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Search results - "13.01"
13019_81_1.jpg
18 viewsTripura, Amara Manikya, Tanka, 10.61g, Sk 1499, citing Queen Amaravati, similar to previous lot, but standard type 'k', small pellet in front of lion, and Śake divided by lion's front foot (RB. 161; KM. 90)SpongeBob
13019_89_1.jpg
21 viewsTripura, Rajadhara Manikya, Tanka, 10.58g, Sk 1508, citing Queen Satyavati, similar to previous lot but different standard (type 'p'?), and no bead to the left of it (RB. 178; KM. 97)SpongeBob
III_Andras-(1290-1301)_U-321_C1-363_H-413_001_Q-001_0h_11,5mm_0,44g-s.jpg
026. H-413 András III., (Andreas III.), King of Hungary, (1290-11301 A.D.), H-413, CNH I.-363, U-321, AR-Denarius, #0184 views026. H-413 András III., (Andreas III.), King of Hungary, (1290-11301 A.D.), H-413, CNH I.-363, U-321, AR-Denarius, #01
avers: King standing facing, holding sword and shield, patriarchal cross on the shield, a border of dots.
reverse: The lion of Saint Mark, a border of dots.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 11,5mm, weight: 0,44g, axis:0h,
mint: Esztergom , date: A.D., ref: Huszár-413, CNH I.-363, Unger-321,
Q-001
quadrans
III_Andras-(1290-1301)_U-334_C1-372_H-422_001_Q-001_4h_12,1mm_0,32g-s.jpg
026. H-422 András III., (Andreas III.), King of Hungary, (1290-11301 A.D.), H-422, CNH I.-372, U-334, AR-Denarius, R!, #01114 views026. H-422 András III., (Andreas III.), King of Hungary, (1290-11301 A.D.), H-422, CNH I.-372, U-334, AR-Denarius, R!, #01
avers: Crowned bust facing between letters A and D, a border of dots.
reverse: Branch of raspberry (?) with leaves and two fruits, a border of dots.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 12,1mm, weight: 0,32g, axis:4h,
mint: Esztergom , date: A.D., ref: Huszár-422, CNH I.-372, Unger-334,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
III_Andras-(1290-1301)_U---_C1----_H----_PTN-14_-No-101_001_Q-001_4h_9,4mm_0,15g-s.jpg
026. H-422A. András III., (Andreas III.), King of Hungary, (1290-11301 A.D.), H--, CNH I.--, U--, PTN 14, No 101, AR-Obolus, RRR!, #01108 views026. H-422A. András III., (Andreas III.), King of Hungary, (1290-11301 A.D.), H--, CNH I.--, U--, PTN 14, No 101, AR-Obolus, RRR!, #01
avers: Two Fish, border of dots.
reverse: Branch of raspberry (?) with leaves and two fruits, a border of dots (Very similar the reverse of the U-334, but smaller).
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 12,1mm, weight: 0,32g, axis:4h,
mint: Esztergom, date: A.D., ref: Huszár--, CNH I.--, Unger--, First published: 08.11.2003., PTN 14., No 101., Very Rare!
Q-001
quadrans
Andras-III_(1290-1301_AD)_U-341_C1-_H-432_Homan-Num-Kozl_-XV_1_Q-001_8h_8-8,5mm_0,16g-s.jpg
026. H-432 András III., (Andreas III.), King of Hungary, (1290-11301 A.D.), H-432, CNH I.--, U-341, AR-Denarius, #0191 views026. H-432 András III., (Andreas III.), King of Hungary, (1290-11301 A.D.), H-432, CNH I.--, U-341, AR-Denarius, #01
avers: +RЄX ANDRЄAS, in a circle, crowned head facing in the center.
reverse: Eagle standing left, line border.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 8-8,5mm, weight: 0,16g, axis:8h,
mint: Esztergom, date: A.D., ref: Huszár-432, CNH I.--, Unger-341, Very Rare !!!
Q-001
quadrans
Vencel_(1301-1305_AD)_U-343a_Q-001_0h_11,5-12,5mm_0,44ga-s.jpg
027 Vencel, (Venceslaus), King of Hungary, (1301-1305 A.D.), AR-Denarius, U-343var, Harpy standing left, #0191 views027 Vencel, (Venceslaus), King of Hungary, (1301-1305 A.D.), AR-Denarius, U-343var, Harpy standing left, #01
avers: King enthroned facing, between two flowers, holding sceptre and orb; border of dots.
reverse: Harpy standing left; border of dots.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 11,5-12,5mm, weight: 0,44g, axis:0h,
mint: Esztergom, date: A.D., ref: Unger-343var, CP-56, Huszár-434a, Very Rare !!!
Q-001
quadrans
Vencel_(1301-1305_AD)_U-343a_Q-003_3h_12mm_0,46ga-s.jpg
027 Vencel, (Venceslaus), King of Hungary, (1301-1305 A.D.), AR-Denarius, U-343var, Harpy standing left, #0296 views027 Vencel, (Venceslaus), King of Hungary, (1301-1305 A.D.), AR-Denarius, U-343var, Harpy standing left, #02
avers: King enthroned facing, between two flowers, holding sceptre and orb; border of dots.
reverse: Harpy standing left; border of dots.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 12mm, weight: 0,46g, axis:3h,
mint: Esztergom, date: A.D., ref: Unger-343var, CP-56, Huszár-434a, Very Rare !!!
Q-002
quadrans
Vencel_(1301-1305_AD)_U-343a_Q-002_0h_12,5mm_0,30ga-s.jpg
027 Vencel, (Venceslaus), King of Hungary, (1301-1305 A.D.), AR-Denarius, U-343var, Harpy standing left, #0399 views027 Vencel, (Venceslaus), King of Hungary, (1301-1305 A.D.), AR-Denarius, U-343var, Harpy standing left, #03
avers: King enthroned facing, between two flowers, holding sceptre and orb; border of dots.
reverse: Harpy standing left; border of dots.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 12,5mm, weight: 0,30g, axis:0h,
mint: Esztergom, date: A.D., ref: Unger-343var, CP-56, Huszár-434a, Very Rare !!!
Q-003
quadrans
1305_-1306_Edward_I_LONDON_PENNY.JPG
1272 - 1307, EDWARD I, AR Penny, Struck 1305 - 1306 at London, England14 viewsObverse: + EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB. Crowned bust of Edward I facing within circle of pellets. Cross pattée in legend.
Reverse: CIVITAS LONDON. Long cross dividing legend into quarters, trefoil in each quarter of inner circle.
Undated Penny, type 10cf1
Diameter: 18.5mm | Weight: 1.2gms | Die Axis: 9
SPINK: 1410

Edward I began a major recoinage in 1279 which consisted not only of pennies and new round half-pennies and farthings, but also introduced a new denomination, a fourpenny piece called the "Groat".

Edward I was King of England from 1272 – 1307. He was the eldest surviving son of Henry III and Eleanor of Provence. The contests between his father and the barons led by Simon de Montfort called Edward early into active life when he restored the royal authority within months by defeating and killing de Montfort at the battle of Evesham in 1265. He then proceeded to Palestine, where no conquest of any importance was achieved. After further campaigns in Italy and France he returned to England on his father's death and was crowned at Westminster Abbey in 1274.
Edward was popular because he identified himself with the growing tide of nationalism sweeping the country, displayed later in his persecution and banishment of the Jews which was the culmination of many years of anti-semitism in England.
Edward now turned his attention to the mountainous land to the west which had never been completely subdued. So, following a revolt in the Principality of Wales against English influence, Edward commenced a war which ended in the annexation of the Principality to the English Crown in 1283. He secured his conquest by building nine castles to watch over it and created his eldest son, Edward the Prince of Wales in 1301.
Edward's great ambition, however, was to gain possession of Scotland, but the death of Margaret, the Maid of Norway, who was to have been married to Edward's son, for a time frustrated the king's designs. However the sudden death of the King of Scotland, Alexander III, and the contested succession soon gave him the opportunity to intervene. He was invited by the Scots to arbitrate and choose between the thirteen competitors for the Scottish throne. Edward's choice, John Balliol, who he conceived as his puppet, was persuaded to do homage for his crown to Edward at Newcastle but was then forced to throw off Edward's overlordship by the indignation of the Scottish people. An alliance between the French and the Scots now followed, and Edward, then at war with the French king over possession of Gascony, was compelled to march his army north. Edward invaded Scotland in 1296 and devastated the country, which earned him the sobriquet 'Hammer of the Scots'. It was at this time that the symbolic Stone of Destiny was removed from Scone. Edward's influence had tainted Balliol's reign and the Scottish nobility deposed him and appointed a council of twelve to rule instead. Balliol abdicated and was eventually sent to France where he retired into obscurity, taking no more part in politics. Scotland was then left without a monarch until the accession of Robert the Bruce in 1306.
Meanwhile Edward assumed the administration of the country. However the following summer a new opposition to Edward took place under William Wallace whose successes, notably at Stirling Bridge, forced Edward to return to Scotland with an army of 100,000 men. Although he defeated Wallace's army at Falkirk, and Wallace himself was betrayed, Edward's unjust and barbaric execution of him as a traitor in London made Wallace a national hero in Scotland, and resistance to England became paramount among the people. All Edward's efforts to reduce the country to obedience were unravelling, and after the crowning of Robert Bruce, Earl of Carrick, as Robert I of Scotland in 1306 an enraged Edward assembled another army and marched yet again against the Scots. However, Edward only reached Burgh-on-Sands, a village near Carlisle, when he died. His body was taken back to London and he was buried at Westminster Abbey.
Edward I was married twice: to Eleanor of Castile, by whom he had sixteen children, and Margaret of France by whom he had three. Twelve memorials to his first wife stood between Nottingham and London to mark the journey taken by her funeral cortege. Three of those memorials, known as “Eleanor Crosses”, can still be seen today at Geddington, Hardingstone near Northampton and Waltham Cross. London's Charing Cross is also named after one, but the original was demolished in 1647 and the monument seen there today is a Victorian replica.
1 comments*Alex
DiocleAnt.jpg
1301a, Diocletian, 284-305 A.D. (Antioch)94 viewsDIOCLETIAN (284 – 305 AD) AE Antoninianus, 293-95 AD, RIC V 322, Cohen 34. 20.70 mm/3.1 gm, aVF, Antioch. Obverse: IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, Radiate bust right, draped & cuirassed; Reverse: CONCORDIA MILITVM, Jupiter presents Victory on a globe to Diocletian, I/XXI. Early Diocletian with dusty earthen green patina.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Diocletian ( 284-305 A.D.)

Ralph W. Mathisen
University of South Carolina


Summary and Introduction
The Emperor Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (A.D. 284-305) put an end to the disastrous phase of Roman history known as the "Military Anarchy" or the "Imperial Crisis" (235-284). He established an obvious military despotism and was responsible for laying the groundwork for the second phase of the Roman Empire, which is known variously as the "Dominate," the "Tetrarchy," the "Later Roman Empire," or the "Byzantine Empire." His reforms ensured the continuity of the Roman Empire in the east for more than a thousand years.

Diocletian's Early Life and Reign
Diocletian was born ca. 236/237 on the Dalmatian coast, perhaps at Salona. He was of very humble birth, and was originally named Diocles. He would have received little education beyond an elementary literacy and he was apparently deeply imbued with religious piety He had a wife Prisca and a daughter Valeria, both of whom reputedly were Christians. During Diocletian's early life, the Roman empire was in the midst of turmoil. In the early years of the third century, emperors increasingly insecure on their thrones had granted inflationary pay raises to the soldiers. The only meaningful income the soldiers now received was in the form of gold donatives granted by newly acclaimed emperors. Beginning in 235, armies throughout the empire began to set up their generals as rival emperors. The resultant civil wars opened up the empire to invasion in both the north, by the Franks, Alamanni, and Goths, and the east, by the Sassanid Persians. Another reason for the unrest in the army was the great gap between the social background of the common soldiers and the officer corps.

Diocletian sought his fortune in the army. He showed himself to be a shrewd, able, and ambitious individual. He is first attested as "Duke of Moesia" (an area on the banks of the lower Danube River), with responsibility for border defense. He was a prudent and methodical officer, a seeker of victory rather than glory. In 282, the legions of the upper Danube proclaimed the praetorian prefect Carus as emperor. Diocletian found favor under the new emperor, and was promoted to Count of the Domestics, the commander of the cavalry arm of the imperial bodyguard. In 283 he was granted the honor of a consulate.

In 284, in the midst of a campaign against the Persians, Carus was killed, struck by a bolt of lightning which one writer noted might have been forged in a legionary armory. This left the empire in the hands of his two young sons, Numerian in the east and Carinus in the west. Soon thereafter, Numerian died under mysterious circumstances near Nicomedia, and Diocletian was acclaimed emperor in his place. At this time he changed his name from Diocles to Diocletian. In 285 Carinus was killed in a battle near Belgrade, and Diocletian gained control of the entire empire.

Diocletian's Administrative and Military Reforms
As emperor, Diocletian was faced with many problems. His most immediate concerns were to bring the mutinous and increasingly barbarized Roman armies back under control and to make the frontiers once again secure from invasion. His long-term goals were to restore effective government and economic prosperity to the empire. Diocletian concluded that stern measures were necessary if these problems were to be solved. He felt that it was the responsibility of the imperial government to take whatever steps were necessary, no matter how harsh or innovative, to bring the empire back under control.

Diocletian was able to bring the army back under control by making several changes. He subdivided the roughly fifty existing provinces into approximately one hundred. The provinces also were apportioned among twelve "dioceses," each under a "vicar," and later also among four "prefectures," each under a "praetorian prefect." As a result, the imperial bureaucracy became increasingly bloated. He institutionalized the policy of separating civil and military careers. He divided the army itself into so-called "border troops," actually an ineffective citizen militia, and "palace troops," the real field army, which often was led by the emperor in person.

Following the precedent of Aurelian (A.D.270-275), Diocletian transformed the emperorship into an out-and-out oriental monarchy. Access to him became restricted; he now was addressed not as First Citizen (Princeps) or the soldierly general (Imperator), but as Lord and Master (Dominus Noster) . Those in audience were required to prostrate themselves on the ground before him.

Diocletian also concluded that the empire was too large and complex to be ruled by only a single emperor. Therefore, in order to provide an imperial presence throughout the empire, he introduced the "Tetrarchy," or "Rule by Four." In 285, he named his lieutenant Maximianus "Caesar," and assigned him the western half of the empire. This practice began the process which would culminate with the de facto split of the empire in 395. Both Diocletian and Maximianus adopted divine attributes. Diocletian was identified with Jupiter and Maximianus with Hercules. In 286, Diocletian promoted Maximianus to the rank of Augustus, "Senior Emperor," and in 293 he appointed two new Caesars, Constantius (the father of Constantine I ), who was given Gaul and Britain in the west, and Galerius, who was assigned the Balkans in the east.

By instituting his Tetrarchy, Diocletian also hoped to solve another problem. In the Augustan Principate, there had been no constitutional method for choosing new emperors. According to Diocletian's plan, the successor of each Augustus would be the respective Caesar, who then would name a new Caesar. Initially, the Tetrarchy operated smoothly and effectively.

Once the army was under control, Diocletian could turn his attention to other problems. The borders were restored and strengthened. In the early years of his reign, Diocletian and his subordinates were able to defeat foreign enemies such as Alamanni, Sarmatians, Saracens, Franks, and Persians, and to put down rebellions in Britain and Egypt. The easter frontier was actually expanded.

.
Diocletian's Economic Reforms
Another problem was the economy, which was in an especially sorry state. The coinage had become so debased as to be virtually worthless. Diocletian's attempt to reissue good gold and silver coins failed because there simply was not enough gold and silver available to restore confidence in the currency. A "Maximum Price Edict" issued in 301, intended to curb inflation, served only to drive goods onto the black market. Diocletian finally accepted the ruin of the money economy and revised the tax system so that it was based on payments in kind . The soldiers too came to be paid in kind.

In order to assure the long term survival of the empire, Diocletian identified certain occupations which he felt would have to be performed. These were known as the "compulsory services." They included such occupations as soldiers, bakers, members of town councils, and tenant farmers. These functions became hereditary, and those engaging in them were inhibited from changing their careers. The repetitious nature of these laws, however, suggests that they were not widely obeyed. Diocletian also expanded the policy of third-century emperors of restricting the entry of senators into high-ranking governmental posts, especially military ones.

Diocletian attempted to use the state religion as a unifying element. Encouraged by the Caesar Galerius, Diocletian in 303 issued a series of four increasingly harsh decrees designed to compel Christians to take part in the imperial cult, the traditional means by which allegiance was pledged to the empire. This began the so-called "Great Persecution."

Diocletian's Resignation and Death
On 1 May 305, wearied by his twenty years in office, and determined to implement his method for the imperial succession, Diocletian abdicated. He compelled his co-regent Maximianus to do the same. Constantius and Galerius then became the new Augusti, and two new Caesars were selected, Maximinus (305-313) in the east and Severus (305- 307) in the west. Diocletian then retired to his palace at Split on the Croatian coast. In 308 he declined an offer to resume the purple, and the aged ex-emperor died at Split on 3 December 316.

Copyright (C) 1996, Ralph W. Mathisen, University of South Carolina
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

1 commentsCleisthenes
DicletianConcordCyz.jpg
1301b, Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 March 305 A.D.59 viewsDiocletian. RIC V Part II Cyzicus 256 var. Not listed with pellet in exegrue
Item ref: RI141f. VF. Minted in Cyzicus (B in centre field, XXI dot in exegrue)Obverse:- IMP CC VAL DIOCLETIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Reverse:- CONCORDIA MILITVM, Diocletian standing right, holding parazonium, receiving Victory from Jupiter standing left with scepter.
A post reform radiate of Diocletian. Ex Maridvnvm.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Diocletian ( 284-305 A.D.)

Ralph W. Mathisen
University of South Carolina


Summary and Introduction
The Emperor Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (A.D. 284-305) put an end to the disastrous phase of Roman history known as the "Military Anarchy" or the "Imperial Crisis" (235-284). He established an obvious military despotism and was responsible for laying the groundwork for the second phase of the Roman Empire, which is known variously as the "Dominate," the "Tetrarchy," the "Later Roman Empire," or the "Byzantine Empire." His reforms ensured the continuity of the Roman Empire in the east for more than a thousand years.

Diocletian's Early Life and Reign
Diocletian was born ca. 236/237 on the Dalmatian coast, perhaps at Salona. He was of very humble birth, and was originally named Diocles. He would have received little education beyond an elementary literacy and he was apparently deeply imbued with religious piety He had a wife Prisca and a daughter Valeria, both of whom reputedly were Christians. During Diocletian's early life, the Roman empire was in the midst of turmoil. In the early years of the third century, emperors increasingly insecure on their thrones had granted inflationary pay raises to the soldiers. The only meaningful income the soldiers now received was in the form of gold donatives granted by newly acclaimed emperors. Beginning in 235, armies throughout the empire began to set up their generals as rival emperors. The resultant civil wars opened up the empire to invasion in both the north, by the Franks, Alamanni, and Goths, and the east, by the Sassanid Persians. Another reason for the unrest in the army was the great gap between the social background of the common soldiers and the officer corps.

Diocletian sought his fortune in the army. He showed himself to be a shrewd, able, and ambitious individual. He is first attested as "Duke of Moesia" (an area on the banks of the lower Danube River), with responsibility for border defense. He was a prudent and methodical officer, a seeker of victory rather than glory. In 282, the legions of the upper Danube proclaimed the praetorian prefect Carus as emperor. Diocletian found favor under the new emperor, and was promoted to Count of the Domestics, the commander of the cavalry arm of the imperial bodyguard. In 283 he was granted the honor of a consulate.

In 284, in the midst of a campaign against the Persians, Carus was killed, struck by a bolt of lightning which one writer noted might have been forged in a legionary armory. This left the empire in the hands of his two young sons, Numerian in the east and Carinus in the west. Soon thereafter, Numerian died under mysterious circumstances near Nicomedia, and Diocletian was acclaimed emperor in his place. At this time he changed his name from Diocles to Diocletian. In 285 Carinus was killed in a battle near Belgrade, and Diocletian gained control of the entire empire.

Diocletian's Administrative and Military Reforms
As emperor, Diocletian was faced with many problems. His most immediate concerns were to bring the mutinous and increasingly barbarized Roman armies back under control and to make the frontiers once again secure from invasion. His long-term goals were to restore effective government and economic prosperity to the empire. Diocletian concluded that stern measures were necessary if these problems were to be solved. He felt that it was the responsibility of the imperial government to take whatever steps were necessary, no matter how harsh or innovative, to bring the empire back under control.

Diocletian was able to bring the army back under control by making several changes. He subdivided the roughly fifty existing provinces into approximately one hundred. The provinces also were apportioned among twelve "dioceses," each under a "vicar," and later also among four "prefectures," each under a "praetorian prefect." As a result, the imperial bureaucracy became increasingly bloated. He institutionalized the policy of separating civil and military careers. He divided the army itself into so-called "border troops," actually an ineffective citizen militia, and "palace troops," the real field army, which often was led by the emperor in person.

Following the precedent of Aurelian (A.D.270-275), Diocletian transformed the emperorship into an out-and-out oriental monarchy. Access to him became restricted; he now was addressed not as First Citizen (Princeps) or the soldierly general (Imperator), but as Lord and Master (Dominus Noster) . Those in audience were required to prostrate themselves on the ground before him.

Diocletian also concluded that the empire was too large and complex to be ruled by only a single emperor. Therefore, in order to provide an imperial presence throughout the empire, he introduced the "Tetrarchy," or "Rule by Four." In 285, he named his lieutenant Maximianus "Caesar," and assigned him the western half of the empire. This practice began the process which would culminate with the de facto split of the empire in 395. Both Diocletian and Maximianus adopted divine attributes. Diocletian was identified with Jupiter and Maximianus with Hercules. In 286, Diocletian promoted Maximianus to the rank of Augustus, "Senior Emperor," and in 293 he appointed two new Caesars, Constantius (the father of Constantine I ), who was given Gaul and Britain in the west, and Galerius, who was assigned the Balkans in the east.

By instituting his Tetrarchy, Diocletian also hoped to solve another problem. In the Augustan Principate, there had been no constitutional method for choosing new emperors. According to Diocletian's plan, the successor of each Augustus would be the respective Caesar, who then would name a new Caesar. Initially, the Tetrarchy operated smoothly and effectively.

Once the army was under control, Diocletian could turn his attention to other problems. The borders were restored and strengthened. In the early years of his reign, Diocletian and his subordinates were able to defeat foreign enemies such as Alamanni, Sarmatians, Saracens, Franks, and Persians, and to put down rebellions in Britain and Egypt. The easter frontier was actually expanded.

.
Diocletian's Economic Reforms
Another problem was the economy, which was in an especially sorry state. The coinage had become so debased as to be virtually worthless. Diocletian's attempt to reissue good gold and silver coins failed because there simply was not enough gold and silver available to restore confidence in the currency. A "Maximum Price Edict" issued in 301, intended to curb inflation, served only to drive goods onto the black market. Diocletian finally accepted the ruin of the money economy and revised the tax system so that it was based on payments in kind . The soldiers too came to be paid in kind.

In order to assure the long term survival of the empire, Diocletian identified certain occupations which he felt would have to be performed. These were known as the "compulsory services." They included such occupations as soldiers, bakers, members of town councils, and tenant farmers. These functions became hereditary, and those engaging in them were inhibited from changing their careers. The repetitious nature of these laws, however, suggests that they were not widely obeyed. Diocletian also expanded the policy of third-century emperors of restricting the entry of senators into high-ranking governmental posts, especially military ones.

Diocletian attempted to use the state religion as a unifying element. Encouraged by the Caesar Galerius, Diocletian in 303 issued a series of four increasingly harsh decrees designed to compel Christians to take part in the imperial cult, the traditional means by which allegiance was pledged to the empire. This began the so-called "Great Persecution."

Diocletian's Resignation and Death
On 1 May 305, wearied by his twenty years in office, and determined to implement his method for the imperial succession, Diocletian abdicated. He compelled his co-regent Maximianus to do the same. Constantius and Galerius then became the new Augusti, and two new Caesars were selected, Maximinus (305-313) in the east and Severus (305- 307) in the west. Diocletian then retired to his palace at Split on the Croatian coast. In 308 he declined an offer to resume the purple, and the aged ex-emperor died at Split on 3 December 316.

Copyright (C) 1996, Ralph W. Mathisen, University of South Carolina
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


Cleisthenes
Edward_II_AR_Penny_Bury_St_Edmunds.JPG
1307 - 1327, EDWARD II, AR Penny, Struck 1307 at Bury St. Edmunds, England3 viewsObverse: + EDWAR R ANGL DNS hYB. Crowned and draped bust of Edward II facing within circle of pellets. Cross pattee in legend.
Reverse: VILL SCI EDMVNDI. Long cross dividing legend into quarters, trefoil in each quarter of inner circle.
Diameter: 19mm | Weight: 1.37gms | Die Axis: 12
Rare mint
SPINK: 1465

Class 11c penny with angular backs to C and E's in legends.

Edward II was born on 25 April 1284, the fourth son of Edward I of England and when Edward I died in July 1307 Edward II became king because his three elder brothers were already dead. Edward II was the first English prince to hold the title prince of Wales, which was bestowed on him by his father in 1301.
Unfortunately Edward II had few of the qualities that made a successful medieval king. He surrounded himself with favourites, the best known being Piers Gaveston who he recalled from exile, Edward I having banished him to France due to his bad influence on his son. Furthermore, Edward II gave Gaveston the earldom of Cornwall, a title which had previously only been conferred on royalty.
Opposition to the king and his favourite began almost immediately, and in 1311 the nobles issued the 'Ordinances', in an attempt to limit royal control of finance and appointments. Gaveston was twice exiled at the demand of the barons, only for him to return to England shortly afterwards. However, in 1312, he was captured by the barons and executed.
In 1314, Edward invaded Scotland where he was decisively defeated by Robert the Bruce at Bannockburn. So bad was this for Edward's rule that by the following year parts of England had fallen into anarchy and power was in the hands of the barons headed by Edward's cousin Thomas of Lancaster, who had virtually made himself the real ruler of England.
By 1318, Edward and Lancaster had been partly reconciled, but the king now had two new favourites, Hugh le Despenser and his son. When Edward supported the two Despensers' ambitions in Wales the barons banished both father and son. This prompted Edward to fight back and he defeated Lancaster at Boroughbridge in March 1322, Lancaster was executed him and the Despensers were called back to Edward's court.
But now, Edward's wife, Isabella of France, emerged as a focus of opposition. In 1325, she was sent on a diplomatic mission to France where she met and became the mistress of Roger Mortimer, an exiled opponent of Edward. In September 1326, Isabella and Mortimer invaded England. There was virtually no resistance and the Despensers were captured and executed. Defeated, Edward was made to renounce the throne in favour of his son Edward who was crowned Edward III in January 1327.
Edward II was imprisoned at Berkeley Castle and later murdered there.
*Alex
1301_P_Hadrian_Pseudo_RPC1784.jpg
1784 LYDIA, Stratonicea Pseudo-autonomous under hadrian 128-30 AD Roma bust17 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1784; LS 10-11; Tübingen SNG 3831; Mu SNG 559

Magistrate Candidus (strategos)

Obv. СΥΝΚΛΗΤΟС СΤΡ ΚΑ
Draped bust of Senate, right

Rev. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟΠ ΡΩΜΗ
Draped bust of Roma, right

1.47 gr
15 mm
12h
1 commentsokidoki
1216_P_Hadrian_RPC3689_7.jpg
3689 SYRIA Antioch. Hadrian Tetradrachm 119 AD Eagle standing27 viewsReference.
Prieur 157; McAlee 534 (this coin illustrated); RPC III 3689/7

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΘΕ ΤΡΑ ΠΑΡ ΥΙ ΘΕ ΝΕΡ ΥΙ ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СΕΒ
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, right

Rev. ΔΗΜΑΡΧ ΕΞ ΥΠΑΤ Γ
Eagle standing l. on leg and thigh of animal

13.96 gr
24 mm
6h

Note.
From the Michel Prieur Collection. Ex Richard McAlee Collection; Classical Numismatic Group XVII (29 September 1993), lot 1301
5 commentsokidoki
Aeolis,_Kyme,_AE-11,_Cup_with_one_handle,_K-Y,_Eagle_standing_right,_BMC_16-20,_SNG_von_Aulock_1625,_c_350-250BC,_Q-001,_5h,_10,5-11,3mm,_1,32g-s.jpg
Aeolis, Kyme, (c. 350-250 B.C.), BMC 16-20, AE-11, Eagle standing right, #1112 viewsAeolis, Kyme, (c. 350-250 B.C.), BMC 16-20, AE-11, Eagle standing right, #1
avers: K-Y to left and right of a cup with one handle.
reverse: Eagle standing right.
exergue: K/Y//--(in avers), diameter: 10,5-11,3mm, weight: 1,32g, axes: 5h,
mint: Aeolis, Kyme, date: c. 350-250 B.C., ref: BMC 16-20, SNG von Aulock 1625, SNG Newcastle SNGuk,1301 0449.
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
IMG_2228.JPG
AEOLIS: Kyme7 viewsAeolis, Kyme, c. 350-250 BC. AE 10mm; 1.05g. Eagle standing right / K-Y to left and right of cup with one handle. BMC 16-20; SNG von Aulock 1625; SNG Newcastle SNGuk_1301_0449.Molinari
Antioches_VII_Euergetes_BM_52.jpg
Antioches VII Euergetes BMC 5225 viewsAntiochos VII Euergetes, Antioch on the Orontes, 138-129 BC, 17.77mm, 5.1g, BMC 52, SNG UK 1301.617-620, SC 2067.15; SGC 7098
OBV: Winged bust of Eros, right
REV: BASILEWS ANTIOXOY EUERGETOU, Headdress of Isis, Seleucid date ΠΡ = 180 SE = 133/2 BC
Son of Demetrius I. Reign 138 - 129 BC. Married Cleopatra Thea (may as well; everyone else had).
Hunted down Tryphon and made him commit suicide.
Romanorvm
Antiochos_VII_Euergetes.jpg
Antiochos VII Euergetes65 viewsFRONT/ Bust of Eros right. BACK / BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU, Headdress of Isis, scepter as monogram to left; aplustre and date EOP below. Minted in the Selukid Kingdom. Struck 138-129 BC. Ref: SNG UK 1301.617-620; BMC 52 (British Museum Catalog #52).

EX ; Andreas Reich


From the Sam Mansourati Collection
2 commentsSam
Antiochus_VII.jpg
Antiochos VII Euergetes-Sidetes, 138 - 129 BC.46 viewsAntiochos VII, Euergetes, 138 - 129 BC. Ae 18mm. Weights (6.26, 6.07, 6.06, 6.05, 6.37, 4.95, 6.19 & 5.85)g. Obv: Winged bust of Eros right, wreathed with myrtle Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY on right, EYEPΓETOY on left, Headdress of Isis. SNG UK 1301.617-620, BMC 60. BMC 52. 1 commentsddwau
Divus_Antoninus-Pius_1a.jpg
Antoninus Pius, Divus * Eagle on Altar, 161 AD. AR Denarius144 views
Commemorative Divus Antoninus Pius * Eagle on Altar, Silver Denarius
Struck by Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus in 161 AD, on the death of Antoninus Pius in memory of the latter and commemoration of his deification by Will of the people &nd the Senate.

Obv: DIVVS ANTONINVS * bare head right.
Rev: CONSECRATIO, eagle standing right, head turned left, on garlanded altar.

Exergue: (Blank)

Mint: Rome
Struck: 161 AD.

Size: 18 mm.
Weight: 3.41 grams
Die axis: 180°

Condition: Beautiful, clear, bright luster, great details and high-relief. Nicely centered and well-struck.

Refs:*
Sear, 1301
Cohen, 154
RSC, 155/6.
Van Meter, 136
RIC III, 430 (Marcus Aurelius)
BMCRE, 48 (Marcus Aurelius)
Sear RCV II (2002), 5190, page 335

3 commentsTiathena
ARADOS - FENICIA.jpg
ARADOS - FENICIA34 viewsAmonedación autónoma de la Ciudad

AE 16 mm 3.4 gr.

Anv: Busto vestido con corona mural o torreada de Tyche (Diosa de la Ciudad), viendo a derecha. Gráfila de puntos.
Rev: Monograma “AP” (Ligados por Arados) - Proa de Galera a izquierda con estatua de Atenas luchadora a izquierda portando lanza y escudo, como mascarón de proa. Gráfila de puntos.

Acuńada: 250 - 221 A.C.
Ceca: Arados - Fenicia

Referencias: Sear GCTV Vol.2 #5997 Pag.550 – B.M.C. Vol.26 (Phoenicia) #88 Pag.13 - SNG_0601_1110 - SNGuk_1301_0790/91
mdelvalle
ARMENIA__Levon_III_(1301-1307),_AE_Kardez__Cilician_Armenia,_Bed_,_1838__Q-001_2h_19,5-20,5mm_3,11g-s.jpg
Armenia, Levon III. (1301-1307 A.D.), AE Kardez, Cilician Armenia, Bed., 1838., Cross, #1112 viewsArmenia, Levon III. (1301-1307 A.D.), AE Kardez, Cilician Armenia, Bed., 1838., Cross, #1
avers: ✠ԼԵՒՆ ԹԱԳԱՒՈՐ ՀԱՅ (Levon, Takavor Hayots = Levon, King of the Armenians)], Levon seated facing in oriental fashion, holding cross and staff.
reverse: ✠ՇԻՆԵԱԼ Ի ՔԱՂԱՔ Ի Ս , Cross potent.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5-20,5mm, weight: 3,11g, axis: 2h,
mint: Cilician Armenia, date: 1301-1307 A.D., ref: Bed., 1838.,
Q-001
quadrans
s-l1600_(45).jpg
BENGAL PRESIDENCY-MURSHIDABAD MINT-SHAH ALAM II-ONE RUPEE-SILVER COIN _130113 viewsAntonivs Protti
1301_382_Naevius.JPG
C. Naevius Balbus - AR serrate denarius11 views˛Sardinia
ąRome
ą˛79 BC
diademed head of Venus right
S·C
Victory right in triga holding reins
XXXIII
C·N(AE)·B(AL)B
ąCrawford 382/1b, SRCV I 309, RSC I Naevia 6, Sydenham 769b, BMCRR Rome 2937 var. (XXXIIII)
˛Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Naumann
ex Forum Ancient Coins
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
Lion_65.JPG
Cherronesos, Thrace66 views386-338 B.C.
Silver hemidrachm (triobol)
2.42 gm, 12 mm
Obverse: Forepart of lion right, looking back.
Reverse: Quadripartite incuse square with pellets
in lower alternating quadrants
Cherronesos mint
BMC Thrace pg. 183, 8, 9; McClean 4056;
Dewing 1301; SNG Copenhagen 824-826
Ex-CNG, Ex-Jörg Müller
1 commentsJaimelai
Chersonesos_Hemidrachm,_480-350_BC.JPG
Chersonesos Lion, two pellets51 viewsChersonesos Hemidrachm, 480-350 B.C. 13mm, 2.3g. Obverse: forepart of lion right, looking back over shoulder. Reverse: quadripartite incuse with two pellets. BMC Thrace p. 183, 8, 9; McClean 4056; Dewing 1301; SNG Copenhagen 824-826. Ex areich, photo credit areichPodiceps
cilic_armen_LEVON_III.jpg
CILICIAN ARMENIA - Levon III42 viewsCILICIAN ARMENIA - Levon III (1301-1307) AE Kardez, probably struck in Sis. A very nice spsecimen! King seated in oriental fashion on obverse; holding long cross. Legend translates LEVON THE KING. Reverese: Cross potent with lines in angles; legend reads LEVON THE KING. 25mm, 2.46 g.dpaul7
Screenshot_2018-11-25_08_13_42.png
Cilician Armenia, Royal Period, King Levon III, AE Kardez.14 viewsSis 1301-1307 A.D. 3.03g - 19.01mm, Axis 2h.

Obv: +ԼԵՒՈՆ ԹԱԳԱՒՈՐ - king seated in oriental fashion holding globe in right hand and sceptre over shoulder in left.

Rev: +ՉՒՆԵԱԼ Ւ ՔԱՂԱՔ - Cross pattée.

AC 432.
2 commentsChristian Scarlioli
ARM_Levon_III_kardez_N_432_B_1821.JPG
Cilician Armenia. Levon III (1301-1307) 21 viewsNercessian 432, Bedoukian 1821

AE 20 mm kardez. Sis (now Kozan, Turkey) mint.

Obv: King seated in oriental fashion, holding cross in right hand and staff in left, +ԼԵՒՆ ԹԱԳԱՒՈՐ ՀԱՅ [Levon, Takavor Hayots = Levon, King of the Armenians].

Rev. Cross potent, +ՇԻՆԵԱԼ Ի ՔԱՂԱՔ Ի Ս [Shineal I Kaghakn I Sis = Struck in the City of Sis].

Note: ՈՐ ligature on obverse.
Stkp
ARM_Levon_III_kardez_Bedoukian_1817a.jpg
Cilician Armenia. Levon III (1301-1307)18 viewsNercessian 432, Bedoukian 1817a

AE kardez, Sis (now Kozan, Turkey) mint, 2.71 g., 19.53 mm. max., 270°.

Obv: King seated in oriental fashion, holding cross in right hand and staff in left, +ԼԵՒՆ ԹԱԳԱՒՈՐ (Levon, Takavor Hayots = Levon, King of the Armenians).

Rev. Cross potent, with dots, +ՇԻՆԵԱ[Լ Ի ՔԱՂ]Ա' (Shineal I Kaghakn I Sis = Struck in the City of Sis).

Note: ՈՐ ligature on obverse.
Stkp
ARM_Levon_III_takvoran_Bedoukian_1743.jpg
Cilician Armenia. Levon III (1301-1307)16 viewsNercessian 419, Bedoukian 1743

AR takvoran, Sis (now Kozan, Turkey) mint, 2.49 g., 20.59 mm. max., 270°.

Obv: King on horseback riding right, holding reins with his left hand and with a cross in his right extending over his shoulder, three dots (inverted pyramid, oriented somewhat intermediately) to left of king, +ԼԵՒՈՆ ԹԱԳԱՒՈՐ ՀԱՅՈՑ (Levon, Takavor Hayots = Levon, King of the Armenians).

Rev: Lion without claws walking right and facing right, behind him a cross with one arm, dot in left field, +ՇԻՆԵԱԼ Ի ՔԱՂԱՔՆ ՍԻ (Shineal I Kaghakn I Sis = Struck in the City of Sis).
Stkp
ARM_Levon_III_kardez_Bedoukian_1826ff.jpg
Cilician Armenia. Levon III (1301-1307)9 viewsNercessian 431, Bedoukian 1826 ff.

AE kardez, Sis (now Kozan, Turkey) mint, 3.94 g., 21.62 mm. max., 90°.

Obv: King seated on a bench-like throne, holding cross in right hand and staff in left, ԼԵՒՆ ԹԱԳԱՒՈՐ... (Levon, Takavor Hayots = Levon, King of the Armenians).

Rev. Cross potent, with lines, + ՇԻՆԵԱԼ Ի ՔԱՂ... (Shineal I Kaghakn I Sis = Struck in the City of Sis).
Stkp
Nercessian-394.jpg
Cilician Armenia: Hetoum II (1289-1293,1295-1296,1301-1305) BI Denier (Nercessian-394, Bedoukian-1575aV)29 viewsObv: King's head facing. Clockwise legend - ՀԵԹՈՒՄ ԹԱԳԱՒՈՐ, Hetowm Tagawor. "Hetoum the King", legend continued on reverse
Rev: Potent cross without field marks. Clockwise legend - ԱՄԵՆԱՅՆ ՀԱՅՈՑ, Amenayn Hayots. "of all Armenians"
SpongeBob
Nercessian-396.jpg
Cilician Armenia: Hetoum II (1289-1293,1295-1296,1301-1305) BI Denier (Nercessian-396)32 viewsObv: King's head facing. Clockwise legend - ՀԵԹՈՒՄ ԹԱԳԱՒՈՐ, Hetowm Tagawor. "Hetoum the King", legend continued on reverse
Rev: Patriarchal cross with star and crescent moon on lower quadrants. Clockwise legend - ԱՄԵՆԱՅՆ ՀԱՅՈՑ, Amenayn Hayots. "of all Armenians"
1 commentsSpongeBob
Nercessian-xxx.jpg
Cilician Armenia: Levon III (1301-1307) AR Takvorin38 viewsObv: King on horseback, riding right, holding a scepter capped with cross. Armenian Legend around +ԼԵՒՈՆ ԹԱԳԱՒՈՐ ՀԱՅՐ - Levon King of Armenians.
Rev: Lion to right, cross behind. Armenian Legend around +ՇԻՆԵԱԼ ՔԱՂԱՔՆ Ի ՍԻՍ - Struck in the city of Sis.
SpongeBob
31325q00~0.jpg
Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Isabella of Villehardouin, 1297 - 1301 Billon denier tournois33 viewsCrusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Isabella of Villehardouin, 1297 - 1301 Billon denier tournois
0.802g, 20.1mm, 255o, Corinth mint, 1299 - 1301; obverse + YSABELLA•P•ACh, cross pattée, small trefoil beginning of legend; reverse + DE CLARENCIA, castle tournois, stars of eight rays at beginning of legend, star of six rays at end of legend
CCS 16 var (Clarentza) unlisted variety? ; Metcalf Crusaders Y2 var (no star at end of legend) .
Ex Alex G. Malloy Ex A.J. Seltman Ex FORUM
Vladislavs D
102.jpg
Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Isabella of Villehardouin, 1297 - 1301 Billon denier tournois38 viewsCrusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Isabella of Villehardouin, 1297 - 1301 Billon denier tournoisVladislavs D
is.jpg
Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Isabella of Villehardouin, 1297 - 1301 Billon denier tournois24 viewsCrusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Isabella of Villehardouin, 1297 - 1301 Billon denier tournois
Vladislav D
EB0212b_scaled.JPG
EB0212 Eagle / Vase3 viewsKyme, AEOLIS, AE 14, 350-250 BC.
Obverse: AΡIΣT-ANΔΡOΣ, Eagle standing right.
Reverse: K-Y, one-handled vase (or cup).
References: SG 4186-7; BMC 16-20; SNG von Aulock 1625; SNG Newcastle SNGuk_1301_0449.
Diameter: 14mm, Weight: 1.978g.
EB
MISC_England_Edward_I_Canterbury_Class_10ab1.jpg
England. Plantagenet. Edward I (1272-1307) 8 viewsNorth 1039/1; Spink 1409B

AR penny, new coinage (struck post 1279), Fox System class 10ab1b (1301), Canterbury mint. 1.42 g.18.92 mm. max., 0°.

Obv: + (cross patteé) + EDWAR ANGL DNS hYB (=EDWARDVS REX ANGLIE DOMINVS HYBERNIE = Edward, King of England, Lord of Ireland) (round E; unbarred As; normal barred Ns; non-composite S; no contractive marks), Crowned facing bust (crown with straight bifoliate side-fleurs).

Rev: CIVI-TAS-CAN-TOR (rounded Cs; unbarred As; non-composite S; normal barred N), Long cross; trefoil of three pellets in each quarter.
Stkp
normal_Williams_394~0.jpg
Greek, Italy, LUCANIA, Velia. Circa 300-280 BC. AR Nomos42 views22mm, 7.46 g, 11h
Philistion Group. Helmeted head of Athena right, griffin on bowl / Lion standing right; die erasure below. Williams 394 (O197/R278); HN Italy 1301; SNG ANS 1397; SNG Ashmolean 1392; BMC 110; McClean 1470 (all from the same dies). VF, toned.
Ex Seaby Coin & Medal Bulletin 818 (March 1987), no. B34.
3 commentsLeo
044~1.JPG
GREEK, Macedonia, Lete, Satyr Silver Eighth Stater or Trihemiobol, 530-480 B.C. 180 views1.20 gm, 9.1 mm - lumpy fabric
Obv.: Naked satyr squatting right, veretrum tenens, one pellet right
Rev.: rough incuse square irregularly divided
BMC Macedonia p. 78, 12-14 var.; ANS 969; SNG Cop. 189., Sear 1301 (later version of this type)

*Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear - rated very fine and a good example of an early issue*
3 commentsJaimelai
15088LG.jpg blk.jpg
GREEK, Quasi-Autonomous, Ionia, Smyrna. Time of Marcus Aurelius, Circa 161-180 AD. AE 15mm.80 viewsIONIA, Smyrna. Time of Marcus Aurelius, Circa 161-180 AD.
Ć 15mm (2.76 gm).
Obv: The River-God Meles reclining left, holding reed
Rev: Nike walking right, holding wreath and palm.
SNG Copenhagen 1301; Klose pg. 178, Gruppe B (V2/R-).
2 commentsJericho
1301.jpg
hj6.26.36.25_23 viewsElagabalus
Marcianopolis

Obv: AVT K M AVP ANT[Ω(NE)INOC], laureate head right.
Rev: VΠ I(OV)Λ ANT CEΛEVK(OV) M(AP)KIANOΠOΛITΩN, Concordia standing left, holding patera and cornucopia.
26 mm, 12.18 gms

Hristova-Jekov 6.26.36.25
Charles M
HUNGARY_WENCESLAUS.jpg
HUNGARY - Wenceslaus41 viewsHUNGARY - Wenceslaus (1301-1305) AR Denar. Obv.: King on throne, with scepter and orb. Rev.: Face in foliage frame. Scarce! Reference: Huszar 436, Unger 354. dpaul7
Huszár-422.jpg
Hungary: Andrew III (1290-1301) Denár (Huszár-422)24 viewsObv: Crowned bust facing front, to the sides A-D
Rev: Forked branch with two strawberries
SpongeBob
Huszár-352a.jpg
Hungary: Wenceslaus (1301-1305) Denár (Huszár-352a)18 viewsObv: King on throne facing front with scepter and orb, flanked by flowers
Rev: Harpy facing left
SpongeBob
Huszár-433.jpg
Hungary: Wenceslaus (1301-1305) Denár (Huszár-433)31 viewsObv: King on horseback with sword to the right
Rev: Eagle facing left
1 commentsSpongeBob
Huszár-434.jpg
Hungary: Wenceslaus (1301-1305) Denár (Huszár-434)20 viewsObv: Enthroned king facing with spectre and orb
Rev: Harpy facing right
SpongeBob
Huszár-436.jpg
Hungary: Wenceslaus (1301-1305) Denár (Huszár-436)20 viewsObv: King enthroned, with scepter and imperial orb.
Rev: Face framed in foliage.
SpongeBob
Huszár-437.jpg
Hungary: Wenceslaus (1301-1305) Denár (Huszár-437)14 viewsObv: Crowned facing bust of king
Rev: Animal (porcupine?) with nut
SpongeBob
HUN_Venzel_Huszar_433.jpg
Huszár 433, Unger 342, Réthy I 382, Frynas H.22.1, Adamovszky A52922 viewsVenzel/Wenceslaus Premyslid (1301-1305)

AR denar, .39 g., 11.47 mm. max., 270°

Obv: Crowned horseman riding right holding a sword.

Rev: Eagle standing left.

Huszár rarity R1, Unger rarity 36, Frynas rarity S.

ex Allen G. Berman; ex Gordon Andreas Singer; ex Alex G. Malloy, Inc. Auction Sale Catalog XIX (March 16, 1984), Lot 972; ex St. George Tucker Collection (see discussion at http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=118005.msg715272#msg715272 re my efforts to provenance the coin, thanks to the assistance of Jordan Montgomery).
1 commentsStkp
HUN_Vencel_Huszar_437.jpg
Huszár 437, Unger 346, Réthy I 386, Frynas H.22.78 viewsHungary. Wenceslaus Premyslid/Vencel (1301-1305)

AR denar, .58 g., 11.24 mm. max., 0°.

Obv: Crowned bust facing.

Rev: Animal (possibly squirrel or porcupine) with nut facing right.

Huszár rarity 10, Unger value 50 DM, Frynas rarity N.
Stkp
HUN_Karoly_Robert_Huszar_449.jpg
Huszár 449, Pohl 6, Unger 356, Réthy II 33, Frynas H.24.811 viewsHungary. Charles Robert/Károly Róbert (1307-1342).
AR denar (nominal weight .50 g.), .38 g., 11.58 mm. max., 0°.
Obv: Crowned head facing, annulets flanking above, S-C flanking below.

Rev: Shield with Angevin fleur-de-lis and Árpádian stripes, pellets flanking.

Issued in 1301 in Zagreb (per Pohl; after his provisional coronation), or in 1307-1310? (per Huszár and Frynas) or in 1308? (per Unger).

Huszár/Pohl rarity R1, Unger rarity R, Frynas rarity R.
Stkp
HUN_Vencel_Huszar_436.JPG
Huszár 436, Unger 345, Réthy I 385 86 viewsHungary. Wenceslaus Premyslid (Vencel, in Hun.) (1301-1305). AR denar, 12 mm.

Obv: King enthroned, with scepter and imperial orb.

Rev: Face framed in foliage.

Huszár rarity rating 10.
Stkp
IMG_1301.JPG
Italy, Rome, Capitoline Museums, Diana177 viewsCapitoline museumsJohny SYSEL
brutus_EID_MAR_denar.jpg
JUNIA 52 - BRUTUS EID MAR denarius (replica)281 viewsobv: BRVT IMP L PLAET CEST (bare head of Brutus right)
rev: EID MAR (liberty cap and two daggers)
ref: RSC 15, Syd 1301, Cr502/4, Albert1617
3.53gms, 18mm
replica

This coin commemorates the most important single day event in ancient history. With this famous reverse type Brutus commemorates his assassination of Julius Caesar on the notorious Ides of March, 44 BC, and claims that the deed was done to secure liberty for the Roman people (the liberty cap).
Somewhat more than 50 of these remarkable coins exist. The fact that a lot of people would like to own one, along with the additional fact that most of these coins are in museums, has created the justifiable price structure that exists today.
berserker
044~0.JPG
Lete, Macedonia131 views530-480 B.C.
Silver Eighth Stater or Trihemiobol
1.20 gm, 9.1 mm - lumpy fabric
Obv.: Naked satyr squatting right, veretrum tenens, one pellet right
Rev.: rough incuse square irregularly divided
BMC Macedonia p. 78, 12-14 var.; ANS 969; SNG Cop. 189., Sear 1301 (later version of this type)

*Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear *
3 commentsJaimelai
020~2.JPG
LIMOUSIN - Vicomté de Limoges - Jean III de Bretagne (1301-1339). 4 viewsDenier, argent, 0,77 g
Monnaie frappée en 1328-1329
Av./ +I DVX BRITAnIE, champ écartelé aux 1 et 4 de Bretagne, aux 2 et 3 de Dreux.
Rv./ +VICE C LEmOVIC, croix cantonnée au 4 d’un L.
Réfs : PA-2317
Gabalor
Williams_394.jpg
LUCANIA, Velia. Circa 300-280 BC. AR Nomos45 views22mm, 7.46 g, 11h

Philistion Group. Helmeted head of Athena right, griffin on bowl / Lion standing right; die erasure below. Williams 394 (O197/R278); HN Italy 1301; SNG ANS 1397; SNG Ashmolean 1392; BMC 110; McClean 1470 (all from the same dies). VF, toned.

Ex Seaby Coin & Medal Bulletin 818 (March 1987), no. B34.
2 commentsLeo
nikopolis_sept_severus_HrHJ(2013)8_14_9_7corr(rev).jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 14. Septimius Severus, HrHJ (2018) 8.14.09.08 (plate coin)24 viewsSeptimius Severus, AD 193-211
AE 26, 12.2g
struck under governor Aurelius Gallus
obv. AV K L CEP. - CEVHROC
Bust, laureate, r., slightly draped on l. shoulder
rev. VP AVR GALLOV.NIKOPOLITWN PROC I
Nike in long double chiton advancing l., holding in l. arm palm branch and in extended r.
hand wreath
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1301 var. (without drapery and NIKOPOLIT)
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.14.9.8 (plate coin)
F+

The bust of this obv. die is always slightly draped on the l. shoulder. Therefore the following types should be corrected:
- No. 8.14.4.7 (Athena)
- No. 8.14.9.11 (Nike with biga)
- No. 8.14.38.15 (Tyche)
This obv. die seems to be one of the rarer ones.
2 commentsJochen
Hemidracma Parion - Mysia.jpg
MYSIA - PARION - Asia Menor29 viewsAR Hemidracma 14 x 12 mm 2.0 gr.

Anv: Cabeza de la GORGONA, con la lengua afuera. (Arte arcaico)
Rev: Forma cruciforme y cóncava con una pequeńa bolita en el centro.

Acuńada: Aproximadamente 480 A.C.
Ceca: Parion - Mysia Hoy Kemer (Turquía).

Referencias: Sear GCTV Vol.2 #3918 Pag.364 - B.M.C. Vol.15 #10 Pag.95 pl. xxi, 6 - Dew #2200 - SNGuk_1301_0433
mdelvalle
IMG_2477.JPG
MYSIA: Miletopolis12 viewsMiletopolis, Mysia, Civic coinage, 4th century BC. AE11. Obv: Laureate head of Apollo right; below, tunny right. Rev: MYLH clockwise, Bull standing left. SNG France 1301 corr (Tunny not described). Rare.Molinari
1301~0.jpg
PROBUS VIRTVS AVG (UNLISTED IN RIC REVERSE TYPE) 18 viewsOBVERSE: IMP C PROBVS AVG
REVERSE: VIRTVS AVG (Virtvs dressed as amazon leaning on shield and holding Victory in hand, captif at foot)
BUST TYPE: B = radiate, cuirassed bust right
FIELD / EXERGUE MARKS: -/-//EXXI
WEIGHT 2.89g / AXIS: 6h / DIAMETER: 20-24 mm
RIC: UNLISTED WITH THIS REVERSE TYPE
COLLECTION NO. 1301

NOTE: Extremely rare and desirable reverse type, unlisted in RIC.

Ex Ph. Gysen collection

Only 2nd specimen known to me (the other being PECUNEM 25 SOLIDUS Numismatic lot 264
Barnaba6
III_Andras-Bagattino_U-_C1-_H-_Q-001_8-8,5mm_0,16g-s.jpg
S-025 Andras III., (???), (Andreas III.), King of Hungary, (1290-1301 A.D.), AR-Bagattino, U-, #0197 viewsS-025 Andras III., (???), (Andreas III.), King of Hungary, (1290-1301 A.D.), AR-Bagattino, U-, #01
avers:- Star on crescent, within the circle.
revers:- Capital Gothic "A", within the circle.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 8-8,5 mm, weight: 0,16 g, axis: - 7h,
mint: Slavonia , date: A.D., ref: Unger-, CHN-1-, Huszar-,
Q-001
quadrans
Slavon-Andras-III_U-Sz-21_RJ-189-198_Q-007_h_mm_g-s.jpg
S-025 Andras III., (Andreas III.), King of Hungary, (1290-1301 A.D.), AR-Denarius, Slavonia, U-Sz-21, #01, RR!63 viewsS-025 Andras III., (Andreas III.), King of Hungary, (1290-1301 A.D.), AR-Denarius, Slavonia, U-Sz-21, #01, RR!
avers:- +MONETA-REGIS-P-SCLAVONIA, Marten running left, star above and below.
revers:- Patriarchal cross, facing crowned heads below, star and crescent above, lily at the foot of the 2nd cross both side, R-A (privy mark) to sides.
diameter: 15mm, weight: 0,63g, axis: 6h,
mint: Slavonia, mint mark: R-A,
date: 1290-1301 A.D., ref: Unger- Sz-21, Rj-189-198, CNH-, Huszar-, RR!,
Q-001
quadrans
JnnIIDO61.jpg
Sear 1301 - Follis - 691-692 AD - Syracuse mint27 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 691-692 AD
Condition: aVF
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Emperor standing, facing, bearded, wearing helmet (with plume) and military dress. In right hand, spear; in left, globus cruciger. In field right, plant. Reel border.

Reverse: Large ""; Above,
To left, //; To right, //
Exergue:

Syracuse mint
DOC 61; Anastasi 277; Spahr 224; MIB 71 var. (branch to left on obv.); SB 1301 var. (same)
6.71g; 23.5mm; 180°

Ex CNG, Ex D. Alighieri Collection
Pep
bracteate_k.jpg
SWITZERLAND, Sankt Gallen (Abtei). Wilhelm von Montfort. 1281-1301.8 viewsAR Bracteate (17mm, 0.3 g). Struck 1295-1301.
Obv.: Agnus Dei standing left, head right; cruciform banner behind; all within linear border; beaded circle around
Rev.: Incuse and reverse of obverse.
Reference: HMZ, Schweiz 1-475a; Bonhoff 1820-1; Kestner 2574; Reichmann 2204; de Wit 2453.
Notes: sold to rrd, 11/5/15
John Anthony
cyrrhus_cyrrhestica_marc_aurel_SNGuk660.jpg
Syria, Cyrrhestica, Cyrrhus, Marcus Aurelius, SNG UK 66041 viewsMarcus Aurelius, AD 161-180
AE 23, 12.9g
obv. AVTO KM A[VRH] - ANTWNINOC CEB
Bust, laureate, r.
rev. [DIOC] KATEBATOV - KVRRHCTWN
Zeus Kataibates, in himation, std l. on rocks, resting r. arm on knee, holding
thunderbolt in r. hand and leaning with l. hand on sceptre; l. before him eagle
r.
SNG UK 1301, 660
extremely rare, with attractive red earthen patina
added to www.wildwinds.com

Kataibates = descending (in lightning and thunder); epikleisis of Zeus as thunder-god, to whom places struck by thunder (lat. putealis) were sacrified.
For more informations look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'!
3 commentsJochen
CampanoTarentine.JPG
Taras, Calabria55 views281-228 BC
AR Didrachm (20mm, 6.95g)
O: Diademed head of nymph Satyra left, wearing triple-pendant earring.
R: Nude youth on horseback right crowning horse and holding reins; star of eight rays above, dolphin below, TA beneath raised foreleg.
Vlasto 1036-37, Cote 548; McGill II, 131; SNG ANS 1301; HN Italy 1098; Sear 366v
ex Praefectus Coins

These so-called Campano-Tarentine (or sometimes Bruttio-Tarentine) types are a numismatic enigma.
The idea of an alliance was originally put forth in the 19th century due to the apparent similarity of the obverse portraits of this series with the coins of Neapolis and other Campanian cities. However the nymph depicted here is more likely to be the local Satyra rather than Campanian Parthenope, and there is no direct historical evidence of any alliance between Taras and the Campanians during this period.
The heavier standard may mean that this series was intended to circulate outside of Taras as a federal issue, or possibly as a trade unit. Further, no coins of this type have been found within the city itself.
It has also been suggested that these coins were struck as tribute to Rome, and the apparent timeframe is in line with such a theory.
2 commentsEnodia
cherincuseOR.jpg
Thrace, Cherronesos, SNG Copenhagen 824-82642 viewsCherronesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 350 B.C. AR, 13mm 2.02g, BMC Thrace pg. 183, 8, 9; McClean 4056; Dewing 1301; SNG Copenhagen 824-826
O: Lion facing right, head left
R: Incuse square with two pellets
casata137ec
20171110_191301.png
THRACE, Philippopolis. Commodus. 177-192 AD. Ć 20mm 10 viewsObv. AVT KAI ΛAVPH KOMOΔOC, laureate and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind, slight drapery on left shoulder.
Rev. font face=symbol>FILIPPO-POLETWN , Hermes standing facing, head left, holding purse and caduceus.
References: Mouchmov 5226; BMC Thrace -; SNG Copenhagen -; Varbanov 1043.
20mm, 3.5 grams.
Canaan
w1301.jpg
Uncertain163 viewsCilicia, Soloi, 3rd - 2nd cent B.C. AE-21 mm, 6.85 grs. AV: Head of Artemis with stephane to right, behind monogram, bow and quiver, dotted border. Round CM: Unidentified (maybe doublestruck?). Collection: Mueller.1 commentsAutoman
   
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