII Denarius21 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEGVII, legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.8g, 17mm
Cr544/20, Syd 1224
2 commentsLegatus
Marcus_Antonius_Leg_VII_2.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legio VII Denarius6 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG VII, legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.8g, 17mm
Cr544/20, Syd 1224
Legatus
Marcus_Antonius_Leg_VIIII.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legio VIIII Denarius16 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG VIIII, legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.8g, 17mm
CR 544/22; Syd 1226
ex Pegasi Numismatics
2 commentsLegatus
MARCUS_ANTONIUS_Legion_XII_2.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legio XII Denarius4 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG XII. Legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.19g, 17mm
Crawford 544/30; RSC I 47; CRI 371
Legatus
Marcus_Antonius_Leg_XVI_2.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legio XVI Denarius16 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG XVI, eagle between standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.63g, 19mm
Cr544/31, Syd 1236, RSC 48
1 commentsLegatus
Marcus_Antonius_Leg_XVII.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legio XVII Denarius10 views"MARCUS ANTONIUS
AR Denarius
OBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG XVII, legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.3g, 17.5mm
Cr 544/32; Sear,
CRI 374; Sydenham 1237; RSC 49
ex. PNP
Legatus
marcus_antonius_Leg_XXI.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legio XXI Denarius16 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG XXI, legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.5g, 17mm
CR 544/37; Sear 381; Sydenham 1244
1 commentsLegatus
Marcus_Antonius_AR_Denarius~0.jpg
Marcus Antonius AR Legionary Denarius46 viewsMark Antony AR Legionary Denarius. 32-31 BC. ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley to the right / LEG XI, legionary eagle (aquila) between two standards. Cr544/25; Syd 1229. RSC 39
16,5mm.,3,28g. _8975 sold
Antonivs Protti
MARCUS_ANTONIUS_Legion_XIV.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legionary Denarius26 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG XIV Legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.5g, 18mm
Cr544/29; Syd 1234
ex. Germania Inferior Numismatics
2 commentsLegatus
Marcus_Antonius_Leg_II.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legionary Denarius 6 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG II, eagle between standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.75g, 17mm
RSC 27, Cr544/14, Syd 1216
Legatus
Marcus_Antonius_Leg_X.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legionary X Denarius 17 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG X, legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.8g, 17mm
Cr 544/24; Sydenham 1228; RSC 38
ex. Marti Classical Numismatics
1 commentsLegatus
Marcus_Antonius_Leg_XIII_Lybicae.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR Legionary XVIII LYBICAE Denarius 13 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG XVIII LYBICAE, legionary eagle between two standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.5g, 18mm
Cr544/11, Syd 1240
ex. Marti Classical Numismatics
1 commentsLegatus
Marcus_Antonius_Silver_Denarius_.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS AR silver denarius. Bearded bust of Antonius, Bust of Sol on disk within temple. Scarce22 viewsMARCUS ANTONIUS AR silver denarius. Struck Autumn 42 BC, military mint moving with Antony in Greece, likely Epirus.
M ANTONI IMP (IMP in monogram), bearded head of Antony right. Reverse - III VIR R.P.C, radiate & draped bust of Sol facing on a disk within distyle temple.
RCV 1467, 17mm, 3.9g. Scarce.
Antonivs Protti
Marcus_Antonius__3.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS Denarius, RSC 27, LEG II12 viewsOBV: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REV: LEG II, eagle between standards
2.9g, 18mm

Minted at Patrae, 32-31 BC
Legatus
Marcus_Antonius_7.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS Denarius, RSC 27, LEG XII15 viewsOBV: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REV: LEG XII, eagle between standards
2.2g, 16mm

Minted at Patrae, 32-31 BC
Legatus
Marcus_Antonius__6.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS Denarius, RSC 27, LEG XV11 viewsOBV: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REV: LEG XV, eagle between standards
2.1g, 17mm

Minted at Patrae, 32-31 BC
Legatus
Marcus_Antonius_5.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS Denarius, RSC 27, LEG XV13 viewsOBV: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REV: LEG XV, eagle between standards

Minted at Patrae, 32-31 BC
Legatus
Marcus_Antonius_Leg-X_3a.jpg
Marcus Antonius Galley | Legion X, AR Denarius, 49-27 BC.82 views
Marcus Antonius Galley | Legion X, Silver Denarius

Obv: Manned Galley right, banner at prow, ANT AVG III VIR [R P C].
Rev: Two military standards with Legionary Eagle between them, LEG X.

Exergue: None.

Mint: Moving mint, perhaps Patrae.
Struck: 32-31 BC.

Size: 17.44 mm.
Weight: 3.24 grm.
Die axis: 0°

Condition: Quite good. Beautiful to me! As shown by the photo, in any event, which is quite faithful to the coin in hand.

Refs:*
Sear I, pg. 283, 1479
Crawford Vol. I, pg. 540, 544/24
3 commentsTiathena
Gordian_III_V_4477.JPG
Marcus Antonius Gordianus III, 238 - 244 AD20 viewsObv: AYT KM ANTΩNIOC ΓOPΔIANOC, facing busts of Gordian III and Serapis, Gordian laureate and draped facing right; Serapis draped, wearing a cornucopia on his shoulder and a kalathos (tall headdress symbolizing prosperity) facing left.

Rev: OΔHCCEITΩN, Demeter standing left holding corn ears and a long torch, E in field.

Æ 26, Odessus, Moesia Inferior mint

11.6 grams, 28 mm, 180°

Varbanov I 4477
SPQR Coins
Gordian_III_V_3712.JPG
Marcus Antonius Gordianus III, 238 - 244 AD18 viewsObv: AYT K M ANT ΓOPΔIANOC AVΓ, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian III, facing right.

Rev: AΔPIANOΠOΛEITΩN, Apollo standing left, nude, branch in right hand resting left on a snake-entwined tripod.

Æ 30, Hadrianopolis, Trace mint

15.6 grams, 31.3 mm, 180°

Varbanov II 3712

Ex: FORVM
SPQR Coins
Gordian_III_V_3680.JPG
Marcus Antonius Gordianus III, 238 - 244 AD18 viewsObv: AY KM ANT ГOPΔIANOC, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian III facing right.

Rev: ЄΔЄCCЄΩN, Roma seated left on a shield holding Nike in her right hand and a parazonium in her left, being crowned by city-goddess standing left, behind, holding a wreath and a scepter.

Æ 25, Edessa, Macedonia

7.15 grams, 22.5 mm, 45°

Varbanov III 3680 (var.)
SPQR Coins
mar_ant_2-horz.jpg
Marcus Antonius legionary denarius. 31 BC.45 viewsANT AVG III VIR RPC, galley to right.
LEG XV, aquila between two standards.

Albert 1731, Cr. 544/30.
4 commentsPedja R
Marcus_Antonius_Leg_XII_Antiqua.jpg
MARCUS ANTONIUS Leg_XII Antiqua, AR Denarius 6 viewsOBVERSE: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REVERSE: LEG XII ANTIQVAE above eagle between standards
Patrae 32-31 BC
3.45g, 18.16mm
Crawford 544/9; Syd 1231
ex: Andrew Short Collection
Legatus
marcus_antonius_Cr544_19cf_Fouree.jpg
Marcus Antonius, cf. Crawford 544/19, silver plated fouree46 viewsMarcus Antonius, Triumvir and Imperator, 44-30 BC
AE - silver plated denarius (Fouree), 18.2mm, 2.86g, 20°
32-31 BC, illegal counterfeiter's mint
obv. ANT.AVG / III.VIR.R.P.C
Galley r. with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots
rev. LEG - VI
Legionary eagle between 2 standards, border of dots
ref. cf. Crawford 544/19; Sydenham 1223; BMCRR 197; RSC I 33 (solid silver,
official, Patrae mint, 32-31 BC)
F, core exposed
From Forum Ancien Coins, thanks!

The coin plainly shows the foil technique used in antiquity to counterfeit denarii. Before striking, two pieces of silver foil were wrapped overlapping around a bronze core to create a silver plated counterfeit flan. This is a rare example where one of the two foil sheets is missing, and the other is fairly complete, revealing details of the technique (FAC)
3 commentsJochen
Elagabalus___J_Maesa_V_1648.JPG
Marcus Aurelius Antoninus "Elagabalus," 218 - 222 AD17 viewsObv: AVT KM AVΓ ANTΩNEINOC AVГ IOYΛIA MAICA AVГ, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Elagabalus right, facing draped bust of Julia Maesa left.

Rev: VΠ IOYA AVT CEΛEVKOV MAPKIANOΠOΛITΩN, draped bust of Serapis, wearing a modius on his head, facing right; E in field behind head.

Legate: Julius Antonius Seleucus

Æ 26, Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior mint

11 grams, 26.4 mm, 0°

Varbanov I 1648
SPQR Coins
Elagabalus_V_1513.JPG
Marcus Aurelius Antoninus "Elagabalus," 218 - 222 AD19 viewsObv: AVT K M AVP ANTΩNEINOC AVГ YГ, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Elagabalus facing right.

Rev: VΠ IOYΛ ANT CEΛEYKOY MAPKIANOPOLITΩN, Dionysos standing left, holding a large bunch of grapes in his right hand and a thyrsos in his left.

Legate: Julius Antonius Seleukos

Æ 26, Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior mint

10.8 grams, 26.2 mm, 0°

Varbanov I 1513
SPQR Coins
Marcus_Antonius10.jpg
Mark Anthony AR Legionary Denarius RSC 5724 viewsOBV: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REV: LEG XX, eagle between standards


Struck at Patrae, 32-31 BC
1 commentsLegatus
Antony_Sol.jpg
Mark Antony225 viewsM ANTONI IMP
Bare head of Marcus Antonius right, bearded

III VIR R P C
Distyle temple containing facing bust of Sol on disk

Epirus? Autumn of 42 BC

3.44g

Sear 1467
Scarce
Ex-Incitatus

David Sear in "The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators" says:

The reappearance of IMP in Antony's titulature suggests that this issue is subsequent to the second battle of Philippi (23 October), though as the Triumvir is still bearded it must have been struck quite soon after the deaths of Brutus and Cassius before orders had been given for the modification of the portrait. With Caesar's murder now avenged both Antony and Octavian could shave the beards which they had worn as a sign of mourning."
11 commentsJay GT4
antonius3.jpg
Mark Antony - Denarius - Sear Imperators 12813 viewsObv: Bare head of Antony right, M ANTONI IMP around
Rev: Radiate head of Sol facing in distyle temple; III VIR R P C around
Size: 17 mm
Weight: 3,5 g
Mint: Military mint traveling with Antony in Greece
Date: 42 BC
Ref: Crawford 496/1. Sydenham 1168. Sear Imperators 128
1 commentsvs1969
Antony_Thessalonica.jpg
Mark Antony AE 27 mm 77 views Mark Antony

ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ ΕΛΕΥΘΕPΙΑΣ
Draped bust of Eleutheria right

M ANT AYT Γ KAI AYT
Nike advancing left, holding wreath and palm

MACEDON, Thessalonica
Circa 37 BC.

Weight: 18.8 gm
Diameter: 27 mm

Very Scarce!

RPC 1551; SNG Copenhagen 374,
1 commentsJay GT4
Antony_and_Octavian_001.jpg
Mark Antony and Octavian 147 viewsM ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P (MP and AV in monogram)
Bare hd of Mark Antony right

Rev
CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C
Bare head of Octavian right

Ephesus spring/summer 41 BC

2.97g

Sear 1504

This series of coins commemorates the establishment of the second Triumvirate of November 43 B.C. between Antony, Octavian and Lepidus. Both sides bear the inscription "III VIR R P C", meaning "One of Three Men for the Regulation of the Republic. Within a few years Antony would depart Italy for the Eastern provinces.

The moneyer for this coin is M. Barbatius Pollio who was also a Questor in 41 BC. Barbatius bears the title of "Quaestor pro praetore" abbreviated to QP a distinction shared by his colleague L. Gelllius.


SOLD!
1 commentsTitus Pullo
reconciliation.jpg
Mark Antony and Octavian Reconciliation Denarius30 viewsMarcus Antonius and Octavianus Reconciliation Denarius, 41 BC, military mint moving with Marc Antony.
Obverse: M ANT IMP AVG IIIVIR R P C M BARBAT Q P, bare head of Marc Antony right.
Reverse: CAESAR IMP PONT IIIVIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right.
Crawford 517/2, 17-19 mm, 3.23 g.
b70
Antony_Fleet_galley.jpg
Mark Antony Fleet coinage157 viewsMarcus Antonius Fleet coinage (Light Series)

M ANT IMP TERT COS DESIG ITER ET TERT III VIR RPC
Conjoined heads of Marcus Antonius and Octavia right

M OPPIVS CAPITO PRO PR PRAEF CLASS FC
Galley under sail right

Tarentum (?) summer 37 BC
4.13g

Sear 1497, RPC 1470, CRI 296,

Very rare in any condition

Cleaned by Kevin at NRC.

The legendary Fleet coinage of Antony belongs to two series, heavy and light. The "light series" is thought to have been minted at a later date, possibly just after Antony returned from his conference with Octavian in 37 BC. The meeting saw the Pact of Tarentum. Part of that agreement saw Antony loan 120 ships to Octavian along with his Admirals Altratinus and Capito.

A fine insight into Antony's administrative abilities can be seen by his fleet coinage that came in sestertius, dupondius and as denominations. Of note is that Antony's "Fleet Coinage" shows the appearance of the first sestertius in bronze rather than silver. When Octavian (Augustus) reformed the coinage 20 years later he maintained the exact same denominations; sestertius, dupondius and as. After Actium Octavian also kept many if not all of the client Kings in their positions and territories. A strong case for Antony's capabilities as an administrator.

M. Oppius Capito occupied an important position in Antony's inner circle although little is known of him. Capito's coins are more abundant than those of his colleagues and only Capito's coins include the title "Praefectus classis" (Prefect of the fleet). Most of his coins are found in Greece and were probably minted in Piraeus, the harbor complex of Athens. Athens at this time was the home of Antony and Octavia so it is likely that Capito's mint would be located here.

Sold to Calgary Coin Jan 2016
4 commentsJay GT4
LEG_III~0.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG III 156 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C

galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG III
legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

SOLD

Legio III Gallica was levied by Julius Caesar around 49 BC, for his civil war against the conservative republicans led by Pompey.

The legion took part in all Julius Caesar's campaigns against his enemies, including the battles of Pharsalus and Munda. Following Caesar's death, III Gallica was integrated in the army of Mark Antony for his campaigns against the Parthians. They were included in the army levied by Fulvia and Lucius Antonius (Antony's wife and brother) to oppose Octavian, but ended by surrendering in Perugia, in the winter of 41 BC. After the battle of Actium and Antony's suicide, the III Gallica was sent again to the East, where they garrisoned the province of Syria.

III Gallica was used in Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo's campaign against the Parthians over the control of Armenia (63). Corbulo's successes triggered emperor Nero's paranoia of persecution and eventually the general was forced to commit suicide. After this, III Gallica is transferred to Moesia province, in the Danube border.
Titus Pullo
LEGIO_III.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG III 109 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C

galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG III
legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

Legio III Gallica was levied by Julius Caesar around 49 BC, for his civil war against the conservative republicans led by Pompey.

The legion took part in all Julius Caesar's campaigns against his enemies, including the battles of Pharsalus and Munda. Following Caesar's death, III Gallica was integrated in the army of Mark Antony for his campaigns against the Parthians. They were included in the army levied by Fulvia and Lucius Antonius (Antony's wife and brother) to oppose Octavian, but ended by surrendering in Perugia, in the winter of 41 BC. After the battle of Actium and Antony's suicide, the III Gallica was sent again to the East, where they garrisoned the province of Syria.

III Gallica was used in Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo's campaign against the Parthians over the control of Armenia (63). Corbulo's successes triggered emperor Nero's paranoia of persecution and eventually the general was forced to commit suicide. After this, III Gallica is transferred to Moesia province, in the Danube border.
Titus Pullo
LEG_V~0.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG V 96 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

Rev LEG V legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

Legio V Alaudae (also known as Gallica) was the first Roman legion composed of provincial soldiers, as opposed to Roman citizens. Caesar paid the soldiers with his own resources, but the legion was later recognized by the Roman Senate. V Alaudae fought in the Gallic wars until 49 BC, as one of the most brave legions of Caesar, then they were moved to Spain. They served with Mark Antony between 41 and 31 BC and probably fought in Actium. After Antony committed suicide, they were merged into Augustus' army in 30 BC.

Their emblem depicted an elephant and was awarded in 46 BC for bravery against a charge of elephants in the Battle of Thapsus.
Titus Pullo
LEG_VI.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG VI 100 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

Rev LEG VI legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31BC

The photo appears to show this as LEG VII but in hand you can see that the second I is a scratch
Background History on the VI Legion

Raised in Cisalpine Gaul in 58 BC by Julius Caesar, the Sixth Legion served with him during his tenure as governor and was withdrawn to Spain in 49 BC where it earned the title “Hispaniensis”.

Later seeing action at Pharsalus in 48 BC, Julius Caesar took the 6th to Alexandria to settle the dispute in Egypt with Cleopatra. Alexandria was laid to siege and the 6th was almost wiped out losing almost two thirds of its entire manpower. Julius Caesar eventually triumphed when reinforcements arrived.

Julius Caesar took his “Veteran Sixth Legion” with him to Syria and Pontus. The Legion then served in Pontus under Caesar in 48 BC and 47 BC. This culminated in the battle of Zela where victory was won by Legio VI.

During Caesar’s African war against Scipio, the Sixth Legion deserted en masse from Scipio to reinforce Caesar and fought under him.

The legion was disbanded in 45 BC after Munda establishing a colony at Arelate (Arles), but was re-formed by Lepidus the following year (44 BC) and given over to Marcus Antonius the year after that. Following the defeat of the republican generals Cassius and Brutus in successive battles at Philippi in 42 BC and the subsequent division of control between Antony and Octavian, a colony was again formed from retired veterans at Beneventum in 41 BC (this is the colony which it is believed became Legio VI Victrix) and the remainder of Legio VI Ferrata was taken by Antony to the East where it garrisoned Judea.

Legio VI fought in the Parthian War in 36 BC.

Another Legio VI Victrix evidently saw action at Perusia in 41 BC, which presents us with a problem because the official Legio VI Ferrata was at that moment with Anthony in the East. This is explained in Lawrence Keppie's excellent book The Making of the Roman Army - from Republic to Empire (pp.134); “Octavian did not hesitate to duplicate legionary numerals already in use by Antony. The latter had serving with him legio V Alaudae, legio VI Ferrata and legio X Equestris. Soon we find Octavian's army boasting of a legio V (the later Macedonica), legio VI (the later Victrix) and legio X (soon to be Fretensis). Of these, legio V and legio X, and less certainly legio VI, bore under the empire a bull-emblem which would normally indicate a foundation by Caesar; but the true Caesarian legions with these numerals (Alaudae, Ferrata and Equestris) were with Antony.”

It would seem, therefore, that Octavian had again used the veterans of Caesars Sixth Legion, this time from those left at Beneventum, to form the core of his own Sixth Legion used at Perusia.

Both Legio VI’s (Ferrata and Victrix) fought at the Battle of Actium, after this event the legio VI Ferrata was dispatched back to Judea and the next time we hear of the legio VI Victrix was in Spain.

Legio VI Ferrata was severely mauled at the Battle of Actium in 31 BC by the forces loyal to Caesar's nephew and heir, Octavian. Following the Battle of Actium, another colony of veterans seems to have been created at Byllis, probably together with soldiers from other legions, and the remainder of VI Ferrata was moved to Syria/Judea where it was to remain.

From 9 BC to 73 AD the VI Ferrata was garrisoned the area of Judea. It was in this time frame that Jesus Christ was tried before Pontius Pilatus, the Roman Governor of Judea.

From 54 AD to 68 AD the Legion served under Corbulo at Artaxata and Tigranocerta against the Parthians. In 69 AD the Legion returned to Judea and fought in the Jewish Civil War. As the Jewish Civil War wound down, the sixth was placed under Mucianis and fought against Vitellius. Legion VI was largely responsible for Mucianis victory over the forces of Vitellius during the brief Roman Civil War .
Titus Pullo
Leg VII.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary denarius LEG VII87 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

Rev LEG VII legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

SOLD!

Legio VII Claudia Pia Fidelis (faithful and loyal Claudian legion) dates back to the four legions used by Julius Caesar in his Gallic Wars and played a crucial role in The Battle of Pharsalus in 58 BC, and it existed at least until the end of the 4th century, guarding middle Danube. The emblem of this legion, as well as of all Caesar's legions, was the bull, together with the lion.

Legio VII was one of the two legions used in Caesar's invasions of Britain.

Tiberius Claudius Maximus the Roman soldier who brought the head of Decebalus to emperor Trajan was serving in Legio VII Claudia.
Titus Pullo
LEG_XI.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XI90 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

Rev LEG XI legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

ex-Arcade Coins

An Antonian legion which was disbanded or lost its separate identity after the battle of Actium.

The two centurions Titus Pullo and Lucius Vorenus were from Legio XI (not XIII as the series Rome would have us believe). Pullo and Vorenus were fierce rivals for promotion to primus pilus, the most senior centurion in a legion. Both distinguished themselves in 54 BC when the Nervii attacked the legion under Quintus Cicero in their winter quarters in Nervian territory. In an effort to outdo Vorenus, Pullo charged out of the fortified camp and attacked the enemy, but was soon wounded and surrounded. Vorenus followed and engaged his attackers in hand-to-hand combat, killing one and driving the rest back, but lost his footing and was himself soon surrounded. Pullo in turn rescued Vorenus, and after killing several of the enemy, the pair returned to camp amid applause from their comrades.

In the Civil War of 49 BC, Pullo was assigned to the XXIV Victrix Rapax, a new Italian legion commanded by the legate Gaius Antonius. In 48 BC, Antonius was blockaded on an island and forced to surrender. Pullo was apparently responsible for most of his soldiers switching sides to fight for Pompey. Later that year, he is recorded bravely defending Pompey's camp in Greece from Caesar's attack shortly before the Battle of Pharsalus.

Titus Pullo
antony_mark_XII.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XII 69 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG XII
legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31BC

This was Caesar's 12th legion, raised in 58 BC for the campaign against the Helvetii. It served throughout the wars in Gaul (58 to 49), Italy (49), and at Pharsalus (48). It was disbanded 46-45 BC and the colonists were settled at Parma. The legion was reformed in 44-43 BC most likely by Lepidus. The legion was then passed to Antony in 41-31 BC and was present at Actium. It appears on Antony's coinage as LEG XII ANTIQVAE. Colonists were settled at Patrai, Greece alongside men of Legio X Equestris, perhaps by Antony, more likely by Octavian soon after Actium.

The legion's whereabouts during most of Augustus' reign is unclear. The 12th was very possibly the unnamed third legion (with III Cyrenaica and XXII Deiotariana) stationed in Egypt. That unnamed legion disappears from Egypt at just about the same time that Legio XII Fulminata is first found in Syria. By early in the reign of Tiberius, the 12th legion was based at Raphanae.
Titus Pullo
LegXII.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XIII69 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

Rev LEG XIII legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

SOLD

Purchased as a low budget LEG XII upon viewing in hand it is definately a 13th Legion

Legio XIII was levied by Julius Caesar in 57 BC, before marching against the Belgae, in one of his early interventions in intra-Gallic conflicts.

During the Gallic wars (58-51 BC), Legio XIII was present at the Battle against the Nervians, the siege of Gergovia, and while not specifically mentioned in the sources, it is not unreasonable to assume that Legio XIII was also present for the Battle of Alesia.

Forced to choose either the end of his political career, or civil war, Caesar brought Legio XIII across the Rubicon river and into Italy. The legion remained faithful to Caesar during the resulting civil war between Caesar and the conservative Optimates faction of the senate, whose legions were commanded by Pompey. Legio XIII was active throughout the entire war, fighting at Dyrrhachium (48 BC) and Pharsalus (48 BC). After the decisive victory over Pompey at Pharsalus, the legion was to be disbanded, and the legionaries "pensioned off" with the traditional land grants; however, the legion was recalled for the Battle of Thapsus (46 BC) and the final Battle of Munda (45 BC). After Munda, Caesar disbanded the legion, retired his veterans, and gave them farmlands in Italy.

Reconstituted by Octavian in 41 BC.
Its standard was the lion.
1 commentsTitus Pullo
LEG_XX_002.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XX 47 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

Rev LEG XX legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31BC

SOLD

The 20th legion was founded in 49 BC by Julius Caesar.

B. The 20th Valeria was founded by Pompey in 84 BC, it was given the vacant 20th number by Augustus in 31-30 BC. Augustus granted the legion the title "Victrix" in about 25 BC.

Unfortunately I can't link the 20th legion of Mark Antony to an exact Imperial Legion. David Sear writes that Legio XX may have been raised after Actium, in which case it could have contained some elements of Antony's disbanded twentieth.
Titus Pullo
LEG_XX.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XX55 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley right, mast with banners at prow

LEG XX
legionary eagle between two standards

IE bankers marks on the reverse.

Patrae mint 32-31BC
2.89g

The 20th legion was founded in 49 BC by Julius Caesar.

B. The 20th Valeria was founded by Pompey in 84 BC, it was given the vacant 20th number by Augustus in 31-30 BC. Augustus granted the legion the title "Victrix" in about 25 BC.

Unfortunately I can't link the 20th legion of Mark Antony to an exact Imperial Legion. David Sear writes that Legio XX may have been raised after Actium, in which case it could have contained some elements of Antony's disbanded twentieth.
1 commentsJay GT4
ANTVerus.jpg
Mark Antony restitution issue by Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus146 viewsANTONIVS AVGVR III VIR R P C
Galley moving left over waves

ANTONINVS ET VERVS AVG REST
Legionary eagle between two standards LEG VI across lower field

Rome 168-9 AD

3.17g

Sear 5236; RIC 443; RSC Mark Antony 83

Ex-ANE

Sear:
The reasons for this remarkable restoration remain obscure. Mattingly suggests that Legio VI Ferrata, which had fought for Antony at Philippi in 42 BC, may have played a leading role in the Parthian War of AD 164, the exceptional commemoration of this achievement on the coinage being prompted both by the legion's long and distinguished history and the similarity of the names "Antonius" and "Antoninus". The 200th Anniversary of the battle of Actium perhaps provides a more obvious reason for the issue.

Curtis Clay:
The reason for the restoration is not in doubt in my opinion, having been discerned by Mommsen in 1859.

Because of their lower silver content, Antony's legionary denarii were excluded from Trajan's recoinage of 107, and therefore Trajan did not restore this type.
But by the reign of Marcus and Verus, the silver content of the current denarius had fallen to the point that it had now become profitable to recoin Antony's denarii. Marcus and Verus did so, and therefore restored the coin too, picking at random one of the commoner legions for their restoration, since it was quite unnecessary to restore coins for several different legions, or for all of them!

The Reka Devnia hoard, ending essentially in c. 241 AD, still contained 9 original legionary denarii of Antony, plus 20 restorations by Marcus and Verus!
3 commentsJay GT4
legioxxiiLG.jpg
Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C.62 viewsMARCUS ANTONIUS (Marc Antony) AR silver legionary denarius. Legion XXIII. 18mm, 3.5g. Struck at a military mint, likely Patrae, 32-31 BC. Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley sailing. Reverse: LEG XXIII, eagle between standards. Ex Incitatus.

Legion XXII, the 22nd, is the second-last legion in the series and one of the scarcer types of the regular numbered legions.

Marcus Antonius (in Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N[1]) (January 14, 83 BC – August 1, 30 BC), known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and general. He was an important supporter and the loyal friend of Gaius Julius Caesar as a military commander and administrator, despite his blood ties, through his mother Iulia, to the branch of Caesars opposed to the Marians and murdered by them. After Caesar's assassination, Antony formed an official political alliance with Octavian (Augustus) and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, known to historians today as the Second Triumvirate.

The triumvirate broke up in 33 BC. Disagreement between Octavian and Antony erupted into civil war, the Final War of the Roman Republic, in 31 BC. Antony was defeated by Octavian at the naval Battle of Actium, and in a brief land battle at Alexandria. He and his lover Cleopatra committed suicide shortly thereafter.

For anyone tempted to laud Marcus Antonius, to Antony's great shame read what Plutarch wrote about what Antony did to Cicero:

Plutarch: Cicero's Death

But in the meantime the assassins were come with a band of soldiers, Herennius, a centurion, and Popillius, a tribune, whom Cicero had formerly defended when prosecuted for the murder of his father. Finding the doors shut, they broke them open, and Cicero not appearing, and those within saying they knew not where he was, it is stated that a youth, who had been educated by Cicero in the liberal arts and sciences, an emancipated slave of his brother Quintus, Philologus by name, informed the tribune that the litter was on its way to the sea through the close and shady walks. The tribune, taking a few with him, ran to the place where he was to come out. And Cicero, perceiving Herennius running in the walks, commanded his servants to set down the litter; and stroking his chin, as he used to do, with his left hand, he looked steadfastly upon his murderers, his person covered with dust, his beard and hair untrimmed, and his face worn with his troubles. So that the greatest part of those that stood by covered their faces whilst Herennius slew him. And thus was he murdered, stretching forth his neck out of the litter, being now in his sixty-fourth year. Herennius cut off his head, and, by Antony's command, his hands also, by which his Philippics were written; for so Cicero styled those orations he wrote against Antony, and so they are called to this day.

When these members of Cicero were brought to Rome, Antony was holding an assembly for the choice of public officers; and when he heard it, and saw them, he cried out, "Now let there be an end of our proscriptions." He commanded his head and hands to be fastened up over the rostra, where the orators spoke; a sight which the Roman people shuddered to behold, and they believed they saw there, not the face of Cicero, but the image of Antony's own soul.

Translation by John Dryden: http://intranet.grundel.nl/thinkquest/moord_cicero_plu.html

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
mauretanien_jubaII_SNGcop574.jpg
Mauretania, Juba II, SNG Copenhagen 57433 viewsMauretania, Juba II, 25 BC - AD 23
AR - drachm, 3.24g, 17.83mm, 180°
struck AD 11 (?)
obv. REX IVBA
diademed head of Juba r.
rev. BACIL - ICC - A KLEO[PA]TRA.
Crown of Isis with grain-ears, below crescent
ref. SNG Copenhagen 574
about VF, obv. a bit excentrically
pedigree:
ex Marc Breitsprecher
ex Harlan J. Berk

Iuba II., like his father, was one of the Roman client kings. Grown up in Rome and educated by Octavia, sister of Octavian, he was appointed as king of Mauretania by Augustus in 25 BC. He was highly cultivated and promoted the Hellenistic culture. Her 1. wife was Kleopatra, daughter of the famous Kleopatra VII and Marcus Antonius. Her time of death is disputed and therewith the dating of this coin. Kleopatra Selene, like her mother, thought herself the incarnation of Isis, whose celestial body was the moon. Therefore on the crescent the crown of Isis above crescent.

One of the rare coins with Greek and Latin legends!
2 commentsJochen
80D0DEAF-3B59-4195-A376-94EFBC8A69D2.jpeg
MOESIA INFERIOR, Marcianopolis. Elagabalus,9 viewsMOESIA INFERIOR, Marcianopolis. Elagabalus, with Julia Paula AD 218-222. Æ Pentassarion (26mm, 10.94 g, 6h). Julius Antonius Seleucus, legatos consularis. Confronted busts of Elagabalus right, laureate, and Maesa left, draped / Homonoia standing left, holding patera and cornucopia; E (mark of value) to left. H&J –; AMNG –; Varbanov –; Pfeiffer –. Near VF, dark green patina, a few scratches in reverse field. Unpublished in the standard references.ecoli
505ED3A1-483E-40C4-92D8-30D61233D92D.jpeg
MOESIA INFERIOR, Marcianopolis. Elagabalus, with Julia Maesa13 viewsMOESIA INFERIOR, Marcianopolis. Elagabalus, with Julia Maesa AD 218-222. Æ Pentassarion (26mm, 10.94 g, 6h). Julius Antonius Seleucus, legatus consularis. Confronted busts of Elagabalus right, laureate, and Maesa left, draped / Homonoia standing left, holding patera and cornucopia; E (mark of value)ecoli
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG811.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.01.04 (plate coin)12 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 26, 5.91g, 26.2mm, 45°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT.K.M.AVRHLI - ANTWNEINOC (NE ligate)
Head, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVCOV MARKIANOPOLI / TWN (both OV and AR ligate)
Zeus, in himation, enthronend l., resting with raised l. hand on sceptre and holding
patera in extended r. hand
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 811 (2 ex., Bukarest, München)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1509
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.1.4 (plate coin)
d) Pfeiffer 334 corr. (wrong obv. legend)
F+, dark green patina
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_HJ6_26_3_3.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.03.0212 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 28, 12.45g, 28.19mm, 15°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRHLI . ANTWNEINO - C
Head, laureate, r., slightly draped on l. shoulder
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOPLIT / WN (1st OV ligate)
Hera in long garment and mantle over both shoulders, stg. l., holding patera in r. hand and resting with l.
hand on her sceptre
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 834 var.
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1521
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.3.2
scarce, about VF, nice rendered garment
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG817.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.03.05 (plate coin)31 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 10.89g, 26.67mm, 0°
struck under governor Iulius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRHLI. - ANT[WNEIN]OC AVG
bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLI / TWN
Hera, in long garment, stg. l., holding sceptre l. and patera in outstretched r. hand
ref. a) not in AMNG
rev. AMNG I/1, 813 (depiction)
AMNG I/1, 849 var. (= 861 var.) (legend, but with dots and square E)
obv. AMNG I/1, 817 (bust)
AMNG I/1, 813 var. (legend, but without AVG
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1571 (PC, unpublished)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No.6.26.3.5 (plate coin)
d) SNG Budapest 167
about VF, dark green patina
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG814.JPG
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.03.08 (plate coin)12 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 10.29g, 27.12mm, 195°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRH - ANTWNEINOC
laureate head r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV - MARKIANOPOLIT / WN (1st OV and WN ligate)
Hera, in long double chiton and mantle, stg. l., holding patera in r. hand and resting with raised l. hand
on sceptre
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 814 (2 ex., Löbbecke, Paris)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1519 (doesn't cite AMNG)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.3.8 (plate coin)
F
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_Athena_unbekannt.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.04.03 (plate coin)27 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 26, 10.26g, 25.64mm, 165°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. [AVT KM AVRH] - ANTWNEINOC AVG (AVG ligate)
Bust, cuirassed, in scale armour, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CEL[EVKOV - MAR]KIANOPOLITW (1st OV and AR ligate)
Athena, in long garment, wearing crested helmet, stg.l., holding with l. hand shield set on
ground and in extended r. hand owl.
ref. a) not in AMNG
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.4.3 (plate coin)
Very rare, F+, dark green patina, partially weakly struck
1 commentsJochen
markianopolis_elagabal_BMC50.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.05.06 #157 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 26, 10.1g, 26.35mm, 180°
struck under governor Iulius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRHLIOC - ANTWNEINOC
bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. VP.IOVL.ANT.CELE - VKOV MARKIANOPO / LITWN
Demeter, in long chiton and himation, stg. frontal, head l., holding two corn-
ears in outstretched r. hand and leaning with l. hand on sceptre.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 819 var. (has torch)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1560 (cites AMNG 819, but writes scepter which can be seen on pic too!)
c) Hristova-Jekov (2013) 6.26.5.6
d) BMC 50
about VF, small scratches on obv.
Pedigree:
ex Colosseum 1997
VF, glossy black-green patina

AMNG has two corn-ears, head of poppy and torch. Here it is doubtless no poppy and a sceptre with knob. But it is Demeter nevertheless.
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_HrJ(2013)6_26_05_06_#2.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.05.06 #29 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 11.1g, 27.19mm, 180°
struck under governor Iulius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRHLIOC - ANTWNEINOC
bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. VP.IOVL.ANT.CELE - VKOV MARKIANOPO / LITWN
Demeter, in long chiton and himation, stg. frontal, head l., holding two corn-
ears in extended r. hand and resting with raised l. hand on sceptre.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 819 var. (has torch)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1560 (cites AMNG 819, but writes scepter which can be seen on pic too!)
c) Hristova-Jekov (2013) 6.26.5.6
d) BMC 50
VF, glossy black-green patina

AMNG has two corn-ears, head of poppy and torch. Here it is doubtless no poppy and a sceptre with knob. But it is Demeter nevertheless.
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG813cf_unbekannt.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.05.07 (plate coin)18 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 9.98g, 27.21mm, 165°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRHLIOC - ANTWNEINOC (C square)
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELE - VKOV MARKIANOPOL / ITWN (WN ligate)
Female deity, in long garment, stg. l., holding patera in extended r. hand and
resting with l. hand on long torch(!)
ref. a) not in AMNG:
obv. AMNG I/1, 817 var. (has dots between the letters)
rev. not in AMNG; AMNG 813, pl.XIV, 2 has clearly a knob atop the scepter!
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.5.7 (plate coin, under Demeter)
very rare, F+/about VF, stripped

The most likely seeming, with a torch, with young woman's hairdo, is Kore / Persephone (Pat Lawrence)
Kore / Persephone is not listed for Markianopolis!
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG822.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.07.01 (plate coin)43 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 25, 8.34g, 25.19mm, 195°
struck under governor Iulius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRHLI - ANTWNEINOC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLIT / WN (OV of IOVL ligate)
Apollo (or Bonus Events), nude, stg. l. sacrificing from patera in r. hand over
flaming altar l. and holding grain-ears in lowered l. hand
ref. a) not in AMNG
rev. AMNG I/1, 822 var. (depiction, but with branch!)
AMNG I/1, 823 (legend)
obv. AMNG I/1, 822
b) Varbanov (eng.) 1511 var. (cites AMNG 822, but in error Moushmov 810; it should be Moushmov 608, pl.VI, 9, but has the usual
branch!)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.7.1 (plate coin)
d) Pfeiffer 342 corr. (writes branch)
very rare, F+, green patina

AMNG I/1, 822 is Apollo holding branch. But here we have obviously grain-ears! So it is rather Bonus Eventus than Apollo!
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_Bonus_Eventus_neu.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.07.0213 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 25, 9.06g, 25.38mm, 180°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRH - ANTWNEINOC AVG (AVG ligate)
Bust, cuirassed with scale armour, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLITW / N (both OV ligate)
Bonus Eventus, nude, stg. l., holding grain-ears in lowered l. hand and patera in outstretched r. hand
ref. a) not in AMNG
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.7.2
very rare, F+, nice style
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_HJ6_26_7_2corr_.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.07.03 (plate coin)17 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 28, 10.69g, 28.04mm, 210°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT.K.M.AVRHLIOC - ANTWNEINOC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. VP.IOVL.ANT CEL - EVKOV MARKIANOPO
in ex. LITWN (small letters)
Youthful Apollo Iatros, unbearded, nude, chlamys over l. shoulder, stg. frontal,
head turned l., resting on snake-staff set in r. armpit
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 832, pl. XVII, 4 (3 ex., Löbbecke, Rollin, probably Wiczsay too)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1559
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.7.3 (plate coin)
rare, F+/about VF, bluegreen patina

Pick calls the rev. figure Asklepios and so does Varbanov. But the fact that he is nude proves that it is obviously Apollo as Apollo Iatros (Apollo Medicus)
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_Rivergod_new.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.32.03 (plate coin)11 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 12.48g, 27.29mm, 180°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRHLI - ANTWNEINOC
laureate head r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT.CELEVKOV MARKIANO / POLITWN (both OV ligate)
Youthful river god, nude to hips, leaning l., holding in r. hand thick waterplant and in l. arm long reed; l.
hand resting on urn from which water flows l.
ref. a) not in AMNG
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.32.3 (plate coin)
d) not in Pfeiffer
unpublished?
very rare, F+

Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG[836]_#1.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.32.04 #1 (plate coin)39 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 26, 9.73g, 26.46mm, 0°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVR - ANTWNEINOC (NE ligate)
Head, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIA. / NOPOLITW / N (1st OV and AR ligate)
Old river-god, bearded, leaning l., in r. arm holding water-plant over r.
shoulder, resting with l. arm on turned-over urn from which water flows to left.
ref. a) not in AMNG:
rev. AMNG I/1, [836] var. (1 ex., Mionnet, AR not ligate)
obv. AMNG I/1, 839
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1589 var. (has AVRH)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.32.4 (plate coin)
good F/about VF

Pick has used square brackets, because he didn't had the coin in hand!
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_Moushmov651.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.32.04 #2 (plate coin) 42 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 25, 8.11g, 24.95mm, 0°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVR - ANTWNEINOC (NE ligate)
Head, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIA. / NOPOLITW / N (1st OV and AR ligate)
Old river-god, bearded, leaning l., in r. arm holding water-plant over r.
shoulder, resting with l. arm on turned urn from which water flows to left.
ref. a) not in AMNG:
rev. AMNG I/1, [836] var. (1 ex., Mionnet, has no ligate AR)
obv. AMNG I/1, 839
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1589 var. (has AVRH)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.32.4 (plate coin)
good F, overall roughness

Pick has used square brackets, because he didn't had the coin in hand!
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG841.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.35.0140 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 26, 9.94g, 26.32mm, 180°
struck under governor Iulius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRH. - ANTWNEINOC AVG (AVG ligate)
Bust, cuirassed, wearing scale armor, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVCOV MARKIANOPOLITWN (both OV and AR ligate)
Nemesis-Aequitas, in long girded double chiton, stg. facing, head l., holding in l. arm
goad and puff of garment and in outstretched r. hand scales; at her feet
l. the wheel.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 841 (1 ex. in Paris)
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No.6.26.35.1
very rare, VF

The rod here has a hook at its upper end. Pick writes: Sometimes the rod has a knot or spines and can't be called a cubit; perhaps it should be an instrument of penalization like a whip. I think it is a goad!
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_HrJ(2011)6_26_35_16var.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.35.0211 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 11.82g, 26.73mm, 0°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVR - ANTWNEINOC AVG (NE and VG ligate)
laureate head r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV - MARKIANOPOLITWN (2nd OV and AR ligate)
Nemesis-Aequitas, in long garment and mantle, stg. frontal, head l., holding goad
in l. arm and scales in r. hand; at her feet l. the wheel
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 846 (1 ex., Copenhagen)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1537 var. (different ligation, AMNG 846 ascribed in error to #
1539)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.35.2
d) not in Pfeiffer
F+, brown patina
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_HrJ2_26_35_15var(rev).jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.35.03 (plate coin)31 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE - AE 27, 11.82g, 26.73mm, 0°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVR - ANTWNEINOC (NE ligate)
laureate head r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV - MARKIANOPOLITWN (2nd OV and AR ligate)
Nemesis-Aequitas, in long garment and mantle, stg. frontal, head l., holding goad in l. arm and scales in r.
hand
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 846 (1 ex., Copenhagen)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1537 var. (different ligation, AMNG 846 ascribed in error to #1539)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.35.3 (plate coin)
d) not in Pfeiffer
F+, stripped
2 commentsJochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG840.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.35.04 (plate coin)21 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 26, 8.32g, 25.91mm, 180°
struck under governor Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRHLIOC - ANTWNEINOC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELE - VKOV MARKIANOPO / LITWN
Nemesis, in long garment, stg. l., holding rod in l. arm and scales in r. hand; l. at her feet the wheel.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 840, pl. XVIII, 25, same rev. die (4 ex., 2x München, Paris, Sofia)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1581
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.35.4 (plate coin)
F+, dark green patina
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG840var.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.35.05 (plate coin)31 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 26, 9.03g, 25.9mm, 15°
struck under governor Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRHLIOC - ANTWNEINOC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. VP.IOVL.ANT CEL - EVKOV MARKIANOPO / LITWN
Nemesis-Aequitas, in long garment, stg. l., holding rod in l. arm and scales in r. hand; l. at her feet the wheel.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 840, pl. XVIII, 25 (4 ex., 2x München, Paris, Sofia; breaks as on ex. 2 and 4)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1581 (cites AMNG 840; writes parazonium instead of rod)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.35.5 (plate coin)
about VF, slightly weakly struck at 5 o'clock, green patina
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

Pick writes: The rod in the l. arm of the goddess has sometimes (like here too) knots and spikes and can't be called cubit. Perhaps it is an instrument for penalization like the scourge.
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG847var.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.35.10 (plate coin)20 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 10.09g, 26.82mm, 0°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT.K.M.AVRELIOC - ANTWNEINOC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. VP.IOVL.ANT.CELE - VKOV MARKIANOPOLIT / WN (2nd OV ligate)
Nemesis/Aequitas, in long garment and mantle, stg. l., holding cornucopiae in l.
arm and scales in r. hand; at her feet l. the wheel.
ref. a) not in AMNG:
obv. AMNG I/1, 847 (= 844)
rev. AMNG I/1, 847 (depiction)
AMNG I/1, 857 (legend)
b) not in Varbanov (engl.):
cf. #1476 (cites AMNG 846 in error, but that is a different type)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.35.10 (plate coin)
pedigree:
ex CNG coins

A new rev. legend for Seleucus!
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG843.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.35.15 (plate coin)38 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 25, 8.85g, 24.98mm, 180°
struck under governor Iulius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRH - ANTWN[EINOC]
laureate head r.
rev. VP [IOVL] ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLITWN (AR and WN ligate)
Nemesis, stg. l., holding scales and measuring rod, wheel at feet
ref. a) AMNG 843 (1 ex., Philippopel)
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.35.15 (plate coin)
very rare, about VF, black-green patina

Rod with hook, probably a goad!
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG845.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.35.17 (plate coin)30 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 10.6g, 27.01mm, 180°
struck under governor Iulius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRH - ANTWNEINOC
Head, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLITWN (both OV, AR and WN ligate)
Nemesis(?), in long girded double chiton and mantle, stg. facing, head
l., holding measuring rod and puff of garment in l. arm and scales in
outstretched r. hand.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 845 (1 ex., Löbbecke)
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.35.17 (plate coin)
Very rare, good F/about VF

This is the first coin I have seen on which Nemesis(?) is wearing only scales and measuring rod without a wheel.
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_HrJ(2011)6_26_35_24corr(rev).jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.35.25 (plate coin)8 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 26, 9.32g, 26.32mm, 330°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRHLIOC - ANTWNEINOC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. VP.IOVL.ANT.CEL - EVKOV MARKIANOP / OLITWN (WN ligate)
Nemesis in long double chiton and with mantle over l. arm, stg. frontal, head l., holding
goad in l. arm and pulling with r. hand garment from r. shoulder; at her feet l. the wheel
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 839
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1580
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.35.25 (plate coin)
d) not in Pfeiffer
rare, F+ to about VF

Here too we find the strange indentations on the r. leg of the figure.
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_HrJ6_26_35_11corr.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.35.299 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 9.84g, 26.31mm, 345°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRHLI - ANTWNEINOC
laureate head r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELE - VKOV MARKIANOPO / LITWN
Nemesis, in long girded double chiton with overhang, stg. l., with r. hand lifting garment over r. shoulder,
holding rod in l. arm; wheel at her feet l.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 838 (3 ex., 2x Berlin, Bukarest)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1579
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.35.29
about VF, dark green patina, small flan defect at 12h
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_Hr6_26_35_1(rev).jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.35.30 (plate coin)11 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 26, 9.93g, 25.65mm, 345°
struck under Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT.K.M.AVRHLIOC. - ANTWNEINOC
Head, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELE - VKOV MARKIANOPO / LITWN
Nemesis, in long garment and mantle, stg. l., holding club in l. arm and
drawing with r. hand garment from r. shoulder; at her feet l. the wheel.
ref. a) not in AMNG:
cf. AMNG I/1, 838 (different obv.)
b) not in Varbanov (engl.):
cf. #1579 (= AMNG 838)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.35.30 (plate coin)
F+, dark green patina
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG858~0.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.36.10 (plate coin)31 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 10.05g, 26.75mm, 180°
struck under governor Iulius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRH - ANTWNEINOC (NE ligate)
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEUKOV MARKIANOPOLEI
in l. and r. field T - WN (WN ligate)
Homonoia, wearing double chiton, tresses falling down at neck, stg. l. in kontrapost, head turned r., sacrifying from patera over altar, stg. l., holding garment and cornucopiae in l. arm.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 858 (1 ex., Leake Europ. Gr.69)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1475 (citing Pick but with head l. in error!)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.36.10 (plate coin)
very rare, about VF

It is the only type of Homonoia with head r. I know!
1 commentsJochen
markianopolis_elagabal_HrJ(2011)6_26_36_24var(rev).jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.36.12 corr. (plate coin)10 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 25, 9.86g, 25.27mm, 0°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRHLIOC - ANTWNEINOC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CEL - EVKOV MARKIANOPO / LITWN (WN ligate)
Female figure in long garment and mantle, stg. frontal, head l., holding cornucopiae in l.
arm and in lowered r. hand 2 grain-ears (Abundantia?)
ref. a) not in AMNG:
rev. AMNG I/1, 860
obv. f.e. AMNG I/1, 861
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1567
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.36.12 (plate coin, calls the figure Concordia in error)
d) Pfeiffer 383 corr. (writes WN not ligate, but legend in ex. illegible)
F+, some encrustations on obv.
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_HJ6_26_36_7var.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.36.15 (plate coin)20 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 9.95g, 27.05mm, 15°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleukus
obv. AVT KM AVRHLI - ANTWNEINOC AVG (AVG ligate)
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLITWN (both OV ligate)
Homonoia stg. l., holding cornucopiae and patera
ref. a) not in AMNG:
rev. AMNG I/1, 852
obv. AMNG I/1, 863 (for Tyche)
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) 6.26.36.15 (plate coin)
about VF, brown patina
1 commentsJochen
markianopolis_elagabal_HrJ(2011)6_26_36_16var.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.36.19 (plate coin)9 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
AE 26, 8.62g, 26.08mm, 195°
obv. AVT KM AVRH - ANTWNEINOC AVG (AVG ligate)
Bust, cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLITWN (1st and 2nd OV ligate)
Homonoia in long garment and mantle stg. l., holding cornucopiae in l. arm and patera in
outstretched r. hand
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 854 var.
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1493
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.36.19 (plate coin)
d) Pfeiffer 377 (same dies)
about VF
Jochen
elagabal_markianopolis_AMNG860.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.36.20 (plate coin)44 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 25, 8.85g, 25.23mm, 225°
struck under governor Iulius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRH - ANTWNEINOC AVG (AVG ligate)
Bust, laureate, r.
rev. VP.IOVL.ANT.CELE - VKOV MARKIANOPO / LITWN (WN ligate)
Abundantia (or Annona?) stg. frontal, head l., holding cornucopiae l. and corn-
ears r.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 860 (like Nr.5, Paris Mionnet, but has no dots), pl. XIX, 1 (same die)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1568 var. (without AVG)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No.6.26.36.20 (plate coin)
d) SNG Cop. 232 (same dies both sides, Curtis Clay)
very rare, VF/good VF, nice green patina
added to www.wildwinds.com
1 commentsJochen
markianopolis_elagabal_HJ6_26_36_8(rev).jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.36.2414 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 11.06g, 26.90mm, 15°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRHLI - ANTWNEINOC
laureate head r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CE[LEVKOV MARK]IANOPOLITWN (both OV and WN ligate)
Homonoia in long garment and mantle, stg. l., holding cornucopiae and patera
ref. a) not in AMNG:
rev. AMNG I/1, 853
obv. AMNG I/1, 852
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1531
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) 6.26.36.24
about VF/F+, dark green patina, rev. with some encrustations
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_HJ6_26_36_7(rev).jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.36.25 (plate coin)20 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 28, 9.56g, 27.86mm, 180°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVR - ANTWNEINOC (NE ligate)
Head with moustache, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLITWN (both OV and AR ligate)
Homonoia, in long garment and mantle, stg. l., holding cornucopiae and patera
ref. a) not in AMNG:
rev. AMNG I/1, 853
obv. z.B. AMNG I/1, 846
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.36.25 (plate coin)
rare, EF/about VF, dark green patina, nice portrait
1 commentsJochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG858cf_unbekannt.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.36.26 18 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 25, 6.59g, 25.25mm, 15°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT.K.M.AVRH - ANTWNEINOC (C square)
Head, laureate, r.
rev. VP.IOVL.ANT.CELE - VKOV MARKIANOPO / LITWN
Homonoia, in long garment, stg. l., holding cornucopiae in l. arm and with r. hand patera
over girlanded flaming altar l.
ref. a) not in AMNG:
obv. AMNG I/1, 860
rev. AMNG I/1, 860 var. (legend only, but has LITWN with ligate WN)
depiction not in AMNG, cf. #858
b) not in Varbanov (engl.):
cf. #1532, but has different legends and different bust (draped and cuirassed)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.36.26
rare, about VF, die break below the bust, fine flan break at 4 o'clock
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNGcf860.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.36.27 (plate coin)36 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 10.22g, 26.55mm, 180°
struck under governor Iulius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT.KM.AVRH - ANTWNEINOC
laureate head r.
rev. VP [IOVL ANT CEL] - EVKOV MARKIANOPO / LITWN (WN ligate)
female figure, in long chiton and with kalathos, stg. l., holding cornucopiae and
two corn-ears downwards in outstretched r. hand (Abundantia or Annona?)
ref. a) not in AMNG:
rev. AMNG I/1, 860 var. (depiction, without kalathos)
AMNG I/1, 850 (rev., legend)
obv. AMNG I/1, 860
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1568
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.36.27 (plate coin)
rare, about VF, glossy black green patina
added to www.wildwinds.com

Varbanov usually doesn't differentiate between different legend breaks!
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_HrJ(2011)6_26_36_24var.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.36.28 (plate coin)11 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 10.78g, 26.76mm, 0°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT.K.M.AVRH - ANTWNEINOC
laureate head r.
rev. VP.IOVL.ANT.CEL - EVKOV MARKIANOPO / . LITWN (WN ligate)
Female figure in long garment and mantle, stg. frontal, head l., holding cornucopiae in l.
arm and 2 grain-ears in lowered r. hand (Abundantia?)
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 860 var. (different rev. die)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1568
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.36.28 (plate coin)
d) Pfeiffer 382 var. (with Kalathos)
F+, high points metallic, die break under bust
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_HJ6_26_38_1var(rev).jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.38.04 (plate coin)13 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 25, 9.66g, 25.19mm, 150°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRHL - ANTWNEINOC
Bust, cuirassed with scale armour, laureate, r.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLITWN (WN ligate)
Tyche, in long garment and mantle, stg. l., holding cornucopiae in l. arm and in r.
hand rudder
ref. a) not in AMNG:
rev. AMNG I/1, 864 var. (AR ligate)
obv. AMNG I/1, 864 (like ex. 3, Paris; bust type only)
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.38.4 (plate coin)
rare, about VF, dark green patina
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG863(rev).jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.38.05 (plate coin)15 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 26, 10.19g, 25.97mm, 30°
struck under governor Iulius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVR - ANTWNEINOC AVG (VG ligate)
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. [VP IOVL ANT ] CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLITWN (both OV and AR ligate)
Tyche, in long garment and mantle, stg. l., holding cornucopiae in l. arm and rudder in r. hand.
ref. a) not in AMNG:
obv. AMNG I/1, 829 (but rev. is Dionysos, without pic)
rev. AMNG I/1, 863
b) not in Varbanov (engl.):
rev. Varbanov (engl.) 1503 (cites AMNG 863)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.26.38.5 (plate coin)
rare, F-F+, flan crack at 2 o'clock
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_AMNG819cf_#2.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 26. Elagabal, HrJ (2013) 6.26.5.6 #244 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 11.1g, 27.19mm, 180°
struck under governor Iulius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRHLIOC - ANTWNEINOC
bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. VP.IOVL.ANT.CELE - VKOV MARKIANOPO / LITWN
Demeter, in long chiton and himation, stg. frontal, head l., holding two corn-
ears in outstretched r. hand and leaning with l. hand on sceptre.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 819 var. (has torch)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1560 (cites AMNG 819, but writes scepter which can be seen on the pic too!)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) 6.26.5.6
d) BMC 50
F+/about VF, glossy dark green patina

AMNG has two corn-ears, head of poppy and torch. Here it is doubtless no poppy and a sceptre with knob. Nevertheless it is Demeter.
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_maesa_AMNG936.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 28. Elagabal & Julia Maesa, HrJ (2013) 6.28.01.02 (plate coin)23 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 10.34g, 26.86mm, 0°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVR ANTWNEINOC AVG IOVLIA MAICA AVG
Head of Elagabal, laureate, r., and bust of Ioulia Maesa, draped and wearing stephane, l.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLI / TWN
Zeus, in himation, stg. l., holding patera in outstretched r. hand and resting with raised l. hand on sceptre
in lower l. field E
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 936 (1 ex., Gotha)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1642
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.28.1.2 (plate coin)
rare, F+, dark green patina
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_maesa_HrJ6_28_1_3var(rev).jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 28. Elagabal & Julia Maesa, HrJ (2013) 6.28.01.05 (plate coin)16 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 28, 10.59g, 27.52mm, 0°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVRH ANTWNEINOC IOVLIA MAICA AVG
Head of Elagabal, laureate, r., and bust of Ioulia Maesa, draped and wearing stephane, l.
rev. VP.IOVL.ANT.CEL - EV - KOV MARKIANOP
in ex. OLITWN (smaller letters)
Zeus, bearded, in himation,stg. l., holding patera in extended r. hand and resting with raised l. hand on
sceptre
in lower r. field E
ref. a) not in AMNG:
rev. AMNG I/1, 936 var. (different legend distribution)
obv. f.e. AMNG I/1, 939 (Hades-Serapis)
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.28.1.5 (plate coin)
rare, about VF, dark green patina
pedigree:
ex J.P.Righetti inventory #9983
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_maesa_Serapis_unknown.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 28. Elagabal & Julia Maesa, HrJ (2013) 6.28.06.01 (plate coin)15 viewsElagabal & Julia Maesa, AD 218-222
AE 28, 14.65g, 28.46mm, 165°
struck under Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVR ANTWNEINOC AVG IOVLIA MAICA AVG . (NE ligate)
Confronting busts of Elagabal, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r., and Julia
Maesa, draped and wearing stephane, l.
rev. VP IOVL ANTO CELEVK - OV MARKIANOPOLIT / WN (1st OV ligate)
Hades/Serapis in himation and with kalathos stg.l., holding wreath (or taenia) in r. hand and
resting with raised l. hand on sceptre.
in r. field E
ref. a) not in AMNG
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.28.6.1 (plate coin)
extremely rare (R9), F+, dark green patina

The iconographical meaning of the wreath (or taenia) is not known.
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_maesa_AMNG948.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 28. Elagabal & Julia Maesa, HrJ (2013) 6.28.07.0525 viewsElagabal & Julia Maesa, AD 218-222
AE 27, 11.44g, 27.26mm, 30°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVR ANTWNEINOC AVG.IOVLIA.MAICA AVG (NE ligate)
Confronted head of Elagabal, laureate, r., and bust of Julia Maesa, draped and wearing stephane, l.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOP[OLITWN] (WN ligate!)
Apollo Lykeios, nude, stg. l., looking r., his r. hand on his head, holding bow in l. hand; r. beside a tree-stump with the snake, serving
as support for his l. arm
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 948 (5 ex.)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1614 (citing AMNG 947 in error)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No.6.28.7.1 (same dies)
rare, VF, dark green patina
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_maesa_AMNG952var.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 28. Elagabal & Julia Maesa, HrJ (2013) 6.28.08.0220 viewsElagabal & Julia Maesa, AD 118-222
AE 28, 11.68g, 28.47mm, 15°
struck under governor Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVR ANTWNEINOC AVG.IOVLIA MAICA AVG.
Confronting busts of Elagabal, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r., and Julia Domna, draped and
with stephane, l.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLITWN (both OV and WN ligate)
Dionysos, nude, with boots, stg. l. with Standbein and Spielbein, holding in raised l. hand thyrsos
and pouring wine from kantharos; at his feet l. the panther is std. l. with raised pawn, head r.,
looking up to him.
in upper l. field E (for pentassarion)
a) AMNG I/1, 952 var. (2 ex., Löbbecke, Paris; the ex. in Paris with unligate MAR; ligate WN not
mentioned)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1666
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No.6.28.8.2
rare, F-VF, soft strike lower left, beautiful Dionysos and beautiful Domna!
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_maesa_Herakles_new.JPG
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 28. Elagabal & Julia Maesa, HrJ (2013) 6.28.14.01 (plate coin)18 viewsElagabal & Julia Maesa, AD 218-222
AE 28, 10.71g, 27.85mm, 30°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM ANTWNEINOC AVG IOVLIA MAICA AVG (NE ligate)
confronting busts of Elagabal, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r,. and Julia Maesa, draped and wearing
stephane, l.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLIT / WN (1st OV and WN ligate)
Herakles, nude, stg. r., head turned l., lion's skin over l. forearm, holding apple of Hesperids in l. hand
and resting with r. hand on his club.
in l. field E (for pentassarion)
ref. a) not in AMNG
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.28.14.1 (plate coin)
very rare, F+, dark green patina
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_iulia_maesa_AMNG957var.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 28. Elagabal & Julia Maesa, HrJ (2013) 6.28.21.05 (plate coin)18 viewsElagabal & Julia Maesa, AD 218-222
AE 26, 11.53g, 26.38mm, 15°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. [AVT] KM AVRH ANTWNEINOC.IOVLIA MAICA [AVG]
Head of Elagabal, laureate, r., and bust of Julia Maesa, draped and with stephane, l.
rev. VP.IOVL.ANT.CEL - EVKOV MARKIANOPO / LITWN
Hygieia, in long garment and mantle, stg. r., holding snake in r. arm and feeding her from patera
in l. hand.
in lower l. field E (for pentassarion)
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 957 var. (2 ex., Gotha, Sofia)
WN ligate
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1636(?), no pic!
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) 6.28.21.5 (plate coin)
rare, F+/about VF, dark green patina
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_maesa_AMNG960var(rev).jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 28. Elagabal & Julia Maesa, HrJ (2013) 6.28.21.08 (plate coin)13 viewsElagabal & Julia Maesa, AD 218-222
AE 28, 13.53g
struck under Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT.K.M.AVRH - ANTWNEINOC - IOVLIA MAIC(sic!) AVG
Confronting head of Elagabal, laureate, r., and bust of Julia Maesa, draped and
wearing stephane, l.
rev. VP.IOVL ANT.VCEL - EVKOV MARKAINOPO / LITWN. (WN ligate)
Hygieia, in long garment and mantle, stg. r., feeding snake in r. arm from patera in
l. hand
in lower r. field E
ref. a) not in AMNG:
rev. AMNG I/1, 960 var. (WN not ligate)
obv. AMNG I/1, 959
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1635a
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.28.21.8 (plate coin)
very rare, F/F+, dark green patina
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_maesa_AMNG971var.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 28. Elagabal & Julia Maesa, HrJ (2013) 6.28.22.0126 viewsElagabal & Julia Maesa, AD 218-222
AE 27, 13.18g, 27.31mm, 30°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVR ANTWNEINOC AVG IOVLIA MAICA AVG
Confronted busts of Elagabal, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r., and Julia Maesa, darped and wearing stephane, l.
rev. VP IOVL AN[T] CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLI / T - WN (both OV, AR and WN ligate)
Snake, cuirassed, erected in several elaborate coils, head r., on small base-line
in ex. E (between T and WN)
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 971 var. (AR not ligate, E in r. field)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1678 corr. (doesn't mention AMNG; depicts under #1677 my type, but writes 'E in l.
field')
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No.6.28.22.1.
F+, some roughness

This is the most sophisticated knot I have ever seen on a coin!
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_maesa_HrJ6_28_22_8.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 28. Elagabal & Julia Maesa, HrJ (2013) 6.28.22.0919 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 9.74g, 26.66mm, 90°
struck under governor Julius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVR - ANTWNEINOC AVG IOVLIA MAICA AVG
Confronted busts of Elagabal, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r., and Julia Maesa, draped and wearing
stephane, l.
rev. VP IOVL ANT CELEVKOV MARKIANOPOLI - TWN
Snake in 6 elaborated coils erecting r.
in ex. E (between LI and TWN)
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 973 (1 ex., London)
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.28.22.9
rare, F+, partially damaged patina, flan break at 1h
Jochen
markianopolis_elagabal_maesa_AMNG268.jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 28. Elagabal & Julia Maesa, HrJ (2013) 6.28.36.01 (plate coin)36 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 28, 13.79g, 28.34mm, 345°
struck under governor Iulius Antonius Seleucus
obv. AVT KM AVR ANTWNEINOC AVG IOVLIA MAICA AVG
confronted busts of Elagabal, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r., and Julia Maesa, draped and diademed, l.
rev. VP.IOVL.ANT.CELE - VKOV.MARKIANOPOLI / TWN
female figure, in long chiton and himation, stg. l., holding
cornucopiae in l. arm and two corn-ears downwards in outstretched r. hand (Abundantia?)
E in l. field (for pentassarion)
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 968 (2 ex., München, Mionnet, but end of rev.-legend missed)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1624 (cites AMNG 968, but has the same breaks on reverse like Hristova/Jekov!)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.28.36.1 (plate coin)
very rare, about VF, deep green patina
Jochen
nikopolis_antoninus_pius_varbanov1679.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 06. Antoninus Pius, HrHJ (2018) 8.06.07.01 (plate coin)124 viewsAntoninus Pius, AD 138-161
AE 20, 5.85g, 20.28mm, 180°
struck under governor M. Antonius Zenon, c. AD 145 (Pick)
obv. AVT AI ADRIA - ANTWNEINOC
bare head r.
rev. HGE ZHNWNOC - NEIKOPOL (odd K)
Apollo Sauroktonos stg. l., leaning with l. hand on tree on which lizard is
climbing up, r. hand at hip.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1225 var. (head laureate, 1 Ex., Gotha)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 2111 var. (laureate)
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.6.7.1 (plate coin)
d) RPC online temp no. 4328
Rare, about VF, black patina, some roughness
added to www.wildwinds.com

This is the earliest and most elegant depiction of the Praxiteles statue which is described by Pliny the Elder in his Natural History 34.69-70, but without an arrow on this type. Pick: 'May be that there is a lizard creeping up the tree.' Here the lizard could be seen clearly.
2 commentsJochen
nikopolis_ant_Pius_AMNG1227var.JPG
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 06. Antoninus Pius, HrHJ (2018) 8.6.35.1 (plate coin)17 viewsAntoninus Pius, AD 138-161
AE 18, 6.4g
struck under governor Antonius Zeno
obv. AVT AI ADRI - ANTWNEINO
Bare head r.
rev. HGE ZHNWNO - C NEIKOPOLEI
Nemesis in long garment, stg. facing, head l., resting with r. arm on on narrow column and
drawing with l. hand garment from l. shoulder
ref. a) not in AMNG
cf. AMNG I/1, 1227 (has ADRIA and 'laureate head r.')
b) not in Varbanov (engl.):
cf. #2112 (= AMNG 1227)
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.6.35.1 (plate coin)
possibly unpublished
very rare, F+/F, black green patina

Jekov suggests this coin as doubtful.

Lost in the mail!
Jochen
nikopolis_marc_aurelius_HrHJ(2017)8_7_9_1corr.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 07. Marcus Aurelius, HrHJ (2018) 8.07.09.01 (plate coin)4 viewsMarcus Aurelius as Caesar, AD 139-161
AE 21, 4.98g, 20.62mm, 180°
struck under governor M. Antonius Zeno, AD 139-144
obv. AVRH OVH - ROC KAIC
Bust, draped, bare-headed, r
rev. HGE ZHNW - NO - C NEIKOPO
Nike, winged, in girded double chiton, tiptoed advancing r., holding in l. arm palm branch
over l. shoulder and in raised r. hand wreath
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1229 var. (has - NOC NEIKOPO)
b) Varbanov 2136 (= AMNG 1229)
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.7.9.2
rare, brown patina, slightly rough
Jochen
nikopolis_marc_aurel_HrHJ(2018)8_6_13_01(rev).jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 07. Marcus Aurelius, HrHJ (2018) 8.6.13.01 (for Antoninus Pius, rev. only)2 viewsMarcus Aurelius, AD 161-180
AE 20, 4.57g, 19.54mm, 180°
struck under governor M. Antonius Zeno
obv. AVRH OVH - ROC KAIC
Bust, draped, bare-headed, r.
rev. HGE ZHNWNOC - NEIKOPOLEIT
Artemis Huntress, in short double chiton, stg. r., holding bow in extended l. hand and
drawing with r. hand arrow from quiver over r. shoulder
ref. a) not in AMNG
b) not in Varbanov
c) not in Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018):
rev. No. 8.6.13.1 (same die, for Antoninus Pius)
obv. e.g. No. 8.7.9.1 (same die)
Extremely rare, unique?, F+, brown patina

Now we know of 12 types for Marcus Aurelius, all as Caesar. 7 of them have been struck with rev. dies of Antoninus Pius. Under Marcus Aurelius as Augustus no coins were minted in Nikopolis. The reason for this is not known.
Jochen
new_nero_ric_68_combined.jpg
Nero RIC 006848 viewsNero. AD 54-68. AR Denarius Rome mint. Struck AD 68.
(17.68 mm, 3.37 g)
Obv: IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P P, Laureate head right
Rev: Legionary eagle between two standards.
RIC I 68 (R2); RSC 356
Ex: CNG e-auction 370 lot 391 March 9, 2016.




The portrait on this coin is what I like to call the "Fat tyrant" portrait. Earlier coins of Nero show a much more slender and younger version. Although he did not fiddle or play the lyre while Rome burned, he did mange to spend the imperial coffers quite extravagantly. His excesses, including many building projects meant that Nero had to make the silver for coins stretch to provide ample coinage for the empire. In order to do this he debased the denarii. While they were once near 100% fineness, Nero reduced this considerably. He also reduced the weight of the denarii. This is one of the reasons why some early denarii are scarce to very rare. People hoarded or melted down the earlier denarii. This includes the coins of Nero himself. While coins of Nero after the debasement are relatively easy to find (but very popular), his earlier coins are quite difficult to find. If you are interested in Nero and see a pre-reform denarius recognize that you might not see another for a while.

This coin is also interesting because of the reverse. Notice it has both the legionary standards, and Aqilla-the legionary eagle. Vespasian was not the only one to use previous coin types. Legionary denarii were minted by Marcus Antonius. I do not know why Nero would want to recall these earlier days. However, the earlier legionary denarii were still circulating at the time of Nero's rule. they were made of poor silver and so they were exchanged many times over the years.
1 commentsorfew
[901a]_NervaAntiochAE26.jpg
Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D., Antioch, Syria195 viewsBronze AE 26, BMC Syria, p. 182, 261, aVF, Antioch mint, weight 13.524g, maximum diameter 25.0mm, die axis 0o, Jan - Sep 97 A.D.; Obverse: IMP CAESAR NERVA AVG III COS, laureate head right; Reverse: large S C in wreath, D below; unbelievable portrait. Ex FORVM. Photo courtesy FORVM.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families
Nerva (96-98 A.D.)

David Wend

Introduction
Although short, the reign of Marcus Cocceius Nerva (A.D. 96-98) is pivotal. The first of Edward Gibbon's so-called "Five Good Emperors," Nerva is credited with beginning the practice of adopting his heir rather than selecting a blood relative. Claimed as an ancestor by all the emperors down to Severus Alexander, he has traditionally been regarded with much good will at the expense of his predecessor, Domitian.

Ancestry
Nerva could claim eminent ancestry on both sides of his family. On the paternal side, his great-grandfather, M. Cocceius Nerva, was consul in 36 B.C.; his grandfather, a distinguished jurist of the same name, accompanied Tiberius on his retirement to Capri in 26 A.D. On his mother's side an aunt, Rubellia Bassa, was the great-granddaughter of Tiberius. In addition, a great-uncle, L. Cocceius Nerva, played a part in the negotiations that secured a treaty between Octavian and Antony in 40 B.C

Early Career and Life under Domitian
Nerva was born on 8 November, 30 A.D. Little is known of his upbringing beyond the fact that he belonged to a senatorial family and pursued neither a military nor a public speaking career. On the other hand, he did hold various priesthoods and was a praetor-designate. More importantly, as praetor designate in 65, Nerva was instrumental in revealing the conspiracy of Piso against the emperor Nero.

As a result, he received triumphal ornaments and his statue was placed in the palace. Following Nero's fall in 68, Nerva must have realized that support of Vespasian and the Flavian cause was in his best interests. In 71 his loyalty was rewarded with a joint consulship with the emperor, the only time that Vespasian ever held the office without his son Titus. It was under the reign of Vespasian's other son, Domitian, that Nerva's political fortunes were ultimately determined, however. He shared the ordinary consulship with Domitian in 90, an honor that was perhaps the result of his alerting the emperor about the revolt of Antonius Saturninus, the governor of Upper Germany, in 89. Even so, like so many others of the senatorial class, Nerva came under scrutiny in the final years of Domitian's reign, when the emperor was unwilling to tolerate any criticism.

Whether or not Nerva was forced to withdraw from public life during Domitian's final years remains an open question. What is not in dispute is that he was named emperor on the same day that Domitian was assassinated in September, 96. Indeed, in some respects the accession was improbable, since it placed the Empire under the control of a feeble sexagenarian and long-time Flavian supporter with close ties to the unpopular Domitian. On the other hand, Nerva had proven to be a capable senator, one with political connections and an ability to negotiate. Moreover, he had no children, thereby ensuring that the state would not become his hereditary possession.

Imperial Initiatives
Upon taking office, Nerva made immediate changes. He ordered the palace of Domitian to be renamed the House of the People, while he himself resided at the Horti Sallustiani, the favorite residence of Vespasian. More significantly, he took an oath before the senate that he would refrain from executing its members. He also released those who had been imprisoned by Domitian and recalled exiles not found guilty of serious crimes. Nevertheless, Nerva still allowed the prosecution of informers by the senate, a measure that led to chaos, as everyone acted in his own interests while trying to settle scores with personal enemies.

In the area of economic administration Nerva, like Domitian, was keen on maintaining a balanced budget. In early 97, after appointing a commission of five consular senators to give advice on reducing expenditures, he proceeded to abolish many sacrifices, races, and games. Similarly, he allowed no gold or silver statues to be made of himself. Even so, there was some room for municipal expenditure. For the urban poor of Italy he granted allotments of land worth 60 million sesterces, and he exempted parents and their children from a 5% inheritance tax. He also made loans to Italian landowners on the condition that they pay interest of 5% to their municipality to support the children of needy families. These alimentary schemes were later extended by Trajan, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius.

Because he reigned only briefly, Nerva's public works were few. By early 98 he dedicated the forum that Domitian had built to connect the Forum of Augustus with the Forum of Peace. It became known as the Forum of Nerva, or the Forum Transitorium. Nerva also built granaries, made repairs to the Colosseum when the Tiber flooded, and continued the program of road building and repairs inaugurated under the Flavians. In addition, pantomime performances, supressed by Domitian, were restored.

In the military realm, Nerva established veterans' colonies in Africa, a practice that was continued by the emperor Trajan. Normal military privileges were continued and some auxiliary units assumed the epithet Nervia or Nerviana. We are not well informed beyond these details, and any military action that may have occurred while Nerva was emperor is known sketchy at best.

Nature of Nerva's Government
Nerva's major appointments favored men whom he knew and trusted, and who had long served and been rewarded by the Flavians. Typical was Sextus Julius Frontinus. A consul under Vespasian and governor of Britain twenty years earlier, Frontinus came out of retirement to become curator of the water supply, an office that had long been subject to abuse and mismanagement. He helped to put an end to the abuses and published a significant work on Rome's water supply, De aquis urbis Romae. As a reward for his service, Frontinus was named consul for the second time in 98. Similarly, the emperor's own amici were often senators with Flavian ties, men who, by virtue of their links to the previous regime, were valuable to Nerva for what they knew. Thus do we find the likes of A. Didius Gallus Fabricius Veiiento, one of Domitian's ill-reputed counselors, seated next to Nerva at an imperial dinner. Nerva was less willing to consult the Senate as a whole. In many cases he preferred the opinions of his own consilium, and was less submissive than many senators would have liked. This attitude may have been responsible for hostile discontent among several senators.

Mutiny of the Praetorians and the Adoption of Trajan
It was not long before the assassination of Domitian came to work against the new emperor. Dissatisfied that Domitian had not been deified after his death, the praetorian guards mutinied under Casperius Aelianus in October 97. Taking the emperor as hostage, they demanded that Nerva hand over Domitian's murderers. The emperor not only relented, but was forced to give a public speech of thanks to the mutineers for their actions. His authority compomised, Nerva used the occasion of a victory in Pannonia over the Germans in late October, 97 to announce the adoption of Marcus Ulpius Traianus, governor of Upper Germany, as his successor. The new Caesar was immediately acclaimed imperator and granted the tribunicia potestas. Nerva's public announcement of the adoption settled succession as fact; he allowed no time to oppose his decision. From the German victory, Nerva assumed the epithet Germanicus and conferred the title on Trajan as well. He also made Trajan his consular colleague in 98.

Death and Deification
On January 1, 98, the start of his fourth consulship, Nerva suffered a stroke during a private audience. Three weeks later he died at his villa in the Gardens of Sallust. From his headquarters at Cologne, Trajan insisted that Nerva's ashes be placed in the mausoleum of Augustus and asked the senate to vote on his deification. We are further told that he dedicated a temple to Nerva, yet no trace of it has ever been found. Nor was a commemorative series of coins issued for the Deified Nerva in the wake of his death, but only ten years later.

Conclusion
Nerva's reign was more concerned with the continuation of an existing political system than with the birth of a new age. Indeed, his economic policies, his relationship with the senate, and the men whom he chose to govern and to offer him advice all show signs of Flavian influence. In many respects, Nerva was the right man at the right time. His immediate accession following Domitian's murder prevented anarchy and civil war, while his age, poor health and moderate views were perfect attributes for a government that offered a bridge between Domitian's stormy reign and the emperorships of the stable rulers to follow.

Copyright (C) 1998, David Wend.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
octant.jpg
Octavian & Marc Antony90 viewsOCTAVIAN & MARCUS ANTONIUS (Marc Antony) AR silver Triumvirate issue denarius. CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right. Reverse - M ANT IMP AVG (MP and AV both in monogram) III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P, bare head of Antony right. Struck at Ephesus mint, Spring - Summer 41 BC. RCV 1504, RARE. 19mm, 3.7g. Holed for suspension in antiquity.1 commentsfordicus
RRC529-4.jpg
Octavian and Antonius, Concordia (Quinarius)45 viewsObv. IIIVIR RPC, veiled and diademed head of Concordia right;
Rev. C CAESAR M ANTON, clasped hands with Caduceus;
Gaul, 40/39 B.C.
14 mm, 1,83 gr.
References: RRC429/4b, RSC 67, Sear 1575

The coinage was struck soon after the Treaty of Brundisium, in which the IIIViri Rei Publicae Constituendae (Triumvirs for the Confirmation of the Republic), Octavian (Caesar), Antony and Lepidus divided the Roman sphere of influence amongst themselves. To cement the alliance, Antony married Octavian's sister, Octavia. Some have believed to see her features in the face of Concordia, thus showing the importance of the politic marriage.
1 commentsSyltorian
Papiria_1.JPG
Papiria 130 viewsPapiria 7 (122BC) moneyer Cn. Papirius Carbo cos. 113BC

Denarius
Ob: Helmeted head of Roma with curl on shoulder; behind X, border of dots
Rev: Jupiter in quadriga holding reigns and scepter in left hand and hurling fulmen in right (fulminans); below CARBO in exergue ROMA. Line border

BMCRR II 449

Sydenham 415

Crawford 279

Ex: Colesseum Coin Exchange 2006; toned

Northumberland refers to this incredibly informative letter:

Ad Fam IX 21 to TO PAPIRIUS PAETUS (AT NAPLES) 46BC

Well, but letting that pass, how did it come into your head, my dear Paetus, to say that there never was a Papirius who was not a plebeian? For, in fact, there were patrician Papirii, of the lesser houses, of whom the first was L. Papirius Mugillanus, censor with L. Sempronius Atratinus--having already been his colleague in the consulship--in the 312th year of the city. But in those days they were called Papisii. After him thirteen sat in the curule chair before L. Papirius Crassus, who was the first to drop the form Papisius. This man was named dictator, with L. Papirius Cursor as Master of the Horse, in the 415th year of the city, and four years afterwards was consul with Kaeso Duilius. Cursor came next to him, a man who held a very large number of offices; then comes L. Masso, who rose to the aedileship; then a number of Massones. The busts of these I would have you keep--all patricians. Then follow the Carbones and Turdi. These latter were plebeians, whom I opine that you may disregard. For, except the Gaius Carbo who was assassinated by Damasippus, there has not been one of the Carbones who was a good and useful citizen. We knew Gnaeus Carbo and his brother the wit: were there ever greater scoundrels? About the one who is a friend of mine, the son of Rubrius, I say nothing. There have been those three brothers Carbo-Gaius, Gnaeus, Marcus. Of these, Marcus, a great thief, was condemned for malversation in Sicily on the accusation of Publius Flaccus: Gaius, when accused by Lucius Crassus, is said to have poisoned himself with cantharides; he behaved in a factious manner as tribune, and was also thought to have assassinated Publius Africanus. As to the other, who was put to death by my friend Pompey at Lilybaeum, there was never, in my opinion, a greater scoundrel. Even his father, on being accused by M. Antonius, is thought to have escaped condemnation by a dose of shoemaker's vitriol. Wherefore my opinion is that you should revert to the patrician Papirii: you see what a bad lot the plebeians were. (trans. Evelyn Shuckburgh)
Petrus Elmsley
eumenia_BMCphrygia21.jpg
Phrygia, Eumeneia (Fulviana), Fulvia BMC Phrygia 2133 viewsFulvia, wife of Marcus Antonius, c. 41-40 BC
AE 20, 7.43g
struck under magistrate Zmertorix, son of Philonidas
obv. Head of Fulvia as winged Nike, draped, with chignon, r.
rev. Athena, in chiton and peplos, helmeted, advancing l., holding spear and round
shield
FOVLOVIANWN / ZMERTORIGOC / FILWNIDOV
RPC I 3139; BMC Phrygia 21
rare, good F

Fulvia was the first real woman depicted on a coin!

Fulvia was first married to P. Clodius, the Roman firebrand. After his violent death in 52 BC she married C. Scribonius Curio, who likewise met an untimely end in Africa. She married Mark Antony in 44 BC, and became an outspoken defender of his interests in Rome while he campaigned in the east (and enjoyed the attentions of Cleopatra). The city of Eumenia was re-named Fulviana in her honor by Antony's partisans. By 40 BC Fulvia's strident attacks on Octavian had provoked a reaction, and she had to flee first to southern Italy and then to Greece. She met Antony at Athens, where he upbraided her for antagonizing Octavian when he was trying to maintain a semblance of cordial relations. Fulvia died at Sicyon shortly thereafter. Sometime afterward these coins struck at "Fulviana" had their ethnic scratched off.
Jochen
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Phrygia, Eumeneia, Nero, SNG Copenhagen 394 #146 viewsNero AD 54-69
AE 20, 4.60g
struck under Nero as Caesar AD 50-54
obv. SEBASTOS - NERWN
Bust, draped, bare-headed, r.
rev. (from r. to l., each from top to bottom)
EVMENEWN / IOVLIOS / KL - EWN / ARXIEREVS ASIAS
Apollo, nude, chlamys over l. arm, stg. l., holding raven in outstretched r. hand and double-axe in l. arm
RPC 3149 (28 ex. listed); SNG Copenhagen 394; SNG von Aulock 3591; SNG München 207; BMC 41
rare, VF, nice for the type
Eumeneia was named Fulvia BC 41/40 to honour the eastern activities of Marcus Antonius whose wife was Fulvia.

Julius Kleon, mentioned on the rev., had the title ARXIEREVC THC ACIAC, meaning 'Highpriest of Asia'. His wife, Bassa Kleonos, was Highpriest, Archiera, too. She too was mentioned on coins, struck for Agrippina jun., mother of Nero. This feature is known only for Archierontes: Both spouses were Archierontes und for both were struck coins. The function of the Archiereus was closely related to the Imperial Cult.

For more information to the double-axe look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'.
3 commentsJochen
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Phrygia, Eumeneia, Nero, SNG Copenhagen 394 #228 viewsNero AD 54-69
AE 18, 3.55g
struck under Nero as Caesar AD 50-54
obv. SEBASTOS - NERWN
Bust, draped, bare-headed, r.
rev. (from r. to l., each from top to bottom)
EVMENEWN / IOVLIOS / KL - EWN / ARXIEREVS ASIAS
Apollo, nude, chlamys over l. arm, stg. l., holding raven in outstretched r. hand and double-axe in l. arm
RPC 3149 (28 ex. listed); SNG Copenhagen 394; SNG von Aulock 3591; SNG München 207; BMC 41
rare, VF, nice golden bronze colour
Eumeneia was named Fulvia BC 41/40 to honour the eastern activities of Marcus Antonius whose wife was Fulvia.
Jochen
PolemoII.jpg
Polemo II-Mark Antony's great grandson478 views Silver drachm

BACΙΛΕΩC ΠΟΛΕΜΩΝΟC
diademed head of Polemo right

ETOYC - K (year 20)
laureate head of Nero right;

57 - 58 A.D.
3.645g

18.1mm, die axis 180o

RPC I 3832, SNG Cop 242, BMC Pontus 7 - 8, SNG von Aulock 6691

Ex-Forum

Marcus Antonius Polemon Pythodoros, also known as Polemon II of Pontos and Polemon of Cilicia is the only known direct descendant of Mark Antony who bares his name. Through his maternal grandmother he was a direct descendant of Mark Antony and his second wife Antonia Hybrida Minor. Antony and Antonia Hybrida were first paternal cousins. He was Antony’s second born great grandson. Through Antony, he was a distant cousin to Roman Client King Ptolemy of Mauretania and Drusilla of Mauretania. He was also a distant cousin to Roman Emperors Caligula, Claudius and Nero and Roman Empresses Valeria Messalina, Agrippina the Younger and Claudia Octavia.

Polemon II’s father Polemon Pythodoros King of Pontos died in 8 BC. His mother then married King Archelaus of Cappadocia, and the family moved to the court of his stepfather. In 17 AD Archelaus died and Polemon II and his mother moved back to Pontus. From 17 until 38, Polemon II assisted his mother in the administration of Pontos. When his mother died in 38, Polemon II succeeded her as the sole ruler of Pontus, Colchis and Cilicia.

Around 50 AD, Polemon II met the Judean princess Julia Berenice in Tiberias during a visit to King Agrippa I. Berenice was widowed in 48 AD when her second husband and paternal uncle Herod of Chalcis, died. She had two sons by him, Berenicianus and Hyrcanus. Berenice set the condition that Polemon II had to convert to Judaism before marriage, which included undergoing the rite of circumcision. Polemon II complied, and the marriage went ahead but it did not last long. Berenice left Pontus with her sons and returned to the court of her brother. Polemon II abandoned Judaism and, according to the legend of Bartholomew the Apostle, accepted Christianity, only to become a pagan again.

In 62, Nero compelled Polemon II to abdicate the Pontian throne. Pontos and Colchis became a Roman province. From then until his death, Polemon II only ruled Cilicia. He never remarried and had no children that are known.

Polemon's sister Antonia Tryphaena's Royal lineage goes all the way down to Nana Queen of Iberia, who died in 363 AD. Truly Antony may have lost the battle of Actium but won the war of genetics!
8 commentsJay GT4
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Q Antonius Balbus Denarius 82/83 bc95 viewsSilver denarius serratus, SRCV I 279, Sydenham 742b, Crawford 364/1a, RSC I Antonia 1, VF, Rome mint, 83 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Jupiter right, S C behind; reverse Victory in a quadriga right, wreath in right and reigns and palm frond in left, letter below horses, Q ANTO BALB / PR in ex (ANT and AL in monogram);

Q. Antonius Balbus was a member of the Marian party and issued this coinage by special decree of the Senate to prepare for opposition to Sulla's return to Rome. In 82 B.C. he was appointed praetor in Sardinia. He was driven from Sardinia by L. Philippus, the legate of Sulla, and slain. Sulla prevailed and the Victory on the reverse of this type was proven a false hope. -- The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Edward A. Sydenham
2 commentsAdrian S
Balbus.JPG
Q Antonius Balbus Denarius Serratus. 83-82 BC81 viewsLaureate head of Jupiter right, S.C behind.
Victory in quadriga right, control letter below, Q. ANTO. BALB
Ex. PR
Antonia 1, Cr 364/1, Syd 742
2 commentswhitetd49
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Q. Antonius Balbus (83 - 82 B.C.)38 viewsAR Serrate Denarius
O: Laureate head of Jupiter right; S·C behind
R:Victory driving quadrgia right, holding reins, palm frond, and wreath; E below horses.
Rome Mint
3.7g
18mm
Crawford 364/1d; Sydenham 742b; Antonia 1
2 commentsMat
364,1a_Q__Antonius_Balbus.jpg
Q. Antonius Balbus - AR serratus denarius8 views²Sardinia
¹Rome
¹²83-82 BC
laureate head of Jupiter right
S·C

Victory riding in quadriga right, holding wreath, reins and palm branch
Q·(ANT)O·B(AL)B / PR
¹Crawford 364/1a, SRCV I 279, Sydenham 742b, RSC I Antonia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g

Moneyer who belonged to the opposition of Sulla struck these coins as praetor in Sardinia according special decree of senate (Senatus Consulto). He was driven from Sardinia by L. Philippus, the legate of Sulla, and slain. Victory on reverse didn't avert defeat of oppositon in battle of Colline Gate.
Johny SYSEL
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Q. Antonius Balbus - denarius serratus37 viewsQ. Antonius Balbus. 83-82 BC. AR Denarius Serratus, 3.81 g; obv. Laureate head of Jupiter right, S C behind; rev. Victory in quadriga right, control letter (P) below, Q ANT BALB P R in ex. Crawford 364/1d; Syd. 742b.1 commentsBartosz Awianowicz
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Q. Antonius Balbus 83-2 B.C., Serrate Denarius23 views3.63g, 5h, Rome Mint.
Laureate Head of Jupiter right, SC behind/Victory driving quadriga right, holding reins, palm frond and wreath, B below horses.
Crawford 364/1d, Sydenham 742b, Antonia 1.
CNG grade: Superb EF, lightly toned. My annotation: Reverse struck off center.
1 commentsLarry M2
balbus.jpg
Q. Antonius Balbus 83-82 B.C.38 viewsRoman Republic, 19mm 3.6g, Rome mint

Obverse: Laureate head of Jupiter right, SC behind
Reverse: Victory in a quadriga right, wreath in right and reigns and palm frond in left, Q ANTO BALB in ex. E below

Minted by special decree of the Senate in preparation for opposition to the return of the Dictator Sulla. The reverse of Victory is ironic considering Sulla was victorious in his return to Rome, and Antonius Balbus who was appointed governor of Sardinia, was executed.

2 commentsDk0311USMC
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Q. Antonius Balbus, Denarius12 viewsRRC 364/1c
83-82 b.c.

"The issue presumable forms part of the preparations made to resist the return of Sulla; the symbolism of victory and triumph clearly reflects the expectations of Q. Antonius Balbus, as Praetor deputed to strike the issue, and his associates." (Crawford)

"Q. Antonius Balbus was a member of the Marian party, and in B.C. 82 was appointed praetor in Sardinia, from whence he was driven by L. Philippus, the legate of Sulla, and slain. (Livy, Epit. 86)" (Grueber, British Museum I)

ex B. Peus nachf. Auct 398, lot 340
Described as:
Republikanische Prägungen Denar. Q. Antonius Balbus 83/82 v. Chr. 3.81 g. Kopf des Jupiter, Stz. A und Punkt / Victoria in Quadriga. Cr. 364, 1c; Syd. 742a. Sehr schön
Norbert
Antonia_1a_img.jpg
Q. Antonius Balbus, denarius serratus9 viewsObv:– Laureate head of Jupiter right, S C behind
Rev:– Victory in quadriga right, control letter below, Q ANT BALB P R in ex
Minted in Rome 83-82 B.C.
Reference:– Sydenham 74, Crawford 364/1, RSC I Antonia 1.
maridvnvm
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Quinarius Antonius and Lepidus20 viewsQuinarius,
Obv: M ANT IMP, lituus, capis & raven
Rev: M LEP IMP, simpulum, aspergillum, axe & apex.
Diameter: 12-15mm
Weight: 1,65g
Cr489/3, Syd 1158a.
2 commentsTomasz P
Antonia_1.JPG
Quintus Antonius Balbus28 viewsObv: Laureate head of Jupiter facing right, SC behind.

Rev: Victory in quadriga galloping right, holding wreath and a palm, control letter X below; Q ANTO BALB / PR in exergue.

Silver Denarius Serratus, Rome mint, 83 - 82 BC

3.9 grams, 19.2 x 18.6 mm, 180°

RSC Antonia 1, S279
1 commentsSPQR Coins
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RIC 095035 viewsTitus. AR Denarius as Caesar, AD 69-79. Rome, under Vespasian, Struck AD 77/8.
(19.04 mm, 3.25 g),
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS, laureate head of Titus right.
Rev: COS VI, prow of galley right, sides ornameted with intricate cross-hatch and maeander patterns; above, star with sixteen rays. RIC 950 (R); BN 202; BMC 226; RSC 68.
Ex: Incitatus Coins




Titus was very much involved in the suppression of the Jewish revolt in Judea. His other claim to fame was that he completed the construction of the Flavian Amphitheater after the death of his father Vespasian.

Titus had something else in common with his father. Like his father, Titus used coin types that were throwbacks to earlier times. One such example is the coin below. On the reverse you will see a ship's prow and a star overhead. This image hearkens back to the Imperatorial period on coins of Marcus Antonius and Ahenobarbus. However, it goes back even further to the republic when it was used on many bronze coins. On the issue of these coins copying earlier designs, a friend who is also an expert in Flavian coinage has this to say:

"I believe that many of these antiquarian reverse types of Vespasian and Titus were struck because the mint was recycling the finer republican and early imperial denarii. The older denarii were struck at nearly 100% silver fineness, the Flavian denarii at 80% fineness. Thus the mint was able to turn over a tidy profit."

This was not an easy coin to find. I had been looking for unusual reverse of Titus and this one popped up at an opportune time. This coin was minted when Titus was Caesar, or next in line to be emperor.
1 commentsorfew
GORDIAN_III_AR_DENARIUS_SALUS.jpg
Roman Empire , Emperor Gordian III. AD 238-244. AR Denarius97 viewsGordian III. AD 238-244. AR Denarius (20 mm, 2.92 g, 1 h) . Rome mint, 4th officina. 7th emission, struck AD 240.

Obverse : Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right .
Reverse : Salus standing right, feeding serpent from patera.

References: RIC IV 129a; RSC 325.
Superb extremely fine .

Salus was a Roman goddess. She was the goddess of health and the daughter of Asclepius God of Medicine .
Hygieia for Ancient Greeks.

New Owner : Miss. Arianna Parrillo.

EX ; The Sam Mansourati Collection./ NO. RI 2032

Marcus Antonius Gordianus (January 20, 225 – February 11, 244), known in English as Gordian III, was a Roman Emperor from 238 to 244. Marcus Antonius Gordianus' mother was the daughter of Gordian I and the sister of Gordian II. This made him the grandson and nephew of the two Gordian emperors. His younger sister was called Gordiana. Gordian had assumed the name of his maternal grandfather in 238.
It was the public hostility towards the successors of the Gordian emperors which brought the thirteen year old boy to the attention of the Roman senate. Not only was he a Gordian and hence to the ordinary Roman people's liking, but so too was his family very rich. Rich enough to finance a bonus payment to the people.So Gordian III became Caesar (junior emperor) alongside the two new Augusti Balbinus and Pupienus. But only a few months after this, Balbinus and Pupienus was murdered by the praetorian guard.This left Gordian III accede to the throne as emperor.
In 241 Gordian married Furia Sabinia Tranquillina, the daughter of Timesitheus. Gordian joined Timesitheus who was campaigning against the Persians. When Timesitheus died of an illness, he was replaced by Philip the Arab who was to become emperor when Gordian III died in 244. How Gordian died is not known, although Philip blamed it on an illness and it is thought that Philip engineered a mutiny. Gordian III was deified after his death. Gordian ruled from 238-244.

Gordian III is considered one of the most powerful men in the world.
1 commentsSam
Gordian_III_Ar.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE / Emperor Gordian III , AD ( 238 – 244 )49 viewsAR ANTONINIANUS OF GORDIAN III (Marcus Antonius Gordianus Pius)

OBVERSE : IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, Radiate bust right, cuirassed.
REVERSE : SAECVLI FELICITAS, Gordian standing right, holding a spear diagonally & globe.

SAECVLI FELICITAS in Latin means age of Good Fortune.
Mint : Antioch.

Max Dia 22.5 mm , 3.85 Gr . Choice VF , RSC 319.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection./ NO. RI 20331

New Owner : Miss. Arianna Parrillo.
1 commentsSam
moneta 493 large.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Elagabalus and Julia Maesa, Markianopolis, AE2780 viewsobv: Facing busts of Elagabalus and Julia Maesa
rev: Aesklepios standing, head left, resting on serpent entwined staff.
Struck 218-222 A.D. at Markianopolis under legate Julius Antonius Seleucus
Moushmov 664; Hristova/Jekov No.6.28.20.2 var.
Jericho
moneta 573.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Elagabalus Provincial, Markianopolis, AE2750 viewsobv: Facing busts of Elagabalus and Julia Maesa
rev: Hermes holding caduceus over left shoulder and purse in right hand.
Struck 218-222 A.D. at Markianopolis under Legat Julius Antonius Seleucus
Moushmov 690
1 commentsJericho
moneta 498b bk.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Elagabalus, Markianopolis, AE2642 viewsAE26. 9.5gms.
obv: Laureate bust right
rev: Demeter standing left, holding corn-ears and cornucopiae.
Struck 218-222 A.D. under Legate Julius Antonius Seleucus
Moushmov 621
1 commentsJericho
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ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Gordian III, Viminacium, ANI I17 viewsMarcus Antonius Gordianus Pius Augustus, AD 238-244.
Viminacium mint AD 238-239.
Obverse: IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, radiate draped bust right.
Reverse: PMS COL VIM, Moesia standing between bull and lion. AN I in exergue.
ggergo
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Agrippa, Copper as, RIC I Caligula 58451 viewsAgrippa, Military commander, friend of Augustus, grandfather of Caligula, great-grandfather of Nero

Copper as, RIC I Caligula 58, SRCV I 556, superb EF, weight 10.34 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 38 A.D.; obverse M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing a rostral crown; reverse Neptune standing half left, dolphin in right, trident in left, S - C across fields; bold high relief strike on a large flan with no wear, beautiful green patina, extraordinary portrait, spectacular!

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was a boyhood friend of Augustus and a renowned military commander on land and sea, winning the famous battle of Actium against the forces of Marcus Antonius and Cleopatra. Declared Augustus' successor, Agrippa's brilliant career ended when he predeceased Augustus in 12 B.C. He was married to Augustus' daughter Julia; father of Gaius and Lucius Caesars, Agrippa Postumus, Julia and Agrippina Senior; grandfather of Caligula, and great-grandfather of Nero.

7 commentsJoe Sermarini
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Marcus Aurelius, Silver Denarius75 viewsStruck 165 AD, Rome mint, 19mm, 3.5g, VF, RIC III 142

OBVERSE: Laureate head of Marcus Aurelius, bearded, right. M[ARCUS] [AURELIUS] ANTONINVS AVG[USTUS] ARMENIACVS (Marcus Aurelius Antonius, the Revered One, Conqueror of the Armenians).

REVERSE: Goddess of the grain supply to the city of Rome, Annona, standing front, head left, holding corn-ears in right hand and cornucopias in left hand; on left, modius (cylindrical headdress so called for its resemblance to the unit measure of grain); on right, ship. P[ONTIFEX] M[AXIMUS] TR[IBUNICIA] P[OTESTATE] XIX IMP[ERATOR] III COS III (Highest Priest, Tribune of the People for the 19th time, Imperium for the 3rd year, Consul for the 3rd time).
Michael H4
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion II Denarius19 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.64g; 17mm).
Military Mint traveling with Antony, 32-1 BCE.

Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; galley facing right.

Reverse: LEG II; Aquilia between two standards.

References: Crawford 544/14; Sydenham 1216; HCRI 349; BMCRR East 190-92; Antonia 105.

Provenance: Ex Pat Coyle Coll. [Goldberg Auction 69 (29 May 2012) Lot 3471]; NAC 40 (16 May 2007), Lot 624.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding. Forty examples of the LEG II variety appeared in the 1905 Delos hoard of 604 Antony Legionary denarii, making it one of the most common varieties of the series.

The Legio II was likely a legion that was disbanded after Actium.
2 commentsCarausius
AntonyLegV.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion V Denarius27 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.79g; 19mm).
Military Mint traveling with Antony, 32-1 BCE.

Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; galley facing right.

Reverse: LEG V; Aquilia between two standards.

References: Crawford 544/18; HCRI 354; Sydenham 1221; BMCRR (East) 196; Banti 75 (this coin); Antonia 110.

Provenance: Ex Kress 109 (24-25 Oct 1958), Lot 749.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding. Thirty-seven examples of the LEG V variety appeared in the 1905 Delos hoard of 604 Antony Legionary denarii, making it one of the most common varieties of the series. However, an example with a verifiable old provenance, such as this coin, is quite rare.
2 commentsCarausius
AntonyXVIIClassicaeCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion XVII Classicae Denarius18 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.41g; 20mm).
Military Mint traveling with Antony, 32-1 BCE.

Obverse: ANT AVG LLL VIR R P C; galley facing right.

Reverse: LEG XVII CLASSICAE; Aquilia between two standards.

References: Crawford 544/10; Sydenham 1238; HCRI 373; BMCRR East 223; Antonia 128

Provenance: Ex Nomisma 58 (6 Nov 2018) Lot 214.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding. Only 8 examples of the LEG XVII Classicae type appeared in the 1905 Delos hoard of 604 Antony Legionary denarii.

The Legio XVII Classicae was likely a legion of marines formed by Antony and disbanded after Actium. They were not the Legio XVII destroyed at Tuetoburg Forest under Varus in 9 CE.
2 commentsCarausius
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, M. Antony, 44 BCE36 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, Apr-May 44 BCE
AR Denarius (4.09g; 19mm)
Rome Mint.

Obv: Antony's bearded, veiled head facing right; jug behind; lituus before.

Rev: P.SEPVLLIVS//MACER. Desultor on horseback, holding whip, galloping right with second horse; wreath and palm behind.

References: Crawford 480/22; HCRI 142; Antonia 2.

Provenance: Ex Kuenker 262 (13 Mar 2015), Lot 7819; ex Gorny & Mosch 141 (10 Oct 2005), Lot 238; Gorny & Mosch 133 (11 Oct 2004), Lot 378.

Minted in 44 BCE, shortly after the assassination of Julius Caesar, this denarius depicts Antony in mourning - veiled and unshaven - likely as he appeared in the Forum when he gave his famous funeral oration. It is probably the first depiction of Antony on a coin. The reverse shows a desultor with two horses, and likely refers to games held in 44 BCE which were largely dedicated to Caesar's memory. The type can be found in better condition, but rarely this complete.

Desultors appear on several Republican coin types, including Crawford 297/1, 346/1 and 480/21. Desultors rode multiple horses and likely changed horses through some sort of fancy leap or dismount maneuver. The practice, with four horses rather than two, is referenced in the Illiad (II.15.680), so likely dates to Homeric times or earlier. As depicted on Republican coins, a Roman desultor rode two horses, bare-back which he managed by reins and whip, and he wore a pileus (felt cap) typically associated with the Dioscuri. The pileus raises the possibility thst the practice had religious connotations rather than a mere circus trick.
2 commentsCarausius
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, 32 BCE59 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 32 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.72g; 18mm).
Athens Mint.

Obv: ANTON AVG IMP III COS DES III III V R P C. Bare head of Antony facing right.

Rev: ANTONIVS AVG IMP III, in two lines.

References: Crawford 542/2; HCRI 347; Sydenham 1209.

Provenance: Ex Andrew McCabe Collection [CNG eSale 385 (26 Oct 2016) Lot 470]; CNG 49 (17 Mar 1999), Lot 1316; Reinhold Faelten Collection [Stack's (20 Jan 1938) Lot 1495].

On the obverse, behind Antony’s ear, a small letter P, likely an engraver’s signature, is hidden within the hair line. This coin was struck in Athens in 32 BCE, while Antony and Cleopatra lived extravagantly among the Greeks. The coin’s inscription refers to a designated third consulship that Antony was supposed to share with Octavian in 31 BCE. Around the time this coin was minted, Antony notified his wife, Octavia (Octavian’s sister), in Rome that he was divorcing her. Octavian was outraged. Cleopatra’s growing influence over Antony was soon used by Octavian as progaganda to unite Italy and the West against Antony. Thus, the designated third consulship referenced on this coin never occurred, as the designated consuls went to war instead, ending with Antony’s naval defeat at Actium in September 31 BCE.
5 commentsCarausius
AntCaesSchottCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, AR Denarius - Crawford 488/228 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius. 43 BCE.
AR Denarius (4.19g; 19mm).
Military mint in Cisalpine Gaul.

Obverse: M.A[NTON IMP RPC]; Antony's bare, bearded head facing right; lituus behind.

Reverse: CAESAR DIC; Laureate head of Julius Caesar facing right; jug behind.

References: Crawford 488/2; HCRI 123; Sydenham 1166; BMCRR (Gaul) 55; Antonia 5-6.

Provenance: Ex Roma E-Live Auction 1 (25-6 Jul 2018) Lot 531; Bernard Poindessault Collection [Oger-Blanchet (17 Nov 2017) Lot 148]; Edouard Schott Collection [E. Bourgey (21 Mar 1972) Lot 337].

This is one of Antony’s earliest issues following the creation of the Second Triumvirate with Octavian and Lepidus. The titulature "RPC" (tip of "C" just barely visible beneath Antony’s portrait on this specimen) reflects the new status. Antony is depicted with a slight beard of mourning, as is Octavian on his coins until the defeat of the Tyrannicides at Philippi the following year. Both Antony and Caesar have symbols of the augurate behind their portraits, as both were members of the college of augurs, and this served to highlight their common bond. The somewhat comical portrait style is reflective of the military mint, with limited die engraver talent.
1 commentsCarausius
AntonyAugurCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, AR Denarius - Crawford 533/217 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius. 43 BCE.
AR Denarius (4.07g; 18mm).
Military mint in Athens, Summer 38 BCE.

Obverse: M ANTONIVS M F M N AVGVR IMP TER; Antony in the priestly robes of an augur, standing right and holding lituus.

Reverse: III VIR R P C COS DESIG ITER ET TERT; Radiate head of Sol facing right.

References: Crawford 533/2; HCRI 267; Sydenham 1199; BMCRR (East) 141; Antonia 80.

Provenance: Ex Kentfield Coll. [Heritage Auction 3067 (9 Jun 2018) Lot 33340]; Michele Baranowski Auction (25 Feb 1931), Lot 1274.

In 50 BCE, Antony was appointed to the College of Augurs, an important group whose job was divining the will of the gods by interpreting auspices (birds and such) and providing advice based on these divinations. Antony was particularly proud of this appointment and referred to it frequently on his coinage, perhaps as a means of highlighting his traditional republican sensibilities. On this coin, he is depicted in full augur regalia. Sol on the reverse is a reference to The East, which Antony controlled per the renewal of the Second Triumvirate several months earlier. The inscriptions reference his augurship, second imperatorial acclamation, and designated second and third consulships. The coin was likely struck in Athens where Antony and Octavia were living after their marriage.
2 commentsCarausius
z49832.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, P. Clodius, AR Denarius - Crawford 494/23 - Sear Plate Coin!8 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Publius Clodius M. f. Turrinus, 41 BCE.
AR Denarius (4.01g; 20mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Laureate head of Apollo, facing right; lyre behind.

Reverse: Diana facing with head right, holding a torch in each hand; M.F – P.CLODIVS in fields.

References: Crawford 494/23; Sear, HCRI 184 (this coin illustrated); BMCRR 4290-1; Sydenham 1117.

Provenance: Ex The Mayflower Collection [Heritage Auction (30 April 2012), Lot 26089]; ex J. Schulman Auction 262 (14 May 1975), Lot 1249.

Nothing certain is known of this moneyer besides his coins. The Clodii were an old patrician family of Sabine origin that also had plebeian branches. It is impossible to know whether this moneyer was of the patrician or plebeian side of the family, though his use of the spelling Clodius suggests he was plebeian. Some researchers have suggested (others disagree) that he was the Clodius sent into Macedonia by Caesar in 48 BCE, who fought on the side of Antonius in the Perusine War, and who was put to death by order of Octavian in 40 BCE.
Carausius
004.jpg
Roman Imperators, Mark Antony & Octavian, 43 to 33 BC.175 viewsMarcus Antonius, 43–33 BC.
AR Denarius, Ephesus mint, spring-summer 41 BC.
Obv. M ANT IMP AVG III R P C M BARBAT Q P (MP and AV in monogram), bare head of M. Antonius right.
Rev. CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavianus right.
RSC 8 (I, 128); Crawford 517/2; Sydenham -.
3,83g, 19mm.
Provenance: Dr.Busso Peus Nachf, Auction 395, lot 232.
1 commentsapyatygin
0023-070.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, MARK ANTONY and LUCIUS ANTONIUS denarius132 viewsEphesus mint, 41 BC
M ANT IMP AVG III VIR RPCM NERVA PROQ P, Bare head of Mark Antony right
L ANTONIUS COS, Bare head of Lucius Antonius right
3.58 gr
Ref : RCV #1509, Cohen #2
Lucius Antonius was the youngest brother of Mark Antony, and Consul in 41 BC
His coinage is rare, one type of aureus, two types of denarius
Following description taken from NAC auction 40, #617, about an other example of the same coin :
"This denarius, depicting the bare heads of Mark Antony and his youngest brother Lucius Antony, is a rare dual-portrait issue of the Imperatorial period. The family resemblance is uncanny, and one wonders if they truly looked this much alike, or if it is another case of portrait fusion, much like we observe with the dual-portrait billon tetradrachms of Antioch on which the face of the Egyptian queen Cleopatra VII takes on the square dimensions of Mark Antony. When Antony fled Rome to separate himself from Octavian and to take up his governorship in Gaul, Lucius went with him, and suffered equally from the siege of Mutina. This coin, however, was struck in a later period, when Lucius had for a second time taken up arms against Octavian in the west. Mark Antony was already in the east, and that is the region from which this coinage emanates. Since Lucius lost the ‘Perusine War’ he waged against Octavian, and was subsequently appointed to an office in Spain, where he died, it is likely that he never even saw one of his portrait coins."
5 commentsPotator II
005.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, Mark Antony and Lucius Antonius, brother of Mark Antony.42 viewsLucius Antonius, brother of Marcus Antonius.
AR Denarius, Asia Minor mint, late summer 41 BC.
Obv. M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M NERVA PROQ P (MP, AV and NE in monogram), bare head of M. Antonius right, jug behind.
Rev. L ANTONIVS COS, bare head of L.Antonius right.
RSC 2b (I, 130); Crawford 517/5c; Sydenham 1186.
3,90g, 20mm.
Provenance: Gorny and Mosch, Auction 159, lot 352.

apyatygin
1~0.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, MARK ANTONY, AR DENARIUS, LEG III27 viewsMarcus Antonius, BC 83-30.
The Legionary Denarius was struck to pay Antony's army before the battle of Actium. Patrae mint 32-31 BC.
Obverse: ANT•AVG IIIVIR•R•P•C, Galley right.
Reverse: LEG III, Aquila (legionary eagle) between two standards
ggergo
2.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, MARK ANTONY, AR DENARIUS, LEG VII30 viewsMarcus Antonius, BC 83-30.
The Legionary Denarius was struck to pay Antony's army before the battle of Actium. Patrae mint 32-31 BC.
Obverse: ANT•AVG IIIVIR•R•P•C, Galley right.
Reverse: LEG VII, Aquila (legionary eagle) between two standards
ggergo
VIII.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, MARK ANTONY, AR DENARIUS, LEG VIII 12 viewsMarcus Antonius, BC 83-30.
The Legionary Denarius was struck to pay Antony's army before the battle of Actium. Patrae mint 32-31 BC.
Obverse: ANT•AVG IIIVIR•R•P•C, Galley right.
Reverse: LEG VIII, Aquila (legionary eagle) between two standards
ggergo
Marcus__Antonius_1_OBV_REV_opt.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, MARK ANTONY, LEG XI, AR Legionary Denarius, RSC 2770 viewsOBV: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley, thyrsos behind prow
REV: LEG XI, eagle between standards
3.05g, 16mm

Minted at Patrae, 32-31 BC
1 commentsLegatus
rrepde23-2~0.jpg
Roman Republic, 83-82 BC, Antonia10 viewsAR Denarius (3.9g, 19mm, 8h). Rome mint, Struck 83-82 BC. Monneyer: Q.Antonius Balbus.
Obv. laureate head of Jupiter facing right, S·C behind.
Rev. Victory in galloping quadriga Q.ANTO BALB / PR [in ex.], E below the horses.
Sear (RCV) 274; Seaby (RSC I.) Antonia 1
Charles S
rrepde17-2.jpg
Roman Republic, 83-82 BC, Antonia9 viewsAR Denarius (3.9g, 19mm, 6h). Rome mint, Struck 83-82 BC. Monneyer: Q.Antonius Balbus.
Obv. laureate head of Jupiter facing right, S·C behind, C under chin.
Rev. Victory in galloping quadriga Q.ANTO BALB / PR [in ex.].
Sear (RCV) 274; Seaby (RSC I.) Antonia 1a
Charles S
ant~0.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Gens Antonia, AR Denarius56 viewsMint:Rome; 83/82 BC, Denarius serratus
Dimensions:19mm/3.94grms.
Obverse: S.C "senatus consulto"
Reverse: Q.(ANT)O.B(AL)B/ PR "Quintus Antonius Balbus Praetor"
Réf: RCV279
2 commentsmoneta romana
Picture_13~1.png
Roman Republic, Q. Antonius Balbus 83-2 B.C., Serrate Denarius75 viewsRoman Republic • Q. Antonius Balbus 83-2 B.C., Serrate Denarius
3.63g, 5h, Rome Mint.
Laureate Head of Jupiter right, SC behind/Victory driving quadriga right, holding reins, palm frond and wreath, B below horses.
Crawford 364/1dSydenham 742b, Antonia 1.
CNG grade: Superb EF, lightly toned. My annotation: Reverse struck off center.
Larry M2
060717e.jpg
Roman Republic, Q. Antonius Balbus, 83 B.C.E.21 viewsSilver denarius serratus, SRCV I 279, Sydenham 742, Crawford 364/1, RSC 1 Antonia.
Obverse - Laureate head of Jupiter right, S C behind.
Reverse - Victory in a quadriga wreath in right and reigns and palm fond in left, C below horses< Q ANTO BALB / PR in ex. (ANT and AL in monogram)
Rome mint 20.1 mm diam.
1 commentsNORMAN K
Gordian_III.jpg
Roman, Gordian III 207 viewsMarcus Antonius Gordianus Pius / SILVER ANTONINIANUS

OBVERSE : IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG - radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.

REVERSE : VIRTVS AVG - Virtus in crested helmet standing left with branch & spear, sheild on ground before .
Max D : 23.8 MM AND 4.03 GRAMS. 
Ref., :RSC 383

Called Gordian III , ruled as a Roman Emperor FROM 238 – 244 AD. 
Gordian III is one of the most powerful men in the world.

Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
LarryW1806.jpg
S.279 Q. Antonius Balbus38 viewsAR serrate denarius, 19mm, 3.67g, Nice VF
Struck 83 BC
Laureate head of Jupiter right, S. C. behind, A or V below / Q.ATO.BAS, Victory in quadriga right, holding branch and palm, no letter below, PR in exg.
Sear 279, Cr 364/1b; Syd 742; Antonia 1a.
Lawrence Woolslayer
41018_Antoninus_Pius___Marcus_Aurelius_as_Caesar,_147_-_161_A_D_,_Seleucia_ad_Calycadnum,_Cilicia_Tracheia.jpg
Seleucia ad Calycadnum, Cilicia Tracheia. AE 19; Antonius Pius/ Young Marcus Aurelius11 viewsAntoninus Pius & Marcus Aurelius as Caesar, 147 - 161 A.D., Seleucia ad Calycadnum, Cilicia Tracheia. Bronze AE 19, SNG Levante 726, RPC 3597, BMC -, SNG Cop -, SNG France -, SGICV -, SNG Hunterian -, aVF, thick patina, Seleucia ad Calycadnum mint, 5.720g, 19.2mm, 0o, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse “ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑ ΑΝΤΩΝΕΙΝΟΣ”, laureate head of Antoninus Pius right; reverse “ΑΥΡΗΛΙΟΣ ΚΑΙΣΑΡ”, bare-headed youth's bust (short beard) of Marcus Aurelius left, wearing paludamentum; very rare. Curiously, Antoninus Pius appears to have been struck with a reverse die (note the raised edge at 11:00 - 3:00) and the Marcus Aurelius die was used as an obverse with a Victory reverse (Levante 727) and a laurel branch reverse (Levante 728). Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Severus_Alexander_Nicaea_Bithynia_3_standarder.JPG
Severus Alexander- 3 standards38 viewsObverse:
Lureate head right

MAYP CEYH AΛΞΞAΔPOC AV

MAYP: Marcus Antonius
CEYH:
AΛΞΞAΔPOC: Severus
AV: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
NI- KA- IE- ΩN

NI- KA- IE- ΩN: Nicaea

Three military standards

Domination: AE 3 Bronze, size 19 mm

Mint: Nicaea- Bithynia
John Schou
Severus Alexander Three military standards.JPG
Severus Alexander- Three military standards28 viewsSeverus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Nicaea, Bithynia, N.W. Asia M

Obverse:
Lureate head right

MAYP CEYH AΛΞΞAΔPOC AV

MAYP:Marcus Antonius
CEYH:
AΛΞΞAΔPOC: Severus
AV: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
NI- KA- IE- ΩN

NI- KA- IE- ΩN: Nicaea

Three military standards

Domination: AE 3 Bronze, size 19 mm

Mint: Nicaea

John S
mpsc.JPG
Statius Longinus22 viewsProvince Moesia Inferior
City Nicopolis ad Istrum
Size (mm) 28
Weight (g) 15.38
Tariff 4 assaria
Governor Statius Longinus
Ob. Leg. K M OPEL ANTΩNI DIADO-VMENIANOC
Ob. Desc. Lauretted right
Meaning Caesar, Marcus Opellius Antonius Diadumenianus
Rev. Leg. VΠ CTATIOV ΛONΓINOV NI-KOΠOΛITΩN / ΠPOC / ICTP
Rev. Desc. Hera standing, holding patera and sceptre
Meaning Consular legate Statius Longinus , (Governor) of the residents of Nikopolis on the (river) Istrus
References; Collection; Moushmov 1360; SNG Cop 280, AMNG I 1833 p. 465; Varbanov (Eng.) Vol.1. No. 3730
1 commentsJRoME
Antoninus_Pius_Templum.JPG
Struck A.D.158 - 159. ANTONINUS PIUS. AR Denarius of Rome9 viewsObverse: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII. Laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Reverse: TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST. Octastyle temple with standing statues of Victory before the two outer columns and seated figures of Divus Augustus and Diva Livia within; in exergue, COS IIII.
RIC III : 290a | C: 804 | BMC: 939
Rough surfaces

The Temple of Divus Augustus was originally built to commemorate the deified first emperor, Augustus. It was built between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia, on the site of the house that Augustus had lived in before he entered public life.
The temple's construction took place during the 1st century AD, having been vowed by the Roman Senate shortly after the death of Augustus in A.D.14. It was not, however, finally completed until after the death of Tiberius in A.D.37 and was dedicated by Tiberius' successor, Caligula at the end of August that year.
During the reign of Domitian the temple was destroyed by fire but it was rebuilt and rededicated in A.D.89-90 as a memorial to four deified emperors, including Vespasian and Titus. It also incorporated a shrine to Domitian's favourite deity, Minerva.
The temple was restored again by Antonius Pius, who was possibly motivated by a desire to be publicly associated with the first emperor. The exact date of the restoration is not known, but the restored temple is shown on coins of A.D.158 onwards, like the one above.
The temple is depicted as an octostyle design with Corinthian capitals and two statues - presumably of Augustus and Livia - in the cella. The pediment displayed a relief featuring Augustus and was topped by a quadriga. Two figures stood on the eaves of the roof, that on the left representing Romulus and the one on the right depicting Aeneas leading his family out of Troy, alluding to Rome's mythical origins. The steps of the temple were flanked by two statues of Victory.
The last known reference to the temple was in A.D.248, at some point after that it was completely destroyed and its stones were presumably quarried for later buildings. Today it's remains are no longer visible and the area in which it sat has never been excavated.
*Alex
coin998.JPG
Syria, Cyrrhestica, Hieropolis; Antonius Pius15 viewsAntonius Pius

RP57037. Bronze AE 25, BMC Syria p. 141, 19; RPC online 6976; SNG Hunterian II 2674; Butcher 17; SNG Cop 53 var (year 2), F, 9.704g, 22.2mm, 0o, Hieropolis mint, ΑΥΤΟ ΚΑΙ ΤΙΤ ΑΙΛ Α∆ΡΙ − ΑΝΤΩΝΕΙΝΟC CΕΒ, laureate bust right; reverse ΘΕΑCCΥΡΙ / ΑC ΙΕΡΟΠΟ / ∆ (year 4), all within laurel wreath
ecoli
antiocheia_RPC4216_countermark.jpg
Syria, Seleukis & Pieria, Antiocheia, RPC 4216 countermarked18 viewsAE 23, 9.65g, 23.3mm, 0°
struck 48/47 BC (year 19)
obv. laureate of Zeus r., c/m
rev. r. side ANTIOXEWN / MHTROPOLEWS
l. side AVTONOMOV
Zeus Nikephoros enthroned kl., resting with raised l. hand on sceptre and holding in
extended r. hand small Nike with wreath
in lower field crown of Isis
in ex. IQ (year 19 of Pompeian era)
ref. RPC I, 4216; BMC Syria p.155, 35; SNG Copenhagen -
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

c/m: Portrait of Cleopatra r. in oval incus, McAllee p.74, note 25
Richard McAllee: "It now seems likely that the countermark portaits Cleopatra, and was used to mark coins circulating in the Syro-Phoenician territorries which were given to her by Marcus Antonius." Older references identified the head as Apollo.
Jochen
12_Caesars.jpg
The 12 Caesars + One Virtual tray425 viewsAfter seeing Potator's image of his 12 Caesar's I was inspired to do my own (of course including Mark Antony! While compiling my list I realized I'm missing a Julius Caesar portrait so a non portrait had to fill in. It's difficult choosing which coin to include in this set, in some cases I only had one (Galba) but others I had many more to choose from (Flavians). I do have better portraits of some but I thought these had more interesting types:

Marcus Antonius denarius
Julius Caesar denarius
Augustus denarius
Tiberius denarius
Caligula AE As
Claudius AE As
Nero Dupondius
Galba AE As
Otho Tetradrachm
Vitellius denarius
Vespasian denarius
Titus denarius
Domitian denarius

Image is clickable for larger size.
To see the coins individually see them in my gallery.
13 commentsJay GT4
tomis_lysimachos_AMNG2480.jpg
Thracia, Tomis, in the name of Lysimachos, AMNG I/2, 248039 viewsLysimachos, kingdom of Thracia
AV - Stater, 8.30g, 20mm, 0°
Tomis, 44-42 BC
obv. head of deified Alexander r., diademed and with horn of Ammon, behind dot and
monogram(?)
rev. BASILEW[S] l., LYSIMAXOY r.
in between Athena Nikophoros sitting l., in extended r. hand holding Nike, crowning the
name of the ruler, l. elbow leaning on shield, spear leaning behind, QEM in l. field,
TO in field below throne; under throne trident to l., dolphin above and below
ref. AMNG I/2, 2480, pl. XXI,6 (crude style, portrait is reminiscent of Pharnakes II); De Callatay p.141 (D4/R1);
Fabricius 308 (obv. same die); Müller 273; SNG Copenhagen 1091(same dies); SNG Stockholm 839 (obv. same die)
EF, mint state
pedigree:
ex Harlan J.Berk

Imitation of a gold stater of Lysimachos (323-281 BC), struck to pay the Thracian mercenaries of Brutus, the assassin of Julius Caesar, for his campaign against Octavian and Marcus Antonius. The style more crude than the original. There is an alternative interpretation: Issued under Mithridates VI, 88-87 BC.
Jochen
Titus,_79-81_AD,_bronze_Judaea_Capta.jpg
Titus Caesarea Maritima W/Countermark65 viewsTitus, 79-81 AD, Ae 21.6 mm, 7.09 g. Caesarea Maritima Mint
O: Laureate head of Titus right, Greek text ΑYTΟΚΡ TΙT ΟΣ ΚΑΙΣΑΡ around.
R: Nike right, left foot on helmet, writing AY T KAIC with right hand upon shield, hanging from palm tree. Greek text IΟΥΔΑΙΑΣ ΕΑΛWΚΥΙΑΣ around w/ countermark. Rare with countermark.
Hendin 1446 (prev. Hendin 743). AJC II supplement VII, 2.

Caesarea Maritima, built by Herod the Great about 25 - 13 B.C., was named to flatter Augustus, the Caesar. It became the capital of Iudaea Province and the residence of the Roman procurators and governors including Pontius Pilatus, praefectus and Antonius Felix. In 66 A.D., the desecration of the local synagogue led to the disastrous Jewish revolt. After the revolt was suppressed, 2500 Jewish captives were slaughtered at Caesarea in Gladiatorial games held by Titus to celebrate his victory. Today, Caesarea's ruins lie on Israel's Mediterranean coast about halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa, on the site of Pyrgos Stratonos ("Straton's Tower").
Nemonater
689_P_Antonius_Pius_RPCIVAspendus.JPG
Unpublished Antonius Pius, Aspendus Ae 21 Zeus and Tyche enthroned7 viewsreference.
cf RPC 4, 5707

Obv: ΑVΤ ΚΑΙСΑΡ ΑΝΤωΝƐΙΝ?
Laureate head right.


Rev: AC
Zeus and Tyche enthroned facing each other, Zeus holding eagle?

7.09 gr
21 mm
6h
okidoki
vesp_cnmk_on_antony.jpg
Vespasian Countermark on Marc Antony Legionary Denarius70 viewsMarcus Antonius (Marc Antony). AR Denarius. Struck 32-31 BC. Obv: [ANT AVG III VIR R P C], praetorian galley. Rev: IMPVES

IMPVESP was commonly found on denarii of the Republic according to Museum of Countermarks on Roman Coins. Although the undertype is very worn, the praetorian galley is clear on the Obverse, and the countermark is very clear (better than my photo makes it) on the reverse. A little something different for my Flavian collection.
2 commentsLucas H
ric1375.JPG
Vespasian-RIC-137585 viewsAR Denarius, 3.22g
Uncertain mint, 69-71 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACIS EVENTVM; Bonus Eventus stg. l., with patera and poppy and corn ears
RIC 1375 (R2). BMC 422. RSC 295a. BNC -.
Ex Lucernae, eBay, August 2011.

This is an early denarius which cannot be assigned to any mint. The entire series it comes from is rare too, not to mention this is the only Bonus Eventus reverse struck for Vespasian (later Titus would issue one as Augustus). A similar Bonus Eventus was struck for Galba in Spain and the RIC speculates that an unknown Spanish mint maybe responsible for this type too. I acquired the coin from Spanish dealer, perhaps a coincidence? The BMCRE attributes this coin to Illyricum and the forces of Antonius Primus who were battling to secure Rome for Vespasian.

Wherever the coin was minted the style is indeed early because the engraver had no idea what Vespasian looked like. This is one of the most unVespasian-like portraits ever minted with the heavy brow, long neck, and full head of hair.

This is the best example I've seen of the type.

2 commentsDavid Atherton
Philippi_3-Standards_2b.jpg
Victory | Three Military Standards, COHOR PRAE PHIL * Philippi, Macedonia, Æ19 - 27 B.C. - 14 A.D.293 views
Victory | Three Military Standards * Philippi Commemorative

Obv: Victory, striding left, holding frond in left hand over left shoulder, closed laurel wreath in outstretched right hand: VIC AV[G]
Rev: Three Military Standards: COHOR PRAE PHIL (to left, right and exergue, repectively).

Exergue: PHIL

Mint: Philippi (Mint moving with Octavian and/or Antonius?).
Struck: 27 B.C. - 14 A.D.
*(See note below regarding dating)

Size: 19.245 mm.
Weight: 4.31 grm.
Die axis: 180°

Condition: Quite fine, considerably better in hand than my best photos can portray.

Refs:*
S 521
BMC 23
RPC 1651
Vagi / CHRE 347

COHOR PRAE PHIL - '(Honoring) the Praetorian Guard of Philippi.'

* This issue may date rather to the reign of Claudius or Nero.
1 commentsTiathena
Gor3Jup.jpeg
[1106a] Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.75 viewsSilver antoninianus, RIC 84, RSC 109, VF, Rome, 4.101g, 24.0mm, 0o, 241 - 243 A.D. Obverse: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, radiate draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: IOVI STATORI, Jupiter standing facing, head right, thunderbolt in left and scepter in right. Ex FORVM.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Gordian III (238-244 A.D.)

Michael L. Meckler
Ohio State University

Relatively few details are known about the five-and-a-half year reign of the teenage emperor Gordian III. Continuity with the Severan era seems to have marked both the policy and personnel of his government. Security along the frontiers remained the most pressing concern, and the young emperor would die while on campaign against the expanding Sassanian empire and its energetic leader, Shapur I.

The future emperor was born in Rome on 20 January 225. His mother was a daughter of the senator Marcus Antonius Gordianus Sempronianus Romanus (known later to historians as Gordian I). His father was undoubtedly a senator, but the name of his father is today unknown. The father was already dead before the start of the African uprising, involving the boy's grandfather, against the emperor Maximinus Thrax in early 238. At the time of the revolt, Maximinus was in Pannonia leading military campaigns to protect the Danube region. Maximinus' representative in Rome was a loyal Praetorian Prefect, Vitalianus. Gordian I's 13-year-old grandson faced no hardships as a result of the revolt, because Vitalianus was assassinated by agents sent by Gordian I before the African uprising was revealed in Rome.

Senators in Rome quickly acknowledged Gordian I as emperor, but the revolt in Africa was soon suppressed. After the deaths of the boy's grandfather (Gordian I) and uncle (Gordian II) were announced in Rome, probably near the end of April 238, a select group of 20 senators decided upon two of their own, Pupienus and Balbinus, as new emperors who would continue to lead the uprising against Maximinus. Not all senators were pleased with the selections, and they immediately stirred up their clients and dependents to prevent a public proclamation of the new emperors. Pupienus, moreover, had been an unpopular urban prefect, and many ordinary Romans were quite willing to take part in rioting against his accession. The grandson of Gordian I made a perfect focal point to represent the concerns of the critics of Pupienus and Balbinus. The 13-year-old was brought from his home, named Marcus Antonius Gordianus after his grandfather, and proclaimed Caesar and imperial heir by the senate.

After the death of Maximinus at the siege of Aquileia, perhaps in early June 238, conflicts between the two emperors Pupienus and Balbinus, and among the emperors, soldiers and ordinary Romans, came to the fore. Sometime during the summer, soldiers of the Praetorian Guard became unruly during a festival, stormed into the imperial complex on the Palatine, and captured, tortured and killed the emperors. The young Caesar was then proclaimed emperor by both the soldiers and the senate.

Little reliable information is available about the first few years of Gordian III's reign. Pupienus and Balbinus suffered damnatio memoriae, though it is difficult to ascertain how many other members of the senatorial elite (if any) were either dismissed from their posts or executed by the new regime. The families prominent during the Severan dynasty, and even some families prominent under the Antonines, continued to control offices and commands with a teenage emperor on the throne. In 240, an uprising again originated in the province of Africa, with the proconsul Sabinianus proclaimed emperor. Like the uprising of Gordian I in Africa two years earlier, this uprising was quickly suppressed, but unlike the events of 238, the revolt of Sabinianus failed to gain support in other parts of the empire.

In late 240 or early 241, Gordian III appointed Timesitheus as pretorian prefect. Timesitheus, who was of Eastern origin, had a long career in the imperial service as a procurator in provinces ranging from Arabia to Gaul and from Asia to Germany. Timesitheus' proven abilities quickly made him the central figure in Gordian III's government, and the praetorian prefect's authority was enhanced by the marriage of his daughter, Furia Sabinia Tranquillina, to the young emperor in the summer of 241.

Maintaining security along the frontiers remained the emperor's most serious challenge. Difficulties along the Danube continued, but the greater danger was in the East. The aggressive expansion of the renewed Persian empire under the Sassanian emperor Ardashir I continued under his son and successor, Shapur I. The focus of that expansion was in upper Mesopotamia (in what today is southeastern Turkey, northern Syria and northern Iraq), much of which had been under direct Roman control for more than a generation. Ardashir may already have captured Nisibis and Carrhae during the final months of Maximinus' reign. In 240, the ailing Ardashir seems to have made his son Shapur co-regent. During this year Hatra, the location of Rome's easternmost military garrison, (today in northern Iraq roughly 55 miles south of Mosul), was captured by the Sassanians.

Planning for a massive Roman military counterattack was soon underway. Soldiers travelled from the West during the following year, when Carrhae and Nisibis were retaken, and the Romans won a decisive victory at Resaina. Gordian III joined his army in upper Mesopotamia for campaigning in 243, but during the year the emperor's father-in-law, Timesitheus, died of an illness. The surviving Praetorian Prefect, C. Julius Priscus, convinced the emperor to appoint his brother M. Julius Philippus -- who would succeed Gordian III as the emperor Philip the Arab -- as Timesitheus' successor. The campaign against the Sassanians continued as the Roman army proceeded to march down the Euphrates during the fall and early winter.

Early in 244, the Roman and Sassanian armies met near the city of Misiche (modern Fallujah in Iraq, 40 miles west of Baghdad). Shapur's forces were triumphant, and the city was renamed Peroz-Shapur, "Victorious [is] Shapur." Shapur commemorated his victory with a sculpture and trilingual inscription (at Naqsh-i-Rustam in modern-day Iran) that claimed that Gordian III was killed in the battle.

Roman sources do not mention this battle, indicating instead that Gordian III died near Circesium, along the Euphrates some 250 miles upstream from Peroz-Shapur, and that a cenotaph was built at a location named Zaitha. Philip is universally blamed in these sources for causing Gordian III's death, either directly or by fomenting discontent with the emperor by cutting off the troops' supplies. Philip, who was proclaimed Gordian III's successor by the army, seems to have reported that the 19-year-old emperor died of an illness.

However Gordian III died, it seems unlikely to have been as a direct result of the battle at Misiche/Peroz-Shapur. The emperor's Persian campaigns were promoted within the Roman Empire as a success. Other than the loss of Hatra, the Sassanians gained control over no additional territory as a result of the war, and Shapur did not disturb Roman interests in upper Mesopotamia for nearly eight years. Gordian III was deified after his death, and the positive portrayal his reign received was reinforced by the negative portrayals of his successor, Philip.

Gordian III was a child emperor, but his reign was not perceived as having been burdened by the troubles faced by other young emperors (such as Nero, Commodus and Elagabalus). Competent administrators held important posts, and cultural traditions appear to have been upheld. Gordian III's unlikely accession and seemingly stable reign reveal that child emperors, like modern-day constitutional monarchs, had their advantage: a distance from political decision-making and factionalism that enabled the emperor to be a symbol of unity for the various constituency groups (aristocrats, bureaucrats, soldiers, urban residents) in Roman society. The paucity of information about Gordian III's reign makes it difficult to know whether the young emperor truly lived up to such an ideal, but the positive historical tradition about him gives one the suspicion that perhaps he did.

Copyright (C) 2001, Michael L. Meckler
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Gord3Nicaea.jpg
[1106b] Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D. (Nicaea, Bithynia, N.W. Asia Minor)52 viewsGordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Nicaea, Bithynia, N.W. Asia Minor. Bronze AE 20, S 3671, SNG Cop 526, VF, Nicaea, Bithynia, 2.950g, 18.8mm, 180o, 238 - 244 A.D. Obverse M ANT GOPDIANOC AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: NIKAI / EWN, two legionary eagles between two standards. Ex FORVM.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Gordian III (238-244 A.D.)

Michael L. Meckler
Ohio State University

Relatively few details are known about the five-and-a-half year reign of the teenage emperor Gordian III. Continuity with the Severan era seems to have marked both the policy and personnel of his government. Security along the frontiers remained the most pressing concern, and the young emperor would die while on campaign against the expanding Sassanian empire and its energetic leader, Shapur I.

The future emperor was born in Rome on 20 January 225. His mother was a daughter of the senator Marcus Antonius Gordianus Sempronianus Romanus (known later to historians as Gordian I). His father was undoubtedly a senator, but the name of his father is today unknown. The father was already dead before the start of the African uprising, involving the boy's grandfather, against the emperor Maximinus Thrax in early 238. At the time of the revolt, Maximinus was in Pannonia leading military campaigns to protect the Danube region. Maximinus' representative in Rome was a loyal Praetorian Prefect, Vitalianus. Gordian I's 13-year-old grandson faced no hardships as a result of the revolt, because Vitalianus was assassinated by agents sent by Gordian I before the African uprising was revealed in Rome.

Senators in Rome quickly acknowledged Gordian I as emperor, but the revolt in Africa was soon suppressed. After the deaths of the boy's grandfather (Gordian I) and uncle (Gordian II) were announced in Rome, probably near the end of April 238, a select group of 20 senators decided upon two of their own, Pupienus and Balbinus, as new emperors who would continue to lead the uprising against Maximinus. Not all senators were pleased with the selections, and they immediately stirred up their clients and dependents to prevent a public proclamation of the new emperors. Pupienus, moreover, had been an unpopular urban prefect, and many ordinary Romans were quite willing to take part in rioting against his accession. The grandson of Gordian I made a perfect focal point to represent the concerns of the critics of Pupienus and Balbinus. The 13-year-old was brought from his home, named Marcus Antonius Gordianus after his grandfather, and proclaimed Caesar and imperial heir by the senate.

After the death of Maximinus at the siege of Aquileia, perhaps in early June 238, conflicts between the two emperors Pupienus and Balbinus, and among the emperors, soldiers and ordinary Romans, came to the fore. Sometime during the summer, soldiers of the Praetorian Guard became unruly during a festival, stormed into the imperial complex on the Palatine, and captured, tortured and killed the emperors. The young Caesar was then proclaimed emperor by both the soldiers and the senate.

Little reliable information is available about the first few years of Gordian III's reign. Pupienus and Balbinus suffered damnatio memoriae, though it is difficult to ascertain how many other members of the senatorial elite (if any) were either dismissed from their posts or executed by the new regime. The families prominent during the Severan dynasty, and even some families prominent under the Antonines, continued to control offices and commands with a teenage emperor on the throne. In 240, an uprising again originated in the province of Africa, with the proconsul Sabinianus proclaimed emperor. Like the uprising of Gordian I in Africa two years earlier, this uprising was quickly suppressed, but unlike the events of 238, the revolt of Sabinianus failed to gain support in other parts of the empire.

In late 240 or early 241, Gordian III appointed Timesitheus as pretorian prefect. Timesitheus, who was of Eastern origin, had a long career in the imperial service as a procurator in provinces ranging from Arabia to Gaul and from Asia to Germany. Timesitheus' proven abilities quickly made him the central figure in Gordian III's government, and the praetorian prefect's authority was enhanced by the marriage of his daughter, Furia Sabinia Tranquillina, to the young emperor in the summer of 241.

Maintaining security along the frontiers remained the emperor's most serious challenge. Difficulties along the Danube continued, but the greater danger was in the East. The aggressive expansion of the renewed Persian empire under the Sassanian emperor Ardashir I continued under his son and successor, Shapur I. The focus of that expansion was in upper Mesopotamia (in what today is southeastern Turkey, northern Syria and northern Iraq), much of which had been under direct Roman control for more than a generation. Ardashir may already have captured Nisibis and Carrhae during the final months of Maximinus' reign. In 240, the ailing Ardashir seems to have made his son Shapur co-regent. During this year Hatra, the location of Rome's easternmost military garrison, (today in northern Iraq roughly 55 miles south of Mosul), was captured by the Sassanians.

Planning for a massive Roman military counterattack was soon underway. Soldiers travelled from the West during the following year, when Carrhae and Nisibis were retaken, and the Romans won a decisive victory at Resaina. Gordian III joined his army in upper Mesopotamia for campaigning in 243, but during the year the emperor's father-in-law, Timesitheus, died of an illness. The surviving Praetorian Prefect, C. Julius Priscus, convinced the emperor to appoint his brother M. Julius Philippus -- who would succeed Gordian III as the emperor Philip the Arab -- as Timesitheus' successor. The campaign against the Sassanians continued as the Roman army proceeded to march down the Euphrates during the fall and early winter.

Early in 244, the Roman and Sassanian armies met near the city of Misiche (modern Fallujah in Iraq, 40 miles west of Baghdad). Shapur's forces were triumphant, and the city was renamed Peroz-Shapur, "Victorious [is] Shapur." Shapur commemorated his victory with a sculpture and trilingual inscription (at Naqsh-i-Rustam in modern-day Iran) that claimed that Gordian III was killed in the battle.

Roman sources do not mention this battle, indicating instead that Gordian III died near Circesium, along the Euphrates some 250 miles upstream from Peroz-Shapur, and that a cenotaph was built at a location named Zaitha. Philip is universally blamed in these sources for causing Gordian III's death, either directly or by fomenting discontent with the emperor by cutting off the troops' supplies. Philip, who was proclaimed Gordian III's successor by the army, seems to have reported that the 19-year-old emperor died of an illness.

However Gordian III died, it seems unlikely to have been as a direct result of the battle at Misiche/Peroz-Shapur. The emperor's Persian campaigns were promoted within the Roman Empire as a success. Other than the loss of Hatra, the Sassanians gained control over no additional territory as a result of the war, and Shapur did not disturb Roman interests in upper Mesopotamia for nearly eight years. Gordian III was deified after his death, and the positive portrayal his reign received was reinforced by the negative portrayals of his successor, Philip.

Gordian III was a child emperor, but his reign was not perceived as having been burdened by the troubles faced by other young emperors (such as Nero, Commodus and Elagabalus). Competent administrators held important posts, and cultural traditions appear to have been upheld. Gordian III's unlikely accession and seemingly stable reign reveal that child emperors, like modern-day constitutional monarchs, had their advantage: a distance from political decision-making and factionalism that enabled the emperor to be a symbol of unity for the various constituency groups (aristocrats, bureaucrats, soldiers, urban residents) in Roman society. The paucity of information about Gordian III's reign makes it difficult to know whether the young emperor truly lived up to such an ideal, but the positive historical tradition about him gives one the suspicion that perhaps he did.

Copyright (C) 2001, Michael L. Meckler
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
TrajSepphorisGalilee.jpg
[18H907] Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Sepphoris, Galilee220 viewsBronze AE 23, Hendin 907, BMC 5, Fair, 7.41g, 23.1mm, 0o, Sepphoris mint, 98 - 117 A.D.; obverse TPAIANOS AYTO]-KPA[TWP EDWKEN, laureate head right; reverse SEPFW/RHNWN, eight-branched palm bearing two bunches of dates.

At the crossroads of the Via Maris and the Acre-Tiberias roads, Sepphoris was the capital of Galilee and Herod Antipas' first capital. Damaged by a riot, Antipas ordered Sepphoris be rebuilt. Flavius Josephus described the rebuilt Sepphoris as the "ornament of all Galilee." Since Sepphoris was only five miles north of Nazareth, Jesus and Joseph may have found work in Antipas' rebuilding projects. Sepphoris was built on a hill and visible for miles. This may be the city that Jesus spoke of when He said, "A city set on a hill cannot be hidden."

Marcus Ulpius Traianus, a brilliant general and administrator was adopted and proclaimed emperor by the aging Nerva in 98 A.D. Regarded as one of Rome's greatest emperors, Trajan was responsible for the annexation of Dacia, the invasion of Arabia and an extensive and lavish building program across the empire. Under Trajan, Rome reached its greatest extent. Shortly after the annexation of Mesopotamia and Armenia, Trajan was forced to withdraw from most of the new Arabian provinces. While returning to Rome to direct operations against the new threats, Trajan died at Selinus in Cilicia.
See: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/indexfrm.asp?vpar=55&pos=0.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Trajan (A.D. 98-117)

Herbert W. Benario
Emory University

Introduction and Sources
"During a happy period of more than fourscore years, the public administration was conducted by the virtue and abilities of Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, and the two Antonines. It is the design of this and of the two succeeding chapters to describe the prosperous condition of their empire, and afterwards, from the death of Marcus Antoninus, to deduce the most important circumstances of its decline and fall, a revolution which will ever be remembered and is still felt by the nations of the earth."

This is perhaps the most important and best known of all Edward Gibbon's famous dicta about his vast subject, and particularly that period which he admired the most. It was a concatenation of chance and events which brought to the first position of the principate five men, each very different from the others, who each, in his own way, brought integrity and a sense of public duty to his tasks. Nerva's tenure was brief, as many no doubt had expected and hoped it would be, and perhaps his greatest achievement was to choose Trajan as his adoptive son and intended successor. It was a splendid choice. Trajan was one of Rome's most admirable figures, a man who merited the renown which he enjoyed in his lifetime and in subsequent generations.

The sources for the man and his principate are disappointingly skimpy. There is no contemporaneous historian who can illuminate the period. Tacitus speaks only occasionally of Trajan, there is no biography by Suetonius, nor even one by the author of the late and largely fraudulent Historia Augusta. (However, a modern version of what such a life might have been like has been composed by A. Birley, entirely based upon ancient evidence. It is very useful.) Pliny the Younger tells us the most, in his Panegyricus, his long address of thanks to the emperor upon assuming the consulship in late 100, and in his letters. Pliny was a wordy and congenial man, who reveals a great deal about his senatorial peers and their relations with the emperor, above all, of course, his own. The most important part is the tenth book of his Epistulae, which contains the correspondence between him, while serving in Bithynia, and the emperor, to whom he referred all manner of problems, important as well as trivial. Best known are the pair (96,97) dealing with the Christians and what was to be done with them. These would be extraordinarily valuable if we could be sure that the imperial replies stemmed directly from Trajan, but that is more than one can claim. The imperial chancellery had developed greatly in previous decades and might pen these communications after only the most general directions from the emperor. The letters are nonetheless unique in the insight they offer into the emperor's mind.

Cassius Dio, who wrote in the decade of the 230s, wrote a long imperial history which has survived only in abbreviated form in book LXVIII for the Trajanic period. The rhetorician Dio of Prusa, a contemporary of the emperor, offers little of value. Fourth-century epitomators, Aurelius Victor and Eutropius, offer some useful material. Inscriptions, coins, papyri, and legal texts are of major importance. Since Trajan was a builder of many significant projects, archaeology contributes mightily to our understanding of the man.

Early Life and Career
The patria of the Ulpii was Italica, in Spanish Baetica , where their ancestors had settled late in the third century B.C. This indicates that the Italian origin was paramount, yet it has recently been cogently argued that the family's ancestry was local, with Trajan senior actually a Traius who was adopted into the family of the Ulpii. Trajan's father was the first member of the family to pursue a senatorial career; it proved to be a very successful one. Born probably about the year 30, he perhaps commanded a legion under Corbulo in the early sixties and then was legate of legio X Fretensis under Vespasian, governor of Judaea. Success in the Jewish War was rewarded by the governorship of an unknown province and then a consulate in 70. He was thereafter adlected by the emperor in patricios and sent to govern Baetica. Then followed the governorship of one of the major military provinces, Syria, where he prevented a Parthian threat of invasion, and in 79/80 he was proconsul of Asia, one of the two provinces (the other was Africa) which capped a senatorial career. His public service now effectively over, he lived on in honor and distinction, in all likelihood seeing his son emperor. He probably died before 100. He was deified in 113 and his titulature read divus Traianus pater. Since his son was also the adoptive son of Nerva, the emperor had officially two fathers, a unique circumstance.

The son was born in Italica on September 18, 53; his mother was Marcia, who had given birth to a daughter, Ulpia Marciana, five years before the birth of the son. In the mid seventies, he was a legionary legate under his father in Syria. He then married a lady from Nemausus (Nimes) in Gallia Narbonensis, Pompeia Plotina, was quaestor about 78 and praetor about 84. In 86, he became one of the child Hadrian's guardians. He was then appointed legate of legio VII Gemina in Hispania Tarraconensis, from which he marched at Domitian's orders in 89 to crush the uprising of Antonius Saturninus along the Rhine. He next fought in Domitian's war against the Germans along Rhine and Danube and was rewarded with an ordinary consulship in 91. Soon followed the governorship of Moesia inferior and then that of Germania superior, with his headquarters at Moguntiacum (Mainz), whither Hadrian brought him the news in autumn 97 that he had been adopted by the emperor Nerva, as co-ruler and intended successor. Already recipient of the title imperator and possessor of the tribunician power, when Nerva died on January 27, 98, Trajan became emperor in a smooth transition of power which marked the next three quarters of a century.

Early Years through the Dacian Wars
Trajan did not return immediately to Rome. He chose to stay in his German province and settle affairs on that frontier. He showed that he approved Domitian's arrangements, with the establishment of two provinces, their large military garrisons, and the beginnings of the limes. Those who might have wished for a renewed war of conquest against the Germans were disappointed. The historian Tacitus may well have been one of these.

Trajan then visited the crucial Danube provinces of Pannonia and Moesia, where the Dacian king Decebalus had caused much difficulty for the Romans and had inflicted a heavy defeat upon a Roman army about a decade before. Domitian had established a modus vivendi with Decebalus, essentially buying his good behavior, but the latter had then continued his activities hostile to Rome. Trajan clearly thought that this corner of empire would require his personal attention and a lasting and satisfactory solution.

Trajan spent the year 100 in Rome, seeing to the honors and deification of his predecessor, establishing good and sensitive relations with the senate, in sharp contrast with Domitian's "war against the senate." Yet his policies essentially continued Domitian's; he was no less master of the state and the ultimate authority over individuals, but his good nature and respect for those who had until recently been his peers if not his superiors won him great favor. He was called optimus by the people and that word began to appear among his titulature, although it had not been decreed by the senate. Yet his thoughts were ever on the Danube. Preparations for a great campaign were under way, particularly with transfers of legions and their attendant auxiliaries from Germany and Britain and other provinces and the establishment of two new ones, II Traiana and XXX Ulpia, which brought the total muster to 30, the highest number yet reached in the empire's history.

In 101 the emperor took the field. The war was one which required all his military abilities and all the engineering and discipline for which the Roman army was renowned. Trajan was fortunate to have Apollodorus of Damascus in his service, who built a roadway through the Iron Gates by cantilevering it from the sheer face of the rock so that the army seemingly marched on water. He was also to build a great bridge across the Danube, with 60 stone piers (traces of this bridge still survive). When Trajan was ready to move he moved with great speed, probably driving into the heart of Dacian territory with two columns, until, in 102, Decebalus chose to capitulate. He prostrated himself before Trajan and swore obedience; he was to become a client king. Trajan returned to Rome and added the title Dacicus to his titulature.

Decebalus, however, once left to his own devices, undertook to challenge Rome again, by raids across the Danube into Roman territory and by attempting to stir up some of the tribes north of the river against her. Trajan took the field again in 106, intending this time to finish the job of Decebalus' subjugation. It was a brutal struggle, with some of the characteristics of a war of extirpation, until the Dacian king, driven from his capital of Sarmizegethusa and hunted like an animal, chose to commit suicide rather than to be paraded in a Roman triumph and then be put to death.

The war was over. It had taxed Roman resources, with 11 legions involved, but the rewards were great. Trajan celebrated a great triumph, which lasted 123 days and entertained the populace with a vast display of gladiators and animals. The land was established as a province, the first on the north side of the Danube. Much of the native population which had survived warfare was killed or enslaved, their place taken by immigrants from other parts of the empire. The vast wealth of Dacian mines came to Rome as war booty, enabling Trajan to support an extensive building program almost everywhere, but above all in Italy and in Rome. In the capital, Apollodorus designed and built in the huge forum already under construction a sculpted column, precisely 100 Roman feet high, with 23 spiral bands filled with 2500 figures, which depicted, like a scroll being unwound, the history of both Dacian wars. It was, and still is, one of the great achievements of imperial "propaganda." In southern Dacia, at Adamklissi, a large tropaeum was built on a hill, visible from a great distance, as a tangible statement of Rome's domination. Its effect was similar to that of Augustus' monument at La Turbie above Monaco; both were constant reminders for the inhabitants who gazed at it that they had once been free and were now subjects of a greater power.

Administration and Social Policy
The chief feature of Trajan's administration was his good relations with the senate, which allowed him to accomplish whatever he wished without general opposition. His auctoritas was more important than his imperium. At the very beginning of Trajan's reign, the historian Tacitus, in the biography of his father-in-law Agricola, spoke of the newly won compatibility of one-man rule and individual liberty established by Nerva and expanded by Trajan (Agr. 3.1, primo statim beatissimi saeculi ortu Nerva Caesar res olim dissociabiles miscuerit, principatum ac libertatem, augeatque cotidie felicitatem temporum Nerva Traianus,….) [13] At the end of the work, Tacitus comments, when speaking of Agricola's death, that he had forecast the principate of Trajan but had died too soon to see it (Agr. 44.5, ei non licuit durare in hanc beatissimi saeculi lucem ac principem Traianum videre, quod augurio votisque apud nostras aures ominabatur,….) Whether one believes that principate and liberty had truly been made compatible or not, this evidently was the belief of the aristocracy of Rome. Trajan, by character and actions, contributed to this belief, and he undertook to reward his associates with high office and significant promotions. During his principate, he himself held only 6 consulates, while arranging for third consulates for several of his friends. Vespasian had been consul 9 times, Titus 8, Domitian 17! In the history of the empire there were only 12 or 13 private who reached the eminence of third consulates. Agrippa had been the first, L. Vitellius the second. Under Trajan there were 3: Sex. Iulius Frontinus (100), T. Vestricius Spurinna (100), and L. Licinius Sura (107). There were also 10 who held second consulships: L. Iulius Ursus Servianus (102), M.' Laberius Maximus (103), Q. Glitius Atilius Agricola (103), P. Metilius Sabinus Nepos (103?), Sex. Attius Suburanus Aemilianus (104), Ti. Iulius Candidus Marius Celsus (105), C. Antius A. Iulius Quadratus (105), Q. Sosius Senecio (107), A. Cornelius Palma Frontonianus (109), and L. Publilius Celsus (113). These men were essentially his close associates from pre-imperial days and his prime military commanders in the Dacian wars.

One major administrative innovation can be credited to Trajan. This was the introduction of curators who, as representatives of the central government, assumed financial control of local communities, both in Italy and the provinces. Pliny in Bithynia is the best known of these imperial officials. The inexorable shift from freedmen to equestrians in the imperial ministries continued, to culminate under Hadrian, and he devoted much attention and considerable state resources to the expansion of the alimentary system, which purposed to support orphans throughout Italy. The splendid arch at Beneventum represents Trajan as a civilian emperor, with scenes of ordinary life and numerous children depicted, which underscored the prosperity of Italy.

The satirist Juvenal, a contemporary of the emperor, in one of his best known judgments, laments that the citizen of Rome, once master of the world, is now content only with "bread and circuses."

Nam qui dabat olim / imperium, fasces, legiones, omnia, nunc se / continet, atque duas tantum res anxius optat, / panem et circenses. (X 78-81)

Trajan certainly took advantage of that mood, indeed exacerbated it, by improving the reliabilty of the grain supply (the harbor at Ostia and the distribution system as exemplified in the Mercati in Rome). Fronto did not entirely approve, if indeed he approved at all. The plebs esteemed the emperor for the glory he had brought Rome, for the great wealth he had won which he turned to public uses, and for his personality and manner. Though emperor, he prided himself upon being civilis, a term which indicated comportment suitable for a Roman citizen.

There was only one major addition to the Rome's empire other than Dacia in the first decade and a half of Trajan's reign. This was the province of Arabia, which followed upon the absorption of the Nabataean kingdom (105-106).

Building Projects
Trajan had significant effect upon the infrastructure of both Rome and Italy. His greatest monument in the city, if the single word "monument" can effectively describe the complex, was the forum which bore his name, much the largest, and the last, of the series known as the "imperial fora." Excavation for a new forum had already begun under Domitian, but it was Apollodorus who designed and built the whole. Enormous in its extent, the Basilica Ulpia was the centerpiece, the largest wood roofed building in the Roman world. In the open courtyard before it was an equestrian statue of Trajan, behind it was the column; there were libraries, one for Latin scrolls, the other for Greek, on each side. A significant omission was a temple; this circumstance was later rectified by Hadrian, who built a large temple to the deified Trajan and Plotina.

The column was both a history in stone and the intended mausoleum for the emperor, whose ashes were indeed placed in the column base. An inscription over the doorway, somewhat cryptic because part of the text has disappeared, reads as follows:

Senatus populusque Romanus imp. Caesari divi Nervae f. Nervae Traiano Aug. Germ. Dacico pontif. Maximo trib. pot. XVII imp. VI p.p. ad declarandum quantae altitudinis mons et locus tant[is oper]ibus sit egestus (Smallwood 378)

On the north side of the forum, built into the slopes of the Quirinal hill, were the Markets of Trajan, which served as a shopping mall and the headquarters of the annona, the agency responsible for the receipt and distribution of grain.

On the Esquiline hill was constructed the first of the huge imperial baths, using a large part of Nero's Domus Aurea as its foundations. On the other side of the river a new aqueduct was constructed, which drew its water from Lake Bracciano and ran some 60 kilometers to the heights of the Janiculum Hill. It was dedicated in 109. A section of its channel survives in the basement of the American Academy in Rome.

The arch in Beneventum is the most significant monument elsewhere in Italy. It was dedicated in 114, to mark the beginning of the new Via Traiana, which offered an easier route to Brundisium than that of the ancient Via Appia.

Trajan devoted much attention to the construction and improvement of harbors. His new hexagonal harbor at Ostia at last made that port the most significant in Italy, supplanting Puteoli, so that henceforth the grain ships docked there and their cargo was shipped by barge up the Tiber to Rome. Terracina benefited as well from harbor improvements, and the Via Appia now ran directly through the city along a new route, with some 130 Roman feet of sheer cliff being cut away so that the highway could bend along the coast. Ancona on the Adriatic Sea became the major harbor on that coast for central Italy in 114-115, and Trajan's activity was commemorated by an arch. The inscription reports that the senate and people dedicated it to the []iprovidentissimo principi quod accessum Italiae hoc etiam addito ex pecunia sua portu tutiorem navigantibus reddiderit (Smallwood 387). Centumcellae, the modern Civitavecchia, also profited from a new harbor. The emperor enjoyed staying there, and on at least one occasion summoned his consilium there.

Elsewhere in the empire the great bridge at Alcantara in Spain, spanning the Tagus River, still in use, testifies to the significant attention the emperor gave to the improvement of communication throughout his entire domain.

Family Relations; the Women
After the death of his father, Trajan had no close male relatives. His life was as closely linked with his wife and female relations as that of any of his predecessors; these women played enormously important roles in the empire's public life, and received honors perhaps unparalleled. His wife, Pompeia Plotina, is reported to have said, when she entered the imperial palace in Rome for the first time, that she hoped she would leave it the same person she was when she entered. She received the title Augusta no later than 105. She survived Trajan, dying probably in 121, and was honored by Hadrian with a temple, which she shared with her husband, in the great forum which the latter had built.

His sister Marciana, five years his elder, and he shared a close affection. She received the title Augusta, along with Plotina, in 105 and was deified in 112 upon her death. Her daughter Matidia became Augusta upon her mother's death, and in her turn was deified in 119. Both women received substantial monuments in the Campus Martius, there being basilicas of each and a temple of divae Matidiae. Hadrian was responsible for these buildings, which were located near the later temple of the deified Hadrian, not far from the column of Marcus Aurelius.

Matidia's daughter, Sabina, was married to Hadrian in the year 100. The union survived almost to the end of Hadrian's subsequent principate, in spite of the mutual loathing that they had for each other. Sabina was Trajan's great niece, and thereby furnished Hadrian a crucial link to Trajan.

The women played public roles as significant as any of their predecessors. They traveled with the emperor on public business and were involved in major decisions. They were honored throughout the empire, on monuments as well as in inscriptions. Plotina, Marciana, and Matidia, for example, were all honored on the arch at Ancona along with Trajan.

The Parthian War
In 113, Trajan began preparations for a decisive war against Parthia. He had been a "civilian" emperor for seven years, since his victory over the Dacians, and may well have yearned for a last, great military achievement, which would rival that of Alexander the Great. Yet there was a significant cause for war in the Realpolitik of Roman-Parthian relations, since the Parthians had placed a candidate of their choice upon the throne of Armenia without consultation and approval of Rome. When Trajan departed Rome for Antioch, in a leisurely tour of the eastern empire while his army was being mustered, he probably intended to destroy at last Parthia's capabilities to rival Rome's power and to reduce her to the status of a province (or provinces). It was a great enterprise, marked by initial success but ultimate disappointment and failure.

In 114 he attacked the enemy through Armenia and then, over three more years, turned east and south, passing through Mesopotamia and taking Babylon and the capital of Ctesiphon. He then is said to have reached the Persian Gulf and to have lamented that he was too old to go further in Alexander's footsteps. In early 116 he received the title Parthicus.

The territories, however, which had been handily won, were much more difficult to hold. Uprisings among the conquered peoples, and particularly among the Jews in Palestine and the Diaspora, caused him to gradually resign Roman rule over these newly-established provinces as he returned westward. The revolts were brutally suppressed. In mid 117, Trajan, now a sick man, was slowly returning to Italy, having left Hadrian in command in the east, when he died in Selinus of Cilicia on August 9, having designated Hadrian as his successor while on his death bed. Rumor had it that Plotina and Matidia were responsible for the choice, made when the emperor was already dead. Be that as it may, there was no realistic rival to Hadrian, linked by blood and marriage to Trajan and now in command of the empire's largest military forces. Hadrian received notification of his designation on August 11, and that day marked his dies imperii. Among Hadrian's first acts was to give up all of Trajan's eastern conquests.

Trajan's honors and reputation
Hadrian saw to it that Trajan received all customary honors: the late emperor was declared a divus, his victories were commemorated in a great triumph, and his ashes were placed in the base of his column. Trajan's reputation remained unimpaired, in spite of the ultimate failure of his last campaigns. Early in his principate, he had unofficially been honored with the title optimus, "the best," which long described him even before it became, in 114, part of his official titulature. His correspondence with Pliny enables posterity to gain an intimate sense of the emperor in action. His concern for justice and the well-being of his subjects is underscored by his comment to Pliny, when faced with the question of the Christians, that they were not to be sought out, "nor is it appropriate to our age." At the onset of his principate, Tacitus called Trajan's accession the beginning of a beatissimum saeculum, and so it remained in the public mind. Admired by the people, respected by the senatorial aristocracy, he faced no internal difficulties, with no rival nor opposition. His powers were as extensive as Domitian's had been, but his use and display of these powers were very different from those of his predecessor, who had claimed to be deus et dominus. Not claiming to be a god, he was recognized in the official iconography of sculpture as Jupiter's viceregent on earth, so depicted on the attic reliefs of the Beneventan arch. The passage of time increased Trajan's aura rather than diminished it. In the late fourth century, when the Roman Empire had dramatically changed in character from what it had been in Trajan's time, each new emperor was hailed with the prayer, felicior Augusto, melior Traiano, "may he be luckier than Augustus and better than Trajan." That reputation has essentially survived into the present day.

Copyright (C) 2000, Herbert W. Benario.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
TrajanDupondiusTrajansColumn.jpg
[902a] Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.104 viewsTRAJAN AE dupondius. Cohen 563, RCV 3323. 29mm, 14.1g. Struck circa 115 AD. Obverse: IMP CAESAR NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, radiate, draped bust right; Reverse: SENATVS POPVLVSQVE ROMANVS, S-C, Trajan's column, eagles at base. This type is noticeably scarcer than the SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI type. Ex. Incitatus Coins. Photo courtesy of Incitatus Coins.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Trajan (A.D. 98-117)

Herbert W. Benario
Emory University

Introduction and Sources
"During a happy period of more than fourscore years, the public administration was conducted by the virtue and abilities of Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, and the two Antonines. It is the design of this and of the two succeeding chapters to describe the prosperous condition of their empire, and afterwards, from the death of Marcus Antoninus, to deduce the most important circumstances of its decline and fall, a revolution which will ever be remembered and is still felt by the nations of the earth."

This is perhaps the most important and best known of all Edward Gibbon's famous dicta about his vast subject, and particularly that period which he admired the most. It was a concatenation of chance and events which brought to the first position of the principate five men, each very different from the others, who each, in his own way, brought integrity and a sense of public duty to his tasks. Nerva's tenure was brief, as many no doubt had expected and hoped it would be, and perhaps his greatest achievement was to choose Trajan as his adoptive son and intended successor. It was a splendid choice. Trajan was one of Rome's most admirable figures, a man who merited the renown which he enjoyed in his lifetime and in subsequent generations.

The sources for the man and his principate are disappointingly skimpy. There is no contemporaneous historian who can illuminate the period. Tacitus speaks only occasionally of Trajan, there is no biography by Suetonius, nor even one by the author of the late and largely fraudulent Historia Augusta. (However, a modern version of what such a life might have been like has been composed by A. Birley, entirely based upon ancient evidence. It is very useful.) Pliny the Younger tells us the most, in his Panegyricus, his long address of thanks to the emperor upon assuming the consulship in late 100, and in his letters. Pliny was a wordy and congenial man, who reveals a great deal about his senatorial peers and their relations with the emperor, above all, of course, his own. The most important part is the tenth book of his Epistulae, which contains the correspondence between him, while serving in Bithynia, and the emperor, to whom he referred all manner of problems, important as well as trivial. Best known are the pair (96,97) dealing with the Christians and what was to be done with them. These would be extraordinarily valuable if we could be sure that the imperial replies stemmed directly from Trajan, but that is more than one can claim. The imperial chancellery had developed greatly in previous decades and might pen these communications after only the most general directions from the emperor. The letters are nonetheless unique in the insight they offer into the emperor's mind.

Cassius Dio, who wrote in the decade of the 230s, wrote a long imperial history which has survived only in abbreviated form in book LXVIII for the Trajanic period. The rhetorician Dio of Prusa, a contemporary of the emperor, offers little of value. Fourth-century epitomators, Aurelius Victor and Eutropius, offer some useful material. Inscriptions, coins, papyri, and legal texts are of major importance. Since Trajan was a builder of many significant projects, archaeology contributes mightily to our understanding of the man.

Early Life and Career
The patria of the Ulpii was Italica, in Spanish Baetica , where their ancestors had settled late in the third century B.C. This indicates that the Italian origin was paramount, yet it has recently been cogently argued that the family's ancestry was local, with Trajan senior actually a Traius who was adopted into the family of the Ulpii. Trajan's father was the first member of the family to pursue a senatorial career; it proved to be a very successful one. Born probably about the year 30, he perhaps commanded a legion under Corbulo in the early sixties and then was legate of legio X Fretensis under Vespasian, governor of Judaea. Success in the Jewish War was rewarded by the governorship of an unknown province and then a consulate in 70. He was thereafter adlected by the emperor in patricios and sent to govern Baetica. Then followed the governorship of one of the major military provinces, Syria, where he prevented a Parthian threat of invasion, and in 79/80 he was proconsul of Asia, one of the two provinces (the other was Africa) which capped a senatorial career. His public service now effectively over, he lived on in honor and distinction, in all likelihood seeing his son emperor. He probably died before 100. He was deified in 113 and his titulature read divus Traianus pater. Since his son was also the adoptive son of Nerva, the emperor had officially two fathers, a unique circumstance.

The son was born in Italica on September 18, 53; his mother was Marcia, who had given birth to a daughter, Ulpia Marciana, five years before the birth of the son. In the mid seventies, he was a legionary legate under his father in Syria. He then married a lady from Nemausus (Nimes) in Gallia Narbonensis, Pompeia Plotina, was quaestor about 78 and praetor about 84. In 86, he became one of the child Hadrian's guardians. He was then appointed legate of legio VII Gemina in Hispania Tarraconensis, from which he marched at Domitian's orders in 89 to crush the uprising of Antonius Saturninus along the Rhine. He next fought in Domitian's war against the Germans along Rhine and Danube and was rewarded with an ordinary consulship in 91. Soon followed the governorship of Moesia inferior and then that of Germania superior, with his headquarters at Moguntiacum (Mainz), whither Hadrian brought him the news in autumn 97 that he had been adopted by the emperor Nerva, as co-ruler and intended successor. Already recipient of the title imperator and possessor of the tribunician power, when Nerva died on January 27, 98, Trajan became emperor in a smooth transition of power which marked the next three quarters of a century.

(For a detailed and interesting discussion of the Emperor Trajan please see: http://www.roman-emperors.org/trajan.htm)

Trajan's honors and reputation
Hadrian saw to it that Trajan received all customary honors: the late emperor was declared a divus, his victories were commemorated in a great triumph, and his ashes were placed in the base of his column. Trajan's reputation remained unimpaired, in spite of the ultimate failure of his last campaigns. Early in his principate, he had unofficially been honored with the title optimus, "the best," which long described him even before it became, in 114, part of his official titulature. His correspondence with Pliny enables posterity to gain an intimate sense of the emperor in action. His concern for justice and the well-being of his subjects is underscored by his comment to Pliny, when faced with the question of the Christians, that they were not to be sought out, "nor is it appropriate to our age." At the onset of his principate, Tacitus called Trajan's accession the beginning of a beatissimum saeculum, and so it remained in the public mind. Admired by the people, respected by the senatorial aristocracy, he faced no internal difficulties, with no rival nor opposition. His powers were as extensive as Domitian's had been, but his use and display of these powers were very different from those of his predecessor, who had claimed to be deus et dominus. Not claiming to be a god, he was recognized in the official iconography of sculpture as Jupiter's viceregent on earth, so depicted on the attic reliefs of the Beneventan arch. The passage of time increased Trajan's aura rather than diminished it. In the late fourth century, when the Roman Empire had dramatically changed in character from what it had been in Trajan's time, each new emperor was hailed with the prayer, felicior Augusto, melior Traiano, "may he be luckier than Augustus and better than Trajan." That reputation has essentially survived into the present day.

Copyright (C) 2000, Herbert W. Benario.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
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