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Search results - "“Posthumous”"
MAXIMIAN-5.jpg
74 viewsMAXIMIAN AE3 (Half-follis). 317-318 AD- Posthumous issue struck under Constantine I. - Mint of Siscia
Obv.: DIVO MAXIMIANO SEN FORT IMP, laureate veiled bust right
Rev.: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM, Emperor seated left on curule chair, raising hand & holding scepter, SIS in ex.
Gs. 1,7 mm. 17,1
RIC 41 (R3), Cohen 495

1 commentsMaxentius
DivaFaustinaI_denarius.jpg
45 viewsFaustina I, posthumous denarius1 commentsmarandnumiz
Constantine_I,_posthumous,_Quadriga,_Antioch,_337-340_AD~0.JPG
12 viewsAntonivs Protti
vbnw.jpg
Divus Constantine I Posthumous commemorative 27 viewsConstantine I AE 4 “Chariot to God” Constantine “The Great” 306-337 CE.
Obverse: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, veiled head right.
Reverse: no legend, Constantine in quadriga right, the hand of God, upper center, grasps the chariot.
SMKA in ex. Cyzicus mint RIC VIII 19
13.4 mm, 1.0 g
NORMAN K
rjb_augustus_08_07.jpg
14117 viewsAugustus 27 BC - 14 AD
AE As (struck posthumously)
Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER
Radiate head left
Rev: PROVIDENT SC
Altar
RIC 6
ex Virgil Brand collection
3 commentsmauseus
Constantius_I_Siscia_42.jpg
3 Constantius I (Posthumous)28 viewsCONSTANTIUS I
Half Follis, Siscia Mint
By Constantine I, 317-318 AD

DIVO CONSTANTIO PIO PRINCIPI, Veiled laureate bust r. / REQVIES OPTIMOR-VM MERITORVM, Constantius seated, raising right hand and holding scepter, SIS in ex.

Siscia RIC VII Siscia 42 (R3); F/VF
Sosius
hand2s.jpg
Divus Constantine I, Posthumous commemorative AE4, 337-341 CE26 viewsObverse: DN CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, veiled head right.
Reverse: No legend, the deified Constantine driving quadriga right, hand of god reaching down from above, star at upper left.
SMANS in ex. Antioch mint, 2nd officina. RIV VIII 37, 16.6 mm, 1.4 g.

It is ironic that Constantine, who tradition tells us was the first Christian emperor (although he only actually became one on his death bed), should have been honored with pagan deification and commemorated posthumously with traditional pagan symbolism as found on this coin. He was the last emperor to be so honored.
NORMAN K
Lysimachos_Alexander_the_Great_Portrait_Coin~0.JPG
Lysimachos Alexander the Great Portrait Coin122 viewsLysimachos, Portrait of Alexander the Great, Kingdon of Thrace, Silver tetradrachm, (Posthumous issue c. 280 - 200 BC), 16.675g, 30.6mm, die axis 0o, Müller 460, Thompson -, SNG Cop -, SNG UK -, uncertain mint,
OBV: Diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon
REV: BASILEWS LUSIMACOU, Athena enthroned left, holding Nike crowning name with wreath in right,
resting left arm on shield at side, transverse spear behind, bow case inner left

EX: Heritage Long Beach Signature Sale (18 Sep 2008), lot 20015; EX: Forum Ancient Coins
3 commentsRomanorvm
BOTH_ANTIOCHOS_1_TET.jpg
SOLD Antiochus 1 Soter 281-261 BC Posthumous Tetradrachm SOLD6 views SOLD Obverse: Diademed head of Antiochus 1 facing right
Reverse: Apollo sitting on ompholos testing arrow in RH, LH holding grounded bow.
2 monograms, one in each field
Ins- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ
A posthumous coinage from the reign of Antiochus 11
Mint of Seleucia on the Tigris
SC 587.1c 17g 29.5mm SOLD
cicerokid
AUGUSTUS_COMMEM_LIVIA~0.jpg
(00040) LIVIA (WITH AUGUSTUS)43 views(wife of Augustus; mother of Tiberius; grandmother of Claudius)
b. 58 BC - d. 29 AD
AUGUSTUS (COMMEMORATIVE, POSTHUMOUS)
UNDER TIBERIUS, 15 - 26 AD
AE 27mm 9.86g
O: RAD HEAD L, STAR ABOVE
R: LIVIA STD R, FEET ON STOOL, HLDG PATERA/ S-C
ROME
laney
normal_galba_diva_aug_b_res~0.jpg
(00040C) LIVIA (with Galba)25 views(wife of Augustus; mother of Tiberius; grandmother of Claudius; b. 58 BC - d. 29 AD)
struck 68 - 69 AD (posthumous issue)
AR Denarius 3.15 g
O: IMP SER GALBA CAESAR AVG laureate head right
R: DIVA AVGVSTA Livia standing right, holding patera and scepter
Rome, RIC 186
laney
faustina_aeternitas.jpg
(0138) FAUSTINA I45 views(wife of Antoninus Pius)
(AUGUSTA 138 - 141 AD)
POSTHUMOUS--STRUCK AFTER 141 AD
AE 28 mm 10.21 g
O: DIVA AVGVSTA FAVSTINA, draped & diademed bust right
R: AETERNITAS S-C, Providentia standing left, holding globe and scepter.
RIC 1163 a; Cohen 37.
laney
faustina_i_post.jpg
(0138) FAUSTINA I20 views(wife of Antoninus Pius)
FAUSTINA SR
ca. 100 - 141 AD
POSTHUMOUS ISSUE
AE 29.5 mm 10.02 g
OBBUST R
R: AETERNITAS SEATED L HOLDING SCEPTER AND PHOENIX ON GLOBE
laney
AUGUSTUS_COMMEM_LIVIA.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS (COMMEMORATIVE, POSTHUMOUS)24 viewsUNDER TIBERIUS, 15 - 26 AD
AE 27mm 9.86g
O: RAD HEAD L, STAR ABOVE
R: LIVIA STD R, FEET ON STOOL, HLDG PATERA/ S-C
ROME
laney
AUG_ox_blk.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS (Posthumous restoration issue)30 viewsStruck under Trajan, 98–102 AD,
Ć 23 mm, 13.16 g
o: DIVOS AVGVSTVS – Bare head of Augustus
R: COLˇ/IVL in upper field, on r., AVG and on l. BER; Founder, veiled, ploughing to r. with ox and cow
Phoenicia, Berytus
cf. Sawaya 2009, p. 37, No, 565; cf. BMC Phoenicia 53 ff
laney
aug_bery_oxen_res.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS (Posthumous restoration issue)29 views27 BC - 14 AD
Restoration issue struck during the time of Trajan, 98 - 117 AD
AE 24 mm; 10.25 g
O: [DIVOS] AVGV[STVS], bare headed bust facing right
R: Founder, veiled, plowing to r. with two oxen
Berytus; BMC 62 (scarce)
laney
aug_bery_oxen_2_res.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS (Posthumous restoration issue)28 views27 BC - 14 AD
Restoration issue struck during the time of Trajan, 98 - 117 AD
AE 25.5 mm; 13.16 g
O: [DIV]OS AVGVSTVS, bare headed bust facing right
R: Founder, veiled, plowing to r. with two oxen
Berytus; BMC 62 (scarce)
1 commentslaney
AUGUSTUS_PROVIDENT.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS (POSTHUMOUS)30 viewsUNDER TIBERIUS, 31 - 37 AD
AE 26mm 9.62g
O: [DIVVS AVGVS]TVS PATER
RAD HEAD L
R: PROVIDENT BELOW LARGE ALTAR, S-C EITHER SIDE
ROME
laney
AUG_THUN_WHT2.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS (POSTHUMOUS)17 views"DIVUS AUGUSTUS" POSTHUMOUS ISSUE
Struck 34 - 37 AD. under Tiberius
AE As 26.5 mm max., 9.5 g
O: Radiate head of Augustus left
R: Large winged thunderbolt between S - C.
Rome, RIC 83 (Tiberius)
laney
augustus_provid.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS (POSTHUMOUS)19 viewsstruck UNDER TIBERIUS, 31 - 37 AD
AE 26mm 5.03 g
O: [DIVVS AVGV[STVS PATER
RAD HEAD L
R: PROVIDENT BELOW LARGE ALTAR, S-C EITHER SIDE
ROME
laney
mariniana.jpg
(0252) MARINIANA23 views(wife of Valerian I)
d. ca. 252 AD
AE ANT. 20 mm max, 1.81 g (posthumous issue)
O: DIVA E MARINIANAE
VEILED, DIAD DR BUST R
R: CONSECRATIO
PEACOCK STANDING FACING
(WIFE OF VALERIAN)
(ex F. Robinson)
laney
HELENA.jpg
(0271) HELENA37 views(1st wife or consort of Constantiius I; mother of Constantine I)
b. ca.248 - d. 330 AD
STRUCK POSTHUMOUSLY
AE 14mm 0.77 g
O: DIAD DR BUST R
]R: PAX PVBLICA
PAX STANDING L HOLDING BRANCH AND SCEPTER
laney
HELENA_C.jpg
(0271) HELENA25 views(1st wife or consort of Constantiius I; mother of Constantine I)
d. 329 AD (POSTHUMOUS ISSUE STRUCK 337 - 340 AD)
AE
O: DIAD DR BUST R
R: PAX STANDING L HOLDING OLIVE BRANCH AND SCEPTER
CONSTANTINOPLE
laney
HELENA_B.jpg
(0271) HELENA23 views(1st wife or consort of Constantiius I; mother of Constantine I)
d. 329 AD (POSTHUMOUS ISSUE, ca. 340)
AE 13.5 mm 1.58 g
O: FL IVL HELENAE AVG
DIAD DRU BUST R
R: PAX PVBLICA
PAX STANDING L HOLDING BRANCH AND SCEPTER
laney
const_chlor_post.jpg
(0293) CONSTANTIUS I CHLORUS (POSTHUMOUS)31 viewsAugustus: 305 - 306 AD
struck ca.
AE Fractional 15.5 mm 1.73 g
O: DIVO CONSTANTIO PIO PRINCIPI , laureate veiled bust right
R: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM , Constantius I seated left on curule chair
Dot TS Dot B Dot in exe
Thessalonica
RIC VII 25 a
Note: unlisted in RIC, which does not include officinae B (or A or D; the listed officinae are Rare (R5)
laney
theodora.jpg
(0293) THEODORA23 views(2nd wife of Constantius I)
Posthumous, Struck 337- 340 AD
AE 13 mm 1.54 g
O: Mantled bust right
R: Pietas standing facing, head right, holding infant to breast; •TRP in exe.
Trier
RIC VIII 48
laney
141149.jpg
002c. Gaius and Lucius Caesars65 viewsJulia, daughter of Augustus, who has had no child by Marcellus (she is only sixteen when he dies), is married to Agrippa, a soldier who has long been the emperor's most trusted supporter. They have two sons, Gaius and Lucius, born in 20 and 17 BC. The boys are adopted by the emperor. The intention now, if Augustus dies, is that Agrippa should rule until one of these grandsons is of an age to take control. But Agrippa dies in 12 BC.

Julia has had a total of five children by Agrippa (the two sons adopted by the emperor, two daughters, and another posthumous son, Agrippa Posthumus). She now has one son by Tiberius, but the child dies in infancy.

By 6 BC it is evident that Tiberius is being set aside. Julia refuses to live with him, and her eldest son Gaius (at the age of fourteen) is given a nominal high appointment as consul. Gaius and Lucius Caesar, grandsons and adopted sons of the emperor, are now clearly the family members in line for the succession. But they die young, Lucius Caesar in AD 2 and then Gaius in AD 4.

LYDIA, Magnesia ad Sipylum. Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. Ć 19mm (4.93 g). Jugate heads of Augustus and Livia right / Confronted heads of Gaius and Lucius Caesars. RPC 2449. Fair. Rare. Ex-Cng
ecoli
Germanicus_AE-AS_GERMANICVS-CAESAR-TI-AVG-F-DIVI-AVG-N_C-CAESAR-DIVI-AVG-PRON-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IIII-P-P_S-dot-C_RIC-50_BMC-74_C-4_Rome-40-41-AD_Q-001_30mm_11,12g-s.jpg
009 Germanicus (15 B.C.-19 A.D.), RIC I 050, Rome, AE-As, C CAESAR DIVI AVG PRON AVG P M TR P IIII P P, Around large S•C,565 views009 Germanicus (15 B.C.-19 A.D.), RIC I 050, Rome, AE-As, C CAESAR DIVI AVG PRON AVG P M TR P IIII P P, Around large S•C,
Germanicus Father of Caligula. Died 19 AD. AE-AS, (15 BC.-19 CE.) posthumous commemorative minted under Caligula.
avers:- GERMANICVS-CAESAR-TI-AVG-F-DIVI-AVG-N, Bare head of left.
revers:- C-CAESAR-DIVI-AVG-PRON-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IIII-P-P, Legend around large S•C.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 30mm, weight: 11,12g, axis:- h,
mind: Rome, date: 40-41 A.D., ref: RIC-50 (Caligula), BMC-74 (Caligula), C-4,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Germanicus_AE-AS_GERMANICVS-CAESAR-TI-AVG-F-DIVI-AVG-N_TI_CLAVDIVS_CAESAR_AVG_GERM_P_M_TR_P_IMP_P_P_S-dot-C_RIC_106(Claudius)_Cohen_9,_BMC_241_Rome-41-43-AD_Q-001_h_mm_gx-s.jpg
009a Germanicus (15 B.C.-19 A.D.), RIC I 106 (Claudius), Rome, AE-As, TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P IMP P P, Around large S•C, #186 views009a Germanicus (15 B.C.-19 A.D.), RIC I 106 (Claudius), Rome, AE-As, TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P IMP P P, Around large S•C, #1
Germanicus Father of Caligula. Died 19 AD. AE-AS, (15 BC.-19 CE.) posthumous commemorative minted under Caligula.
avers:- GERMANICVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N, Bare head right
revers:- TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P IMP P P, Legend around large S•C.
exerg: S•C//--, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: 9,87g, axis: 6h,
mind: Rome, date: 40-41 A.D., ref: RIC I 106 (Claudius), Cohen 9, BMC 241,
Q-001
quadrans
Germanicus_AE-AS_GERMANICVS-CAESAR-TI-AVG-F-DIVI-AVG-N_TI_CLAVDIVS_CAESAR_AVG_GERM_P_M_TR_P_IMPPP_S_C_RIC_106(Cl)_C_9,_Rome-41-3AD_Q-001_6h_30,5mm_11,03ga-s.jpg
009a Germanicus (15 B.C.-19 A.D.), RIC I 106 (Claudius), Rome, AE-As, TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P IMP P P, Around large S•C, #2141 views009a Germanicus (15 B.C.-19 A.D.), RIC I 106 (Claudius), Rome, AE-As, TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P IMP P P, Around large S•C, #2
Germanicus Father of Caligula. Died 19 AD. AE-AS, (15 BC.-19 CE.) posthumous commemorative minted under Caligula.
avers:- GERMANICVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N, Bare head right
revers:- TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P IMP P P, Legend around large S•C.
exerg: S•C//--, diameter: 29,5-30,5mm, weight: 11,03g, axis: 6h,
mind: Rome, date: 40-41 A.D., ref: RIC I 106 (Claudius), Cohen 9, BMC 241,
Q-002
3 commentsquadrans
038_Laszlo-V_(Ladislaus_V_)_Throne_require_(1440-1453),_Denar,_H-643,_C2-201A,_U-494_f_,_P-150-15,_1442_AD,_Q-001,_1h,_12,5mm,_0,36g-s.jpg
038 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as Throne Require of Hungary, (1440-1453 A.D.), AR Denarius, H-643.var., C2-201A.var., U-494.f.var., P-150-15, Rare!67 views038 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as Throne Require of Hungary, (1440-1453 A.D.), AR Denarius, H-643.var., C2-201A.var., U-494.f.var., P-150-15, Rare!
avers: •m•LADISLA(I R•VnGARIE), Patriarchal cross in the circle, mint-mark S-D, on each side, the border of dots.
reverse: Hungarian shield with stripes, amongst three arches, three shields in the arches (Austrian band, Moravian eagle, Czech lion), a small circles between the shields!
exergue, mint mark: S/D//-- were struck by "Civitas" Town coin, (by Pohl), diameter: 12,5mm, weight: 0,36g, axis: 1h,
mint: Hungary, Szomolnok, (Schmölnitz, by Pohl, today in Slovakia, Smolnik), date:1442 A.D. (by Pohl), ref: Huszár-643var. (reverse!), CNH2-201A.var., Unger-494.f.var., Pohl-150-15, Rare!
Q-001
The piece was cut around, at that used time.
1 commentsquadrans
038_Laszlo-V_(Ladislaus_V_)_Throne_require_(1440-1453)_Denar_U-500_C2-193_H-649_Q-001_h_mm_ga-s~0.jpg
038 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as Throne Require of Hungary, (1440-1453 A.D.), AR Denarius, U-500-b., #01106 views038 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as Throne Require of Hungary, (1440-1453 A.D.), AR Denarius, U-500-b., #01
avers: ✠mOnETA•LADISLAI•DEI•GRA, Hungarian Shield three parts left Árpádian stripes, and right Lion over the Patriarchal cross, C-G, circle, border of dots.
reverse: ✠REGIS•VnGARIE•ETCETERA, Winged eagle, at the breast band shield, circle, border of dots.
exergue, mint mark: C/G//-- were strucked by Augustin Greniczer (by Pohl), diameter: mm, weight: g, axis:h,
mint: Hungary, Kassa (Kaschau, today Kosice by Pohl), date:1442-1443 A.D. (by Pohl), ref: Unger-500-b., CNH-2-193, Huszár-649, Pohl-156-01,
Q-001
quadrans
038_Laszlo-V_(Ladislaus_V_)_Throne_require_(1440-1453)_Denar_U-503_C2---_H-653_Q-001_9h_17,5mm_54g-s.jpg
038 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as Throne Require of Hungary, (1440-1453 A.D.), AR Denarius, U-503, Extremely Rare!!!224 views038 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as Throne Require of Hungary, (1440-1453 A.D.), AR Denarius, U-503, Extremely Rare!!!
avers: ✠mOnETA•LADISLAI•DEI•G, Hungarian Shield two parts left Árpádian stripes, and right the Patriarchal cross, K-G, circle, border of dots.
reverse: ✠REGIS•VnGARIE•ETCT, Hungarian shield.
exergue, mint mark: K/G//-- were struck by Johannes Constorfer (by Pohl), diameter: 17,5mm, weight: 0,54g, axis: 9h,
mint: Hungary, Körmöczbánya (Kremnitz,), date:1452 A.D. (by Pohl), ref: Unger-503-b., CNH-2-Not in, Huszár-653, Pohl-167, Extremely Rare!!!
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
038_Laszlo-V_(Ladislaus_V_)_Throne_require_(1440-1453)_Denar_U-505b_C2-183_H-654_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
038 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as Throne Require of Hungary, (1440-1453 A.D.), AR Denarius, U-505-b., #0186 views038 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as Throne Require of Hungary, (1440-1453 A.D.), AR Denarius, U-505-b., #01
avers: rosette mOnETA•LADISLAI•DEI•G, Patriarchal Cross, K-P over +, circle ; border of dots.
reverse: ✠REGIS•VnGARIE•ET•CETERA, Crowned Bohemian Lion advancing left, circle, border of dots.
exergue, mint mark: K/+ over P//-- were struck by Petrus Jung (by Pohl), diameter: mm, weight: g, axis:h,
mint: Hungary, Körmöcbánya (Kremnitz, today Slovakia: Kremnica, by Pohl), date:1447-1450 A.D., ref: Unger-505-b., CNH-2-183, Huszár-654, Pohl-160-01,
Q-001
quadrans
039_Laszlo-V_(Ladislaus_V_)_as_King_(1453-1457)_Denar_U-522a_C2-179_H-662_Q-001_19mm_0,99g-s.jpg
039 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as King of Hungary, (1453-1457 A.D.), AR Denarius, U-522-a., #0188 views039 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as King of Hungary, (1453-1457 A.D.), AR Denarius, U-522-a., #01
avers: rosette LADISLAVS•DEI•GRA•REX, Patriarchal Cross, A-B, circle of dots; border of dots.
reverse: S•LADISL AVS•REX, Saint Ladislas standing facing, holding halberd and orb; circle of dots; border of dots.
exergue, mint mark: A/B//-- were struck by familie Bánfi (by Pohl), diameter: 19mm, weight: 0,99g, axis:h,
mint: Hungary, Alsólendva (Lindau, today Lendava in Slovenia by Pohl), date:1453-1454 A.D., ref: Unger-522a, CNH-2-179, Huszár-662, Pohl-186B-01,
Q-001
quadrans
039_Laszlo-V_(Ladislaus_V_)_as_King_(1453-1457)_Denar_U-523a_C2-182_H-664_Q-001_14mm_0,31g-s.jpg
039 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as King of Hungary, (1453-1457 A.D.), AR Denarius, U-523-a., #0184 views039 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as King of Hungary, (1453-1457 A.D.), AR Denarius, U-523-a., #01
avers: mOn•LAD-ISLAI•DEI•G, Patriarchal Cross, K-P, circle ; border of dots.
reverse: ✠REGIS•VnGARIE•ET•C, circle ; border of dots.
exergue, mint mark: K/P//-- were struck by Petrus Jung (by Pohl), diameter: mm, weight: g, axis:h,
mint: Hungary, Körmöcbánya (Kremnitz, today Slovakia: Kremnica, by Pohl), date:1455 A.D. (by Pohl), ref: Unger-523-a., CNH-2-182, Huszár-664, Pohl-187-05,
Q-001
quadrans
039_Laszlo-V_(Ladislaus_V_)_as_King_(1453-1457)_Denar_U-525b_C2-186_H-668_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
039 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as King of Hungary, (1453-1457 A.D.), AR Denarius, U-525-b., #0171 views039 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as King of Hungary, (1453-1457 A.D.), AR Denarius, U-525-b., #01
avers: mOn•LAD ISLAI•RЄ, Patriarchal Cross, B-P, circle of dots; border of dots.
reverse: VnGAR IЭ•ЭTC, circle of dots; border of dots.
exergue, mint mark: B/P//-- were struck by Petrus Jung (by Pohl), diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Hungary, Buda (by Pohl), date:1457 A.D., ref: Unger-525-b., CNH-2-186, Huszár-668, Pohl-190-01,
Q-001
quadrans
039_Laszlo-V_(Ladislaus_V_)_as_King_(1453-1457)_Denar_U-525e_C2-186_H-668_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
039 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as King of Hungary, (1453-1457 A.D.), AR Denarius, U-525-e., #0193 views039 László V. “Posthumous” (Ladislaus V.) as King of Hungary, (1453-1457 A.D.), AR Denarius, U-525-e., #01
avers: mOn•LAD ISLAI•RЄ, Patriarchal Cross, h-O, circle of dots; border of dots.
reverse: VnGAR IЄ•ЄTC, circle of dots; border of dots.
exergue, mint mark: h/O//-- were struck by Oswald Wenzel (by Pohl), diameter: mm, weight: g, axis:h,
mint: Hungary, Nagyszegben (Hermanstadt, today Romania: Sibiu, by Pohl), date:1457 A.D., ref: Unger-525-e., CNH-2-186, Huszár-668, Pohl-190-03,
Q-001
quadrans
RI_051j_img.jpg
051 - Marcus Aurelius denarius - RIC III (Commodus) 27027 viewsDenarius - Posthumous issue minted by Commodus
Obv:– DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS, Bare head right
Rev:– CONSECRATIO, Eagle standing right on thunderbolt, head left.
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– BMCRE Commodus 24. RIC III Commodus 270. RSC 82a.
maridvnvm
RI 052b img.jpg
052 - Faustina Junior Posthumous Denarius - RIC 74738 viewsObv:– DIVA AVG FAVSTINA, Draped bust right
Rev:– CONSECRATIO, Funeral pyre; Faustina II atop, riding biga towards
Minted in Rome. A.D. 176-180
References:– Cohen 77. BMC 698. RIC 747 (Rated scarce).
maridvnvm
antoninus-pius_divus-antoninus_altar_2_99gr_obv_14.JPG
06 - Antoninus Pius - AR Denarius - Posthumous Issue - Altar 11 viewsImperial Rome
Antoninus Pius ( 138-161 AD.)
Silver Denarius. Rome Mint.
Posthumous Issue struck under Emperor Marcus Aurelius.

obv: DIVVS ANTONINVS - Bare head right.
rev: DIVO PIO - Altar/Shrine with doors closed.

RIC III-441 (Marcus Aurelius).

2.99gr.
rexesq
antoninus-pius_divus-antoninus_altar_2_99gr_obv_13.JPG
06 - Antoninus Pius - AR Denarius - Posthumous Issue - Altar 10 viewsImperial Rome
Antoninus Pius ( 138-161 AD.)
Silver Denarius. Rome Mint.
Posthumous Issue struck under Emperor Marcus Aurelius.

obv: DIVVS ANTONINVS - Bare head right.
rev: DIVO PIO - Altar/Shrine with doors closed.

RIC III-441 (Marcus Aurelius).

2.99gr.
rexesq
antoninus-pius_divus-antoninus_altar_2_99gr_obv_01_rev_02.JPG
06 - Antoninus Pius - AR Denarius - Posthumous Issue - Altar 33 viewsImperial Rome
Antoninus Pius ( 138-161 AD.)
Silver Denarius. Rome Mint.
Posthumous Issue struck under Emperor Marcus Aurelius.

obv: DIVVS ANTONINVS - Bare head right.
rev: DIVO PIO - Altar/Shrine with doors closed.

RIC III-441 (Marcus Aurelius).

2.99gr.
3 commentsrexesq
antoninus-pius_divus-antoninus_altar_2_99gr_00.JPG
06 - Antoninus Pius - AR Denarius - Posthumous Issue - Altar.21 viewsImperial Rome
Antoninus Pius ( 138-161 AD.)
Silver Denarius. Rome Mint.
Posthumous Issue struck under Emperor Marcus Aurelius.

obv: DIVVS ANTONINVS - Bare head right.
rev: DIVO PIO - Altar/Shrine with doors closed.

RIC III-441 (Marcus Aurelius).

2.99gr.
--------
Seller Photo.
2 commentsrexesq
faustina-sr_den_veiled-bust-peacock_2_82gr_feb2012a.JPG
06 - Faustina I - 02 - AR Denarius - Peacock 'CONSECRATIO' - NGC Choice VF56 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Empress Faustina Senior (138 - 141), Wife of Emperor Antoninus Pius (AD 138 - 161).
Silver Denarius, Struck at the Rome Mint by the Emperor Antoninus Pius to consecrate and commemorate his wife after her death.

(All Titles in Latin)
obv: DIVA FAUSTINA - Veiled and Draped bust facing right.
rev: CONSECRATIO - Peacock facing right, head left, standing on scepter with knobs on both ends.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

*Note how the two head feathers on the top of the Peacock's head seperate the 'R' and the 'A' in " CONSECR ATIO ' on the reverse.
***Less common type with Veiled bust obverse rather than her usual bust with hair wrapped on the top of her head, like on my other example of this type with the same reverse design and titles, and the same obverse titles.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Certified "Choice Very Fine" by NGC Ancients.
Strike: 4/5
Surface: 4/5
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>^..^< CLICK PHOTO FOR FULLSIZE IMAGE >^..^
5 commentsrexesq
faustina-sr_den_veiled-bust-peacock_2_82gr_feb2012b.jpg
06 - Faustina I - 02 - AR Denarius - Peacock 'CONSECRATIO' - NGC Choice VF.15 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Empress Faustina Senior (138 - 141), Wife of Emperor Antoninus Pius (AD 138 - 161).
Silver Denarius, Struck at the Rome Mint by the Emperor Antoninus Pius to consecrate and commemorate his wife after her death.

(All Titles in Latin)
obv: DIVA FAUSTINA - Veiled and Draped bust facing right.
rev: CONSECRATIO - Peacock facing right, head left, standing on scepter with knobs on both ends.
~~
*Note how the head feathers on the peacock's head seperate the 'R' and the 'A' in CONSECR ATIO

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Certified "Choice Very Fine" by NGC Ancients.
Strike: 4/5
Surface: 4/5
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** Any scratches, smudges or marks are on the slab, not the coin itself. **
rexesq
Nigrinianus_AE-Ant_DIVO-NIGRINIANO_CONSECRATIO_RIC-V-II-474-Num_Q-001_axis-h_21-22,5mm_5_40g-s.jpg
092 Valerian-II (256-258 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 024a, CONSECRATIO, Large altar, 214 views092 Valerian-II, (256-258 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 024a, CONSECRATIO, Large altar,
avers:- DIVO CAES VALERIANO, Radiate head right of Valerianus II. as a boy.
revers:- CONSECRATIO, Large altar.
exerg: , diameter: 21-22,5 mm, weight: 5,40g, axis: h,
mint: Minted posthumously at Rome, date: 258-259 A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-024a,
Q-001
quadrans
2750063-1.jpg
1) Julius Caesar24 viewsIMPERATORIAL ROME
Julius Caesar
AR Denarius (16mm, 2.97 g, 11h)
42 BC. Posthumous issue. Rome mint. L. Mussidius Longus, moneyer.

Laureate head right / Rudder, cornucopia on globe, winged caduceus, and flamen’s cap.

Crawford 494/39b; CRI 116; Sydenham 1096c; RSC 29. Fine, porous, bankers’ marks on obverse.

Property of Princeton Economics acquired by Martin Armstrong. Ex Stack’s (3 December 1996), lot 769.

Ex CNG
RM0008
1 commentsSosius
coin213.JPG
103. Hadrian19 viewsHadrian

With execution of four power men in the beginning of his reign, his relations with the senate were irrevocably damaged, never really to improve until his death, when the senate hoped to have posthumous revenge. Much was said against him after his death, and by many persons. The senate wished to annul his acts, and would have refrained from naming him "the Deified" had not Antoninus requested it. Antoninus, moreover, finally built a temple for him at Puteoli to take the place of a tomb, and he also established a quinquennial contest and flamens and sodales and many other institutions which appertain to the honour of one regarded as a god. It is for this reason, as has been said before, that many think that Antoninus received the surname Pius.

AR Denarius. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right / P M TR P COS III, Victory flying right with trophy. RSC 1132, RIC 101
ecoli
RI_109a_img.jpg
109 - Valerian II - RIC 0096 viewsObv:– DIVO VALERIANO CAES, Radiate & draped bust right
Rev:– CONSACRATIO, Eagle flying right, bearing the deceased young Caesar to heaven.
Minted in Rome (Posthumous issue). A.D. 257-258
Reference(s) – RIC 9. RSC 5.

4.13 gms, 22.36mm. 180 degrees.
maridvnvm
RIC_V-II_110K_Carus_AE-Ant_DIVO-CARO-PARTHICO_CONSECRATIO-AVG_A_SMS-XXI_RIC-V-II-110K_p-147_C-_Siscia_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
113 Carus (282-283 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 110K, Siscia, -/A//SMSXXI, CONSECRATIO AVG, Altar, Scarce!87 views113 Carus (282-283 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 110K, Siscia, -/A//SMSXXI, CONSECRATIO AVG, Altar, Scarce!
avers: DIVO-CARO-PARTHICO, Radiate head right.(K)
revers: CONSECRATIO-AVG, Altar.
exerg: -/A//SMSXXI, diameter: mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Siscia, date: Posthumous A.D., ref: RIC V-II 110K , p-147, Scarce!
Q-001
quadrans
RIC_V-II_112K_Carus_AE-Ant_DIVO-CARO-PARTHICO_CONSECRATIO-AVG_RIC-112K-6th_-em-p-148_Siscia_C-_284AD_R_Q-001_6h_21-22mm_3,50g-s.jpg
113 Carus (282-283 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 112K, Siscia, -/A//SMSXXI, CONSECRATIO AVG, Eagle standing riht, Rare!120 views113 Carus (282-283 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 112K, Siscia, -/A//SMSXXI, CONSECRATIO AVG, Eagle standing riht, Rare!
avers: DIVO-CARO-PARTHICO, Radiate head right.(K)
revers: CONSECRATIO-AVG, Eagle standing riht, looking left.
exerg: -/A//SMSXXI, diameter: 21-22mm, weight: 3,50g, axes: 6h,
mint: Siscia, 6th. em.,date: 284 A.D. (Posthumous A.D.), ref: RIC V-II 112K , p-148, Rare!
Q-001
quadrans
William_the_lion_AR_penny.JPG
1169 - 1214, William I “the lion”, AR Penny, Struck 1205 - 1230 at Perth or Edinburgh, Scotland20 viewsObverse: + LE REI WILAM•: Head of William I facing left, wearing crown of pellets, sceptre to left, within inner circle of pellets. All surrounded by outer circle of pellets. Cross potent in legend.
Reverse: + hVE WALTER: Voided short cross, six pointed star in each angle, within inner circle of pellets. All surrounded by outer circle of pellets. Cross potent in legend. (No mint name on coin. Moneyers: Hue (cognate with the modern English name of Hugh) and Walter, the Edinburgh and Perth moneyers working jointly)
Short cross, phase B. Late William I and posthumous issue struck c.1205 to c.1230.
William I died in 1214 but it would appear that although Alexander II was 16 years old when he came to the throne he continued his father's issues for some 15 years and struck no coins in his own name until around 1230.
Diameter: 21mm | Weight: 1.3gm | Die Axis: 6
SPINK: 5029

William I was not known as "the Lion" during his own lifetime, the title was attached to him because of his flag or standard, a red lion rampant on a yellow background which went on to become the Royal Banner of Scotland which is still used today.

William I was crowned on 24th December 1165, he came to the throne when his elder brother Malcolm IV died at the age of 24 on 9th December 1165.
Early in his reign William attempted to regain control of Northumbria which had been lost, in 1157 during the reign of Malcolm IV, to the Anglo-Normans under Henry II. He thereby lent support to the English barons who rebelled against Henry II in 1173. In 1174 however, while actively assisting the rebels at the Battle of Alnwick, William was captured by Henry's forces and taken to Falaise in Normandy. He was forced, under the terms of the Treaty of Falaise which he signed in December, to do homage for the whole of Scotland and also to hand over the castles of Roxburgh, Berwick and Edinburgh. Edinburgh, however, was later returned to him as part of the dowry of Ermengarde, a cousin of Henry II, whom William married in 1186.
The Treaty of Falaise remained in force for the next fifteen years until the new English King Richard the Lionheart, needing money for the Third Crusade, agreed to terminate it in return for 10,000 marks. William also attempted to purchase Northumbria from Richard, however his offer of 15,000 marks was rejected due to him wanting all the castles within the lands, something Richard was not willing to concede.
Relations between Scotland and England remained tense during the first decade of the 13th century and in August 1209 King John decided to exploit the weakening leadership of the ageing Scottish monarch by marching a large army to Norham on the south side of the River Tweed. William bought John off with the promise of a large sum of money, and later, in 1212, he agreed to his only surviving son Alexander, marrying John's eldest daughter, Joan.
William I died in Stirling in 1214 and lies buried in Arbroath Abbey, which he is credited with founding in 1178. He was succeeded by his son, who reigned as Alexander II.
3 comments*Alex
FaustinaBlack.jpg
15 Faustina I RIC 110519 viewsFaustina I 138-140 AD. AE Sestertius. Rome Mint. Posthumous commemorative of 141-161 AD. (24.18g, 32.58mm) Obv: DIVA FAVSTINA, Draped bust right. Rev: AETERNITAS S-C, Aeternitas standing left holding phoenix on globe and holding up skirt.
RIC 1105

Ex: Incitatus Coins, Vcoins
Paddy
FaustinaPeacock.jpg
15 Faustina RIC 38415 viewsFaustina I 138-140 AD. Rome Mint. Posthumous commemorative of 141-161 AD. (3.78g; 17mm) Obv: DIVA FAVSTINA, Draped bust right. Rev:
CONSECR-ATIO, peacock walking right, head left.
RIC 384; Cohen 176

Ex: Pecunem
Paddy
RI_161aq_img~0.jpg
161 - Constantine the Great (posthumous) - AE4 - RIC VIII 1220 viewsObv:- DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled bust right
Rev:- Emperor, veiled, in quadriga right, the hand of God reaches down to him
Minted in Alexandria (//SMALA) 337 - April 340 A.D.
Reference RIC VIII Alexandria 12
maridvnvm
RI_161as_img.jpg
161 - Constantine the Great (posthumous) - AE4 - RIC VIII 3237 viewsAE4
Obv: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled bust right
Rev: VN | MR, Emperor veiled standing right
Minted in Alexandria (//SMALD) 337 - April 340 A.D
Reference:– RIC VIII Alexandria 32
3 commentsmaridvnvm
GermanicusAsSC.jpg
1an Germanicus36 viewsAdopted by Tiberius in 4 AD, died mysteriously in 19

As, struck by Caligula

Bare head, left, GERMANICVS CAESAR TI AVGVST F DIVI AVG N
C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT SC

RIC 57

Germanicus Julius Caesar (c16 BC-AD 19) was was born in Lugdunum, Gaul (modern Lyon). At birth he was named either Nero Claudius Drusus after his father or Tiberius Claudius Nero after his uncle. He received the agnomen Germanicus, in 9 BC, when it was posthumously awarded to his father in honour of his victories in Germania. Germanicus was the grandson-in-law and great-nephew of the Emperor Augustus, nephew and adoptive son of the Emperor Tiberius, father of the Emperor Caligula, brother of the Emperor Claudius, and the maternal grandfather of the Emperor Nero. He married his maternal second cousin Agrippina the Elder, a granddaughter of Augustus, between 5 and 1 BC. The couple had nine children. Two died very young; another, Gaius Julius Caesar, died in early childhood. The remaining six were: Nero Caesar, Drusus Caesar, the Emperor Caligula, the Empress Agrippina the Younger, Julia Drusilla, and Julia Livilla.

According to Suetonius: Germanicus, who was the son of Drusus the Elder and Antonia the Younger, was adopted (in 4AD) by Germanicus’s paternal uncle, Tiberius. He served as quaestor (in7AD) five years before the legal age and became consul (in12AD) without holding the intermediate offices. On the death of Augustus (in AD14) he was appointed to command the army in Germany, where, his filial piety and determination vying for prominence, he held the legions to their oath, though they stubbornly opposed Tiberius’s succession, and wished him to take power for himself.

He followed this with victory in Germany, for which he celebrated a triumph (in 17 AD), and was chosen as consul for a second time (18 AD) though unable to take office as he was despatched to the East to restore order there. He defeated the forces of the King of Armenia, and reduced Cappadocia to provincial status, but then died at Antioch, at the age of only thirty-three (in AD 19), after a lingering illness, though there was also suspicion that he had been poisoned. For as well as the livid stains which covered his body, and the foam on his lips, the heart was found entire among the ashes after his cremation, its total resistance to flame being a characteristic of that organ, they say, when it is filled with poison.

All considered Germanicus exceptional in body and mind, to a quite outstanding degree. Remarkably brave and handsome; a master of Greek and Latin oratory and learning; singularly benevolent; he was possessed of a powerful desire and vast capacity for winning respect and inspiring affection.

His scrawny legs were less in keeping with the rest of his figure, but he gradually fleshed them out by assiduous exercise on horseback after meals. He often killed enemy warriors in hand-to-hand combat; still pleaded cases in the courts even after receiving his triumph; and left various Greek comedies behind amongst other fruits of his studies.

At home and abroad his manners were unassuming, such that he always entered free or allied towns without his lictors.

Whenever he passed the tombs of famous men, he always offered a sacrifice to their shades. And he was the first to initiate a personal search for the scattered remains of Varus’s fallen legionaries, and have them gathered together, so as to inter them in a single burial mound.

As for Germanicus, Tiberius appreciated him so little, that he dismissed his famous deeds as trivial, and his brilliant victories as ruinous to the Empire. He complained to the Senate when Germanicus left for Alexandria (AD19) without consulting him, on the occasion there of a terrible and swift-spreading famine. It was even believed that Tiberius arranged for his poisoning at the hands of Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso, the Governor of Syria, and that Piso would have revealed the written instructions at his trial, had Tiberius not retrieved them during a private interview, before having Piso put to death. As a result, the words: ‘Give us back Germanicus!’ were posted on the walls, and shouted at night, all throughout Rome. The suspicion surrounding Germanicus’ death (19 AD) was deepened by Tiberius’s cruel treatment of Germanicus’s wife, Agrippina the Elder, and their children.
1 commentsBlindado
27-Antiochos-VII.jpg
28. Antiochos-VII.27 viewsTetradrachm, 138-129 BC.
Obverse: Diademed head of Antiochos VII.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΟΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ / Athena standing, holding Nike, spear, and shield. Monogram and A at left, O at right.
16.81 gm., 27 mm.

This coin was purchased in 1997 as a tetradrachm of Antiochus VII before the posthumous tetradrachms of Antiochus VII were identified. 

In 2002 a tetradrachm was discovered that bore a portrait of Antiochus VII but was in the name of Ariarathese VII of Cappadocia.  Research eventually die-linked tetradrachms of Antiochus VII to those of Ariarathese VII, and concluded that numerous tetradrachms in the name of Antiochus VII were actually issued by Ariarathese VII around 104-102 BC. This research was published as Cappadician Tetradrachms in the Name of Antiochus VII by Catharine Lorber and Arthur Houghton (NC 166, 2006).

Recently Elke Krengle and Catharine Lorber published Early Cappadocian Tetradrachms in the Name of Antiochus VII.  This is a more in-depth look at these tetradrachms, and this coin is listed there:

See table 1 on p. 65, and plate 11:
Mint II, Emission 5: control mark O, #117-171. All the dies are not illustrated, so I do not know exactly which number between 117 and 171 is actually this coin.
Callimachus
ConVIIIConst52.jpg
307-337 AD - Constantine I Posthumous - RIC VIII Constantinople 052 - Quadriga Reverse35 viewsEmperor: Constantine I (r. 307-337 AD)
Date: 337-340 AD
Condition: Fair
Size: AE4

Obverse: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
Posthumous issue
Bust right; veiled

Reverse: (no legend)
Emperor, veiled, to left in quadriga; the hand of God reaches down to him.
in field.
Exergue: CONS(?) (Constantinople mint, third officina?)

RIC VIII Constantinople 52; VM 95
1.27g; 14.8mm; 165°
Pep
ConVIIIHera14.jpg
307-337 AD - Constantine I Posthumous - RIC VIII Heraclea 014 - Quadriga Reverse30 viewsEmperor: Constantine I (r. 307-337 AD)
Date: 337-340 AD
Condition: aFine
Size: AE4

Obverse: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
Posthumous issue
Bust right; veiled

Reverse: (no legend)
Emperor, veiled, to left in quadriga; the hand of God reaches down to him.
Exergue: SMHE (Heraclea mint, fifth officina)

RIC VIII Heraclea 14; VM 95
1.17g; 14.9mm; 315°
Pep
ConVIIIHera14_2.jpg
307-337 AD - Constantine I Posthumous - RIC VIII Heraclea 014 - Quadriga Reverse - 2nd Example26 viewsEmperor: Constantine I (r. 307-337 AD)
Date: 337-340 AD
Condition: Fair
Size: AE4

Obverse: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
Posthumous issue
Bust right; draped, cuirassed and veiled

Reverse: (no legend)
Emperor, veiled, to left in quadriga; the hand of God reaches down to him.
Exergue: SMHE (Heraclea mint, fifth officina)

RIC VIII Heraclea 14; VM 95
1.48g; 15.9mm; 315°
Pep
ConVIIIHera14_3.jpg
307-337 AD - Constantine I Posthumous - RIC VIII Heraclea 014 - Quadriga Reverse - 3rd Example32 viewsEmperor: Constantine I (r. 307-337 AD)
Date: 337-340 AD
Condition: Fine
Size: AE4

Obverse: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
Posthumous issue
Bust right; draped, cuirassed and veiled

Reverse: no legend
Emperor, veiled, to right in quadriga; the hand of God reaches down to him.
Exergue: SMHE (Heraclea mint, fifth officina)

RIC VIII Heraclea 14; VM 95
1.08g; 15.2mm; 135°
Pep
HelenaVM4.jpg
324-328/9 AD - Helena - Van Meter 4 - PAX PVBLICA24 viewsAugusta: Helena (324-328/9 AD)
Date: after 328/9 AD (Posthumous)
Condition: Mediocre
Size: AE4

Obverse: FL IVL HE-LENA AVG
Flavia Julia Helena Augusta
Bust right; diademed and draped

Reverse: PAX PVBLICA
The people are at peace.
Pax standing left.
Exergue: unknown

VM 4
1.57g; 16.8mm; 150°
Pep
HelenaVM4_2.jpg
324-328/9 AD - Helena - Van Meter 4 - PAX PVBLICA - 2nd Example35 viewsAugusta: Helena (324-328/9 AD)
Date: after 328/9 AD (Posthumous)
Condition: Fine
Size: AE4

Obverse: FL IVL HELENA AVG
Flavia Julia Helena Augusta
Bust right; diademed and draped

Reverse: PAX PVBLICA
The people are at peace.
Pax standing left.
Exergue: unknown

VM 4
1.69g; 15.6mm; 165°
Pep
329_Hadrian_RIC364.JPG
364 Hadrian Denarius Roma 134-38 AD Liberalitas standing.45 viewsReference.
RIC 364

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P
Head of Hadrian, laureate, right

Rev. LIBERALITAS AVG in ex COS III
Liberalitas, draped, standing left, holding cornucopiae in both hands as if about to empty it

3.16 gr
18 mm
6h

Note from Curtis Clay.
This denarius is rare with Liberalitas standing left rather than right as usual.

Cohen 916 cites this variant from a private collection, Elberling, that was published in 1864. That identical Elberling coin, as one can tell from the accurate line drawing, then came to the BM, BMC 524, pl. 57.8, as part of the Blacas collection in 1867. Your specimen is from the same pair of dies as this BM specimen ex Blacas and Elberling. Strack 201 knew only two specimens of this coin, the BM one and another in Vienna. This variant was missing from the Reka Devnia hoard, compared to seven specimens with Liberalitas standing right. I have a specimen with Liberalitas left myself, from different dies than yours and the BM's.

The old RIC of 1926, pp. 316-7, champions a quite impossible date for Hadrian's HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P issue: Mattingly didn't think it fit in 128-9 AD, so proposed that it was a posthumous issue of 138-9, struck by Antoninus Pius as propaganda while he was quarreling with the Senate over Hadrian's deification! Strack objected strongly and correctly in his Hadrian monograph of 1933, and in BMC III of 1936 Mattingly had no choice but to relent and abandon his "posthumous" attribution. This issue is beyond question simply Hadrian's earliest issue with the title Pater Patriae, struck between Hadrian's acceptance of that title in 128 and c. 129 AD.
okidoki
coin599.JPG
501. Constantine I Alexandria Posthumous23 viewsAlexandria

The city passed formally under Roman jurisdiction in 80 BC, according to the will of Ptolemy Alexander but after it had been previously under Roman influence for more than a hundred years. Julius Caesar dallied with Cleopatra in Alexandria in 47 BC, saw Alexander's body (quipping 'I came to see a king, not a collection of corpses' when he was offered a view of the other royal burials) and was mobbed by the rabble. His example was followed by Marc Antony, for whose favor the city paid dearly to Octavian, who placed over it a prefect from the imperial household.

From the time of annexation onwards, Alexandria seems to have regained its old prosperity, commanding, as it did, an important granary of Rome. This fact, doubtless, was one of the chief reasons which induced Augustus to place it directly under imperial power. In AD 215 the emperor Caracalla visited the city and for some insulting satires that the inhabitants had directed at him, abruptly commanded his troops to put to death all youths capable of bearing arms. This brutal order seems to have been carried out even beyond the letter, for a general massacre ensued.

Even as its main historical importance had formerly sprung from pagan learning, now Alexandria acquired fresh importance as a centre of Christian theology and church government. There Arianism was formulated and where also Athanasius, the great opponent of both Arianism and pagan reaction, triumphed over both, establishing the Patriarch of Alexandria as a major influence in Christianity for the next two centuries.

As native influences began to reassert themselves in the Nile valley, Alexandria gradually became an alien city, more and more detached from Egypt and losing much of its commerce as the peace of the empire broke up during the 3rd century AD, followed by a fast decline in population and splendour.

In the late 4th century, persecution of pagans by Christians had reached new levels of intensity. Temples and statues were destroyed throughout the Roman empire: pagan rituals became forbidden under punishment of death, and libraries were closed. In 391, Emperor Theodosius I ordered the destruction of all pagan temples, and the Patriarch Theophilus, complied with his request. It is possible that the great Library of Alexandria and the Serapeum was destroyed about this time. The pagan mathematician and philosopher Hypathia was a prominent victim of the persecutions.

The Brucheum and Jewish quarters were desolate in the 5th century, and the central monuments, the Soma and Museum, fell into ruin. On the mainland, life seemed to have centred in the vicinity of the Serapeum and Caesareum, both which became Christian churches. The Pharos and Heptastadium quarters, however, remained populous and left intact.

veiled head only
DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
RIC VIII Alexandria 32 C3

From uncleaned lot; one of the nicer finds.
ecoli
coin762.JPG
501. Constantine I Antioch Posthumous7 viewsRIC VIII Antioch 37

ecoli
56167.jpg
504. CONSTANTIUS II148 viewsFlavius Iulius Constantius, known in English as Constantius II, (7 August 317 - 3 November 361) was a Roman Emperor (337 - 361) of the Constantinian dynasty

Constantius was the second of the three sons of Constantine I and his second wife Fausta. Constantius was born in Sirmium (in Illyricum) and named Caesar by his father. When Constantine died in 337, Constantius II led the massacre of his relatives decended from the second marriage of his grandfather Constantius Chlorus and Theodora, leaving himself, his older brother Constantine II, his younger brother Constans and two cousins (Gallus and his half-brother Julian) as the only surviving adult males related to Constantine. The three brothers divided the Roman Empire among them, according to their father's will. Constantine II received Britannia, Gaul and Hispania; Constans ruled Italia, Africa, and Illyricum; and Constantius ruled the East.

This division changed when Constantine II died in 340, trying to overthrow Constans in Italy, and Constans become sole ruler in the Western half of the empire. The division changed once more in 350 when Constans was killed in battle by forces loyal to the usurper Magnentius. Until this time, Constantius was preoccupied with fighting the Sassanid Empire, and he was forced to elevate his cousin Gallus to Caesar of the East to assist him, while he turned his attention to this usurper.

Constantius eventually met and crushed Magnentius in the Battle of Mursa Major, one of the bloodiest battles in Roman history, in 351. Magnentius committed suicide in 353, and Constantius soon after put his cousin Gallus to death. However, he still could not handle the military affairs of both the Eastern and German frontiers by himself, so in 355 he elevated his last remaining relative, Julian, to Caesar. As Julian was hailed Augustus by the army in Gaul, Constantius saw no alternative but to face the usurper with violent force. As the two armies sought engagement, Constantius died from a fever near Tarsus on November 3, 361, and Julian was hailed Augustus in the whole of the Roman empire.

Constantius took an active part in the affairs of the Christian church, frequently taking the side of the Arians, and he called the Council of Rimini in 359.

Constantius married three times, first to a daughter of Julius Constantius, then to Eusebia, and last to Faustina, who gave birth to a posthumous daughter, Faustina Constantia, who later married Emperor Gratian.

CONSTANTIUS II. 337-361 AD. Ć 18mm (2.41 gm). Siscia mint. Struck 351-355 AD. D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier spearing falling enemy horseman who wears conical hat; at right, shield on ground; ASIS. RIC VIII 350. Good VF, green patina. Ex CNG
1 commentsecoli73
57- Galerius Posthumous.JPG
57- Galerius Posthumous104 viewsAE Follis, 311 AD, Thessalonica mint.
Obv: DIVO MAXIMIANO, Veiled head right.
Rev: MEM DIVI MAXIMIANI, Eagle surmounting domed shrine with closed doors, (Gamma) in right field. SMTS in exergue.
23mm , 4.9gm
RIC 48 variant, Very Rare!
2 commentsjdholds
TiberiusHierapolis.jpg
703b, Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Hierapolis, Phrygia104 viewsBronze AE 16, RPC I 2966 (1 specimen), F, Phrygia, Hierapolis, 3.300g, 15.6mm, 0o; Obverse: TIBEPIOC KAISAR, laureate head right; Reverse: IERAPOLEITWN ZOSIMOS [...], Apollo Archegetes (Lairbenos) standing left, playing lyre; reverse countermarked with star of six rays, in oval punch, 2.5 x 3.5 mm, Howgego 445 (3 pcs, 1 of which from this magistrate); dark patina; very rare. Ex FORVM.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

TIBERIUS (A.D. 14-37)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

The reign of Tiberius Claudius Nero (b. 42 B.C., d. A.D. 37, emperor A.D. 14-37) is a particularly important one for the Principate, since it was the first occasion when the powers designed for Augustus alone were exercised by somebody else. In contrast to the approachable and tactful Augustus, Tiberius emerges from the sources as an enigmatic and darkly complex figure, intelligent and cunning, but given to bouts of severe depression and dark moods that had a great impact on his political career as well as his personal relationships. His reign abounds in contradictions. Despite his keen intelligence, he allowed himself to come under the influence of unscrupulous men who, as much as any actions of his own, ensured that Tiberius's posthumous reputation would be unfavorable; despite his vast military experience, he oversaw the conquest of no new region for the empire; and despite his administrative abilities he showed such reluctance in running the state as to retire entirely from Rome and live out his last years in isolation on the island of Capri. His reign represents, as it were, the adolescence of the Principate as an institution. Like any adolescence, it proved a difficult time.

. . . .

It is all but inevitable that any historical assessment of Tiberius will quickly devolve into a historiographical assessment of Tacitus. So masterful is Tacitus's portrayal of his subject, and so influential has it been ever since, that in all modern treatments of Tiberius, in attempting to get at the man, must address the issue of Tacitus's historiographical methods, his sources, and his rhetoric. The subject is too vast to address here, but some points are salient. Tacitus's methods, especially his use of innuendo and inference to convey notions that are essentially editorial glosses, makes taking his portrayal of Tiberius at face value inadvisable. Further, his belief in the immutable character of people -- that one's character is innate at birth and cannot be changed, although it can be disguised -- prevents him from investigating the possibility that Tiberius evolved and developed over his lifetime and during his reign. Instead, Tacitus's portrayal is one of peeling back layers of dissimulation to reach the "real" Tiberius lurking underneath.

Overall, Tiberius's reign can be said to show the boons and banes of rule by one man, especially a man as dark, awkward, and isolated as Tiberius. For the people of the provinces, it was a peaceful and well-ordered time. Governors behaved themselves, and there were no destructive or expensive wars. In the domestic sphere, however, the concentration of power in one person made all the greater the threat of misbehavior by ambitious satellites like Sejanus or foolish friends like Piso. Furthermore, if the emperor wished to remain aloof from the mechanics of power, he could do so. Administrators, who depended on him for their directions, could operate without his immediate supervision, but their dealings with a man like Sejanus could lead to disaster if that man fell from grace. As a result, although he was not a tyrant himself, Tiberius's reign sporadically descended into tyranny of the worst sort. In the right climate of paranoia and suspicion, widespread denunciation led to the deaths of dozens of Senators and equestrians, as well as numerous members of the imperial house. In this sense, the reign of Tiberius decisively ended the Augustan illusion of "the Republic Restored" and shone some light into the future of the Principate, revealing that which was both promising and terrifying.

[For the complete article please refer to http://www.roman-emperors.org/tiberius.htm]

By Garrett G. Fagan, Pennsylvania State University.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.


Hierapolis in History

Usually said to be founded by Eumenes II, king of Pergamum (197-159 BC), Hierapolis may actually have been established closer to the 4th century BC by the Seleucid kings.

The name of the city may derive from Hiera, the wife of Telephus (son of Hercules and grandson of Zeus), the mythical founder of Pergamum. Or it may have been called the "sacred city" because of the temples located at the site. (The name Pamukkale is sometimes used just to refer to the white terraces, but the modern name of the whole area is also Pamukkale.)

With Colossae and Laodicea, Hierapolis became part of the tri-city area of the Lycus River valley. Hierapolis was located across the river from the other two cities and was noted for its textiles, especially wool. The city was also famous for its purple dye, made from the juice of the madder root.

The hot springs at Hierapolis (which still attract visitors today) were believed to have healing properties, and people came to the city to bathe in the rich mineral waters in order to cure various ailments.

Hierapolis was dedicated to Apollo Lairbenos, who was said to have founded the city. The Temple of Apollo that survives in ruins today dates from the 3rd century AD, but its foundations date from the Hellenistic period.

Also worshipped at Hierapolis was Pluto, god of the underworld, probably in relation to the hot gases released by the earth (see the Plutonium, below). The chief religious festival of ancient Hierapolis was the Letoia, in honor of the the goddess Leto, a Greek form of the Mother Goddess. The goddess was honoured with orgiastic rites.

Hierapolis was ceded to Rome in 133 BC along with the rest of the Pergamene kingdom, and became part of the Roman province of Asia. The city was destroyed by an earthquake in 60 AD but rebuilt, and it reached its peak in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD.

Famous natives of Hierapolis include the Stoic philosopher Epictetus (c.55-c.135 AD) and the philosopher and rhetorician Antipater. Emperor Septimus hired Antipater to tutor his sons Caracalla and Geta, who became emperors themselves.

Hierapolis had a significant Jewish population in ancient times, as evidence by numerous inscriptions on tombs and elsewhere in the city. Some of the Jews are named as members of the various craft guilds of the city. This was probably the basis for the Christian conversion of some residents of Hierapolis, recorded in Colossians 4:13.

In the 5th century, several churches as well as a large martyrium dedicated to St. Philip (see "In the Bible," below) were built in Hierapolis. The city fell into decline in the 6th century, and the site became partially submerged under water and deposits of travertine. It was finally abandoned in 1334 after an earthquake. Excavations began to uncover Hierapolis in the 19th century.

Hierapolis in the Bible

Hierapolis is mentioned only once in the Bible, when St. Paul praises Epaphras, a Christian from Colossae, in his letter to the Colossians. Paul writes that Epaphras "has worked hard for you and for those in Laodicea and in Hierapolis" (Colossians 4:12-13). Epaphras was probably the founder of the Christian community at Hierapolis.

Ancient tradition also associates Hierapolis with a biblical figure, reporting that Philip died in Hierapolis around 80 AD. However, it is not clear which Philip is menat. It could be Philip the Apostle, one of the original 12 disciples, who is said to have been martyred by upside-down crucifixion (Acts of Philip) or by being hung upside down by his ankles from a tree.

Or Philip could be Philip the Evangelist, a later disciple who helped with administrative matters and had four virgin-prophetess daughters (Acts 6:1-7; 21:8-9). Early traditions say this Philip was buried in Hierapolis along with his virgin daughters, but confusingly call him "Philip the Apostle"! In any case, it seems a prominent person mentioned in Acts did die in Hierapolis.
http://www.sacred-destinations.com/turkey/hierapolis-pamukkale.htm

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
agrippa_06_14_res.jpg
AGRIPPA21 views(b. 63 BC - d. 12 BC)
Struck posthumously 38 AD, under Caligula
AE As 30 mm; 8.7 g
O: Head left wearing a rostral crown
R: Neptune standing half left, dolphin in right, trident in left, S - C across fields
Rome mint
RIC I Caligula 58, BMC II 161; SRCV I 556
laney
Agrippa_RIC_I_58.jpg
Agrippa, AE As, RIC I 585 viewsAgrippa
As Consul for the third time, 27 B.C.

Coin: AE As

Obverse: M AGRIPPA L F COS III, bust facing left, wearing Rostral crown.
Reverse: Neptune, standing, facing left, a Chlamys draped over his arms, holding a Dolphin in his right hand and a Trident with his left. S - C across the fields.

Weight: 9.52 g, Diameter: 26.8 x 28 x 1.5 mm, Die axis: 160°, Mint: Rome, posthumous issue by his grandson, Gaius "Caligula", between 37-41 A.D. Reference: RIC I 58
Masis
Agrippa_RIC_I_58_Second_example.jpg
Agrippa, AE As, RIC I 58, Second example6 viewsAgrippa
As Consul for the third time, 27 B.C.

Coin: AE As

Obverse: M AGRIPPA L F COS III, bust facing left, wearing Rostral crown.
Reverse: Neptune, standing, facing left, a Chlamys draped over his arms, holding a Dolphin in his right hand and a Trident with his left. S - C across the fields.

Weight: 9.43 g, Diameter: 27.2 x 27 x 1.8 mm, Die axis: 220°, Mint: Rome, posthumous issue by his grandson, Gaius "Caligula", between 37-41 A.D. Reference: RIC I 58
Masis
Agrippa_RIC_I_58_Third_example.jpg
Agrippa, AE As, RIC I 58, Third example4 viewsAgrippa
As Consul for the third time, 27 B.C.

Coin: AE As

Obverse: MˇAGRIPPAˇLˇFˇCOSˇIIIˇ, bust wearing a Rostral crown, facing left.
Reverse: Neptune, standing, facing left, a Chlamys draped over his arms, holding a Dolphin in his right hand and a Trident with his left. S - C across the fields.

Weight: 9.65 g, Diameter: 27.1 x 26.6 x 1.8 mm, Die axis: 210°, Mint: Rome, posthumous issue by his grandson, Gaius "Caligula", between 37-41 A.D. Reference: RIC I 58
Masis
0035-510np_noir.jpg
Agrippa, As - *323 viewsPosthumous issue of Caligula, in honour of his grandfather (died 12 BC)
Rome mint, ca AD 37/41
M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa left with rostral crown
Neptun standing left, holding trident and dolphin. Large S C in fields
10.9 gr
Ref : RCV #1812, Cohen #3
Ex Alwin collection

The following commentary is a (quick) translation from CGB about a similar coin :

"Although Augustus associated his close friend Agrippa in his coinage, he didn't for him alone. Gaius honoured the memory of his grandfather, recalling he had been COS III in 27 BC while Augustus was COS VII at the same time.
Gaius, however, as the new emperor would like us to remember his double filiation : Through his father, Germanicus, he's descended from Nero Drusus and Antonia, thus from Tiberius ; through his mother Agrippina the elder, he tells us Agrippa and Julia are his grand parents and he's a grand grand son of Augustus. Agrippa remained prestigious all along the first century CE, although he had died 12 BC. Titus then Domitian will also strike this type, seemingly very succesfull towards population (see RCV 2589 and 2894)"
6 commentsPotator II
Agrippina-Ses-Ob-_-Rev~4.jpg
Agrippina the Elder (ca. 14 B.C.-33 A.D)1190 viewsAgrippina the Elder (ca. 14 B.C.-33 A.D)
Sestertius
Daughter of Julia and Marcus Agrippa, wife of Germanicus and mother of Emperor Caligula. The most beautiful woman of all Caesars in the most incredible condition. The finest known specimen originally from the Morreti Collection.
Obv.Posthumous portrait ordered by Caligula to commemorate his mother who had tragically died in exile. Rev.The carpentum drawn by two mules, the vehicle reserved for the use of the women of the imperial family in the city.
Cohen 1 ; RIC 42
10 commentsPetitioncrown
Alexander_Zeus_3b.jpg
Alexander III 'The Great' | Zeus - Macedonian Kingdom, AR Drachm, 337 to 323 BC.79 views
Alexander III 'The Great' | Zeus - Silver drachm

Obv: Head of Alexander in guise of Herakles, wearing lion-skin headdress, right-facing.
Rev: Zeus enthroned, nude to waste, left-facing, holding and gazing at eagle in outstretched right hand, scepter in raised left hand; monogram TI before the god, below the eagle - second eagle below the monogram(?): [A]LEXANDROY down-vertical in right field.

Exergue: None.

Mint: Sardis
Struck: 310-301 BC. (Posthumous issue)

Size: 14.9 x 15.9 mm.
Weight: 4.27 grams.
Die axis: 0°

Condition: Quite fine. Beautiful, bright, clear, lustrous with subtle but distinctive toning. Nicely centered, well struck with excellent images, legend and monogram, in fine relief.

Refs:*
Müller 186.
Reference: Price - 2617
Tiathena
Alexander_III_Drachm.jpg
Alexander III Drachm94 viewsOBV: Herakles' head right, clad in lion-skin head-dress.
REV: "ALEXANDROU", Zeus enthroned left, eagle in
extended right, scepter in left, "MU" monogram
within wreath left, head wearing Phrygian hat
below throne.

Price 1565
posthumous, c. 310 - 297 B.C.
4.24gm 17.1mm

7 commentsgoldenancients
Alexander_III_Tetradrachm2.jpg
Alexander III Posthumous Tetradrachm -- Amphipolis -- ~323 BC19 views16.80 g, 25 mm, 270°
Amphipolis Mint
Silver Tetradrachm
Minted during reign of Alexander III; Posthumous
Price 104

Obverse: Head of Herakles Wearing Nemean Skin Headdress Right.
Reverse: AΛEΞAN∆POY (Of Alexander), Zeus Aëtophoros Enthroned Left Holding Eagle and Staff.

Alexander III the Great, the King of Macedonia and conqueror of the Persian Empire is considered one of the greatest military geniuses of all times. He became king upon his father’s death in 336 BCE and went on to conquer most of the known world of his day. He is known as 'the great' both for his military genius and his diplomatic skills in handling the various populaces of the regions he conquered. He is further recognized for spreading Greek culture, language, and thought from Greece throughout Asia Minor, Egypt, and Mesopotamia to India and thus initiating the era of the Hellenistic World.
___________________
What a nose.
Hydro
Alexander_III_Tetradrachm_3.jpg
Alexander III Posthumous Tetradrachm -- Arados -- 328-323 BC23 views16.03 g, 26 mm, 90°
Arados Mint
Silver Tetradrachm
Minted during reign of Alexander III; Posthumous
Price 3325

Obverse: Head of Herakles Wearing Nemean Skin Headdress Right.
Reverse: AΛEΞAN∆POY (Of Alexander), Zeus Aëtophoros Enthroned Left Holding Eagle and Staff.

Alexander III the Great, the King of Macedonia and conqueror of the Persian Empire is considered one of the greatest military geniuses of all times. He became king upon his father’s death in 336 BCE and went on to conquer most of the known world of his day. He is known as 'the great' both for his military genius and his diplomatic skills in handling the various populaces of the regions he conquered. He is further recognized for spreading Greek culture, language, and thought from Greece throughout Asia Minor, Egypt, and Mesopotamia to India and thus initiating the era of the Hellenistic World.
Hydro
Alexander_III_Tetradrachm.jpg
Alexander III Posthumous Tetradrachm -- Phocis -- ~323 BC25 views16.95 g, 30 mm, 100°
Phocis Mint
Silver Tetradrachm
Minted during reign of Alexander III; Posthumous
Price 834; Muller 750

Obverse: Head of Herakles Wearing Nemean Skin Headdress Right.
Reverse: AΛEΞAN∆POY (Of Alexander), Zeus Aëtophoros Enthroned Left Holding Eagle and Staff.

Alexander III the Great, the King of Macedonia and conqueror of the Persian Empire is considered one of the greatest military geniuses of all times. He became king upon his father’s death in 336 BCE and went on to conquer most of the known world of his day. He is known as 'the great' both for his military genius and his diplomatic skills in handling the various populaces of the regions he conquered. He is further recognized for spreading Greek culture, language, and thought from Greece throughout Asia Minor, Egypt, and Mesopotamia to India and thus initiating the era of the Hellenistic World.
________________________
A nice coin, but a past owner was way too harsh in chemically cleaning this. On the obverse, the lower jaw of the lion and Herakle's cheek contains a thin line of what I believe to be black chemical burn.
Hydro
010952LG.jpg
Alexander III Tetradrachm50 viewsPosthumous issue of Amphipolis mint 316-305 bc, Zeus / Herakles, 17.06 gram1 commentsAdrian S
100_0747.JPG
Alexander III Tetradrachm Amphipolis Mint41 viewsTetradrachm of Alexander III of Macedon known as "the great". This is posthumous issue from the mint of Amphipolis in Macedonia, minted 316 - 305 B.C. The obverse shows Alexander as Herakles wearing a lion skin. The reverse shows Zeus enthroned, holding a sceptre and eagle with a crescent moon in the left field and the legend ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝ ΔΡΟΥ aroundsimmurray
Alexander_III_the_Great_hemidrachm.jpg
Alexander III the Great - Drachm - Colophon, Lydia59 viewsDate: 310-301 BC (posthumous)
Size: 16 mm
Weight: 4.3 g
Obv: Head of Herakles wearing lion's scalp right
Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, legs crossed, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right; crescent in left field, N below throne
Price 1798
Viriathus
price1959.jpg
Alexander III The Great, drachm; Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, Price 195933 viewsAlexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C. Silver drachm, Price 1959, SNG Cop 965, VF/F, Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, 3.889g, 17.0mm, 0o, posthumous, c. 319 - 305 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse “ALEXANDROU”, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long vertical scepter in left, right leg drawn back, “PA” monogram right, AT monogram under throne, B outer right (off-flan). Ex FORVMPodiceps
alex3_miletos_pan.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C. Miletos mint89 viewsBronze AE 1/4 Unit, Price 2102Ab, weight 1.1g, max. diameter 11.65 mm, Miletos mint, Posthumous issue c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obv. Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; rev. ΑΛΕΞΑΝ∆ΡΟ[Υ], bow in case above, club and stalk of grain below. Dark brown and green patina with some earthen residue. Appears to have little or no wear! (much better in hand) Very scarce denomination from this mint.1 commentsSteve E
AlexTheGreatMemphisTet.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Possible Lifetime Issue104 viewsThis is the same coin in my collection, different picture, as the Alexander tetradrachm listed as [300mem].

Silver tetradrachm, Price 3971, VF, 16.081g, 26.1mm, 0o, Egypt, Memphis mint, c. 332 - 323 or 323 - 305 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse ALEXANDROU, Zeus enthroned left, legs crossed, eagle in right, scepter in left, rose left, DI-O under throne. Ex Pavlos S. Pavlou. Ex FORVM, "The Memphis issues are among the finest style Alexander coins. Experts disagree on the date of this issue. Some identify it as a lifetime issue and others as a posthumous issue (Joseph Sermarini).

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC)

"Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.

Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr. Joann Fletcher
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml

"When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."--attributed to Plutarch, The Moralia.
http://www.pothos.org/alexander.asp?paraID=96

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsJames Fitzgerald
Alexander_the_Great_AR_Drachm_-_Miletos_Mint.jpg
Alexander III “The Great” AR Drachm, Miletos mint.46 viewsKings of Macedon, 18mm 4.15g Posthumous issue 310-301 BC.
O: Head Herakles r. in lionskin.
R: Zeus enthroned l., one foot back, holding eagle and sceptre, ALEXANDROU (partial, at edge of flan) to r, Miletos monogram in l. field, XE monogram beneath throne.
SG6730-31v(letters, monogram),Price 2151v(second monogram). _6830
1 commentsAntonivs Protti
alexander_III_price_1560.jpg
Alexander III, drachm, Price 156032 viewsAlexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C. Silver drachm, Price 1560, SNG Cop 972, nice VF, Troas, Abydus? mint, 4.229g, 17.4mm, 0o, posthumous, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse “ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ”, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long vertical scepter in left, right leg drawn back, ME monogram left, ivy leaf under throne. Price attributes this coin to Abydus but notes that the attribution can be made "only with caution." ex FORVMPodiceps
006~1.JPG
Alexander the Great31 views294-260 B.C.
Silver Drachm
4.08 gm, 18 mm
Obv.: Head of Alexander as Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress
Rev.: Zeus enthroned left holding eagle and scepter, city monogram MI to left, AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ to right
Miletos mint, 294-260 B.C.
Price 2151; Müller 1057.

Ex R.J. O'Hara (this coin featured on his most excellent webpage: http://rjohara.net/coins/alexander-posthumous/ Coin No. RJO 104)
1 commentsJaimelai
Alexander_III_4d.jpg
Alexander the Great * Colophon, Ionia, 337 to 323 BC. Silver drachm148 views
Alexander III * Colophon, Ionia, Macedonian Kingdom * AR drachm

Obv: Portrait head of Alexander right, wearing the lion's skin in style of Herakles.
Rev: Zeus enthroned seated left, holding a scepter in left hand, arm raised, and eagle in his right hand, arm extended to front, with [A]ΛEXANΔΡOY vertical in left field. Interesting set of mint marks: Male lion's head left-facing in left field, above ornate Φ - ornate pentagram below the throne.

Exergue: (None)

Mint: Colophon
Struck: 301-297 BC.
* Posthumous issue
* Issued under Lysimachos

Size: 17.34 x 17.18 mm.
Weight: 4.11 grams
Die axis: 180°

Condition: Apparent in photo which is quite faithful to the coin in hand. Very lovely bright and clear silvery luster.

Refs:*
Price 1836d

1 commentsTiathena
Alexander_the_Great_AR_Drachm__Kolophon_Mint_.jpg
Alexander the Great AR Drachm - Kolophon Mint103 viewsKings of Macedon, Alexander III “The Great” AR Drachm 18mm 4.20g Posthumous issue 310-301 BC.
O: Head Herakles r. in lionskin.
R: Zeus enthroned l., one foot back, holding eagle and sceptre, ALEXANDROU to r, B over TI in l. field, G beneath throne.
SG - , Price 1808. _6930 _sold
Antonivs Protti
Alexander_tetra.jpg
Alexander the Great Tetradrachm, Amphipolis Mint. Price 45921 viewsSilver tetradrachm, 16.7g, maximum diameter 26mm, Amphipolis mint, posthumous, c. 315 - c. 294 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse ΑΛΕΞΑΝ∆ΡΟΥ, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long vertical scepter in left, right leg drawn back, holding eagle and scepter, Λ and torch l., Pegasus forepart r. under throne. Price 459Podiceps
Alexander_drachm.jpg
Alexander the Great, drachm19 viewsAlexander the Great. AR Drachm. Ionia, Colophon mint. Posthumous, c. 323-319 B.C.. Price 1769. Obverse: Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck. Reverse: Greek inscription, Zeus on throne, right leg drawn back, holding eagle and scepter, lyre left, A under throne. Ex Forvm.Lucas H
drach2.jpg
Alexander The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, (336 - 323 B.C.)76 viewsAR Drachm
Posthumous
O: Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck.
R: ΑΛΕΞΑΝ∆ΡΟΥ, Zeus seated left, right leg drawn back, eagle in right, long vertical scepter in left, X within Ω left, KH under throne.
Mylasa mint 310-300 B.C.
4.1g
16mm
Price 2480
1 commentsMat
AG-Antigonos_I_Monophthalmos-3.jpg
Antigonos I Monophthalmos. As Strategos of Asia, 320-306/5 BC, or king, 306/5-301 BC., AR Drachm 12 views4.30 grams
Obv.: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
Rev.:Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; ME monogram in left field, ivy leaf below throne.
Price 1560; ADM II Series XIX
This coin was purchased form the Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. (CNG)
NGC Ch AU; Strike 4/5; Surface 55

Normally such coins are listed as a posthumous issue of Alexander III which I have no interest in since I rather a coin of Alexander III that is in fact a lifetime issue. However CNG attributed this coin to the actual issuer something that has more meaning to me that simply a posthumous issue of Alexander III.
Richard M10
ppsectetORweb.jpg
Antioch, Revised Posthumous Philip, RPC 413654 viewsAntioch Mint, revised posthumous Philip, year = 19 (31/30 B.C.) AR, 26mm 14.39g, RPC 4136, Newell, no. 23
O: Diademed head of Philip Philadelphus, r.
R: BAEILEWE FILIPPOY EPIFANOYE FILADELFOY, Zeus, seated l., holding Nike and scepter
EX: THI
* "In the early fifties, the Romans revived the coinage of King Philip Philadelphus to be their coinage of Syria, copying his types (portrait of Philip/Zeus seated l.), though in a debased style. The coinage lasted from then until the reign of Augustus, and was discussed most recently by H.R. Baldus (in CRWLR, pp. 127-30, with earlier references for H. Scying, E. T. Newell, A. R. Bellinger and C. M. Kraay). The first issues were made with the monogram of Gabinius (57-55 BC), Crassus (54/53 BC) and Cassius (52/51 BC). There after the establishment of a Caesarian era at Antioch in 44/48 BC, their monogram was replaced by one standing for Antioch )or ‘autonomous’: see Wr. 21) and the coins were dated in the exergue by the years of this era. Year 3-12 and, then with a new style (see E. T. Newell, NC, 1919, pp. 69ff.; Baldus, p. 150, n. 14) 19-33 are known.
It may seem odd that the Romans chose the Tetradrachm of Philip (92-83 BC) to revive, rather than those of the last king, Antiochus XII; it is true that the last substantial issue of Seleucid tetradrachms was made by Philip, so that his would have comprised a most important proportion of the currency (so Newell, pp 80-4; M. J. Price ap. Baldus, op. cit., p. 127), but it is hard to see that this provides a sufficient reason, and it is possible that some other consideration might be relevant. While Antiochus (c. 69-65 BC) was away campaigning against the Arabs, the people of Antioch revolted and put forward, as king, Philip, the son of Philip Philadelphus. As the claims of Antiochus were rejected by Pompey when he formed the province, the Roman view may have been that Philip was the last legitimate Seleucid king, and, if so, his coins would naturally have been chosen as the prototype of the Roman coinage in Syria.
The Philips were interrupted from year 12 until year 19, and it seems that in this gap the tetradrachms of Cleopatra and Antony were produced. The evidence for their production at Antioch, however, does not seem sufficient, and they have been catalogued elsewhere, under ‘Uncertain of Syria’ (4094-6). It is certain, however, that a unique drachm portraying Antony was produced at Antioch during this period, as it bears the ethnic ANTIOXEWN MHTPOPOLEWS. See also addenda 4131A.
After the defeat of Antony, the coinage of posthumous Philip was revived in 31/30 BC, though it is not clear whether this represents a conscious decision to avoid putting Octavian’s portrait on the coinage, as happened in Asia and Egypt (similarly, the portrait does not appear on city bronzes of Syria before the last decade BC) or whether it is just the simple reinstatement of the previous type, after the new type of Antony and Cleopatra became unacceptable. At any rate the coinage continued until at least year 33 (= 17/16 BC). Current evidence does not permit us to be sure that it continued any later, to the year 36 (= 14/13 BC), as Newell thought, though this is not impossible."

RPC I, pp. 606-607
casata137ec
Antiochos_VII_(posthumous_Cappadocian_issue,_reigned_138–129_BCE)_tetradrachm_(AR).png
Antiochos VII (posthumous Cappadocian issue, reigned 138-129 BCE) tetradrachm (AR)143 viewsObv.: Diademed head of king Rev.: BASILEWS ANTIOXOY EYEPGETOY (Athena Nikephoros std. within laurel wreath) Field: Monogram above A, phi in right side of field Diameter: 28 mm Weight: 16,43 g SC 2143.2; HGC 9, 1068

These tetradrachms were probably issued in the Kingdom of Cappadocia to fund the usage of Syrian mercenaries. Antiochos VII could be called the last great Seleucid king. He undertook several successful campaigns in the East to reclaim territory lost to the Parthian advance. After his death, however, the Seleucid Empire was rapidly confined to Syria.
1 commentsNick.vdw
antiochusIV.jpg
Antiochus IV12 viewsAntiochos IV. 146/5 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 15.90 g, 12h). Antioch on the Orontes mint. Dated SE 167 (146/5 BC). Diademed head right / Zeus Nikephoros seated left; ZEP (date) and monogram in exergue. SC 1885.5b (this coin referenced); Mřrkholm, Posthumous – (but obv. die A1); CSE 209 (this coin); HGC 9, 744; DCA 97. VF, toned, flan crack, harshly cleaned.

From the MNL Collection, purchased from Eukratides Ancient Numismatics, November 2009. Ex Arthur Houghton Collection.

Ex CNG 109, lot 311
arash p
Antonia_AE_Dupondius.JPG
Antonia AE Dupondius. c50-54 AD. Daughter of Mark Antony & Augustus' sister Octavia, all coins struck posthumously by her son Claudius.32 viewsANTONIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P S C, Claudius, togate, standing left with simpulum. Cohen 6. RIC 104 [Claudius], Cohen 6, BMC 213.
sold

Antonivs Protti
Antoninus D 3~0.jpg
Antoninus Pius303 viewsAE Antoninianus. Obv.:DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS ; rad. hd. r. ; Rev.: CONSECRATIO ; eale stg. r. on scepter, looking l.
Posthumous issues
By Trajan Decius
Tanit
antoninus_pius_03.jpg
Antoninus Pius AE Sestertius20 viewsObv: DIVVS ANTONINVS - Bare head right.
Rev: DIVO PIO - Column of Antoninus, surmounted by statue of the emperor; S C across field.
Year: 162 AD
Ref: RIC III 1269
oa
4dc8_1B.jpg
Antoninus Pius Denarius 29 viewsSilver denarius, RIC III M. Aurelius 431, Cohen 155, gVF, Rome mint, posthumous, 161 - 180 A.D.; obverse DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head right; reverse CONSECRATIO, eagle standing half-right on garlanded altar, looking left; minted posthumously by Marcus Aurelius;Adrian S
Antoninus Pius 5 D.jpg
Antoninus Pius Divvs Antoninianus25 viewsAE Antoninianus. Obv.:DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS ; rad. hd. r. ; Rev.: CONSECRATIO ; eagle stg. r. on scepter, looking l.
Posthumous issues
By Trajan Decius
Tanit
Antoninus_Pius_RIC_431.JPG
Antoninus Pius, 138 - 161 AD (Posthumous issue)114 viewsObv: DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head of Antoninus Pius facing right.

Rev: CONSECRATIO, Eagle standing right, head turned left, on an altar decorated with garlands.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, Memorial issue struck by Marcus Aurelius, 161 AD

3.4 grams, 18 mm, 0°

RIC III M. Aurelius 431, RSC 155/6, S5192, VM 136/3
3 commentsSPQR Coins
Antoninus_Pius_RIC_M442.JPG
Antoninus Pius, 138 - 161 AD (Posthumous issue)27 viewsObv: DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare headed bust of Antoninus Pius facing right.

Rev: DIVO PIO, cult statue of Antoninus Pius enthroned left, holding a branch and a scepter.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 162 AD

3.2 grams, 18 mm, 180°

RIC III M. Aurelius 442, RSC 352, S5194
SPQR Matt
Antoninus_Pius_RIC_440.JPG
Antoninus Pius, 138 - 161 AD (Posthumous issue)34 viewsObv: DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare-headed bust of Antoninus Pius facing right, drapery on left shoulder.

Rev: DIVO PIO, Column surmounted by a statue of the deified Antoninus Pius standing left, holding an eagle and a long scepter, trellis work balustrade around large base.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, c. 161 AD

3.4 grams, 18.1 mm, 180°

RIC III Marcus Aurelius 440, RSC II 353, S5195

Ex: FORVM
1 commentsMatt Inglima
Antoninus_Pius_RIC_M442~1.JPG
Antoninus Pius, 138 - 161 AD (Posthumous issue)11 viewsObv: DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare headed bust of Antoninus Pius facing right.

Rev: DIVO PIO, cult statue of Antoninus Pius enthroned left, holding a branch and a scepter.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 162 AD

3.46 grams, 19.2 mm, 180°

RIC III M. Aurelius 442, RSC 352, S5194

Ex: FORVM
Matt Inglima
Antoninus_Pius_RIC_III_1266.jpg
Antoninus Pius, AE Sestertius, Ustrinum, RIC III 12666 viewsAntoninus Pius
Augustus, 138 - 161 A.D.
AE (Orichalcum) Sestertius

Obverse: DIVVS ANTONINVS, Bare headed bust facing right.
Reverse: CONSE-CRATIO, a four tiered Ustrinum, decorated with Garlands and Statues, surmounted by Antoninus Pius in a Quadriga. S - C across the fields.

Weight: 22.05 g, Diameter: 31 x 31 x 4 mm, Die axis: 330°, Mint: Rome, posthumous issue, struck in 161 A.D. in the joint reigns of Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, Reference: RIC III 1266
Masis
Antoninus_Pius_RIC_III_441.jpg
Antoninus Pius, AR Denarius, Shrine, RIC III 4418 viewsAntoninus Pius
Augustus, 138 – 161 A.D.

Coin: AR Denarius

Obverse: DIVVS-ANTONINVS, Bare-headed bust facing right.
Reverse: DIVO-PIO, Large Shrine, with the doors closed.

Weight: 2.61 g, Diameter: 16.5 x 17 x 1.5 mm, Die axis: 330°, Mint: Rome, struck in 162 A.D., issued during the reign of Marcus Aurelius, Reference: RIC III 441
Masis
Augustus_Prov.jpg
Augustus69 viewsDIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER

Rev. PROVIDENT SC around alter

Posthumous issue by Tiberius Aug 19th 14 A.D.

SEAR 1789
Titus Pullo
63761q00.jpg
Augustus89 viewsRoman Imperatorial
Octavian Caesar
(Reign as ‘Augustus’ 1st Emperor of the Roman Empire 27 BC-14 AD)
(b. 63 BC, d. 14 AD)


Obverse: Bare head of Octavian facing right

Reverse: IMP CAESAR, Facing head of Octavian on ithyphallic boundary stone of Jupiter Terminus, winged thunderbolt below

Reverse refers to Octavian's reestablishment of boundaries in the east after the battle of Actium and review of the client kingdoms established by Mark Antony (in particular return of Roman territory from Cleopatra and her children)

Silver Denarius
Minted in Italy 30-29 BC




Translations:

Imperatorial=The Imperatorial period extends from the outbreak of civil war between Julius Caesar and Pompey in January 49 BC and ends early 27 BC when Caesar's adopted heir Octavian was given the title "Augustus" by the Senate, effectively making him the sole ruler of the entire Roman territory. 

IMP CAESAR=Imperator(Commander-in-Chief) Caesar(Octavian took Julius Caesar’s name after he was posthumously adopted by him in 44 BC)


Reference
RIC I 269a
2 commentsSphinx357
Auguste 21 D.jpg
Augustus As35 viewsPosthumous issues by Tiberius
Copper As. Obv.:DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER ; rad. hd. of Augustus l.
Rev.: PROVIDENT S C , facade of altar-enclosure of the Ar Providentiae Augusti, with double panelled door and horns of the altar visible above.
RIC 81
Tanit
augustus_2~0.jpg
Augustus As28 viewsAE As Posthumous issues by Tiberius
Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER ; rad. hd. l.
Rev: S C ; winged thunderbolt

Cohen 249
Tanit
Tibere.jpg
Augustus As28 viewsPosthumous issues by Tiberius
Copper As.
Obv.:DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER ; rad. hd. of Augustus l.
Rev.: PROVIDENT S C , facade of altar-enclosure of the Ar Providentiae Augusti, with double panelled door and horns of the altar visible above.

RIC 81
Tanit
Augustus D 3.jpg
Augustus Dupondius37 viewsPosthumous issues by Tiberius
AE Dupondius. Obv.: DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER ; rad. hd. l. ; Rev.: SC ; legend in field, surrounded by oak-wreath.
RIC 79 Tiberius
Posthumous issues by Tiberius
Tanit
August.jpg
Augustus Provident62 viewsDIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER
Radiate head of Augustus left

PROVIDENT SC around alter

Posthumous issue by Tiberius Aug 19th 14 A.D.

9.73g

SEAR 1789; RIC
Jay GT4
Augustus_RIC_I_81.jpg
Augustus, AE As, RIC I 814 viewsAugustus
27 B.C. – 14 A.D.

Coin: AE As

Obverse: DIVVS ● AVGVSTVS ● PATER, radiate bust facing to left.
Reverse: A large Altar. S - C across the fields. PROVIDENT in exergue.

Weight: 10.71 g, Diameter: 28.8 x 28 x 2.2 mm, Die axis: 220°, Mint: Rome, posthumous issue by Tiberius, 31-37 A.D. Reference: RIC I 81
Masis
Augustus_RPC_I_32.jpg
Augustus, AE26, RPC I 3210 viewsAugustus
27 B.C. – 14 A.D.

Coin: AE26

Obverse: DIVVS AVGVSTVS PA-TER, radiate bust facing left.
Reverse: COL - AVGVST - EMERITA, around the city of Emerita.

Weight: 8.87 g, Diameter: 26.3 x 26 x 2.6 mm, Die axis: 190°, Mint: Emerita, Spain, posthumous issue by Tiberius, 14-37 A.D. Reference: RPC I 32
Masis
346.jpg
Augustus, Posthumous12 viewsAugustus, Posthumous as struck under the reign of Tiberius
DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER, Radiate head of Augustus left
PROVIDENT, Altar, S C in field
11.02 gr
Ref : Cohen #228, RCV #1789, RIC I # 81
2 commentsAncient Aussie
0030-510np_noir.jpg
Augustus, Posthumous as324 viewsAs struck under the reign of Tiberius
DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER, Radiate head of Augustus left
PROVIDENT, Altar, S C in field
11.02 gr
Ref : Cohen #228, RCV #1789, RIC I # 81
3 commentsPotator II
xE7Ks4WzaFy3M5MtNb6CZRs92jwGe8.jpg
Augustus. Posthumous AE As Winged Thunderbolt29 viewsDIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER, head of Augustus left.
Large winged thunderbolt between S - C.
RIC: 83 for Tiberius. 34-37 AD. Rome. _3820
Antonivs Protti
faustina_vanhempi.jpg
AVGVSTA (Ceres)13 viewsFaustina I AR Denarius. Silver denarius, RIC III 362, BMCRE IV 421, RSC II 104, SRCV II 4584, Rome mint, 3.277g, 17.1mm, 0o, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing half left, holding long torch in right and raising drapery with left. ex FORVM

kaitsuburi
faustina_I_362.jpg
AVGVSTA, Ceres (2)5 viewsFaustina I AR Denarius, Silver denarius, RIC III 362, BMCRE IV 421, RSC II 104, SRCV II 4584, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing half left, holding long torch in right and raising drapery with left. Ex FORVMPodiceps
faustinaI.jpg
AVGVSTA, Pietas9 viewsFaustina Sr. Silver denarius, RIC III 374, RSC II 124a, BMCRE IV 452, VF, Rome mint, 2.836 g, 17.5 mm, 180o, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAV-STINA, draped bust right; reverse AVGVSTA, Pietas standing half left, raising right hand, left hand at side, lit altar left; tight, slightly irregular flan. ex FORVMPodiceps
MISC_AyyubidBalog_629.JPG
Ayyubid. al-Zahir Ghazi (Governor of Halab (now Aleppo) from 581-613 A.H. = 1186-1216 A.D.)106 viewsBalog 596 or 599 ff. or 629 (in which case it was issued posthumously (614-638 A.H. = 1218-1241 A.D.)).

AR dirham, 18-22 mm. Struck at the Halab mint. Dated but the date is unreadable.

Obv: al-Imam / al-Nasir Ahmed. / al-Malik al-Adil / Abu Bakr, in four lines within hexagram. La Ilaha Illa Allah. Muhammed Rasul Allah (Kalima), in margin.

Rev: al-Malik / al-Zahir Ghazi / ibn Yusuf bin / Ayyub, in four lines within hexagram. Duribe bi-Halab sene [date], in margin.

Note: al-Zahir Ghazi was the third son of Saladin (Salah ad-Din Yusuf ibn Ayyub). The lands that he was assigned to govern were under the control of his uncle, Al-Adil I (al-Malik al-Adil Sayf al-Din Abu-Bakr ibn Ayyub), who was Saladin’s younger brother.
Stkp
Hermaios.jpg
Bactrian/Indo Greek - Hermaios (90-70 BCE) - Posthumous AD 20-4011 viewsSize/Metal: AE25; Weight: 8.86 grams; Mint: Uncertain Mint in the Paropamisadai or Gandhara Region; Denomination: Tetradrachm; Date: 20-40 AD (Posthumous); Obverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ EΡMAIOΥ ΣΩTHΡOΣ (King Hermaios the Savior). Diademed draped bust right. Reverse: Zeus enthroned facing 3/4 left with right hand raised making benediction gesture and holding scepter. Monogram to left and Kharoshthi letter to right - in Kharoshthi, Maharajasa tratarasa Heramayasa (of Great King Hermaios the Savior). References: Bopearachchi #20; Mitchiner #236, Hoover #308.museumguy
Hermaios~0.jpg
Bactrian/Indo Greek - Hermaios (90-70 BCE) - Posthumous AD 20-408 viewsSize/Metal: AE23; Weight: 9.42 grams; Mint: Uncertain Mint in Eastern Gandhara; Denomination: Tetradrachm; Date: 20-40 AD (Posthumous); Obverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ SOTHROS/ERMAIOY (of Great King Hermaios the Savior). Diademed draped bust right. In Kharoshthi (Maharajasa tratarasa Heramayasa). Reverse: Zeus enthroned facing 3/4 left, making benediction gesture and holding scepter - monogram to left and Kharoshthi letter to right. References: Bopearachchi #20; Mitchiner MACW #2041, Hoover #308.museumguy
Bactria,_Diodotos_I_posthumous_issue_Tetradrachm_.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Diodotos II, ca. 240-230 BC, AR Tetradrachm 11 viewsPosthumous diademed idealised head of Diodotos I right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔIOΔITOY (of King Diodotos). Zeus striding left, hurling thunderbolt in right hand, aegis over extended left arm; eagle standing at his feet.

Holt B2 (Holt B2 example 3 = this coin); Kritt B2; Bopearachchi 6A; SNG ANS 9, 87; Qunduz 8; HGC 12, 21. Struck ca. 230 BC at Mint "B" - Baktra.

(25 mm, 16.42 g, 6h).
CNG 778209; ex -CNG e-Auction 124, October 2005, 139 (incorrectly attributed as Holt B1); ex- Munz und Medaillen Fixed Price List 332 (1972).

The coin was struck shortly before Euthydemos overthrew Diodotos II. The idealised posthumous image of Diodotos I on the obverse was a statement of the legitimacy of the right of Diodotos II to the throne of Baktria, as the lineal successor to Diodotos I. This B2 issue is distinguished from the preceding B1 type by the absence of a wreath beneath the extended arm of Zeus on the reverse. Holt suggested that the removal of the wreath from coinage followed Diodotos II’s treaty with the Parthians. The wreath is believed to have been instituted as a celebration of Diodotos I victory over Arsaces in the previous decade and thus potentially perceived as an insult to the Parthians on consummation of the treaty.
n.igma
spear_collage.jpg
Bronze Age Reworked Dagger44 viewsAn ancient European Bronze Age reworked dagger, dating to approximately 800 BC.

Of rare and unusual form, with a long ridged handle, slender blade and prominent central rib. Unusually, this piece appears to have originally been made as a spear head, subsequently broken (possibly in battle), and reworked into a dagger. Beating marks from this process of reworking are still clearly visible.
A weapon such as this would have been used in battle by the early Celtic peoples and their predecessors, indeed the period to which this artifact dates was characterized by migrations and invasions of warrior led groups across Europe. The late Bronze Age appears to have been a time of widespread warfare and social upheaval, ultimately carried on the back of weapons such as this.

Length: 8 ˝ inches.


Provenance:
Ex-Collection of Henk Huffener (1923 – 2006), a respected artist, officially honored hero of the Dutch resistance, and successful antiques dealer, with establishments in Surrey and Kensington, England.
Huffener was born in Utrecht in 1923. One of nine children, he soon became known for his artistic talents, most notably for his still lifes, portraits, and abstractionist works. Huffener, inspired by his father, also became immersed in the world of anti-fascist activism. Come the start of the war, he began traveling the Netherlands, helping Jews escape Nazi-occupied Europe by providing them with forged papers, and hiding them from their persecutors. This incredible bravery and selflessness was documented in The Other Schindlers by Agnes Grunwald-Spier (2010), and Huffener was honoured by Yad Vashem as 'Righteous Among the Nations' in 1998. His wartime contributions were also commemorated posthumously in March 2010, when Prime Minister Gordon Brown awarded him the Hero of the Holocaust medal for "the service of humanity."
Huffener eventually moved to England in the 1950s, establishing his own antiques business in 1959 in Albury, Surrey. Here, his knowledge and collections grew to encompass antiquities, ethnographic art, glass, paintings and fossils. Also noted for his restoration skills, Huffener was much respected in his field, coming to befriend Herbert Reiser, one of the world's leading collectors.
Salaethus
comp.jpg
Cappadocia, Ariarathes VII ca 110-99 BC, AR Tetradrachm in the name of Antiochos VII (138-129 BC)205 viewsDiademed head of Antiochos VII right, fillet border / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ Athena standing half-left in crested helmet on short ground line, confronting Nike held in right hand and with left arm balancing a spear while holding a grounded shield decorated with a Gorgoneion head, primary controls ΔI (in ligature) over A in outer left field, secondary controls O-Λ in inner fields, laurel crown around.
Lorber and Houghton, NC 2006, ser. 1, iss. 3 (A1/P1 - coin 12 - this coin); HGC 9 1069; SC 2148; SMA 298; SNG Spaer 1873 (same obverse die).
Uncertain Cappadocian mint, probably Ariaratheia or Eusebeia-Tyana.
From the same obverse die as the first issue to bear a reverse legend in the name of Ariarthes VII with the same O-Λ mint controls (second coin in image).
(28 mm, 16.63 gm, 12h)
ex- Commerce (‘Antiochus VII Posthumous’ Hoard) 2005

This coin is from an extensive imitative series struck by the Cappadocian Kings during the internecine wars for power that plagued the region in the early first century BC. The exact reason as to why coinage imitating that of the deceased Seleukid Syrian ruler Antiochos VII was struck is unknown. However, the utilization of the coinage to pay Syrian mercenaries in familiar coin appears most likely. This coin is most significant in that the obverse die from which it was struck was used to strike a unique coin of similar iconography and with identical mint controls, bearing the name Ariarathes VII in the legend ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ APIAPAΘOY ΦIΛOMHTOPOΣ (image below). This die linkage (only recognized in 2002) confirmed that many of the Antiochos VII issues previously attributed to Syria were posthumous issues made by the Cappadocian Kings commencing with Ariathes VI and continuing through the reigns of Ariarathes VII – IX and Ariobazanes I.

Ariarathes VII who was responsible for the striking of this coin was a hapless pawn in the power struggle for control of Cappadocia between Mithradates VI of Pontus and Nikomedes III of Bithynia. Ariarathes VII was the product of the marriage of Mithradates older sister Laodike to Ariarathes VI. When the latter began to exhibit a degree of independence, Mithradates had him murdered, then appointed Laodike as regent for her young son Ariarathes VII. When Laodike married Nikomedes III of Bithynia, Mithradates expelled her and the Bithynian army from Cappadocia and placed his young nephew Ariarathes VII directly on the throne of Cappadocia. Later, when Ariarathes VII rejected Mithradates offer of his confidant Gordius as an advisor, Mithradates moved with his army to depose Ariarathes VII. The armies of Mithradates and Ariarathes met prepared for battle. At this point Mithradates called for an unarmed discussion meeting with his nephew Ariarathes in the middle ground of the battlefield. In front of the two assembled armies, Mithradates drew a concealed blade and slit his nephew’s throat, thus avoiding battle and clearing the way for a new puppet, his stepson, to be appointed as King Ariarathes VIII.
2 commentsLloyd T
Antiochus.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII70 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Houghton II 655 (same dies), SNG Spaer -, Newell SMA -, gVF, weight 16.157g, maximum diameter 28.8mm, die axis 0o, posthumous, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; obverse diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border; reverse BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU, Athena standing left, Nike in right, spear and shield in left, ligate DI / A left, A inner left, G inner right, Nike crowns epithet, laurel wreath border; scarce;

Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian King Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII.

Ex Houghton collection
Ex Forum
1 commentsPhiloromaos
antiochos_VII_tetra.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom/ In the name of Antiochos VII; tetradrachm; Nike20 viewsCappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII, 138 - 129 B.C. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton II 651 ff. (different dies), SNG Spaer -, Newell SMA -, VF, grainy, 15.919g, 29.4mm, 0o, posthumous, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; obverse diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border; reverse “BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU”, Athena standing left, Nike in right, spear and shield in left, ligate “DI” / A left, ligate “OD” inner left, K inner right, Nike crowns epithet, laurel wreath border. Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian King Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Divus_Carus.jpg
Carus - AE antoninianus18 viewsLugdunum
end 284 AD
10th emission
radiate head right
DIVO CARO PIO
eagle standing left, head right
CONSECRATIO
II
RIC V 29; Lyon 623; Pink VI/2, p. 24
ex Lucernae
Johny SYSEL
divocaro.jpg
Carus - RIC 4710 viewsCarus, posthumous antoninianus, struck by Carinus, 284 AD.
DIVO CARO, radiate head right /
CONSECRATIO, eagle standing left, head right, wings spread. Mintmark KAA.
xokleng
061117d.jpg
Carus Silvered Antoninianus, RIC 127 Antioch29 viewsObverse - DIVO CARO AVG. Radiate bust right
Reverse - CONSECRATIO. Tall, garlanded, burning altar, Delta to the right, XXI (1/20 silver) in ex.
21.3 mm., 3.3g
Posthumous Consecration Issue struck under Carinus and or Numerian
sold 4-2018
1 commentsNORMAN K
Carus_RIC_47.JPG
Carus, 282 - 283 AD (Posthumous issue)26 viewsObv: DIVO CARO, radiate bust of Carus r., slight drapery on far shoulder.

Rev: CONSECRATIO, eagle standing facing, head turned left.

Billon Antoninianus, Rome mint, 283 AD

3.2 grams, 22 mm, 0°

RIC Vii 47, VM 19
SPQR Coins
0530-510np_noir.jpg
Carus, Posthumous antoninianus - *85 viewsAntoninianus minted in Lugdunum, 2nd officina, AD 284-285
DIVO CARO PIO, Radiate head of Carus right
CONSECRATIO, Eagle facing, II at exergue
3.50 gr
Ref : Cohen #18, RCV #12394
2 commentsPotator II
Augustus_RPC_32.jpg
CITY-GATE, Augustus, AE26, Emerita, Spain, RPC 3279 viewsAugustus
27 B.C. – 14 A.D.

Coin: AE26

Obverse: DIVVS AVGVSTVS PA-TER, radiate bust facing left.
Reverse: COL - AVGVST - EMERITA, around the city of Emerita.

Weight: 8.87 g, Diameter: 26.3 x 26 x 2.6 mm, Die axis: 190°, Mint: Emerita, Spain, posthumous issue by Tiberius, 14-37 A.D. Reference: RPC 32
Masis
Claudius II 33+.jpg
Claudius Goeticus AE Antoninianus11 viewsAE Antoninianus
Posthumous issues
Obv: DIVO CLAVDIO
Rev: CONSECRATIO , altar
Tanit
coin162.jpg
Claudius II14 viewsPosthumous Claudius II issue.
(rev CONSECRATIO/Eagle) Coin #162
cars100
0-Divo_Cláudio_II-RIC_106.jpg
Claudius II - RIC VII 10616 viewsRome struck 317-318 AD.
RIC VII 106 Claudius II, AE20 posthumous issue, Rome mint.
3.2 gr. 19 mm.
DIVO CLAUDIO OPTIMO IMP, veiled and laureate head right /
REQVIES OP-TIMOR MERIT, Claudius seated left on curule chair, holding sceptre and raising right hand. Mintmark RP.
xokleng
X 15 D.jpg
Claudius II AE Antoninianus26 viewsAE Antoninianus. Claudius II Gothicus posthumous .
Obv.: DIVO CLAVDIO, radiate head right ;
Rev.: CONSECRATIO, eagle standing right or left.
Tanit
Claudius_II_Gothicus_Posthumous~0.JPG
Claudius II Gothicus25 viewsDivo Claaudius II Gothicus, AE half follis, Struck by Constantine I, 1.63g,
OBV: DIVO CLAVDIO OPTIMO IMP, veiled head of Claudius II right
REV: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM, SIS in Exergue, emperor veiled, seated left in curule chair, right hand raised, short sceptor in left
Struck by Constantine in honor of his ancestor, Claudius II.
"I honor my Grandfather, Claudius Gothicus," emperor from AD 268-270
RIC VII, Siscia 43

RARE (R3)
Romanorvm
RIC_Claudius_II_Gothicus_RICV-1_261.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus (Marcus Aurelius Claudius) (268-270 A.D.)8 viewsRIC V-1 261, Sear 11462, Van Meter 44/1

BI Antoninianus, 2.50 g., 16.58 mm. max., 0°

Milan mint, struck posthumously in 270 A.D. under Quintillus and/or Aurelian

Obv: DIVO CLAVDIO, radiate head right.

Rev: CO[NSECR]ATIO, altar with flames above, front divided into four sections with dot in each section

RIC rarity C, Van Meter VB2.
Stkp
Claudius II Gothicus  4 D.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus23 viewsAE Antoninianus. Claudius II Gothicus posthumous .
Obv.: DIVO CLAVDIO, radiate head right ;
Rev.: CONSECRATIO, eagle standing right or left.
Tanit
4649_4650.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Antoninianus, CONSACRATIO7 viewsAE Antoninianus
Claudius II Gothicus
Augustus: 268 - 270AD
Issued Posthumously: 270AD
18.5 x 12.5mm
O: DIVO CLAVDIO; Radiate head, right.
R: CONSACRATIO; Lighted altar with four panels, dot in each panel.
Exergue: Obverse, (dot)(dot).
Cyzicus Mint
LaVenera Vol. 1 10924; Goebl 288a1.
Aorta: 498: B14, O17, R135, T4, M3.
aitorazpeitia 321138576406
6/12/13 3/6/17
Nicholas Z
4647_4648.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Antoninianus, CONSECRATIO6 viewsAE Antoninianus
Claudius II Gothicus
Augustus: 268 - 270AD
Issued Posthumously: 270AD
15.8mm 3.08gr
O: DIVO CLAVDIO; Radiate head, right.
R: CONSECRATIO; Eagle standing left, head right.
Rome Mint
RIC 266; Cohen 43; Sear 11459.
Aorta: 505: B14, O17, R138, T29, M6.
davis-ancients 271220341622
6/16/13 3/6/17
Nicholas Z
Claudius II Gothicus- Consecratio Altar new.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus- Consecratio Altar42 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.

Obverse:
Radiate head right

DIVO CLAVDIO

DIVO: God

CLAVDIO: Cladius

Reverse:
CONSECRATIO

CONSECRATIO: Divine

Showing: Altar with 4 "dots" and perhaps fire. The altar is reverse

Domination: Antoninianus, Copper, size 20 mm, Posthumous
John Schou
7A419884-32FE-4F90-8A95-950BD5FCD85A.jpeg
Claudius II Gothicus/Eagle, Posthumous6 viewsBillon antoninianus. Remnants of original silvering. AE19, 1.6g. Obverse: DIVO CLAVDIO. Reverse: CONSECRATIO. RIC VI 261a.Celticaire
Claudius_Consecratio_AE.JPG
Claudius II Posthumous antoninianus. 15 viewsDIVO CLAVDIO, radiate head right / CONSECRATIO, garlanded altar with flames above, no decoration on front. Minster 478. Antonivs Protti
claudius2.jpg
Claudius the 2nd contemporary imitation.11 viewsPosthumous death commemorative,eagle antoninianus.tiberiusjulius
Constantine_I_RIC_constantinople_68.JPG
Constantine I "the Great," 307 - 337 AD (Posthumous Issue)23 viewsObv: (DV CONST)ANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled head of the deified Constantine facing right.

Rev: VN - MR in field separated by Constantine veiled, standing right; CONSA in exergue.

AE 4, Constantinople mint, 347 - 348 AD

1.7 grams, 14 mm, 0°

RIC VIII Constantinople 68, VM 96
SPQR Coins
Constantine_I_RIC_Alexandria_12.JPG
Constantine I "the Great," 307 - 337 AD (Posthumous Issue)23 viewsObv: DV CONSTANTINVS AVGG, veiled bust of the deified Constantine facing right.

Rev: No legend, Constantine, veiled, riding right in a quadriga being welcomed into heaven by the hand of God which reaches down from above; SMALB in exergue.

AE 4, Alexandria mint, 337 - 340 AD

1.6 grams, 14 mm, 180°

RIC VIII Alexandria 12, VM 95
SPQR Coins
handofgodORweb.jpg
Constantine I (Posthumous)54 viewsO: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, facing r., veiled, draped, cuirassed
R: Constantine in quadriga right, the hand of God, upper center
EX: CONS
16mm 1.11g Constantinople RIC VIII 37
casata137ec
vnmrORweb.jpg
Constantine I (Posthumous)36 viewsO: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, veiled, head only
R: VN-MR, Constantine, veiled, standing right
Ex. is unknown
14mm 1.31g Cyzicus RIC VIII 46
casata137ec
Constantine_I_RIC_VIII_Antioch_39_neu.jpg
Constantine I (Struck posthumously)33 viewsAE4 (1,8g - 12mm)
obv. DV CONSTANTI NVS PT AVGG
veiled, draped and cuirassed bust right.
No legend, Divus Constantine in quadriga right, the hand of God reaching down to him.
in erxergue SMAN gamma
mint Antioch
RIC VIII Antioch 39
HG
Constantine_19_2.jpg
Constantine I - AE 435 viewsposthumous
Cyzicus
IX 337 - 340 AD
veiled head right
DV CONSTANTI_NVS PT AVGG
Constantine riding quadriga right, Hand of God above
SMKAˇ
RIC VIII Cyzicus 19
1,11 g 16 mm
Johny SYSEL
constantine_quadriga.jpg
Constantine I - Posthumous Quadriga26 viewsRoman Imperial, Divus Constantine AE3/4 (337-340 AD), 15mm, 1.5g

Obverse: DV CONSTANTINVS PF AVGG, Veiled head right.

Reverse: Constantine in quadriga right, the hand of God, upper center, grasping the chariot, CONS in ex.

Reference: RIC VIII Constantinopolis 37
Gil-galad
constantine-posthumous-1-reshoot.jpg
Constantine I AE419 viewsRoman Imperial, Divus Constantine I AE4, 15mm, 1.5g

Obverse: D V CONSTANTI-NVS P T AVGG, Veiled head of Constantine right.

Reverse: VN-MR to left and right of shrouded figure of emperor facing. Mintmark: SMNA. "Venerable Memory"

Reference: RIC VIII Nicomedia 48
Gil-galad
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Constantine I Antioch Posthumous10 viewsRIC VIII Antioch 112
ecoli
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Constantine I Antioch Posthumous29 viewsDV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
RIC VIII Antioch 37 C3
ecoli
coins140.JPG
Constantine I Antioch Posthumous21 viewsDV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
IVST-VEN MEM

RIC VIII Antioch 64
ecoli
t33~0.JPG
Constantine I Cyzicus posthumous24 viewsRIC VIII Cyzicus 46
ecoli
Constantine_I_Post_Antioch.JPG
Constantine I Post Antioch23 viewsDivus Posthumous, Veiled VNMR
ROMAN Imperial - Antioch Mint
Constantine the Great (307 – 337 AD)

Bronze AE 3, RIC VIII Antioch 112, 1.16 g, 16mm, ,late 347 - 348 A.D.
obverse DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, veiled bust right, draped, cuirassed
Rev: VN MR, Constantine, veiled, standing right, raising hand; Ex: SMANA
Romanorvm
Constantine 16 D.jpg
Constantine I Posthumous33 viewsAE4 (under 17 mm)
Posthumous issues
Obv: DIVO CONSTANINVS PT AVGG; veiled hd. r.
Rev: VN MR ; Constantne, veiled, stg. r.
Tanit
Constantius II 24 D.jpg
Constantine I Posthumous24 viewsAE4 (under 17 mm)
Posthumous issues
Obv: DIVO CONSTANINVS PT AVGG; veiled hd. r.
Rev: VN MR ; Constantne, veiled, stg. r.
Tanit
Constantine 25 D.jpg
Constantine I Posthumous24 viewsAE4 (under 17 mm)
Posthumous issues
Obv: DIVO CONSTANINVS PT AVGG; veiled hd. r.
Rev: VN MR ; Constantne, veiled, stg. r.
Tanit
constantineI_posthumous.jpg
Constantine I posthumous53 views2 commentsareich
039-constantine I.jpg
Constantine I Posthumous36 viewsAE4
Posthumous issues
Obv:DV CONSTANTINOVS PT AVGG; veiled hd. r.
Rev: No reverse legend; Constantine in a quadriga r., with the hand og God extending out of the sky to reeive him.
Tanit
012.jpg
Constantine I Posthumous30 viewsConstantine I the Great 307 - 337
AE 4
Posthumous issues
Obv:- DV CONSTANTI - NVS PT AVGG veiled head r.
Rev:- (no legend), Constantin veiled, standing in quadriga to r., hand of god reaches down to him
Tanit
Constantine I 1.jpg
Constantine I Posthumous26 viewsAE4
Obv: DV CONSTANINVS PT AVGG
Rev: No reverse; Constantine in a quadrig right, with the had of God extending out of the sky to receive him
Tanit
Const_4.jpg
Constantine I Posthumous31 viewsConstantine I the Great 307 - 337
AE 4
Posthumous issues
Obv:- DV CONSTANTI - NVS PT AVGG veiled head r.
Rev:- (no legend), Constantin veiled, standing in quadriga to r., hand of god reaches down to him
1 commentsTanit
Constantine_commem.jpg
Constantine I the Great posthumous commemorative151 views4 commentsmihali84
Constantine_Robed.jpg
Constantine I the Great posthumous commemorative83 viewsConstantine I the Great
Posthumous commemorative
c. 347-348
Obv: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, Veiled bust right.
Rev: Veiled and togate emperor standing right, VN MR across fields. Exergue: SMANE

mihali84
Posthumous.jpg
Constantine I the Great Posthumous Commemorative 50 views AE4
Mint: Cyzicus;DATE: 347-348 AD
Obv: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, Veiled bust right.
Rev: Veiled emperor standing right, VN / MR across field.
Exergue: SMKB
Size:17X15mm; ? gms
Ref: RIC VIII 46
9 commentsbrian l
Constantine_commemorative.jpg
Constantine I the Great Posthumous commemorative 267 viewsConstantine I the Great Posthumous commemorative coin
Beautiful rainbow iridescent toning
Great detail and patina
3 commentsmihali84
AAGMb_small.png
Constantine I, AE3 posthumous issue.7 views347-348 AD.

16mm., 1.58g.

DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG. Bust of Constantine I, veiled, draped, cuirassed, right

VN - MR. Constantine I, veiled, draped, standing right, raising left hand. Mintmark unread.

References:

AAGM
RL
4814_4815.jpg
Constantine I, AE4, NO LEGEND; Constantine I riding Quadriga Right, Hand of God above.7 viewsAE4
Constantine I
Caesar: 306 - 307AD
Augustus: 307 - 337AD
Issued: Posthumously, September, 337 - April, 340AD
15.0mm 1.90gr
O: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG; Veiled head, right.
R: NO LEGEND; Constantine I, riding quadriga right, hand of God above.
Exergue: TRS
Trier Mint
Aorta: 3390: B95, O71, R42, T256, M19.
Sear 3889; RIC VIII Trier 68.
2/19/17
Nicholas Z
4812_4813.jpg
Constantine I, AE4, NO LEGEND; Constantine I riding Quadriga Right, Hand of God above.4 viewsAE4
Constantine I
Caesar: 306 - 307AD
Augustus: 307 - 337AD
Issued: Posthumously, September, 337 - April, 340AD
15.0 x 14.0mm
O: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVG; Veiled bust, right.
R: NO LEGEND; Constantine I, riding quadriga right, hand of God above.
Exergue: SMNS(Dot)
Nicomedia Mint
Aorta: 3383: B95, O71, R256, T42, M11.
2/19/17
Nicholas Z
4816_4817.jpg
Constantine I, AE4, NO LEGEND; Constantine I riding Quadriga Right, Hand of God above.3 viewsAE4
Constantine I
Caesar: 306 - 307AD
Augustus: 307 - 337AD
Issued: Posthumously, September, 337 - April, 340AD
14.0 x 13.0mm
O: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVG; Veiled bust, right.
R: NO LEGEND; Constantine I, riding quadriga right, hand of God above.
Exergue: SMNΓ
Nicomedia Mint
Aorta: 3884: B95, O71, R256, T42, M11.
2/19/17
Nicholas Z
coin772.JPG
Constantine I, posthumous, Cyzicus6 viewsRIC VIII Cyzicus 46
ecoli
Constantine_I,_posthumous,_Quadriga,_Antioch,_337-340_AD.jpg
Constantine I, posthumous, Quadriga, Antioch, 337-340 AD14 viewsRIC VIII Antioch 37
1.7g / 15mm _747
Antonivs Protti
Constantine_I,_posthumous,_Quadriga,_Constantinople,_337-340_AD.JPG
Constantine I, posthumous, Quadriga, Constantinople, 337-340 AD20 viewsRIC VIII Constantinople 37
1.7g / 13.5mm _632

Antonivs Protti
Const1 65.jpg
Constantine I, RIC VIII 37, Antioch (posthumous)58 viewsObv: DIV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG
Bust: Veiled bust right
Rev: Emperor in quadriga reaching for the hand of God.
Exe: SMANS, star above
Date: 337-340 AD
RIC VIII 37
Denom: Ae4
Rated "C3"
Bluefish
Constantine_patina.jpg
Constantine Posthumous issue AD 33791 viewsDie axis 90 degrees

Antioch mint
green patina
1 commentsPaul D3
Constantine_chariot.jpg
Constantine Posthumous Issue AD337127 viewsDie Axis 0 degrees
Antioch mint
Sear 3789
weak reverse die
1 commentsPaul D3
Constantine.jpg
Constantine the Great25 views307 - 337 A.D.
Posthumous issue
AE 4, veiled, draped bust right
1.80 g, 16 mm
DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
reverse no legend
Emperor veiled, to right in quadriga, the hand of God reaches down to him
SMNΔ in ex,
RIC VIII Nicomedia 18
Nicomedia mint, 337-340 A.D.
Jaimelai
Constantine_the_Great_the_hand_of_God_reaches_down_.jpg
Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D. , Manus Dei, the hand of God.8 viewsBillon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 39; LRBC I 1374; SRCV V 17488; Voetter 34; Cohen VII 760; Hunter V p. 283, 4 ff. var. (officina), EF, glossy black patina, red earthen deposits, 1.821g, 15.0mm, 330o, 10th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, posthumous, Sep 337 - 347 A.D.; obverse DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled bust right; reverse Constantine in quadriga right, veiled, the hand of God reaches down to take him to heaven; star above, SMANI in exergue.

FORVM Ancient Coins. /The Sam Mansourati Collection.

Soon after the Feast of Easter 337, Constantine fell seriously ill. He left Constantinople for the hot baths near his mother's city of Helenopolis. There, in a church his mother built in honor of Lucian the Apostle, he prayed, and there he realized that he was dying. He attempted to return to Constantinople, making it only as far as a suburb of Nicomedia. He summoned the bishops, and told them of his hope to be baptized in the River Jordan, where Christ was written to have been baptized. He requested the baptism right away, promising to live a more Christian life should he live through his illness. The bishops, Eusebius records, "performed the sacred ceremonies according to custom." It has been thought that Constantine put off baptism as long as he did so as to be absolved from as much of his sin as possible. Constantine died soon after at a suburban villa called Achyron, on 22 May 337.
2 commentsSam
constantineI_postumous1.jpg
Constantine the Great, posthumous28 viewsConstantine the Great, early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D., Antioch mint, posthumous, late 347 - 348 A.D.
1.52g, 15.3mm, 0°
Obv.: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, veiled bust right
Rev.: VN MR, Constantine, veiled, standing right, raising hand, SMANΓ in exergue
RIC 112
ex FORVM
areich
0640-510np_noir.jpg
Constantine the Great, Posthumous AE3134 viewsNicomedia mint, 2nd officina
D V CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled bust right
Anepigraph, Constantine the great in a Quadriga right, SMNS at exergue
2.19 gr
Ref : Cohen # 760, LRBC # 1132
1 commentsPotator II
Constantine The Great- Posthumous 3.jpg
Constantine The Great- Posthumous commemorative Aequitas160 viewsConstantine the Great, early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

Obverse:
Constantine with veiled bust right

DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG

DV: Divus, Divine (acclaimed a deity), Divus was applied to consecrated deceased rulers.
CONSTANTI-NVS: Constantine
PT: Pather, farther (is used with AVGG)
AVGG: Augustus, more than one emperor

Reverse:

IVST VENER MEMOR

IVST: IVSTITA, The personification of justice.
VENER: Venerabilis (revered memory)
MEMOR: MEMORIA, memory

IVST (JUST) means just in the sense of fair, so the legend means "justly venerated memory".

VENER MEMOR/ VNMR (revered memory) was used on the consecration coins of Constantine the Great.

Aequitas standing left holding scales and a scepter. She's also winged on this coin.

Domination: Bronze, AE 4, Size 14 mm. Posthumous commemorative for Constantine the Great

Mint: SMALΓ, Alexandria, Oficina=Γ Gamma (3rd Oficina). The choices for this time period at Alexandria are - A /α (Alpha, first), B /β (Beta, second), (Gamma/Γ, third) and (Delta /Δ,forth).

The coin is dedicated to Constantine The Great by one of his sons from 341 to 347AD

The attribution is RIC VIII Alexandria 28, minted in 345-347. RIC rates the coin as merely "scarce", but perhaps that's rather an understatement!
John Schou
Constantine The Great- Posthumous.jpg
Constantine The Great- Posthumous commemorative Aequitas85 viewsConstantine the Great, early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

Obverse:
Constantine with veiled bust right

DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG

DV: Divus, Divine (acclaimed a deity), Divus was applied to consecrated deceased rulers.
CONSTANTI-NVS: Constantine
PT: Pather, farther (is used with AVGG)
AVGG: Augustus, more than one emperor

Reverse:

IVST VENER MEMOR

IVST: IVSTITA, The personification of justice.
VENER: Venerabilis (revered memory)
MEMOR: MEMORIA, memory

IVST (JUST) means just in the sense of fair, so the legend means "justly venerated memory".

VENER MEMOR/ VNMR (revered memory) was used on the consecration coins of Constantine the Great.

Aequitas standing left holding scales and a scepter. She's also winged on this coin.

Domination: Bronze, AE 4, Size 14 mm. Posthumous commemorative for Constantine the Great

Mint: SMALΓ, Alexandria, Oficina=Γ Gamma (3rd Oficina). The choices for this time period at Alexandria are - A /α (Alpha, first), B /β (Beta, second), (Gamma/Γ, third) and (Delta /Δ,forth).

The coin is dedicated to Constantine The Great by one of his sons from 341 to 347AD

The attribution is RIC VIII Alexandria 28, minted in 345-347. RIC rates the coin as merely "scarce", but perhaps that's rather an understatement!
John Schou
Constantine The Great- Posthumous Quadriga.jpg
Constantine The Great- Posthumous commemorative Quadriga78 viewsConstantine the Great, early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

Obverse:
Constantine I with veiled bust right

DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG

DV: Divus, Divine (acclaimed a deity), Divus was applied to consecrated deceased rulers.
CONSTANTI-NVS: Constantine
PT: Pather, farther (is used with AVGG)
AVGG: Augustus, more than one emperor


Reverse:

Constantine The Great, veiled, in quadriga right, star above, the hand of God reaches down to him.

Domination: Bronze AE 4, size 15-16 mm

Mint: SMAN= Antioch, S (S= Secunda Oficina). Minted 337-340 AD. RIC VIII, 37, Rated C3.
Posthumous commemorative for Constantine the Great

Comment:
It might not be an S on exergue, but a ς (stigma), 6th officina.
East provinces, like Antiochia, used greek numerals.
John Schou
Constantine I- Posthumous Quadriga 1.jpg
Constantine The Great- Posthumous Commemorative Quadriga77 viewsConstantine the Great, early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

Obverse:
Constantine The Great with veiled bust right

DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG

DV: Divus, Divine (acclaimed a deity), Divus was applied to consecrated deceased rulers.
CONSTANTI-NVS: Constantine
PT: Pather, farther (is used with AVGG)
AVGG: Augustus, more than one emperor

Reverse:

Constantine The Great, veiled, in quadriga right, star above, the hand of God reaches down to him.

Domination: Bronze AE 4, size 15 mm

Mint: SMH= Heraclea, Officina??, RIC VIII Heraclea 13

Posthumous commemorative for Constantine the Great
John Schou
Constantine I- Posthumous VNMR.jpg
Constantine The Great- Posthumous Commemorative VNMR67 viewsConstantine the Great, early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

Obverse:
ConstantineThe Great with veiled bust right

DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG

DV: Divus, Divine (acclaimed a deity), Divus was applied to consecrated deceased rulers.
CONSTANTI-NVS: Constantine
PT: Pather, farther (is used with AVGG)
AVGG: Augustus, more than one emperor

Reverse:

VN MR (VENER MEMOR) across the reverse side of the coin.

VENER MEMOR

VENER: Venerabilis (revered memory)
MEMOR: MEMORIA, memory

VENER MEMOR/ VNMR (revered memory) was used on the consecration coins of Constantine the Great.

Constantine The Great, veiled and right, raising hand.

Domination: Bronze AE 4, size 13 mm

Mint: SMHΓ = Heraclea Γ= Gamma (Third Officina). Struck 347-348, RIC VIII

Posthumous commemorative for Constantine the Great
John Schou
Constantius I D.jpg
Constantius I Chlorus Divus A316 viewsAE3
Posthumous issues
Obv: DIVO ONSTANTIO PIO PRINCIP ; laur. and veiled hd. r.
Rev: REQVIES OPTIMOR MERIT ; Constantius std. l. on curule bench
Tanit
Faustina_II_41.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.273, 738 - Faustina II, Aeternitas37 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome mint, posthumous AD 176 - 181
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped and veiled bust right
Rev.: AETERNITAS, Aeternitas standing front, head left, arranging veil and holding torch.
Ag, 3.42g, 18mm
Ref.: RIC 738, Kamp. 38.87, CRE-I 156 [R]
1 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_28.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.273, 739 - Faustina II, Aeternitas18 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome mint, posthumous AD 176 - 181
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right
Rev.: AETERNITAS, Aeternitas standing frontal, arranging veil and holding torch
Ag, 3.20g, 17.8mm
Ref.: RIC III 739, CRE-I 155 [S]
Ex Münzen Ritter
shanxi
Faustina_II_34-0.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.273, 741 - Faustina II, CONSECRATIO, Pietas6 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome mint, posthumous AD 176 - 181
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right
Rev.: CONSECRATIO, Pietas standing right, sacrificing on altar, and holding scepter
Ag, 3.38g, 18.1mm
Ref.: RIC III 741 [S], CRE 204 [R]
Ex Karl-Ludwig Grabow, Berlin
Ex Künker
shanxi
Faustina_II_12~0.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.273, 744 - Faustina II, CONSECRATIO, peacock9 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome mint, posthumous AD 176 - 181
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right
Rev.: CONSECRATIO, peacock standing right with head turned right, tail and wings closed
Ag, 3.25g, 16.8mm
Ref.: RIC III 744, RSC II 71, BMCRE 714, CRE 201 [R]
Ex Forvm Ancient Coins Shop

for the same type, but peacock with head turned left, click here
shanxi
Faustina_R618_fac.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.273, 744 var. - Faustina II, CONSECRATIO, peacock 13 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome mint, posthumous AD 176 - 181
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right
Rev.: CONSECRATIO, peacock standing right with head turned left, tail and wings closed
Ag, 3.48g, 17mm
Ref.: RIC III 744 var., CRE 202 [C]

for the same type, but peacock with head turned right, click here
shanxi
Faustina_II_R676_fac.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.273, 745 - Faustina II, CONSECRATIO, peacock, throne4 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome mint, posthumous AD 176 - 181
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right
Rev.: CONSECRATIO, transversed sceptre on draped throne; in foreground, peacock standing right.
Ag, 2.62g, 19.5mm
Ref.: RIC III 745, CRE 219 [C]
shanxi
vespa_den~0.jpg
Denarius, Commemorative Issued by Titus, Two capricorns, RIC 63 Titus11 viewsVespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Commemorative Issued by Titus. Silver denarius, RIC II Titus 63, RSC II 497, BMCRE II 129, F, bent, Rome mint, 2.763g, 17.9mm, 180o, posthumous, 80 - 81 A.D.; obverse DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, laureate head right; reverse S C, on shield supported by two Capricorns, globe below; deep divot on obverse gives the coin a cup shape. Ex FORVMPodiceps
41873_Ant_Pius_denarius,_RIC_III_M__Aurelius_431.jpg
Denarius; CONSECRATIO, eagle standing half-right on altar, looking left; RIC III 4319 viewsAntoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D. Silver denarius, RIC III M. Aurelius 431, Cohen 155, F, Rome mint, 2.943g, 18.6mm, 180o, posthumous, 161 - 180 A.D.; obverse DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head right; reverse CONSECRATIO, eagle standing half-right on garlanded altar, looking left; minted posthumously by Marcus Aurelius. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
FAUSTJR-26~0.jpg
Diana (Artemis) as the moon goddess364 viewsFaustina Junior -- Died 175/6. Wife of Marcus Aurelius. Augusta, AD 147-175/6.
Orichalcum sestertius (30 mm), issued posthumously, Rome mint, AD 176-180.
Obv: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, Bare-headed and draped bust right.
Rev: SIDERIBVS RECEPTA S C, Diva Faustina, as Diana Lucifera, draped, wearing crescent on shoulders behind neck, standing r., holding lighted torch in both hands.
RIC-1715; BMC-1584; Cohen-215.

Diana in her lunar aspect here holds a torch and is shown with a crescent moon on her shoulders. SIDERIBVS RECEPTA = "received by the stars". Diana Lucifera lit the way for the dead to journey to their new home among the heavens, appropriate for a posthumous issue.
EmpressCollector
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Diva Faustina II, Sestertius69 viewsPosthumous issue, Rome mint, after AD 176
DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right
SIDERIBVS RECEPTA, Diana standing right, holding a torch, SC in field
19.76 gr
Ref : Cohen # 215, RCV # 5233 v
Potator II
0131-510np_noir.jpg
Diva Faustina Senior, As104 viewsPosthumous issue, struck in Rome after 147 AD
DIVA FAVSTINA, Draped bust of Faustina right
AETER NITAS, Eternity standing left, holding Phoenix in right hand and her dress in left hand
11.45 gr
Ref : Cohen #13, RCV #4638
Potator II
constantin_divo.jpg
Divo Constantinus I, Nummus26 viewsMint of Alexandria
DV CONSTANTINVS P T AVGG -Veiled head right.
VN MR (Venerandae Memoriae)//SMALA - Constantine I standing right
1,96gr
347-348AD

Ref: RIC 32 - Cohen 716
byzancia
constantin_divo_2.jpg
Divo Constantinus I, Nummus25 viewsStruck at Alexandria
DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG - Veiled head right.
Anepigriphic // SMALB - Constantine riding quadriga right, Hand of God above.
1,68gr
337-340AD

Ref:RIC 39
byzancia
0580-510np_noir.jpg
Divo Constantius, Follis80 viewsPosthumous issue under the reign of his son Constantine the great
Trier mint, 1st officina, c. AD 307-309
DIVO CONSTANTIO PIO, laureate, cuirassed and veiled bust of Constantius right
MEMORIA FELIX, large altar between two eagles. PTR at exergue
5,62 gr, 26 mm
Ref : RCV # 16420 (200), Cohen # 179, RIC VI # 789
2 commentsPotator II
014BValerianII.jpg
Divo Valerian II7 viewsSilver Antoninianus
Roman Imperial - The Crisis of the Third Century

Divo Valerian II

Colonia Agrippinensis mint, posthumous, 258 - 259 A.D.
Fine, toned, centered, flan cracks.
24.5 mm / 2.348 g / 180°

Obverse: "DIVO VALERIANO CAES", radiate and draped bust right, from behind.
Reverse: "CONSECRATIO", Valerian II carried into the heavens seated on eagle flying right, waiving his right hand, scepter in his left.

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins 2015 (65658)

Göbl MIR 911e, SRCV III 10606, RIC V 9 (Lugdunum), RSC IV 5

MyID: 014B

Image Credit: Forvm Ancient Coins
TenthGen
AntoSe73-scan.jpg
Divus Antoninus, RIC (Marcus Aurelius) 1272, Sestertius of AD 161-169 (Altar)12 viewsĆ Sestertius (26.30g, , 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 161-169 (under Marcus Aurelius).
Obv.: DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head right.
Rev.: DIVO PIO around, S C across field, rectangular altar set on five steps, with double panelled door and horns l. and r. above.
RIC (Marcus Aurelius) 1272; BMCRE (M. Aurelius) 886; Cohen 358; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 147 (14 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins & their Values II) 5200; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 136/19
Ex Jean Elsen, Auction 95 (2008); ex coll. A. Senden: l'architecture des monnaies Romaines.

Coin issued posthumously by Marcus Aurelius commemorating the funeral & deification of Antoninus Pius.
Charles S
7CdWpSX83kdDRx6swWo5N4fnyQD29q.jpg
Divus Augustus Posthumous 26mm "Radiate Bust & Eagle on Globe" RIC 82 Tiberius21 viewsDivus Augustus AE As. Rome Mint 34-37 AD. Obverse: DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER, radiate head left. Reverse: Eagle standing facing on globe, head right, with wings spread; S-C across fields. RIC I: 82 (Tiberius). Size: 26mm, 10.82g. Antonivs Protti
gothico.jpg
Divus Claudius Gothicus32 viewsObv: DIVO CLAVDIO GOTHICO
Radiate head right,
Rev: CONSECRATIO
Altar, with flame above, divided in four squares with a dot inside of each square.
Base Antoninianus, traces of silvering (3.09g).
RIC Milan 264; Normanby 1141; Cunetio 2317; [Online RIC temp. #1272].
Quite possibly the finest known!
OldMoney
claudius-ii-posthumous-eagle-ant.jpg
Divus Claudius II (c. 270 AD) AE Antoninianus10 viewsRoman Imperial, Divus Claudius II (c. 270 AD) AE Antoninianus

Obverse: DIVO CLAVDIO, Radiate head right.

Reverse: CONSECRATIO, Eagle standing facing and perched, head right.

Reference: RIC 266; Cohen 43; Sear 11459.
Gil-galad
divoclaudio.jpg
Divus Claudius, Consecratio, Altar (Imitation)9 viewsHispanic of Gallic illegal mint, ~274-~285. 1.96 g.

Obverse: DIVO CLAVDIO Radiate bust of Claudius.

Reverse: CONSECRATIO Altar with flame.
Manuel
consecratio.jpg
Divus Claudius, Consecratio, Eagle (Imitation)10 viewsHispanic of Gallic illegal mint, ~274-~285. 16 mm, 1.58 g, 180ş.

Obverse: DIVO CLAVDIO Radiate bust of Claudius.

Reverse: CONSECRATIO Eagle.

The style is remarkably accurate for a "barbarous" imitation, with legible letters and detailed figures; the small size and weight, however, gave it away. This type is often described as a Hispanic imitation, though they were more likely produced in Gaul. Study of local hoard finds indicates they were introduced in Spain during Aurelian's time and remained in circulation until the end of Probus' reign.
Manuel
divconstantine.png
Divus Constantine18 viewsConstantine I
Posthumous issue
16-17mm
2.6g
A.D. 347- 348
DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG; Veiled head right. VN-MR [VENERANDAE MEMORIAE]
Constantine veiled, standing right.
In ex. SMALΔ
RIC VIII Alexandria 32
Adam P2
divuscon2.png
Divus Constantine I Posthumous commemorative22 viewsObverse: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled bust right
Reverse: VN-MR, emperor veiled standing right.
SMAN in ex. Antioch mint.
14.56 mm, 1.5 g
NORMAN K
Divo_Galerius.jpg
Divus Galerius7 viewsDivus Galerius

A.D. 311, 23x25mm 4.5gm
DIVO MAXIMIANO; veiled head right.
MEM DIVI M-AXIMIANI; Eagle surmounting domed shrine with closed doors. B in right field.
In ex. •SM•TS•
RIC VI Thessalonica 48
Posthumous issue struck under Licinius
Ancient Aussie
divusvesp.jpg
Divus Vespasian46 viewsVESPASIAN, posthumous memorial AR silver denarius, Struck by TITUS, 79AD. DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, laureate head of Divus Vespasian right. Reverse - S C inscribed on shield supported by two capricorns, orb below. RCV 2569, scarce. Well centered on a full sized flan. 19mm, 3.2g.1 commentsfordicus
ALEXANDER DRACHM 2.jpg
DRACHM - Alexander III18 viewsDRACHM - Alexander III - Posthumous issue. dpaul7
drusus_1.jpg
DRUSUS10 viewsd. 23 AD
POSTHUMOUS
AE 26.5 mm 7.54 g
O: BARE HEAD L
R: LARGE SC
laney
EB0088b_scaled.JPG
EB0088 Herakles / Zeus3 viewsAlexander III AR Tetradrachm. Temnos, late posthumous issue, ca. 188-170 BC.
Obverse: Head of young Herakles right in lionskin headdress.
Reverse: AΛEΞANΔΡOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, E and ΠA monogram above oenochoe beneath vine tendril in left field.
References: Price 1678.
Diameter: 32.5mm, Weight: 16.22g.
EB
EB0089b_scaled.JPG
EB0089 Herakles / Zeus13 viewsKingdom of Macedon, Alexander III, AR tetradrachm. Posthumous issue, year 26 = 187-188 BC.
Obverse: Head of Herakles right in lionskin headdress.
Reverse: AΛEΞANΔΡOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, right leg drawn back. AΣ over date K :Csquare: in left field, rectangular Seleukid countermark of anchor to right.
References: SNG Israel 1235, Price 2901.
Diameter: 32mm, Weight: 16.55g.
1 commentsEB
EB0107b_scaled.JPG
EB0107 Antiochus VII / Athena4 viewsAntiochus VII Sidetes, 139-129 BC, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, Cappadocian mint, posthumous issue.
Obverse: Diademed head of Antiochos right.
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY EYEΡΓETOY, Athena standing left holding Nike, spear and shield. ΔI monogram over A in outer left field. T - A across inner fields.
References: HGC 9, 1069. Lorber & Houghton 15-26. See also BMC 32-33; Hoover 1067; SG 7091-7092.
Diameter: 28mm, Weight: 16.356g.
EB
EB0775_scaled.JPG
EB0775 Constantine I / Quadriga15 viewsConstantine I 307-337, Ć Reduced Follis of Constantinople, posthumous commemorative 337-340.
Obverse: DV CONSTANT [INVS PT A] VGG, Veiled bust right.
Reverse: Emperor in quadriga right, hand of God reaches him from above, CONS in exergue.
References: RIC 37.
Diameter: 14mm, Weight: 1.354g.
1 commentsEB
EB0789_scaled.JPG
EB0789 Constantine I / Quadriga13 viewsConstantine I 307-337, Ć Reduced Follis of Constantinople, posthumous commemorative 337-340.
Obverse: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, Laureate veiled bust right.
Reverse: Emperor in quadriga right, [hand of God reaches him from above], CONS in exergue.
References: RIC VIII 37.
Diameter: 16mm, Weight: 1.68g.
EB
EB0845_scaled.JPG
EB0845 Valerian II / Flying9 viewsValerian II 253-255, Posthumous Antoninianus, 257-258 AD.
Obverse: DIVO VALERIANO CAES, radiate & draped bust right.
Reverse: CONSACRATIO, eagle flying right, bearing the deceased young Caesar to heaven.
References: RIC 9, Cohen 5.
Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 2.676g.
EB
EB0884_scaled.JPG
EB0884 Constantine I / Quadriga4 viewsConstantine I 307-337, AE4, posthumous commemorative 337-340.
Obverse: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, Veiled bust draped and cuirassed right.
Reverse: Constantine driving quadriga right, hand of God reaching down to him, Mintmark: SMANA.
References: RIC VIII 39.
Diameter: 16mm, Weight: 1.637g.
EB
EB0886_scaled.JPG
EB0886 Constantine I / VN-MR4 viewsConstantine I, posthumous commemorative, AE 4, 347-348.
Obverse: DV CONSTANTINVS P T AVGG, veiled head right.
Reverse: VN-MR to either side of Constantine, standing right, togate and veiled. [Mintmark ?].
References: Cf. RIC VIII Antioch 112.
Diameter: 15mm, Weight: 1.227g.
EB
fas[1].jpg
Faustina I Senior, wife of Antoninus Pius. Died 141 CE. Posthumous issue.77 viewsAR Denarius (3.35 gm). 18.5 mm
Obverse: DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right.
Reverse: C-E-RES, Ceres, veiled, standing left, holding long torch and grain ears. RIC III 378 (Antoninus); BMCRE 461 (Antoninus); RSC 136.
NORMAN K
Faustina_RIC_III_384.jpg
Faustina I, AR Denarius, RIC III 38489 viewsFaustina I ("the Elder")
Augusta, 138 - 140 A.D.

Coin: AR Denarius

Obverse: DIVA FAV-STINA, draped bust facing right.
Reverse: CONSECRA-TIO, a Peacock, standing to the right, upon a Sceptre, its head turned to the left.

Weight: 2.93 g, Diameter: 16.9 x 16.6 x 1.6 mm, Die axis: 330°, Mint: Rome, posthumous issue, struck between 141 - 146 A.D. Reference: RIC III 384
Masis
Faustina_Sr_Pietas.JPG
Faustina Sr Pietas13 viewsSilver denarius, Rome mint, weight 2.992g, maximum diameter 17.5mm,
die axis 0o, posthumous, 145 A.D.; obverse DIVA AVG FAVSTINA, draped bust right; reverse PIETAS AVG, Pietas, veiled, standing left
holding box and dropping incense on alter;
SRCV II 4598, RSC II 234, BMCRE IV 311

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins
Romanorvm
FAUSTINA SR.jpg
Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - early 141, wife of Antoninus Pius42 viewsSilver denarius, RIC 344, Cohen 25, BMC 344, aEF, 3.369g, 19.3mm, 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 141 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right; reverse AETERNITAS, Juno raising hand and holding scepter1 commentsMarjan E
Faustina_the_Elder_RIC_A351~0.JPG
Faustina the Elder, wife of Antoninus Pius (Posthumous issue)21 viewsObv: DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust of Faustina facing right, hair waved and coiled on top of head.

Rev: AETERNITAS, Providentia standing facing, head turned left, with veil billowing around it, she holds a globe in her right hand and her left hand holds the end of the veil.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 147 AD

2.9 grams, 17.6 mm, 180°

RIC III Antoninus Pius 351a, RSC 32, S4578
SPQR Coins
Faustina_the_Elder_RIC_A343.JPG
Faustina the Elder, wife of Antoninus Pius (Posthumous issue)30 viewsObv: DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust of Faustina facing right.

Rev: AED DIV FAVSTINAE, front view of hexastyle temple on four or five steps, fencing before, seated figure of Faustina within.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 150 AD

3.2 grams, 18 mm, 0°

RIC III Antoninus Pius 343, RSC 1, S4573
SPQR Coins
Faustina_the_Elder_RIC_A384.JPG
Faustina the Elder, wife of Antoninus Pius (Posthumous issue)22 viewsObv: DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust of Faustina facing right.

Rev: CONSECRATIO, a peacock walking right, head turned left.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, after 147 AD

3.3 grams, 17.47 mm, 315°

RIC III Antoninus Pius 384, RSC 175, S4594, VM 9/2
Matt Inglima
Faustina_the_Elder_RIC_A343_(2).JPG
Faustina the Elder, wife of Antoninus Pius (Posthumous issue)33 viewsObv: DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust of Faustina facing right.

Rev: AED DIV FAVSTINAE, front view of hexastyle temple, fencing before, seated figure of Faustina within.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 150 AD

3.3 grams, 18 mm, 180°

RIC III Antoninus Pius 343, RSC II 1, S4573
1 commentsMatt Inglima
fau1163.jpg
Faustine I, Wife of Antoninus Pius, RIC 1124 Rome15 viewsAE-As. Rome mint 25.8 mm diam. 11.4 g
Faustina, AE sestertius, posthumous, after 141 AD.
Obverse: DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right
Reverse: AVGVSTA, S-C, Vesta, veiled, standing facing, head left, holding Palladium and sceptre. RIC 1124.
NORMAN K
faustina_foure.jpg
Fouree denarius; AVGVSTA, Ceres standing left15 viewsFaustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - early 141, Ancient Plated Counterfeit. Fouree silver plated denarius, cf. RIC III 361 (official, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.), F, illegal mint, 2.303g, 17.1mm, 180o, obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing left, raising right and holding long torch in left. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Julius_Caesar.jpg
Gaius Julius Caesar206 viewsFebruary-March 44 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.90 g, 5h). Rome mint. P. Sepullius Macer, moneyer. Laureate and veiled head right / Venus standing left, holding Victory and scepter; shield at base of scepter. Crawford 480/13; CRI 107d; Sydenham 1074; RSC 39. From the Jörg Müller Collection.

Alföldi arranges Crawford 480 series coins in (44 BC) month order as follows:

RRC 480/1, Buca - January
RRC 480/2, DICT QVART - early February
RRC 480/3/4/5, CAESAR IMP - late February
RRC 480/6/7/8/9/10/11/12/13/14, DICT PERPETVO - early to mid March
RRC 480/17/18, CAESAR IMPER - late March
RRC 480/19/20, PARENS PATRIAE - April
RRC 480/15/16, MARIDIANVS - April
RRC 480/21/22, CLEMENTIAE CAESARIS and Mark Antony - April

"Iconography, historical meaning:

The rev. can be understand easily: The Iulians ascribed their gens back to Aeneas who was the son of Venus (Aphrodite) and Anchises.Venus was the tutelary goddess of the gens Iulia and hence of Caesar. 46 BC Caesar has consecrated together with his new built forum also the temple of Venus Genetrix, the ancestress of his gens. On this denarius with Victory, spear and shield it is rather Venus Victrix.

The portrait on obv. is imposing by its realistic depiction. It was for the first time that a living ruler was pictured on a Roman coin. This too raised suspicion that Caesar - even if he wasn't acclaimed king - would behave as such.

Caesar's portrait attracts attention by the wreath he is wearing. It protrudes notable wide beyond his forehead. Furthermore it is padded and very ragged. This characteristic received too little attention until now. There is every indication that it is not a usual wreath but a corona graminea, a Grass or Blockade crown. This crown was dedicated by the army to that commander who has freed them from an encirclement and saved them from certain death. The crown was composed from flowers and tuft of grass which was plucked at the location of their liberation. This crown was regarded as the highest of all crowns! Pliny (nat. 22, 6) has known only of 8 persons with this honour:
1. Lucius Siccius Dentatus, tribunus plebis 454 BC
2. Publius Decius Mus, 343 BC, 1st Samnite War, dedicated even by 2 armies!
3. Marcus Calpurnius Flamma, 258 BC, at Carmina on Sicily
4. Quintus Fabius Maximus, after the departure of the Carthaginians from Italy, 203 BC
(dedicated by the Senate and the people of Rome, possibly posthumous)
5. Scipio Aemilianus Africanus
6. Gnaeus Petreius Atinas, centurio during the war against the Cimbri
7. Lucius Cornelius Sulla, during the Allied War at Nola 89 BC
8. Quintus Sertorius, 97 BC aa military tribune in Spain under Titu Ddius.
To Caesar and Augustus the crown was dedicated by the Senate!

The veil Caesar is wearing as Pontifex Maximus for lifetime.

DICTATOR PERPETVVS

During Republican times a dictator was designated when the state was in an emergency situation. His position was always temporally limited, yes, sometimes designated only for a single task. In the beginning Caesar too was dictator limited to 1 year and had to be designated again for the next year. Already 46 BC Caesar has been nominated dictator for 10 years but the title had to be renewed each year. So we know of coins with DICT, DICT ITER (= again, for the second time), IC TER (for the third time) and DICT QVART.

Since the proclamation as king has failed the title dictator disappeared from the denarii and were replaced by IMP. But soon behind Caesar's head appeares a star, a crescent, or Victory's spear stands on a star. These celestial signs - and that was understod by all - stand for divinity and should raise Caesar high above all Romans. Incompatible with the idea of a republican constituted Rome.

The point of culmination in this series is the legend DICT PERPETVO of this coin. Now the title of dictator was no more temporally limited but was valid like his office as Pontifex Maximus for all his life and it no more was necessary to confirm the title each year. That actually was a spectacular violation of the Roman constitution! The fact that he appeared at the Lupercalia on February 15. 44 BC in the ancient robe of kings strengthened the suspicion that he was looking for the kingship. In fact he has publicly
refused the royal crown that was offered to him by Marcus Antonius, but his authority to exert power was equal a king even without bearing the title of king. That was the most hateful title of the Roman Republic.

Now he has passed a line that his republican enimies couldn't tolerate any more if they still wanted to be taken seriously. So this coin actually led to his murder by the conspirators. So "The coin that kills Caesar" is by no means an exaggeration.

The planned Parthian War:

Caesar has planned a war against the Parthians. In March 44 BC he wanted to start for a campaign to the east. His assassination inhibited this intention. In science disputed are the goals which Caesar has had in mind with his war. They are reaching from a boundary adjustment, as Mommsen suggested, to world domination like Alexander the Great, as Plutarch is writing: According to him Caesar after the submission of the Parthians would go across Hyrcania at the Caspian Sea, then round the Black Sea via the Caucasus, invade the land of the Scyths, attack Germania and would finally return to Italy through the land of the Celts. In this way he would have conquered the world known to the Ancients and his limits were only the shores of the surrounding Okeanos.

Probably Sueton who was sitting directly at the sources was more realistic. And we know of the campaigns of Marcus Antonius and Augustus who surely have known Caesar's plans and have used them for their own purposes. It's clear that Caesar doesn't want to repeat the errors of Crassus who perished at Carrhae, and has tried to avoid he Parthian cavalry units. Therefore a route through Lesser Armenia is most probable. And there was hope that the Mesopotamian cities would raise against the Parthians. Caesar had gathered an army of 16(!) legions, a huge power that alone by its mere bigness would ensure the victory. Caesar was no gambler, rather a cautious and prudential commander.The famous "veni, vidi, vici" doesn't exist longer. What he actually had in mind we don't know. It's speculative. But there is every indication that it was a reorganisation of the east. And that rather by establishing client-kingdoms than creating new Roman provinces.

Probably the conspirators were afraid of Caesar's Parthian War, because a victory, which was possible or even probable, would have strengthen Caesar's position and has made him practically invulnerable." - Jochen
4 commentsNemonater
007.jpg
Galba As100 viewsRIC II 496 (new) Rome, BMC 261a, Cohen 159
11.89 g, 28 mm
SER GALBA IMP CAESAR AVG TR P, laureate head right
PAXS AVGVSTI S-C, Pax draped, standing half left, holding cornucopiae and torch, with which she is sets fire to a heap of arms on the ground.
Scarce
Rev. legend is PAXS (not just PAX) AVGVSTI S C, and she applies a torch to a pile of captured arms; obv. legend is without P M. Cat. no. 409 in Kraay's die study, RIC 496 in the new RIC (publ. 1984), BMC 261a, Cohen 159. Probably an As not a dupondius; only the metal color, and to some extent the weight, tell them apart. Belongs to Kraay's interesting Officina G (many spectacular types on the sestertii), which Mattingly in BMC wrongly regarded as posthumous.
(Many thanks to Mr. Curtis Clay for attribution and comments!)
8 commentsMark Z2
0041-520np_noir.jpg
Germanicus, As86 viewsPosthumous issue of Caligula, in honour of his father (died AD 19)
Rome mint, AD 37-38
GERMANICVS CAESAR TI AVGVST F DIVI AVG N, Bare head of Germanicus left
C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT around large SC
10,64 gr
Ref : RCV #1821, Cohen #1
Potator II
0041-510.jpg
Germanicus, Dupondius - *149 viewsPosthumous issue of Caligula, in honour of his father (died AD 19)
Rome mint, AD 37-41
GERMANICVS CAESAR, Germanicus in triumphal quadriga right
SIGNIS RECEPT DEVICTIS GERM, Germanicus standing left, rising right arm, holding legionnary eagle
17.79 gr
Ref : RCV #1820, Cohen #7
3 commentsPotator II
Germanicus_RIC_C50.JPG
Germanicus, father of Caligula, brother of Claudius22 viewsObv: (GERM)ANICVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI A(VG N), bare head of Germanicus facing right.

Rev: (C) CAESAR DIVI AVG PRON AVG PM TRP III PP, around large SC.

Copper As, Rome mint, 40-1 AD (posthumous commemorative issued by Caligula)

10.7 grams, 28 mm, 180°

RIC I Caius 50, S1822, VM 3
SPQR Coins
Ariarathes_VII_-_Antiochos_VII_imitative.jpg
GREEK, Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariarathes VII ca 110-99 BC, AR Tetradrachm in the name of Antiochos VII (138-129 BC)242 viewsDiademed head of Antiochos VII right, fillet border. / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ Athena standing half-left in crested helmet on short ground line, confronting Nike held in right hand and with left arm balancing a spear while holding a grounded shield decorated with a Gorgoneion head, primary controls ΔI (in ligature) over A in outer left field, secondary controls O-Λ in inner fields, laurel crown around.
Lorber and Houghton, NC 2006, ser. 1, iss. 3 (A1/P1 - coin 12 - this coin); HGC 9 1069; SC 2148; SMA 298; SNG Spaer 1873 (same obverse die).
Uncertain Cappadocian mint, probably Ariaratheia or Eusebeia-Tyana.
From the same obverse die as the first issue to bear a reverse legend in the name of Ariarthes VII with the same O-Λ mint controls.
(28 mm, 16.63 gm, 12h)
ex- Commerce (‘Antiochus VII Posthumous’ Hoard) 2005

Ariarathes VII was the nephew of Mithradates VI Eupator of Pontus and a hapless pawn in the developing power struggle of his uncle with Bithynia and later Rome to control Asia Minor. After rebuffing Mithradates VI's 'advice and assistance' the armies of Mithradates and Ariarathes met prepared for battle. At this point Mithradates called for an unarmed discussion meeting with Ariarathes in the middle ground of the battlefield. In front of the two assembled armies, Mithradates drew a concealed blade and slit his nephew's throat, thus avoiding battle and clearing the way for a new puppet, his stepson, to be appointed ultimately as King Ariarathes IX.
8 commentsLloyd T
48867q00.jpg
GREEK, Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great, Gold stater24 viewsSH48867. Gold stater, Müller 162; SNG Cop 1086 ff. var. (monogram), EF, weight 8.544 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Byzantion (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, posthumous, c. 250 - 150 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great right wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena seated left, Victory in extended right, resting left elbow on shield, monogram inner left, BY on throne, trident in exergue ornamented with two small dolphins; extraordinary mint luster, high relief, nice style, fantastic coin!Joe Sermarini
09059q00.jpg
GREEK, Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great, Gold stater22 viewsSH09059. Gold stater, Thompson 164, EF, weight 8.50 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesus mint, posthumous, 305 - 297 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great right wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena seated left, resting elbow on shield and holding Victory, bee and E-Φ in left field; struck with beautiful dies, mint luster!Joe Sermarini
Kingdom_of_Macedonia__Alexander_III,_336_–_323_and_posthumous_issues_Tetradrachm,_Amphipolis_circa_318-317,_AR_8h_25,5-26,5mm,_17_26_g-s.jpg
Greek, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III (the Great), 323 - 317 B.C., Price 0111, AR-Tetradrachm, Zeus Aëtophoros seated on throne left, laurel branch in left field,357 viewsMacedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, (323 - 317 B.C.), AR-Tetradrachm, Price 111, Zeus Aëtophoros seated on throne left, laurel branch in left field,
avers:- No legends, Young Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck.
revers:- BAΣILEΩΣ-AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Zeus Aëtophoros seated on throne left, right leg drawn back, holding eagle and scepter, laurel branch in left field.
exerg:-/-//--, diameter: 25,5-26,5mm, weight: 17,26g, axes: 8 h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, ‘Amphipolis’ mint. Struck under Antipater, circa 322-320 B.C.,
date: posthumous, c. 322 - c. 320 B.C., ref: Price 111,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Greek-xx022_Alexandros-III_Q-001_axis-10h_15mm_3,99g-s.jpg
Greek, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III (the Great), 323 - 317 B.C., Price 2247b, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on throne left, griffin left, Rare! 279 viewsMacedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, Ionia, Theos, West Asia Minor, (323 - 319 B.C.), Ar-Drachm, Price 2247b, Zeus seated on throne left, griffin left, Rare!
avers:- Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck,
revers:- AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Zeus seated on throne left, right leg drawn back, holding eagle and scepter, griffin left;,
exerg: , diameter: 15mm, weight: 3,99g, axes: 10 h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, Ionia, Theos, West Asia Minor, date: posthumous, c. 323 - c. 319 B.C., ref: Price 2247b,
Q-001
quadrans
336_-_323_BC_ALEXANDER_III_AE_Hemiobol.JPG
GREEK, Macedonian kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AE Hemiobol (4 Chalkoi). Struck 336 – 320 BC at Miletus, Caria.42 viewsObverse: No legend. Head of Alexander the Great as Herakles, wearing lion-skin knotted at base of neck, facing right.
Reverse: AΛEΞANĐPOY. Bow in Gorytos (a case for bow and quiver) above, club and compound ΠΥΡ monogram below.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 5.79gms | Die Axis: 3
Price:0335

Alexander the Great reigned from 336 to 323 BC but, although Price supposes this coin to be a lifetime issue, Thompson proposes the posthumous date of 321 – 320 BC (Thompson series VI) based on the ΠΥΡ control mark.

It is difficult to interpret the die orientation in these issues because not only is it unclear what the Ancient Greeks would have considered “up” with respect to the reverse design but modern scholars are ambiguous on the subject as well. I have, however, assumed that the modern conventional orientation is with the name reading horizontally, and therefore have described my example as having a 3 o’clock orientation, the “top” of the reverse being aligned with the back of Herakles’ head on the obverse.
*Alex
68354p00.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C., Gold stater18 viewsSH68354. Gold stater, Le Rider p. 146 & pl. 58. 157 (D42/R112), SNG ANS 172 ff., SNG Cop 529, SNG Alpha Bank -, EF, perfect centering, weight 8.602 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Pella mint, posthumous, 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY (in exergue), charioteer driving biga right, kentron in right, reins in left, kantharos below; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 215, lot 758Joe Sermarini
Price_3704.jpg
GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos i Nikator, AR Tetradrachm, Babylon, Price 370424 viewsTetradrachme ( 16,64g ) , Babylon, posthumously , ca. 317-311 v . Chr .
Obv: Head of Herakles with lion hood.
Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros with gavel on the throne , in l . Field monogram in wreath , under the throne H.
Price 3704 , Müller 714.
HD Rauch e-auc 20 lot 11
chance v
136~0.jpg
Hadrian Denarius - Adoptio (RIC 3c)61 viewsAR Denarius
Rome, late 117 AD
3.24g

Obv: Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Hadrian (R)
IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO OPT AVG GER DAC

Rev: Hadrian and Trajan standing facing each other
clasping hands in sign of adoption of Hadrian.
ADOPTIO in exergue.
PARTHIC DIVI TRAIAN AVG F P M TR P COS PP

RIC 3c RSC 4

NAC Auction 92 part II, Lot 2196, 23/05/16
ex. CNG Webshop

The circumstances surrounding Hadrian's adoption and ultimate accession have long been clouded in mystery. Trajan never made a public endorsement of him, or any other potential candidate as heir. Dio Cassius reported that Trajan's widow Plotina actually secured Hadrian's adoption, announcing the adoption posthumously through letters signed in her own hand rather than Trajan's. Either way, ADOPTIO was announced on August 9, AD 117, though the emperor's death was still kept secret from the public. Two days later, on the 11th, when Trajan's death was finally declared, the Syrian legions hailed Hadrian as the new emperor and the matter was reduced to a mere formality awaiting Senatorial approval.
5 commentsKained but Able
68.jpg
Hadrian Denarius - Adoptio (RIC II 3b)138 viewsAR Denarius
Rome 117 AD
3.13g

Obv: Laureate bust of Hadrian (R), draped far shoulder.
IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIAN OPT AUG GER DAC


Rev: TRAJAN AND HADRIAN standing clasping hands, each holds scroll. ADOPTIO in exergue.
PARTHIC DIVI TRAIAN AUG F PM TRP COS PP

The circumstances surrounding Hadrian's adoption and ultimate accession have long been clouded in mystery. Trajan never made a public endorsement of him, or any other potential candidate as heir. Dio Cassius reported that Trajan's widow Plotina actually secured Hadrian's adoption, announcing the adoption posthumously through letters signed in her own hand rather than Trajan's. Either way, ADOPTIO was announced on August 9, AD 117, though the emperor's death was still kept secret from the public. Two days later, on the 11th, when Trajan's death was finally declared, the Syrian legions hailed Hadrian as the new emperor and the matter was reduced to a mere formality awaiting Senatorial approval.

Note: Genuine coin likely used as master to the matching cast in Fake Reports.

RIC II 3b RSC 4
2 commentsKained but Able
RIC_Helena_RIC_VIII_Constantinople_49.JPG
Helena (mother of Constantine I & first wife of Constantius I Chlorus)18 viewsRIC VIII Constantinople 49, Sear RCV 3910, Cohen 4

AE4, 15 mm, die alignment 180°

Constantinople mint, struck posthumously, 337-340 A.D.

Obv: FL IVL HE—LENAE AVG, bust facing right, ornamental mantle and necklace, hair elaborately dressed.

Rev: PAX PV—BLICA, CONS theta in exergue, Pax standing left, holding branch and transverse scepter.


Stkp
Helena_Trier.jpg
Helena - AE 429 viewsposthumous
Trier
337-340 AD
diademed, draped bust right
FL IVL HE_LENAE AVG
Pax standing left, holding branch and scepter
PA_X PV_BLICA
?TRP?
RIC VIII Trier (47, 55, 63, 78, 90)
1,58 g 14,5 mm
Johny SYSEL
Helena~2.JPG
Helena - Bronze AE4 Struck posthumously circa 337-340 AD19 viewsObverse: FL IVL HELENA AVG - Diademed, draped bust right
Reverse: PAXPVBLICA - Pax standing left, holding branch and sceptor
Size: 16 mm
Marjan E
helenaobvrev.jpg
Helena -Posthumous196 viewsAttribution-RIC VIII Constantinople 33,38 or 48

Obv. FL IVL HE-LENAE AVG Head right with ornamental mantle and necklace with elaborate hairstyle
Rev. PAX PV-BLICA Pax standing left holding branch and transverse sceptre-Double strike
Ex.? Not sure but my guess based on style is Constantinople
5 commentsblack-prophet
Helena_Pax_RIC_34.jpg
Helena Pax RIC 3426 viewsHELENA, Mother of Constantine I. Augusta, 324 - 328/30 AD, Constantinople mint. Posthumous issue, struck 337-341 AD, RIC VIII pg 449, 34
OBV: FL IVL HEL-ENAE AVG, (H2 bust) diademed and draped bust right
REV: PAX PVBLICA•, Pax standing left, holding branch and sceptre, CONSE in exergue

SCARCE
Romanorvm
HUN_Albert_Huszar_592_Pohl_127-10.jpg
Huszár 592, Pohl 127-10, Unger 461s, Réthy II 135B29 viewsHungary. Albert (1437-1439). AR denar, .54 g., 14.80 mm. max., 0°

Obv: m • ALBERTI • – R • VnGARIE •, Patriarchal cross, K–P (privy mark) in fields.

Rev: Central shield with Árpádian stripes, surrounded by three shields bearing (in clockwise order) Austrian stripe, Moravian eagle and Bohemian lion, all within border.

The type was struck in 1438-40 (per Unger and Pohl) or 1439-1440 (per Huszár). This privy mark was struck posthumously in 1440 in Kremnitz/Körmöcbánya/now Kremnica, Slovakia, under Queen Elizabeth by Konrad Polnar, kammergraf.

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 5.
1 commentsStkp
HUN_Laszlo_V_Huszar_643_Pohl_150-1__.JPG
Huszár 643, Pohl 150-1, Unger 494a, Réthy II 201A91 viewsHungary. Ladislaus V (László in Hun.) “Posthumous” (1440-1457). AR denar, 14-15 mm., .63 g.

Obv: M • LADISLAI – R • VnGARIE, Patriarchal cross, C–G (privy mark) in fields.

Rev: Pointed trefoil with shield bearing Árpádian stripes in the center, surrounded by (clockwise) the shields of Austria, shield bearing Moravian eagle and shield bearing Bohemian lion.

The type was struck 1440 (per Huszár and Unger) or 1440-1442 (per Pohl). This privy mark was struck in Kassa (now Košice, Slovakia) by Augustin Greniczer, in the second half of 1440 (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 5.
Stkp
HUN_Laszlo_V_Huszar_670_Pohl_166-2.png
Huszár 670, Pohl 166-2, Unger 499b, Réthy II 191, Frynas H.33.8.27 viewsHungary. Lászlö/Ladislaus V "Posthumous" (1440-1457).

AR denar, .45 g., 15.30 mm. max., 0°.

Obv: [⁎ m]OnET[A ⁎ LADIS]LAI, double cross on top of crown, S-D flanking.

Rev: + RE[GIS VnGAR]IE • [E]T[ • C], Three-part shield (patriarchal cross and Árpádian stripes, Bohemian lion and Austrian fess/single stripe).

Type struck 1453-1457 (per Huszár), 1452 (per Pohl), 1442-1443? (per Unger) on behalf of Ladislaus by the Hussite warlord, Jan Giskra, but only in those parts of upper Hungary under Giskra’s control. This privy mark was tentatively struck as a civic mark in Schmöllnitz/Szomolnok, now Smolnik, Slovakia (per Pohl).

“Owing to inner strife and disordered general conditions, the coins [of this period] were usually minted with extremely low precious metal content; moreover, poor mintages were often struck with negligently engraved dies. As a result of the hurried, superficial minting, it was sometimes doubtful whether a faulty coin had been issued officially, or was a forgery” (Huszár 1963).

Huszár/Pohl rarity 5, Unger value 20 DM, Frynas rarity N.
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HUN_Lajos_II_Huszar_841_1527_Pohl_255-38_L-K.jpg
Huszár 841, Pohl 255-38, Unger 673u, Réthy II 306A, dated 1527 36 viewsHungary. Louis II (Lajos II in Hun.) (1516-1526). AR denar, ): .64 g., 15.83 mm. max., 180°

Obv: 1527 * LVDOVICVS ◦ R ◦ VNGAR *, shield w/ Árpádian stripes, patriarchal cross, Dalmatian leopard heads, Bohemian lion, & Polish eagle in escutcheon in center.

Rev: PATRONA * --* VNGARIE, Crowned Madonna w/ infant Jesus to her right, L-K flanking.

The type was struck 1516-1527 (per Huszár, Pohl & Unger). This privy mark was struck in Kremnitz (Körmöcbánya, in Hun., now Kremnica, Slovakia) and was a posthumous issue of Louis II (per Pohl). Louis II died on August 29, 1526 when he drowned while fleeing from the Turks after the carnage of the battle of Mohács.

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 3.
1 commentsStkp
HUN_Hunyadi-Laszlo_Huszar_630.JPG
HuszĂĄr 630, Pohl 185A, Unger --, RĂŠthy II 165101 viewsHungary. János Hunyadi (Governor, 1446-1453) and or in the name of Ladislaus V (László in Hun.) “Posthumous” (1440-1457). Billon denar, .57 gr., 17 mm.

Obv: [* ]MOnTA • LADISLAI • DEI [• G], Patriarchal cross, K-R (privy mark) in fields.

Rev: [+ TEMPOR]E • [IO • GVBER]nATORI, Bohemian lion facing left.

Struck in 1452 per Huszár or post 1447 (probably 1452) per Pohl to pay laborers (per Pohl). This is a mule (Although not noted as such in Huszár, it is stated to be a mule in Unger and Pohl. It was listed as Unger 493 in the first edition of that catalog, but is not listed in the second edition). The “obverse” of this coin is the obverse of a denar (Huszár 654, Pohl 160-3, Unger 505c, Réthy II 183) struck on behalf of Ladislaus V by the Hussite warlord Jan Giskra in 1447-1450 (per Pohl, Huszár and Unger). The “reverse” is the obverse of a denar (Huszár 620, Pohl 177, Unger 486, Réthy II 157A) struck by János Hunyadi in 1447-1450 (per Huszár and Unger) or 1447-1451 (per Pohl). The privy mark is a collective mark struck in Kremnitz (formerly Körmöcbánya, Hungary, now Kremnica, Slovakia) that was used on both types in all those years (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating R1. The reverse legend in Huszár differs from that in Réthy only in that there is a final “S” in the legend in Huszár. This coin appears to comport with Réthy.
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HUN_Laszlo_V_Huszar_654_Pohl_160-1.JPG
HuszĂĄr 654, Pohl 160-1, Unger 505b, RĂŠthy II 183108 viewsHungary. Ladislaus V (László in Hun.) “Posthumous” (1440-1457). Billon denar, .49 g., 17 mm.

Obv: * MOnETA • LA[DISL]AI • DEI • G, Patriarchal cross, K–+/P (privy mark)

Rev: + REGIS VnGARIE ET CETERA, Crowned lion of Berszterce facing left.

The type was struck 1447-1450 (per Pohl, Huszár & Unger) on behalf of Ladislaus by the Hussite warlord, Jan Giskra, but only in those parts of upper Hungary under Giskra’s control. This privy mark was struck in Kremnitz (formerly Körmöcbánya, Hungary, now Kremnica, Slovakia) by Petrus Jung, kammergraf (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 5. The reverse legend described in Huszár differs slightly from that depicted and described in Réthy and Unger. This coin comports with Réthy and Unger.
Stkp
HUN_Laszlo_V_Huszar_657.JPG
HuszĂĄr 657, Pohl 163-2, Unger 512c, RĂŠthy II 189 109 viewsHungary. Ladislaus V (László in Hun.) “Posthumous” (1440-1457). Billon obol, .32 g., 13 mm.

Obv: + MOnETA • – • LADISLAI •, Patriarchal cross, S–C (privy mark) in fields.

Rev: + REGIS • VnGARIE ET C •, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes, Bohemian lion, Moravian eagle, Austrian shield), pellets to sides.

The type was struck 1451-1452 (per Pohl, Huszár & Unger) on behalf of Ladislaus by the Hussite warlord, Jan Giskra, but only in those parts of upper Hungary under Giskra’s control. This municipal privy mark was probably struck in Schmöllnitz (then Szomolnock, Hungary, now Smolnik, Slovakia).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 5.
Stkp
HUN_Laszlo_V_Huszar_662.JPG
HuszĂĄr 662, Pohl 186B-1, Unger 522a, RĂŠthy II 179106 viewsHungary. Ladislaus V (László in Hun.) “Posthumous” (1440-1457). Billon denar, 1.01 gr., 18 mm.

Obv: * LADISLAVS • DEI •] GRA • REX, Patriarchal cross, A–B (privy mark) in fields.

Rev: S [LADISL]-AVS • REX (bracketed letters are bungled), Standing nimbate king (St. Ladislaus), facing, holding halberd and imperial orb.

The type was struck ca. 1453-1454 (per Huszár, Pohl and Unger). This privy mark was struck in Alsólendva (now Lendava, Slovenia) by the Bánfi family (per Pohl).

Note: Ladislaus I (László in Hun.) (1077-1095) was canonized in 1192. His name typically appeared, albeit in an increasingly decaying form, on the reverse of 12th century emissions, and his stylized image and name appeared on this and other later emissions.

Huszár rarity rating 7; Pohl rarity rating 6. The obverse legend as described in Huszár begins with a rosette, whereas that legend, as described and depicted in Unger and Réthy begins with a cross (and ends with a rosette). The legend on this coin appears to begin with a rosette and lacks the cross, as per Huszár. The reverse legend, as described by Huszár, has a pellet on either side of the initial S, whereas those pellets are lacking in the legend, as depicted in Unger and Réthy. The (bungled) legend on this coin lacks the pellets, as per Unger and Réthy.
Stkp
HUN_Laszlo_V_Huszar_664_Pohl_187-5.JPG
HuszĂĄr 664 var., Pohl 187-5, Unger 523a, RĂŠthy II 182168 viewsHungary. Ladislaus V (László in Hun.) “Posthumous” (1440-1457). Billon denar, .31 gr., 14 mm.

Obv: [MOn • L]ADI – SLAI • DEI • G, Patriarchal cross, K–P (privy mark) in fields.

Rev: + REGIS • VnGAR[IE • ET • C •], Shield with Árpádian stripes.

The type was struck in 1455 (per Pohl, Huszár and Unger). This privy mark was struck in Kremnitz ((formerly Körmöcbánya, Hungary, now Kremnica, Slovakia)) by Petrus Jung, kammergraf (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4. This coin is a variant that bears the reverse legend per Unger and Réthy. The reverse legend per Huszár is + R • VnGARIE • ET • CETERA•.
Stkp
HUN_Laszlo_V_Huszar_668_Pohl_190-1.JPG
HuszĂĄr 668, Pohl 190-1, Unger 525b, RĂŠthy II 186 166 viewsHungary. Ladislaus V (László in Hun.) “Posthumous” (1440-1457). AR denar, 16 mm.

Obv: MOn • LAD – ISLAI • RE, Patriarchal cross above three-part mound, B–P (privy mark) in fields.

Rev: VnGAR -- IE • ET • C, Crowned four-part shield (Árpádian stripes, Bohemian lion, Austrian shield, Moravian eagle).

The type was struck ca. 1453-1457 (per Pohl) or 1456-1457 (per Huszár) or 1457 (per Unger). This privy mark was struck in Buda (now Budapest) by Petrus Jung, kammergraf in 1456/57 (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 6.
Stkp
HUN_Laszlo_V_Huszar_668_Pohl_190-5.JPG
HuszĂĄr 668, Pohl 190-5, Unger 525c, RĂŠthy II 186129 viewsHungary. Ladislaus V (László in Hun.) “Posthumous” (1440-1457). AR denar, 16 mm., .35 g.

Obv: MOn • LA[D] – ISLAI • RE, Patriarchal cross above three-part mound, n–E (privy mark) in fields.

Rev: VnGA -- RIE • ET, Crowned four-part shield (Árpádian stripes, Bohemian lion, Austrian shield, Moravian eagle).

The type was struck ca. 1453-1457 (per Pohl) or 1456-1457 (per Huszár) or 1457 (per Unger). This privy mark was struck in Nagybanya (now Baia Mare, Romania) by Emmerich Szapolyai, kammergraf in 1457 (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 6. The style of the letter A (at least on the obverse, where it is legible) and the reverse legend described in Huszár differs slightly from those depicted and described in Réthy and Unger. This coin comports with Huszár.
Stkp
HUN_Lajos_II_Huszar_841_1526_Pohl_255-33.JPG
HuszĂĄr 841, Pohl 255-33, Unger 673ζ, RĂŠthy II 306A, dated 1526 55 viewsHungary. Louis II (Lajos II in Hun.) (1516-1526). AR denar, 15 mm.

Obv: LVDOVICVS ◦ R ◦ VNGAR * 1526 *, Four-part shield with Hungarian arms (Árpádian stripes, patriarchal cross, Dalmatian leopard heads, Bohemian lion), Polish eagle in escutcheon.

Rev: PATRONA * – * VNGARIE, Crowned Madonna with infant Jesus to her right, L–V (privy mark) in fields.

The type was struck 1516-1527 (per Huszár, Pohl & Unger). This privy mark was struck in Visegrád and was a posthumous issue of Louis II (per Pohl). Louis II died on August 29, 1526 when he drowned while fleeing from the Turks after the carnage of the battle of Mohács.

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 3.
Stkp
hermaios_resxxx.jpg
INDO-GREEK--HERMAIOS (BAKTRIAN KING)18 viewsca. 30 B.C. - 10 B.C.
AE 24 mm; 8.42 g
O ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ ΕΡΜΑΙΟΥ, diademed and draped bust right, flowing diadem ties
R: Zeus seated left, right extended, scepter in left, Kharosthi monogram left, Kharosthi letter behind throne
Probably Posthumous Imitative
laney
hermai_resb.jpg
INDO-GREEK--HERMAIOS (BAKTRIAN KING)12 viewsca. 30 B.C. - 10 B.C.
AE 24 mm max; 8.83 g
O ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ ΕΡΜΑΙΟΥ, diademed and draped bust right, flowing diadem ties
R: Zeus seated left, right extended, scepter in left, Kharosthi monogram left, Kharosthi letter behind throne
Probably Posthumous Imitative
laney
MISC_Italian_States_Norman_Sicily_Tancred_Spahr_139.jpg
Italian States: Norman Sicily. Tancred of Hauteville (1189-1194) with Roger III (1192-1193)16 viewsTravaini 399; Spahr 139; Biaggi 1237; MEC Italy XIV 449-453.

AE Follaro, second coinage, 1192-1193. Messina mint. 1.81 g., 13.55 mm. max, 0°

Obv: al–malik Tanqrīr (= King Tancred) in Kufic script.

Rev: + ROGERIVS : around margin, • / REX / • in center.

Tancred was the illegitimate son of Duke Roger III of Apulia, eldest son of King Roger II (1130-1154) by his mistress Emma, daughter of Count Achard II of Lecce. Roger II was succeeded by his fourth son, William I, the Bad (1154-1166). As soon as William's son and successor, William II, the Good (1166-1189) (who was married to Joanna, sister of Richard I, the Lionheart, King of England), died without issue, Tancred seized Sicily against the claims of his Aunt Constance, the posthumously-born daughter of Roger II, and her husband, Henry VI Hohenstaufen, then King of the Romans (soon to be crowned Holy Roman Emperor, and later, Henry I of Sicily). Tancred's claim was supported by the official class, while most of the nobility supported the claim of Henry and Constance. Tancred's premature death several months after that of his eldest son, Roger III (then age 18/19) lead to Hohenstaufen rule of Sicily, after the failed 10-month regency of Tancred's second son, William III (age four) in 1094.
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Italy- Rome- The Arch of Vespasian.jpg
Italy- Rome- The Arch of Tito50 viewsThe Arch of Titus (Arcus Titi) is a triumphal arch that commemorates the victory of the emperors Vespasian and Titus in Judea in 70 CE, which lead to the conquest of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Jewish temple there, and the triumphal procession the two held in Rome in 71 CE. It is situated at the E. entrance to the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra, south of the Temple of Amor and Roma, close to the Colosseum.

The arch was definitely erected sometimes after after the death of Titus in 81 CE, since Titus is referred to as Divus in the inscription. The deification of an emperor only happened posthumously after decision by the senate. It was most probably erected by emperor Domitian who succeeded his brother Titus in 81 CE, but it has also been suggested that it was built later, by Trajan, because of stylistic similarities with the Arch of Trajan at Benevento.

The Arch of Titus is a single arch, measuring 15.4m in height, 13.5m in width and 4.75m in depth, originally constructed entirely in Pantelic marble, with four semi-columns on each side. The external decorations include figures of Victoria with trophies on the spandrels and images of Roma and the Genius of Rome on the two keystones.

The inscription on the E. side is the original dedication of the arch by the senate. It reads:

Senatus
Populusque Romanus
divo Tito divo Vespasiani f(ilio)
Vespasiano Augusto

The senate
and people of Rome
to the divine Titus, son of the divine Vespasian,
Vespasianus Augustus

The inside the archway the monument is decorated with reliefs in marble. The S. side shows the beginning of the triumphal entry into Rome of the victorious emperor and his troops. The soldiers, walking left to right, are carrying the spoils of war, which include the seven armed candelabrum and the silver trumpets from the temple of Jerusalem. The signs carried by some soldiers displayed the names of the conquered cities and people. To the right the procession is entering the city through the Porta Triumphalis.

The N. side of the arch is decorated with a relief of the emperor in the triumphal procession. The emperor is riding a quadriga, which is lead by the goddess Roma, and he is crowned by Victoria flying above him. The lictors are walking in front of the chariot with their long ceremonial axes. After the emperor follow as a young man, who represents the Roman people, and an older man in toga, representing the senate. In the middle, under the vault a small relief shows the apotheosis of Titus, flying to the heavens on the back of an eagle.
John Schou
Italy- Rome- The arch of Tito and inside the arches.jpg
Italy- Rome- The arch of Tito and inside the arches47 viewsThe Arch of Titus (Arcus Titi) is a triumphal arch that commemorates the victory of the emperors Vespasian and Titus in Judea in 70 CE, which lead to the conquest of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Jewish temple there, and the triumphal procession the two held in Rome in 71 CE. It is situated at the E. entrance to the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra, south of the Temple of Amor and Roma, close to the Colosseum.

The arch was definitely erected sometimes after after the death of Titus in 81 CE, since Titus is referred to as Divus in the inscription. The deification of an emperor only happened posthumously after decision by the senate. It was most probably erected by emperor Domitian who succeeded his brother Titus in 81 CE, but it has also been suggested that it was built later, by Trajan, because of stylistic similarities with the Arch of Trajan at Benevento.

The Arch of Titus is a single arch, measuring 15.4m in height, 13.5m in width and 4.75m in depth, originally constructed entirely in Pantelic marble, with four semi-columns on each side. The external decorations include figures of Victoria with trophies on the spandrels and images of Roma and the Genius of Rome on the two keystones.

The inscription on the E. side is the original dedication of the arch by the senate. It reads:

Senatus
Populusque Romanus
divo Tito divo Vespasiani f(ilio)
Vespasiano Augusto

The senate
and people of Rome
to the divine Titus, son of the divine Vespasian,
Vespasianus Augustus

The inside the archway the monument is decorated with reliefs in marble. The S. side shows the beginning of the triumphal entry into Rome of the victorious emperor and his troops. The soldiers, walking left to right, are carrying the spoils of war, which include the seven armed candelabrum and the silver trumpets from the temple of Jerusalem. The signs carried by some soldiers displayed the names of the conquered cities and people. To the right the procession is entering the city through the Porta Triumphalis.

The N. side of the arch is decorated with a relief of the emperor in the triumphal procession. The emperor is riding a quadriga, which is lead by the goddess Roma, and he is crowned by Victoria flying above him. The lictors are walking in front of the chariot with their long ceremonial axes. After the emperor follow as a young man, who represents the Roman people, and an older man in toga, representing the senate. In the middle, under the vault a small relief shows the apotheosis of Titus, flying to the heavens on the back of an eagle.
John Schou
Italy- Rome- The entrance to Forum and the arch of Tito.jpg
Italy- Rome- The entrance to Forum and the arch of Tito40 viewsThe Arch of Titus (Arcus Titi) is a triumphal arch that commemorates the victory of the emperors Vespasian and Titus in Judea in 70 CE, which lead to the conquest of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Jewish temple there, and the triumphal procession the two held in Rome in 71 CE. It is situated at the E. entrance to the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra, south of the Temple of Amor and Roma, close to the Colosseum.

The arch was definitely erected sometimes after after the death of Titus in 81 CE, since Titus is referred to as Divus in the inscription. The deification of an emperor only happened posthumously after decision by the senate. It was most probably erected by emperor Domitian who succeeded his brother Titus in 81 CE, but it has also been suggested that it was built later, by Trajan, because of stylistic similarities with the Arch of Trajan at Benevento.

The Arch of Titus is a single arch, measuring 15.4m in height, 13.5m in width and 4.75m in depth, originally constructed entirely in Pantelic marble, with four semi-columns on each side. The external decorations include figures of Victoria with trophies on the spandrels and images of Roma and the Genius of Rome on the two keystones.

The inscription on the E. side is the original dedication of the arch by the senate. It reads:

Senatus
Populusque Romanus
divo Tito divo Vespasiani f(ilio)
Vespasiano Augusto

The senate
and people of Rome
to the divine Titus, son of the divine Vespasian,
Vespasianus Augustus

The inside the archway the monument is decorated with reliefs in marble. The S. side shows the beginning of the triumphal entry into Rome of the victorious emperor and his troops. The soldiers, walking left to right, are carrying the spoils of war, which include the seven armed candelabrum and the silver trumpets from the temple of Jerusalem. The signs carried by some soldiers displayed the names of the conquered cities and people. To the right the procession is entering the city through the Porta Triumphalis.

The N. side of the arch is decorated with a relief of the emperor in the triumphal procession. The emperor is riding a quadriga, which is lead by the goddess Roma, and he is crowned by Victoria flying above him. The lictors are walking in front of the chariot with their long ceremonial axes. After the emperor follow as a young man, who represents the Roman people, and an older man in toga, representing the senate. In the middle, under the vault a small relief shows the apotheosis of Titus, flying to the heavens on the back of an eagle.

John Schou
JUCHIDL_-toqtamish_flower_hajji_tarkhan_mint.jpg
JUCHIDS - Toqtamish 29 viewsJUCHIDS - Toqtamish (782-797 AH/1380-1395 AD) (Mongols of the Golden Horde) Anonymous copper pulo, Hajji Tarkhan mint. Posthumous issue; dated 799 AH (1397). Reference: Fedorov-Davidov #128.dpaul7
julius92.jpg
Julius Caesar portrait Denarius Sepullius Macer51 viewsJULIUS CAESAR
AR silver portrait denarius. Possibly posthumous issue, .

OBV:CAESAR DICT PERPETVO, veiled head of Caesar right.
RX - SEPVLLIVS MACER, Venus standing right holding Victory and scepter.
RSC 41, RCV 1414.
17mm, 3.1g.
Condition G-VG
1 commentscliff_marsland
EM006_Julius_Caesar.JPG
Julius Caesar; 46 - 44BC42 viewsĆ Sestertius (poss. Dupondius)
Struck ca. 38BC, generally attributed to an unknown "Southern Italian" mint.
Rev. - Wreathed head of Julius Caesar right, DIVOS JVLIVS around
Obv. - Bare head of Octavian right, wearing slight beard CAESAR (DIVI), around
13.82 grams
28 mm

While obviously Julius Caesar does not qualify as a First Century Roman Emperor, I figured that a coin depicting his posthumous image might technically allow me to complete a "12 Caesars" set until a lifetime portrait in bronze can be found.
1 commentscmcdon0923
SeleukosIBabylon.jpg
King 01. Seleucos I, 312-281. 93 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Price 3747, Houghton 82(5), gVF, 17.05g, 25.9mm, 45o, Babylon mint, posthumous, 311 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in lion head headdress; reverse BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter, monogram in wreath left, MI under throne; nice-style high-relief obverse, flat center on reverse

Seleucos I was a comrade of Alexander the great and founded the Seleucid Empire in 312B.C.
2 commentsLordBest
111teg3.jpg
Kingdom of Macedon AR Drachm39 viewsKingdom of Macedon Alexander III Posthumous AR Drachm c. 295/4 b.c.
Mint of Miletos
4.8g, 18mm, 1h. VF
O: Head of Herakles wearing lion skin
R: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left. Monogram in left field, double axe below throne.
Ref: M.J Price 2148.
3 commentsAndrew B2
336_-_323_BC_ALEXANDER_III_Hemiobol.JPG
Kingdom of Macedonia, Alexander the Great. AE Hemiobol (4 Chalkoi). Struck 336 – 323 BC at Macedon.9 viewsObverse: No legend. Head of Alexander the Great as Herakles, wearing lion-skin knotted at base of neck, facing right.
Reverse: AΛEΞANĐPOY. Bow in Gorytos (a case for bow and quiver) above, club and compound ΠΥΡ monogram below.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 5.79gms | Die Axis: 3
Price: 0335

Alexander the Great reigned from 336 to 323 BC but, although Price supposes this coin to be a lifetime issue, Thompson proposes the posthumous date of 321 – 320 BC (Thompson series VI) based on the control mark.

It is difficult to interpret the die orientation in these issues because not only is it unclear what the Ancient Greeks would have considered “up” with respect to the reverse design but modern scholars are ambiguous on the subject as well. I have, however, assumed that the modern conventional orientation is with the name reading horizontally, and therefore have described my example as having a 3 o’clock orientation, the “top” of the reverse being aligned with the back of Herakles’ head on the obverse.
*Alex
496_Greek.jpg
Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great31 viewsReference. this is the only example of this type known to Forum; possibly unique
Unpublished variety; Meydancikkale - (cf. 2691, different controls, same engraver), Müller -, SNG Cop -, Thompson -, Black Sea Hoard -, Armenak -

Note. Thrace, Ainos (Enez, Turkey) mint, likely posthumous, c. 282 - 272 B.C

Obv.
diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon
.

Rev. BASILEWS LUSIMACOU
Athena enthroned left, holding Nike and resting left elbow on shield decorated with lion’s head, spear resting to her right; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, monogram in inner left field, monogram in exergue

16.503 gr
28.6 mm
180o

Note.
Barry Murphy identified the mint for this coin as Ainos, noting, "Not the same dies or the same monograms, but clearly the same engraver as Meydicikkale 2691."

A subject ally of Athens, Aenus provided peltasts at the Battle of Sphacteria in 425 B.C. and sent forces to the Sicilian Expedition in 415. It was in the possession of Ptolemy Philopator in 222 B.C., of Philip V of Macedon in 200, of Lysimachos in 283, and later of Antiochus the Great, who lost it to the Romans in 185 B.C., whereupon the Romans declared Aenus a free city. It was still a free city in the time of Pliny the Elder.
2 commentsokidoki
Thrace 1b img.jpg
Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, Silver tetradrachm93 viewsObv:– Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon.
Rev:– BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣMAXOY, Athena seated left, holding Nike in extended right hand, left arm resting on shield, spear behind, monogram in inner left field, monogram under Throne
Ainos mint. Posthumous issue struck after 281 B.C.
Reference:- Thompson -, Muller -.

Allocated to Ainos thanks to Barry Murphy who stated "Not the same dies or the same monograms, but clearly the same engraver as Meydicikkale 2691".
4 commentsmaridvnvm
Thrace_1b_img~0.jpg
Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, Silver tetradrachm40 viewsObv:– Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon.
Rev:– BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣMAXOY, Athena seated left, holding Nike in extended right hand, left arm resting on shield, spear behind, monogram in inner left field, monogram under Throne
Ainos mint. Posthumous issue struck after 281 B.C.
Reference:- Thompson -, Muller -.

Allocated to Ainos thanks to Barry Murphy who stated "Not the same dies or the same monograms, but clearly the same engraver as Meydicikkale 2691".

The coin has a dark blue-black toning that makes it tricky to photograph.

Updated image using new photography setup.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Thrace_1b_obv.jpg
Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, Silver tetradrachm - Portrait50 viewsObv:– Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon.
Rev:– BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣMAXOY, Athena seated left, holding Nike in extended right hand, left arm resting on shield, spear behind, monogram in inner left field, monogram under Throne
Ainos mint. Posthumous issue struck after 281 B.C.
Reference:- Thompson -, Muller -.

Allocated to Ainos thanks to Barry Murphy who stated "Not the same dies or the same monograms, but clearly the same engraver as Meydicikkale 2691".

New photo of obverse.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
56899q00_(2).jpg
Kingdom of Thrace. Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm180 viewsCirca 297-281 B.C. AR Tetradrachm, Thompson 59, Müller 88 (Sestus mint), 17.146g, maximum diameter 31.2mm, die axis 0o, Mysia, Lampsacus mint. Obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon. Reverse Athena seated left on prow, Nike crowning name in extended right, transverse spear resting against right side, resting left arm on shield behind, KA monogram inner left, herm outer left. gVF. Nice style, beautiful portrait of Alexander.

Ex Otakirak Collection. Ex Stack's, Bowers and Ponterio NYINC Auction 2012, lot 194. Ex FORVM.

Lysimachos, a Macedonian of great physical strength and fortitude, rose to prominence as a σωματοφύλαξ, or “bodyguard” for Alexander the Great. When Alexander’s territories were parceled out during the settlement at Babylon in 323 BC, Lysimachos was given control of Thrace, the Chersonese, and the intervening Black Sea coast. Unfortunately, much of this territory was no longer under Macedonian control, but was claimed by various Thracian tribes. Although Lysimachos was involved to some extent in the early wars of the Diadochs, most of his early years as satrap were preoccupied with subduing the Thracian tribes, an endeavor that was largely unsuccessful. By the time he assumed the royal title in 306/5 BC, his kingdom consisted of little more than the southern portions of Thrace. While this territory included a few already active mints, such as Ainos and Byzantion, Lysimachos was forced to depend on his ally Kassander, the king of Macedon, for coinage, as the sources of bullion were under the control of his enemies. This situation changed in 302 BC, when Lysimachos raised an army at the urging of Kassander and invaded Asia Minor, territory which Antigonos I Monophthalmos controlled, and whose son, Demetrios I Poliorketes, was threatening Kassander’s southern flank in Thessaly. Lysimachos quickly captured much of the Hellespont, and he penetrated as far as Lydia. This territory was rich with both silver bullion and mint cities, including Alexandria Troas, Ephesos, Lampsakos, Magnesia, and Sardis. Lysimachos used these mints to begin striking coinage on his behalf, while at the same time, he apparently sent bullion back to Thrace, where Lysimacheia and Sestos also began to produce coinage for him. These mints initially struck coins of Alexander type for Lysimachos, but later changed to the new Lysimachos type in 297 BC. After Lysimachos and Seleukos I defeated the Antigonids at Ipsos in 301 BC, most of western Asia Minor passed to Lysimachos. He now held some of the most prosperous cities in the Aegean, and soon most of the well-established mints were striking coinage in his name. Many of these same mints were required to pay large sums of tribute in order to fund further campaigns of expansion. One such object of expansion was Macedon, the ultimate goal of all the Diodochs. Since the death of Kassander in 298 BC, it had fallen into chaos and was eventually captured by Demetrios, who was, in turn, driven out by the joint invasion of Lysimachos and Pyrrhos in 288 BC. Initially, Macedon was split between the two, with Lysimachos taking the eastern half and its mint of Amphipolis. By 285 BC, when Lysimachos also obtained the western half from Pyrrhos, Pella also began producing coinage for Lysimachos. His successes, however, were short-lived. Beginning in 284 BC with the murder of his step-sons, Lysimachos became involved in a treacherous game of political and dynastic intrigue. As a result, revolt broke out among the Asian cities under his control, and Seleukos I launched an invasion against him. At the battle of Korupedion in 281 BC, Lysimachos was killed, and his kingdom was subsumed into the Seleukid empire. Ptolemy Keraunos, however, siezed Lysimachos’ European territories after he murdered Seleukos I later that year. Edward T. Newell’s study of Lysimachos’ lifetime issues arranged them according to the territorial expansion of his kingdom. Unfortunately, Newell died before completing his study, and consequently many issues are missing from Margaret Thompson’s survey of his unfinished work. The many ‘unpublished’ coins that have appeared over the past two decades reveal how little is known about Lysimachos’ coinage. Although most catalogs list these unpublished coins as posthumous issues, this is unlikely, as most of his mint cities were taken over by other kingdoms following Lysimachos’ death. The cities that continued to issue his coins as a regular type, such as Byzantion, were mostly ones that regularly conducted trade with cities to the north of Thrace, whose economies were likely dominated by Lysimachos type coinage during his lifetime. A few cities, such as Tenedos, struck brief, sporadic issues of Lysimachos type coins long after his death, but these issues were likely struck for some specific purpose that required this type, and are not part of any regular series. At the beginning of his reign, Lysimachos continued to use Alexander’s coinage types, later modifying them by replacing Alexander’s name with his own. In 297 BC, Lysimachos introduced a new type: the obverse was a portrait of Alexander; the reverse was Athena, Lysimachos’ patron goddess. G.K Jenkins noted the power of the Alexander portrait in his commentary on the Gulbenkian Collection: “The idealized portrait of Alexander introduced on the coinage of Lysimachos in 297 BC is characterized by the horn of Ammon which appears above the ear. The allusion is to Alexander’s famous visit to the oracle of Ammon at the Siwa Oasis in 331, when the god is supposed to have greeted Alexander as ‘My son’.... The best of the Alexander heads on Lysimachos’ coinage...have a power and brilliance of effect that is irresistible. It [is speculated] that these Alexander heads may have derived from an original gem carved by Pyrgoteles, an engraver prominent among the artists of Alexander’s court....” Regardless of the inspiration for the new design, part of the remarkable attraction of this coinage is its artistic variety: each engraver created his own fresh and distinctive portrayal of the world’s greatest conqueror. (Commentary courtesy of CNG).
6 commentsJason T
FotorCreated~100.jpg
Kings of Macedon Alexander the great circa 328-323 BC AR Drachm 16 mm 4.19 g 3h16 viewsHead of Herakles right wearing lion skinb headdress.Rev Zeus enthroned left holding eagle and scepter in left field Demeter facing with two torches,symbol below throne.Lamsacus mint
Life time issue,the vast majority of Alexanders drachms are Posthumous,and life time issue are scarce.
Grant H
Alexander_III_“The_Great”_AR_Drachm___19mm___4_13g___Posthumous_issue_struck_323-317_BC_at_Troas,_Abydos_.jpg
Kings of Macedon, Alexander III “The Great” AR Drachm40 viewsKings of Macedon, Alexander III “The Great” AR Drachm 19mm 4.13g Posthumous issue struck 323-317 BC at Troas, Abydos.
O: Head Herakles r. in lionskin.
R: Zeus enthroned l., one foot back, holding eagle and sceptre, ALEXANDROU to r, MY monogram in l. field, Ivy-leaf beneath throne.
SG6730-31v(symbol), Price 1527.
_9450
Antonivs Protti
Alexander_the_Great_AR_Drachm_-_Magnesia_Mint.jpg
Kings of Macedon, Alexander III “The Great” AR Drachm 44 views17mm 3.90g Posthumous issue 319-305 BC. Minted at Ionia, Magnesia.
O: Head Herakles r. in lionskin.
R: Zeus enthroned l., one foot back, holding eagle and sceptre, ALEXANDROU (partial, at edge of flan) to r, STW monogram. in l. field, AT monogram beneath throne.
Price 1970, Mueller 793. SCARCE TYPE! _6399
Antonivs Protti
Alexander_the_Great_AR_Drachm_-_Kolophon_Mint.jpg
Kings of Macedon, Alexander III “The Great” AR Drachm 18mm 4.04g101 viewsPosthumous issue 323-319 BC. Kolophon Mint
O: Head Herakles r. in lionskin.
R: Zeus enthroned l., one foot back, holding eagle and sceptre, ALEXANDROU to r, Lyre in l. field, A beneath throne.
SG - , Price 1769, Mueller 241. _7359 sold :o(
Antonivs Protti
Cassander.jpg
Kings of Macedon. Alexander III ‘The Great’ (Circa 325-315 BC)22 viewsAR Tetradrachm

26 mm, 16.77 g

Late lifetime or posthumous issue struck under Antipater or Polyperchon. Pella Mint. Circa 325-315 BC

Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress.

Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, thunderbolt in left field, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right.

Price 232
Nathan P
Alexander_III__Tetra.jpg
KINGS of MACEDON. Alexander the Great ( or Alexander III ) Early posthumous issue145 viewsKINGS of MACEDON. Alexander the Great ( or Alexander III )  336-323 BC. AR Tetradrachm
early posthumous issue , 17.11 gr . Amphipolis mint. Struck under Polyperchon or Kassander (for Philip III), circa 318-317 BC. Head of Herakles right wearing lion's skin headdress /BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY means ( Of King Alexander ) , Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; branch in left field, Π below throne. Price 124 . NGC AU.





From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
2 commentsSam
Lucius_Verus_RIC_M596b~0.JPG
Lucius Verus, 161 - 169 AD (Posthumous issue)28 viewsObv: DIVVS VERVS, bare head of Lucius Verus facing right.

Rev: CONSECRATIO, a funeral pyre of four tiers adorned with statues, drapery and garland; surmounted by Verus in a quadriga.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 169 AD

3.4 grams, 18.5 mm, 0°

RIC III M. Aurelius 596b, RSC 58, S5206, VM 50/3
1 commentsSPQR Matt
Thrace_1h_img.jpg
Lysimachos, Kingdom of Thrace, AR tetradrachm, Posthumous Issue, circa 2nd Century B.C.58 viewsObv:– Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon.
Rev:– Athena enthroned l., holding Nike on extended r. hand and spear, and resting l. elbow on shield propped against throne; LUSIMACOU in l. field; KP monogram in inner field; BY on throne, BASILEWS in r. field; ornamented trident in exergue
Minted in Byzantium, circa 2nd Century B.C. (Posthumous Issue)

Weight 16.97g. Size 37.11 mm
1 commentsmaridvnvm
16-alex_drachm.jpg
MACEDON - Alexander III, (posthumous) 16 viewsMACEDON - Alexander III, (posthumous) AR drachm, Lampsakos mint. ca 300 BC. Obv.: Head of Heracles with lionskin right. Rev.: Zeus left seated, holding eagle and sceptre, ALEXANDROU to right, left in field Pegasos, LAM monogram beneath throne. Reference: Price 1389bdpaul7
Philipp-II-Macedonia_AG-One-fifth-Teradrachm-Tetrobol_Apollo_h_r__PHILIPPOY_PA_SNGANS-653_Amphipolis-Postum-c323-316-BC_Q-001_0h_13-14mm_2,60g-s.jpg
Macedonia, Kings, 015 Philip II., (359-336 B.C), SNG ANS 653, Amphipolis, AR-one-fifth tetradrachm, ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ/ ΠΑ,211 viewsMacedonia, Kings, 015 Philip II., (359-336 B.C), SNG ANS 653, Amphipolis, AR-one-fifth tetradrachm, ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ/ ΠΑ,
avers: Head of Apollo right, wearing taenia.
reverse: ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ, youth on horseback right, ΠΑ monogram below.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 13-14mm, weight: 2,60g, axis: 0h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Philipp II., Amphipolis posthumous issue, date: ca. 323-316 B.C., ref: SNG ANS-653,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Philip_II_,_Macedonia,_Kings,_(359-336_B_C),_AR-One-fifth-Teradrachm-Tetrobol_Apollo_h_r__PHILIPPOY_Star_SNG-ANS-Not_Amphipolis-Postum-c32-17-BC_Q-001_7h_12,5-13,5mm_2,25g-s.jpg
Macedonia, Kings, 015 Philip II., (359-336 B.C), SNG ANS Not in, AR-1/5-Tetradrachm, ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ/ Star, Rare!164 viewsMacedonia, Kings, 015 Philip II., (359-336 B.C), SNG ANS Not in, AR-1/5-Tetradrachm, ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ/ Star, Rare!
avers: Head of Apollo right, wearing taenia.
reverse: ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ, youth on horseback right, eight pointed star below.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 12,5-13,5mm, weight: 2,25g, axis: 7h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Philipp II., Amphipolis posthumous issue Struck under Antipater or Polyperchon (for Philip III and Alexander IV),
date: ca. 320-317 B.C., ref: SNG ANS-Not In, Le Rider pl. 44, 14; Troxell, Studies, Group 3, 343;
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Kingdom_of_Macedonia__Alexander_III,_336_–_323_and_posthumous_issues_Tetradrachm,_Amphipolis_circa_318-317,_AR_Q-001_8h_25,5-26,5mm_17,26g-s.jpg
Macedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 0110, Amphipolis, AR-Tetradrachm, Zeus Aëtophoros seated on throne left, bow and quiver in left field,689 viewsMacedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 0110, Amphipolis, AR-Tetradrachm, Zeus Aëtophoros seated on throne left, bow and quiver in left field,
avers: No legends, Young Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at the neck.
reverse: BAΣILEΩΣ-AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Zeus Aëtophoros seated on throne left, right leg drawn back, holding eagle and scepter, bow and quiver in left field.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 25,5-26,5mm, weight: 17,26g, axes: 8 h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, ‘Amphipolis’ mint.
date: c. 323 - c. 320 B.C., ref: Price 110,
Q-001
7 commentsquadrans
Alexander_III,_AR-Tetradrachm,_Mesembria_mint,_Price_1082,_175-125_BC_,_Q-001,_0h,_32,5mm,_16,47g-s.jpg
Macedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 1082, Mesembria, AR-Tetradrachm, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, eagle on outstretched right hand, #1155 viewsMacedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 1082, Mesembria, AR-Tetradrachm, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, eagle on outstretched right hand, #1
avers: No legends, Head of beardless Heracles right wearing lion-skin headdress.
reverse: BAΣILEΩΣ/AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, eagle on outstretched right hand, scepter in left hand. MA monogram in left field, below Corinthian helmet right, Monogram (AΠO) beneath throne.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 32,5mm, weight: 16,47g, axes: 0h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, ‘Mesembria’ mint.
date: posthumous, c. 175 - c. 125 B.C., ref: Price 1082,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Alexander_III,_AR-Tetradrachm,_Mesembria_mint,_Price_1110,_125-65_BC_,_Q-001,_0h,_32,5-33mm,_16,12gx-s.jpg
Macedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 1106A, Mesembria, AR-Tetradrachm, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, eagle on outstretched right hand, #1325 viewsMacedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 1106A, Mesembria, AR-Tetradrachm, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, eagle on outstretched right hand, #1
avers: No legends, Head of beardless Heracles right wearing lion-skin headdress.
reverse: BAΣILEΩΣ/AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, eagle on outstretched right hand, scepter in left hand. Monogram in left field, below Corinthian helmet right, Monogram beneath throne.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 32,5-33,0mm, weight: 16,12g, axes: 0h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, ‘Mesembria’ mint.
date: posthumous, c. 125 - c. 65 B.C., ref: Price 1106A,
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans
Alexander_III,_AR-Drachm,_Colophon_mint,_Price_1791,_319-310_BC_,_Q-001,_11h,_17,5mm,_3,82g-s.jpg
Macedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 1791, Colophon, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on throne left, 99 viewsMacedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 1791, Colophon, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on throne left,
avers: Head of beardless Heracles right wearing lion-skin headdress.
reverse: AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Zeus seated on stool-throne left, eagle on outstretched right hand, scepter in left hand, monogram (M,Ω) left, monogram beneath throne.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5mm, weight: 3,82g, axes: 11h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, Colophon mint, date: posthumous, c. 319 - c. 310 B.C., ref: Price 1791,
Q-001
quadrans
Alexander_III,_AR-Drachm,_Colophon_mint,_Price_1813,_310-301_BC_,_Q-001,_0h,_16,5-17mm,_3,95g-s.jpg
Macedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 1813, Colophon, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on throne left, 99 viewsMacedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 1813, Colophon, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on throne left,
avers: Head of beardless Heracles right wearing lion-skin headdress.
reverse: AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Zeus seated on stool-throne left, eagle on outstretched right hand, scepter in left hand, crescent left, Π beneath throne.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5-17,0mm, weight: 3,95g, axes: 0h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, Colophon mint, date: posthumous, c. 310 - c. 301 B.C., ref: Price 1813,
Q-001
quadrans
Alexander_III,_AR-Drachm,_Colophon_mint,_Price_1837,_301-297_BC_,_Q-001,_1h,_18mm,_2,23(x2)g-s.jpg
Macedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 1837, Colophon, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on throne left, 112 viewsMacedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 1837, Colophon, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on throne left,
avers: Head of beardless Heracles right wearing lion-skin headdress.
reverse: AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Zeus seated on stool-throne left, eagle on outstretched right hand, scepter in left hand, lion-head left, below crescent, crab-claw beneath throne.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0mm, weight: 2,23(x2)g, axes: 1h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, Colophon mint, date: posthumous, c. 301 - c. 297 B.C., ref: Price 1837,
Q-001
quadrans
Alexander_III,_AR-Drachm,_Colophon_mint,_Price_1840,_301-294_BC_,_Q-001,_0h,_18-18,5mm,_4,13g-s.jpg
Macedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 1840, Colophon, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on throne left, 121 viewsMacedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 1840, Colophon, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on throne left,
avers: Head of beardless Heracles right wearing lion-skin headdress.
reverse: AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Zeus seated on stool-throne left, eagle on outstretched right hand, scepter in left hand, lion-forepart left, below Φ, pentagram beneath throne.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-18,5mm, weight: 4,13g, axes: 0h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, Colophon mint, date: posthumous, c. 301 - c. 297 B.C., ref: Price 1840,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Alexander_III_,_Macedonia,_Kings,_(The_Great,_320-315_BC),_Price_3426,_AR-Tetradr_,_Arados,_Q-001,_0h,_25,5-27,5mm,_16,97g-s.jpg
Macedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 3426, Phoenicia, Arados, AR-Tetradrachm, Zeus Aëtophoros seated on throne left, AP monogram in left field,84 viewsMacedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 3426, Phoenicia, Arados, AR-Tetradrachm, Zeus Aëtophoros seated on throne left, AP monogram in left field,
avers: No legends, Young Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at the neck.
reverse: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, AP monogram in left field, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 25,5-27,5mm, weight: 16,97g, axes: 0h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, ‘Arados, Phoenicia’ mint, AP monogram,
date: c.c.320-315 B.C.,(Posthumous issue), ref: Price(1991) 3426,
Q-001
quadrans
Philip_III,_AR-Drachm,_Colophon_mint,_Price_P48,_323-319_BC_,_Q-001,_0h,_17-17,5mm,_4,21g-s.jpg
Macedonia, Kings, 017 Philip III., (Arrhidaeus, 323 - 317 B.C.), Price P48, Colophon, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on throne left, 93 viewsMacedonia, Kings, 017 Philip III., (Arrhidaeus, 323 - 317 B.C.), Price P48, Colophon, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on throne left,
He was an elder half-brother of Alexander the Great.
avers: Head of beardless Heracles right wearing lion-skin headdress.
reverse: ΦIΛIΠΠOΥ, Zeus seated on stool-throne left, eagle on outstretched right hand, scepter in left hand, monogram ΠΑ left, Β beneath throne.
exergue: , diameter: 17,0-17,5mm, weight: 4,21g, axes: 0h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, Colophon mint, date: posthumous, c. 323 - c. 319 B.C., ref: Price P48,
Q-001
quadrans
Macedon_Philip_II_Tetrad_-_SNG_ANS_740.jpg
Macedonia, Philip II36 viewsMACEDONIAN KINGDOM
Philip II (359-336 BC)
AR tetradrachm (13.77 gm). Amphipolis, posthumous issue under Cassander as regent, ca. 316-311 BC.
Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth, holding palm frond, on horseback right; aplustre below; • in Π below raised foreleg.
Le Rider pl. 46, 18. SNG ANS 740.
Attractively toned. Insignificant flan crack at 4:00 on obverse, otherwise Extremely Fine.
Ex Heritage
1 commentsSosius
1AlexanderDrachm~0.JPG
Macedonian Kingdom49 viewsafter 323 BC
AR Drachm (18mm, 3.91g)
O: Head of Alexander as Herakles right, clad in lion's skin.
R: Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and sceptre, his right leg drawn back; buckle symbol in field to left, monogram (cresent above A) beneath throne, AΛEΞANΔPOY behind.
Lampsakos mint (posthumous issue).
cf Price 1372; Sear 6730v
ex Jack H. Beymer
Enodia
GRK_Alexander_Tet_Price_3602_(CNG).jpg
Macedonian Kingdom76 viewsSear 6713-20 var; Price 3602; Newell __, Group 2; Müller 671.

AR tetradrachm (17.10 gr., 25 mm.), struck by Alexander III the Great (336-323 B.C.E.) at Babylon ca. 325-323 B.C.E. (his last lifetime issue).

Obv: Head of beardless Herakles facing right, wearing Nemian lion’s skin headdress.

Rev: Zeus seated left (on throne with back, his legs parallel, feet on stool), holding eagle and scepter, M to left, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, monogram beneath thrown.

Alexander adopted the Attic weight standard for his silver coinage.

Note on Characteristics of Newell Group 2: The coins carry the letter M as the magistrate’s mark together with this monogram or an M with both this monogram and a symbol (33 are known). The legs of Zeus are parallel. The legend is ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, and then ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ. The dies are not necessarily aligned at 0-degrees (as in Group 1). There are 77 obverse dies. Price (1991) wrote that “this group of issues, with its closely knit interlocking of obverse dies, has every aspect of a large-scale production over a relatively short period of time.” Le Rider (1991) suggested that Groups 1 and 2 were issued in parallel with one-another, essentially in different workshops.

Note on Mint Attribution: Imhoof-Blumer (1895) noted that the M-ΛY on lion tetradrachms issued by Mazaeus as satrap of Alexander at Babylon (331-328 B.C.E.) also appear on Newell’s Group 3 tetradrachms. Newell (1923) concluded that, since his Groups 1-3 tetradrachms form an ensemble, they were all issued in Babylon. Price (1991) questioned but did not depart from this attribution. LeRider (2007) agrees with this attribution, adding that eight of the nine symbols that appear with the Γ on certain lion tetradrachms also appear on Newell’s Groups 1-2 tetradrachms.

Note on Dating: Newell Group 2 is dated to 329-324/3 B.C.E., per Newell (1923); to 329/8-23/2 B.C.E., per Waggoner (in Mřrkholm (1979)); to 325-323 B.C.E., per Price (1991); and to 324/3-322/1 B.C.E., per LeRider (2007), with the posthumous issues within the group including ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ in the legend. This coin was Alexander’s last lifetime issue.
2 commentsStkp
ALEXIII.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom Alexander III (The Great) Silver Tetradrachm 336-323 BC31 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Seleukos, Satrap in Babylon, 311 - 306 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great
posthumous issue struck under Seleukos I Nikator (uncertain Babylonian mint), 312-306 BC,

Struck in the name of Alexander, this coin also bears the personal badge of Seleukos, an anchor. Seleukos was first appointed satrap in Babylonia in 320 B.C. but was put to flight by Antigonus in 315. He returned in 311 only to be forced to evacuate later that year by a counterattack by Antigonus' son, Demetrius. Not long after, however, Seleukos again recovered the city.

Scroll down for table


Metal:
AR Silver


Diam:
26 mm.


Weight:
16.56 gr.


OBV:
Head of Heracles Facing Right ,
clad in Nemean Lion-skin headdress


OBV-LEGEND:
None


Marks-OBV:
None


REV:
Zeus seated on throne facing left, holding eagle in outstretched right hand, scepter in left
Right leg drawn behind left
Left field : Anchor flukes up

REV-LEGEND :
(Right and vertical) ALEXANPROY


Marks-REV:
Monegram Below throne: Pi with a dot in it


In Exer:
 ???


Source :
N/A


Age:
336-323 BC


Mint:
 ???


Grade
 Ch VF  


Strike
 4/5 


Susrface
 4/5 


Ref : SC 94•3d.1 ???
NGC Ancients Cert.#2411942-052
Michel C2
Alexander_III_Posthumous_Issue.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C. Silver tetradrachm.114 viewsRule of Philip III Arrhidaeus.
Posthumous, struck shortly after the death of Alexander the great c. 323 - 320 BC.
Amphipolis mint.
Obv ; Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Rev ;BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY "Of King Alexander"
Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; Macedonian helmet in left field. Price 113.
NGC EF / Scratches . 17.04 gr.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
Alex.JPG
MACEDONIAN KINGDOM. Alexander III the Great (336-323 BC)11 viewsMACEDONIAN KINGDOM. Alexander III the Great (336-323 BC). AR tetradrachm (27mm, 16.92 gm, 3h). NGC Choice XF 5/5 - 4/5. Early posthumous issue of Tyre, under Ptolemy I Soter, as satrap, dated Regnal Year 35 of Azemilkos (315/4 BC). Head of Heracles right, wearing lion skin headdress, paws tied before neck / AΛEΞANΔPOY, Zeus seated left on backless throne, right leg drawn back, feet on stool, eagle in right hand, scepter in left; ?O (Phoenician for Azemilkos) to right of ||||| - // (date) in left field. Price 3291 (Ake).

For the reattribution of the Alexander series of Ake (Price) to Tyre, see A. Lemaire, "Le monnayage de Tyr et celui dit d'Akko dans la deuxičme moitié du IV sičcle avant J.-C.," RN 1976, and G. Le Rider, Alexander the Great: Coinage, Finances, and Policy (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 2007), pp. 125-34.
Mark R1
alabanda_tetradrachm.jpg
MACEDONIAN KINGDOM. Alexander III the Great (336-323 BC). AR tetradrachm (16.49 gm).14 viewsLate posthumous issue of Caria, Alabanda, ca. 188-173 BC. Head of Heracles right, wearing lion-skin headdress, paws tied before neck / AΛEΞANΔPOY, Zeus enthroned left, right leg drawn back, feet on ground line, eagle in right hand, scepter in left; Pegasus flying left in left field, AΛBP monogram under throne. Price 2455.
1 commentsBritanikus
PhilipAplustre_Tet_b.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom. Philip II, Amphipolis mint47 viewsMacedonian Kingdom. Philip II, 359-336 BC. Silver Tetradrachm, Amphipolis mint. Early posthumous issue, struck under Kassander.
O: Zeus right wearing laurel wreath with berries.
R: Φ I Λ I Π - Π OY (Of Philip) Naked youth on horse prancing right holding long palm branch and reins; aplustre below; Γ under foreleg. Rider pl. 46, 18; SNG ANS 740. Light golden toning.

Plutarch (Alex., 3)
"To Philip, however, who had just taken Potidaea, there came three messages at the same time:
the first that Parmenio had conquered the Illyrians in a great battle, the second that his race-horse had won a victory at the Olympic games, while a third announced the birth of Alexander. These things delighted him, of course, and the seers raised his spirits still higher by declaring that the son whose birth coincided with three victories would be always victorious."

Plutarch (Alex., 4.10)
"...and (Philip) took care to have the victories of his chariots at Olympia engraved upon his coins..."

The reverse-types of Philip’s coins are nearly all agonistic, and refer either to the games celebrated by him at Dium in
honour of the Olympian Zeus (Müller, Mon. d'Alex., pp. II and 344), or, preferably, to the great Olympian games where his
chariots were victorious. We have, indeed, the direct assertion of Plutarch (Alex., c. 4) in favour of the latter
hypothesis, τας εν ‘Ολυμπια νικας των αρματων εγχαραττων τοις νομισμασιν. Philip was also successful at Olympia with the
race-horse (ιππω κελητι νενικηκέναι; Plut., Alex., 3), a victory of which he perpetuated the memory on his tetradrachms. The horseman
with kausia and chlamys is less certainly agonistic, and may (perhaps with a play upon his name) represent the king
himself as a typical Macedonian ιππευς.
Philip’s coins were struck at many mints in various parts of his empire. For the various mint-marks which they bear see
Müller’s Num. d'Alex. le Grand, the local attributions in which are, however, to be accepted with great caution. They
continued to circulate in Europe long after his death, and the Gauls, when they invaded and pillaged Greece, took vast
numbers of them back into their own land, where they long continued to serve as models for the native currency of Gaul and
Britain. (Historia Numorum, Barclay V. Head, 1887)

It is clear that, trying hard to show off, to pass and ultimately to impose his Greek character, Philip was especially
interested in the aesthetic aspect of his coins and also in the propaganda and psychological effects they would have
on the rest of the Greek world, and especially on "those sarcastic, democratic Athenians" and on "the more barbarian" people than himself...

Demosthenes (19, 308)
"And as for Philip,—why, good Heavens, he was a Greek of the Greeks, the finest orator and the most thorough—going
friend of Athens you could find in the whole world. And yet there were some queer, ill-conditioned fellows in Athens who
did not blush to abuse him, and even to call him a barbarian! "
4 commentsNemonater
Price-1534.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom: Alexander III ' the Great' (336-323 BCE) AR Drachm, Abydus (Price 1534; Muller 1626)26 viewsObv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress
Rev: AΛEΞANΔPOY; Zeus enthroned facing left holding eagle and scepter, monogram in left field, monogram below throne

Early Posthumous issue

1 commentsQuant.Geek
Marcus Aurelius -2.jpg
Marcus Aurelius Divvs Sestertius34 viewsAE Sestertius - Posthumous
Obv: DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS
Rev: CONSECRATIO S C ; eagle stg. on globe
Tanit
Antoninus -10.jpg
Marcus Aurelius Divvs Sestertius20 viewsAE Sestertius
Marcus Aurelius - Posthumous issue by Commodus
Obv: DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS; bare hd. r.
Rev: CONSECRATIO S C ; Aurelius std. on eagle r.
Tanit
Aurelius -3.jpg
Marcus Aurelius Divvs Sestertius23 viewsAE Sestertius
Marcus Aurelius - Posthumous issue by Commodus
Obv: DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS; bare hd. r.
Rev: CONSECRATIO S C ; funeral pyre surmounted by Aurelius in a quariga
Tanit
Aurelius -8.jpg
Marcus Aurelius Divvs Sestertius26 viewsAE Sestertius
Marcus Aurelius - Posthumous issue by Commodus
Obv: DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS; bare hd. r.
Rev: CONSECRATIO S C ; Aurelius std. on eagle r.
Tanit
Marcus_Aurelius_RIC_C273.JPG
Marcus Aurelius, 161 - 180 AD (Posthumous issue)26 viewsObv: DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS, bare head of Marcus Aurelius facing right.

Rev: CONSECRATIO, Eagle standing on a globe facing right, head turned left.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 180 AD

3.2 grams, 19 mm, 180°

RIC III Commodus 273, RSC 91, S5974, VM 50/2
SPQR Coins
4509_4510.jpg
Marcus Aurelius, Denarius, CONSECRATIO7 viewsAR Denarius
Marcus Aurelius
Caesar: 140 - 161AD
Augustus: 161 - 180AD
Issued (Posthumously, under Commodus): 180AD
18.0 x 17.5mm
O: DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS; Bare head, right.
R: CONSECRATIO; Eagle perched right, on bar, head left.
Rome Mint
RIC C265; RSC 78b; BMC C11.
Aorta: B3, O71, R189, T35, M2.
valdemar4499 140969155612
3/6/13 4/3/17
Nicholas Z
Mariniana_Diva.JPG
MARINIANA. Commemorative AR Antoninianus of Rome. Struck A.D.253 - 254 under Valerian I.132 viewsObverse: DIVAE MARINIANAE. Diademed and veiled bust of Mariniana, resting on crescent, facing right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO. Mariniana being borne to heaven seated on the back of a peacock flying right.
Diameter: 21mm | Weight: 2.18gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC V i : 6
RARE

Mariniana was the wife of Valerian I but it would seem that she must have died before he became emperor because all of her coins are posthumous commemoratives.
1 comments*Alex
0621-310.jpg
MAUSOLEUM or SHRINE, Romulus, Posthumous follis256 viewsFollis struck in Ostia, 1st officina
DIVO ROMVLO N V BIS CONS, Bare head of Romulus right
AETERNAE MEMORIAE, Temple with domed roof surmounted by eagle, M OST P at exergue
7.35 gr
RC #3786 var, Cohen #4

The Temple of Divus Romulus is a circular building with a concave facade preceded by columns on the Via Sacra. It was probably a temple for Romulus, the son of emperor Maxentius, but it has also been identified as the Temple of Jupiter Stator and as the sanctuary of the penates publici. The building is located between the Temple of Antoninus and Faustina and the Basilica of Maxentius.

When emperor Maxentius' son Romulus died in 307 CE, he was deified and hence a temple was built in his honour. Coins commemorating Romulus often depict a round building with a varying number columns in front. Some of them probably show the round mausoleum of Romulus on the Appian Way, others might portray the temple, which has led to the identification of the rotunda on the Via Sacra with the Temple of Divus Romulus. The location would be likely, given Maxentius' building activities nearby.
Explanations are copied from : http://sights.seindal.dk/sight/176_Temple_of_Romulus.html
5 commentsPotator II
divus_lion.jpg
Maximianus, MEMORIAE AETERNAE Lion24 viewsMaximianus, 285 - 310 A.D., posthumous. Rare AE 4, Rome, 317-318 AD, 1.87g. RIC-123, officina P=1 (r2); C-400 (2 Fr.). Obv: DIVO MAXIMIANO SEN FORT IMP Veiled, laureate head r. Rx: MEMORIAE AETERNAE Lion walking r., RP in exergue. F+; a bit rough. Ex Vatican & H.J.BerkPodiceps
0570-501.jpg
Maximianus, Posthumous half-follis - 005044 viewsRome mint, 3rd officina, c. AD 317/318
DIVO MAXIMIANO SEN FORT IMP, laureate and veiled bust right
MEMORIAE AETERNAE, Eagle facing, head left, RT at exergue
2.0 gr, 17 mm
Ref : Cohen # 397, RCV # 16401
Potator II
divo_constantius.jpg
MEMORIAE AETERNAE, eagle standing right, looking left, wings spread, RQ in ex. Rome RIC VII 11117 viewsConstantius I, AE3. Posthumous Issue by Constantine I. 317-318 A.D. DIVO CONSTANTIO PIO PRINC, veiled & laureate head right / MEMORIAE AETERNAE, eagle standing right, looking left, wings spread, RQ in ex. Rome RIC VII 111. Podiceps
IMG_0412.jpg
MINT II Normanby 1451 113 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PIO, Radiate head right.
PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left.
Posthumous issue.
Weight 1.83g.
Adrianus
IMG_0416.jpg
MINT II Normanby 1451 210 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PIO, Radiate head right.
PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left.
Posthumous issue.
Weight 2.43g.
Adrianus
IMG_0410.jpg
MINT II Normanby 1451 var. 15 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PO, Radiate head right
PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left
Normanby 1451 var.
Posthumous issue. Note the othographic error in the obverse legend. An obverse die link to a specimen offered in the Numismatic Circular for April 1995, no. 1613.
Weight 1.55g
Adrianus
odessos_sept__severus_AMNG2271.jpg
Moesia inferior, Odessos, Septimius Severus, AMNG 227137 viewsSeptimius Severus, AD 193-211
AE 26, 9.39g
struck posthumous after 211 under Caracalla and Geta
obv. DIVW CEV - HRW PEIW
Head of Severus without wreath, r.
rev. ODHCC - E - ITWN
The Great God of Odessos, in himation and wearing kalathos, stg. l., holding cornucopiae in . arm and sacrificing from patera over flaming altar, stg. l. before him
AMNG I/2, 2271 (2 ex., Moskow, Munich); Varbanov (engl.) 4357
rare, VF, dark-green patina
added to www.wildwinds.com

Pick writes: The obv. is the exact imitation of some Roman consecration denari, so that face, hair and beard step by step seem to be re-cut. That is the explanation too that for the reproduction of the legend DIVO SEVERO PIO instead of the usual term Theos the Latin loan word DIVUS was taken, which otherwise never occurs on coins - at least on authentic ones.
1 commentsJochen
0035-510.jpg
NEPTUNE252 viewsPosthumous issue of Caligula, in honour of his grandfather Agrippa
Rome mint, ca AD 37/41
M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa left with rostral crown
Neptun standing left, holding trident and dolphin. Large S C in fields
10.9 gr
Ref : RCV #1812, Cohen #3
Ex Alwin collection
4 commentsPotator II
Augustus_altar_Providentia.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - AE as8 viewsposthumous - struck by Tiberius
Rome
22-30 AD
radiate head left
DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER
altar
S C
PROVIDENT
RIC I Tiberius 81, BMCRE I 146, Cohen 228 (Augustus), SRCV I 1789
6,22g
Johny SYSEL
10221v.jpg
Odessos in Thracia, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III., posthumous issue, Tetradrachm, 125-70 BC.155 viewsOdessos in Thracia, as part of the Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III (the Great), 336-323 BC., posthumous issue,
Tetradrachm (29-30 mm, 16.46 g.), Odessos mint, ca. 120-95 BC.
Obv.: Head of Herakles (Alexander?) in lion-skin headdress right.
Rev. BAΣIΛEΩΣ / AΛEΞANΔPOY , Zeus, wearing himation, seated left on throne with back, holding eagle in his right hand and scepter with his left; ΔH to left, ; below throne, OΔH - monogram.
De Callata˙ group 1, D2. ; Price 194, 1179 .

my ancient coin database
5 commentsArminius
Macedon_PhilipII_SNG-ANS_658_gf.jpg
Philip II, Posthumous (temp Philip III-Kassander) AR 1/5 Tet. 3 viewsMacedon, Philip II, Posthumous (temp Philip III-Kassander) 359-336 BC. AR 1/5 Tet. (2.56 gm) of Amphipolis c. 323/2-316/5. Head of Apollo r. / Youth on horseback prancing r. ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ above, ΔI below horse's belly. VF. Ponterio 136 #1701. SNG ANS 8 #658 (same dies); Le Rider Group III (plate 45 #20); HGC 3.1 -. Anaximander
Macedon_PhilipII_SNG-ANS_638_gf.jpg
Philip II, Posthumous (temp Philip III-Kassander) AR Tetradrachm10 viewsMacedon, Philip II, Posthumous (temp Philip III-Kassander) 323-297 BC. AR Tetradrachm (14.23 gm) of Amphipolis c. 323/2-316/5. Laureate head of Zeus, r. / Youth on horseback, r., holding long palm branch. ΦΙΛΙΠ-ΠΟΥ. Λ in circle below, Λ below foreleg. nEF. SNG ANS 8 #638-639 (same obv. die); Le Rider Group III p. 121 (plate 45 11-12); HGC 3.1 -; Troxell Studies Issue 7 #311-312. cf. Nomisma Auction 54 #6; SNG Berry 118. 2 commentsAnaximander
philip_I_philadelphos_01.jpg
Philip Philadelphos AR Tetradrachm, Posthumous26 viewsObv: Diademed head right.
Rev: BASILEWS FILIPPOU EPIFANOU FILADELFOU - Zeus enthroned left, holding Nike and sceptre; centre field monogram AYGB.
Date: 57-55 BC
Mint: Antioch
Ref: RPC I 4124
Notes: Posthumous issue under Aulus Gabinius, Roman proconsul.
oa
20180219_182637.jpg
Philippos Philadelphos (Posthumous), 93-83 BC. Nominal: AR tetradrachm. City: Antioch.26 viewsObv .: Diad. King's head to the right.
Rev .: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦIΛΛIΠΠOY ... Zeus is enthroned to the left, holding scepter and Nike.
Condition: fine to very fine.
Dimensions: 15.06g, 25mm.
Newell: 441, BMC: 10, Sear: 7196.
1 commentsCanaan
phil_II_pan.jpg
Phillip II, Macedonian Kingdom, 359 -336 B.C.88 viewsBronze 1/4 unit, SNG ANS Macedonia II 979-993 (Symbols off flan on rev.); SNG Alpha Bank-online 449, uncertain mint c. 359 - 294 B.C. (many posthumous issues minted for Phillip II), weight 1.2 g. max. diameter 10.5 mm, Obv. head of Herakles r. wearing lion skin headdress, Rev. (Φ)ΙΛΙΠ above, (Π)OY below, club in between. Bright green patina with some earthen deposits.2 commentsSteve E
LZ_11.jpg
Phoenicia, Arados 217-216 B.C35 viewsAR 28.89mm (Thickness 3.23mm), weight 16.77g, die axis = 12h (0 degrees). 4 drachmae = Tetradrachm.

Obverse: Alexander III The Great; Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress.

Reverse: AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, footstool beneath feet, lower limbs wrapped in Himation, Eagle in right hand, sceptre in left hand, palm tree in left field, Aradian monogram AP under throne and era date 43 in exerque.

Posthumous issue.
2 commentsMartin Rowe
LW_11.jpg
Phoenicia, Arados 243-242 B.C18 viewsAR 26.98mm (Thickness 3.19mm), weight 16.76g, die axis = 12h (0 degrees). 4 drachmae = Tetradrachm.

Obverse: Alexander III The Great; Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress.

Reverse: AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, footstool beneath feet, lower limbs wrapped in Himation, Eagle in right hand, sceptre in left hand, palm tree in left field, Aradian monogram AP under throne and era date 17 (…. … -) in exerque.

Posthumous issue.
Martin Rowe
Alexander_III_,_Macedonia,_Kings,_(The_Great,_336_-_323_B_C_),_Price_3426,_AR-Tetradr_,_Arados,_Byblos,_cc__330-20,_Q-001,_0h,_25,5-27,5mm,_16,97g-s.jpg
Phoenicia, Arados, Macedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 3426, AR-Tetradrachm, Zeus Aëtophoros seated on throne left, AP monogram in left field,90 viewsPhoenicia, Arados, Macedonia, Kings, 016 Alexander III., (The Great, 356-323 B.C.), Price 3426, AR-Tetradrachm, Zeus Aëtophoros seated on throne left, AP monogram in left field,
avers: No legends, Young Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at the neck.
reverse: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, AP monogram in left field, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 25,5-27,5mm, weight: 16,97g, axes: 0h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, ‘Arados, Phoenicia’ mint, AP monogram,
date: c.c.320-315 B.C.,(Posthumous issue), ref: Price(1991) 3426,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
POLAND_-_2010_KAYN_2_ZL.jpg
POLAND - 2010 Katyn Massacre Commemorative78 viewsPOLAND - 2010 2-Zloty, Aluminum-copper-zinc alloy. Commemorative coin '70th Anniversary of the Katyń Crime'.
Obverse: An image of the Eagle established as the State Emblem of the Republic of Poland. On the sides of the Eagle, the notation of the year of issue: 20 – 10. Below the Eagle, an inscription: ZŁ 2 ZŁ in the rim, an inscription: RZECZPOSPOLITA POLSKA, preceded and followed by six pearls. The Mint’s mark: M/W, under the Eagle’s left leg. Reverse: Centrally, an inscription: KATYŃ. Below, a stylized image of the military forage cap with the Polish military Eagle. At the top, a semicircular inscription: 70. ROCZNICA ZBRODNI KATYŃSKIEJ (70 TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE KATYN MASSACRE). Diameter – 27 mm, weight – 8.15 g., edge plain with the inscription, NBP, repeated eight times, every second one inverted by 180 degrees, separated by stars.
Put in circulation since April 8, 2010. Mintage: 1 000 000. The coin was struck at the National Bank of Poland.
In light of the recent tragedy of Poland losing her president and top leaders, this coin is sold out in Poland, I have been told.
On September 17, 1939 the Red Army invaded the territory of Poland from the east. This invasion took place while Poland had already sustained serious defeats in the wake of the German attack on the country that started on September 1, 1939; thus Soviets moved to safeguard their claims in accordance with the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact.
In the wake of the Red Army's quick advance that met little resistance, between 250 000 and 454 700 Polish soldiers had become prisoners and were interned by the Soviets. About 250 000 were set free by the army almost on the spot, while 125 000 were delivered to the internal security services (the NKVD).
The NKVD in turn quickly released 42 400 soldiers. The approximately 170 000 released were mostly soldiers of Ukrainian and Belarusian ethnicity serving in the Polish army. The 43 000 soldiers born in West Poland, now under German control, were transferred to the Germans. By November 19, 1939, NKVD had about 40 000 Polish POWs: about 8 500 officers and warrant officers, 6 500 police officers and 25 000 soldiers and NCOs who were still being held as POWs.
As early as September 19, 1939, the People's Commissar for Internal Affairs and First Rank Commissar of State Security, Lavrenty Beria, ordered the NKVD to create a Directorate for Prisoners of War to manage Polish prisoners. The NKVD took custody of Polish prisoners from the Red Army, and proceeded to organize a network of reception centers and transit camps and arrange rail transport to prisoner-of-war camps in the western USSR. The camps were located at Jukhnovo (Babynino rail station), Yuzhe (Talitsy), Kozelsk, Kozelshchyna, Oranki, Ostashkov (Stolbnyi Island on Seliger Lake near Ostashkov), Tyotkino rail station (90 km from Putyvl), Starobielsk, Vologda (Zaenikevo rail station) and Gryazovets.
The approximate distribution of men throughout the camps was as follows: Kozelsk – 5 000; Ostashkov – 6 570; and Starobelsk – 4 000. They totalled 15 570 men.
On March 5, 1940, pursuant to a note to Joseph Stalin from Lavrenty Beria, the members of the Soviet Politburo – Stalin, Vyacheslav Molotov, Lazar Kaganovich, Mikhail Kalinin, Kliment Voroshilov, Anastas Mikoyan and Beria – signed an order to execute 25,700 Polish 'nationalists and counterrevolutionaries' kept at camps and prisons in occupied western Ukraine and Belarus.
Up to 99% of the remaining prisoners were subsequently murdered. People from Kozelsk were murdered in the usual mass murder site of Smolensk country, called Katyn forest; people from Starobilsk were murdered in the inner NKVD prison of Kharkiv and the bodies were buried near Pyatikhatki; and police officers from Ostashkov were murdered in the inner NKVD prison of Kalinin (Tver) and buried in Miednoje (Mednoye).
Estimates of the number of executed persons ranges from 15 000 to 21 768. Polish POWs and prisoners were murdered in Katyn forest, Kalinin (Tver) and Kharkiv prisons and elsewhere. About 8 000 of the victims were officers taken prisoner during the 1939 invasion of Poland, the rest being Polish citizens who had been arrested for allegedly being 'intelligence agents, gendarmes, spies, saboteurs, landowners, factory owners and officials'.
The term 'Katyn massacre' originally referred to the massacre, at Katyn Forest near villages of Katyn and Gnezdovo (about 12 miles (19 km) west of Smolensk, Russia), of Polish military officers confined at the Kozelsk prisoner-of-war camp. It is applied now also to the execution of prisoners of war held at Starobelsk and Ostashkov camps, and political prisoners in West Belarus and West Ukraine, shot on Stalin's orders at Katyn Forest, at the NKVD (Narodny Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del) Smolensk headquarters and at a slaughterhouse in the same city, as well as at prisons in Kalinin (Tver), Kharkiv, Moscow, and other Soviet cities.
The 1943 discovery of mass graves at Katyn Forest by Germany, after its armed forces had occupied the site in 1941, precipitated a rupture of diplomatic relations between the Soviet Union and the Polish government-in-exile in London. The Soviet Union continued to deny responsibility for the massacres until 1990, when it acknowledged that the NKVD secret police had in fact committed the massacres and the subsequent cover-up. The Russian government has admitted Soviet responsibility for the massacres, although it does not classify them as war crimes or as acts of genocide, as this would have necessitated the prosecution of surviving perpetrators, which is what the Polish government has requested. It also does not classify the dead as the victims of Stalinist repressions, in effect barring their formal posthumous rehabilitation.
On 13 April 1990, the forty-seventh anniversary of the discovery of the mass graves, the USSR formally expressed 'profound regret' and admitted Soviet secret police responsibility.
That day is also an International Day of Katyn Victims Memorial (Światowy Dzień Pamięci Ofiar Katynia).
After Poles and Americans discovered further evidence in 1991 and 1992, Russian President Boris Yeltsin released and transferred to the new Polish president, former Solidarity leader Lech Wałęsa, top-secret documents from the sealed package no. 1.
In June 2008, Russian courts consented to hear a case about the declassification of documents about Katyn and the judicial rehabilitation of the victims. In an interview with a Polish newspaper, Vladimir Putin called Katyn a 'political crime'.
dpaul7
const_i_post_hand_A_res.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I 12 views307 - 337 AD
Posthumous issue. ca. 337-340 AD.
AE 15 mm 0.85 g
O: veiled, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: no legend, Constantine veiled, to right in quadriga, the hand of God reaching down to him
laney
const_i_post_hand_B_res.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I14 views307 - 337 AD
Posthumous issue. ca. 337-340 AD.
AE 15.1 mm 1.61 g
O: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, veiled, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: no legend, Constantine veiled, to right in quadriga, the hand of God reaching down to him
laney
post_const_stand_res.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I 9 views307 - 337 AD
struck ca. 337 - 348
AE 15.5 mm 1.38 g
O:Veiled head right
R: Constantine standing right
laney
const_post_6.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I23 views307 - 337 AD
struck ca. 337 - 348
AE 13.5 mm max. 1.92 g
O:Veiled head right
R: Constantine standing right, VN to left, MR to right
laney
const_post_5.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I24 views307 - 337 AD
struck ca. 337 - 348
AE 13.5 X 15.5 mm 2.09 g
O:Veiled head right
R: Constantine standing right, VN to left, MR to right
laney
const_post_quad.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I32 views307 - 337 AD
Posthumous issue, ca. 337-340 AD.
AE 15 mm 1.45 g
O: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, veiled, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: no legend, Constantine veiled, to right in quadriga, the hand of God reaching down to him; Sear 3889
laney
const_post_9_25_10.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I34 viewsPosthumous, late 347 - 348
AE 14 mm 1.82 g
O: DV CONSTAN[TINVS PT] AVGG, veiled bust right
R: VN MR, Constantine, veiled and shrouded, standing half right
1 commentslaney
const_post_4.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I25 views307 - 337 AD
struck ca. 337 - 348
AE 15.5 mm 1.41 g
O: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled head right
R: Constantine standing right, VN to left, MR to right
SMNS in exe
Nicomedia
laney
const_post_3.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I23 views307 - 337 AD
struck ca. 337 - 348
AE 14.5 mm 1.60 g
O:Veiled head right
R: Constantine standing right, VN to left, MR to right
laney
const_post_2.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I31 views307 - 337 AD
struck ca. 337 - 348
AE 16.5 mm 1.68 g
O:Veiled head right
R: Constantine standing right, VN to left, MR to right
laney
const_quad_3.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I23 views307 - 337 AD
Posthumous issue. ca. 337-340 AD.
AE 15.5 mm 1.72 g
O: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, veiled, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: no legend, Constantine veiled, to right in quadriga, the hand of God reaching down to him
laney
const_quad_1.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I27 views307 - 337 AD
Posthumous issue. ca. 337-340 AD.
AE 15 mm 1.47 g
O: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, veiled, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: no legend, Constantine veiled, to right in quadriga, the hand of God reaching down to him
SMNA in exe., Nicomedia
laney
con_post_quad.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I25 views307 - 337 AD
Posthumous issue. ca. 337-340 AD.
AE 15 mm max. 1.48 g
O: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, veiled, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: no legend, Constantine veiled, to right in quadriga, the hand of God reaching down to him
laney
const_post_1.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I 22 views307 - 337 AD
struck ca. 337 - 348
AE 16 mm 1.15 g
O: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled head right
R: Constantine standing right, VN to left, MR to right
Nicomedia
laney
con_quad_10_03_10.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I23 viewsCONSTANTINE I
307 - 337 AD
Posthumous issue. ca. 337-340 AD.
AE 15 mm 1.83 g
O: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, veiled, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: no legend, Constantine veiled, to right in quadriga, the hand of God reaching down to him
laney
con_quad_2_10_03.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I35 views307 - 337 AD
Posthumous issue. ca. 337-340 AD.
AE 16.5 mm 1.31 g
O: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, veiled, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: no legend, Constantine veiled, to right in quadriga, the hand of God reaching down to him
SMNA in exe.
RIC VIII 18
Nicomedia

laney
CONSTANTINE_POSTH_RES.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I 26 views307 - 337 AD
struck ca. 337 - 348
AE 13 mm 1.01 g
O:Veiled head right
R: Constantine standing right, VN to left, MR to right
laney
constantine_post_tog_res.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I18 views307 - 337 AD
struck ca. 337 - 348
AE 13.39 mm 1.68 g
O:Veiled head right
R: Constantine standing right, VN to left, M[R] to right
laney
cst_i_post_quad_res.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I11 views307 - 337 AD
Posthumous issue. ca. 337-340 AD.
AE 13.5 mm 1.47 g
O: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, veiled, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: no legend, Constantine veiled, to right in quadriga, the hand of God reaching down to him
Cyzicus mint
laney
constantine_posthumous_quad.jpg
POSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I7 viewsPOSTHUMOUS CONSTANTINE I
307 - 337 AD
Posthumous issue, ca. 337-340 AD.
AE 13 mm 1.50g
O: Veiled, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: Constantine veiled, to right in quadriga, the hand of God reaching down to him
laney
Constantius I, Commemorative Rehash.jpg
Posthumous Constantius I- Siscia RIC 46111 viewsHalf-Follis

obv: DIVO PIO CONSTANTIO PRINC
Veiled head right.
rev: REQVIES OPT-IMOR MERIT
Emperor raising right hand, holding sceptre

SIS in exergue- Siscia

RIC VII 46- R5

This issue commemorates the death of Constantius I, Constantine the Great's father. It was issued under Constantine 317-318 in only. Scan doesn't do it justice, quite a nice hard green patina, without the gunk that presents itself in the pic.
1 commentswolfgang336
Constantine I Posthumous Aeternatia.jpg
Posthumous issue- Arles 17200 viewsConstantine I Posthumous

obv: DIVO CONSTANTINO P
rev: AETERNA PIETAS
X in right field, PCONS in exergue
RIC Arles 17, R2

337-340

For once, RIC actually underestimates a coin's rarity. You almost never see these for sale, and I consider myself extremely fortunate to have been able to purchase at the cost I did. Ex. Mayadigger
1 commentswolfgang336
Constantine I Posthumous Quadriga.jpg
Posthumous issue- Heraclea 13158 viewsConstantine I Posthumous

obv: DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, bust veiled left
rev: (No legend) Constantine on quadriga, reaching for hand of god.
SMH in exergue
RIC Heraclea 13, Rare

337-340

Extremely nice reverse.
wolfgang336
divus_claudius.jpg
Posthumous under Constantine I: Eagle11 viewsClaudius II, 317-318 Rome, posthumously under Constantine I, DIVUS CLAUDIUS II Ć 4. Rev. MEMORIAE AETERNAE, Eagle standing right, head left, RT in exergue, mint of Rome. 1.7 g 16 mm RIC 112 Sear 1988: 3234. Podiceps
Constantine_I,_posthumous,_quadriga,_Antioch.JPG
Posthumous: quadriga, Antioch21 viewsConstantine I, posthumous, quadriga, Antioch, struck 337-340.15 mm, 1.25 g. Obverse: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG; veiled bust right. Reverse: Emperor, veiled, to right in quadriga, hand of God reaching down to him, SMANS in exe. RIC VIII Antioch 37. ex areich, photo credit areichPodiceps
constantinus_con.jpg
Posthumous: quadriga, Constantinople14 viewsConstantine the Great, Posthumous. Bronze AE 4, RIC VIII 37, Constantinople mint, 1.614 grams, 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, posthumous, 9 Sep 337 - Apr 340 A.D.; obverse DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, veiled bust right; reverse Constantine, veiled, in quadriga right, the hand of God reaches down to him, CONS in ex; ex FORVMPodiceps
Constantine_I,_posthumous,_quadriga,Cyzicus.JPG
Posthumous: quadriga, Cyzicus34 viewsConstantine I, posthumous, quadriga, Cyzicus, struck 337-340. 17 mm, 1.45 g. Obverse: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG; veiled bust right. Reverse: Emperor, veiled, to right in quadriga, hand of God reaching down to him, SMKE in exe. RIC VIII Cyzicus 4. ex areich, photo credit areich1 commentsPodiceps
CI_heraclea_hand.jpg
Posthumous: quadriga, Heraclea22 viewsPosthumous AE4 of Constantine I "The Great". Heraclea Mint, Officina 5, 337-340 A.D. Size and weight: 14x15mm, 2.05g. 
Obverse: Veiled bust of Constantine right. 
DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG 
Reverse: Constantine driving a quadriga right, reaching up to the hand of God. 
Exergue: SMHЄ 
Reference: RIC VIII Heraclea 14. Ex moremothPodiceps
divus.jpg
Posthumous: quadriga, Nicomedia26 viewsDivus Constantine the Great 307-337 AD, AE4 Nicomedia 337-340
DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG; Veiled bust r. Emperor, veiled, to r. in quadriga, the hand of God reaches down to him; In ex: SMN. RIC 4; 1.12g; 16mm; VF. ex Gert Boersema

Podiceps
Constantine_I,_posthumous,_VNMR.JPG
Posthumous: veiled bust, Antioch38 viewsConstantine the Great, Posthumous. 15mm, 2.05g. Obverse: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG; veiled bust right. Reverse: VN MR; Constantine, veiled, standing facing, head right. Attribution: Antioch mint. RIC VIII Antioch 112. ex areich, photo credit areich2 commentsPodiceps
83298q00_RIC_VIII_48,_VF,_Nicomedia_posthumous_Constantine_I_RIC_VIII_48,_VF,_Nicomedia.jpg
Posthumous; veiled bust; RIC VIII 48, Nicomedia14 viewsConstantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D. Bronze AE4, RIC VIII 48, Nicomedia mint, 1.403g, 14.5mm, 0o, posthumous, 347 - 348 A.D.; obverse DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled bust right; reverse VN MR (venerabilis memoria - revered memory), Emperor standing right, togate, veiled, SMN“E” in exergue; scarce. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
divus_constantinus_cyzicus.jpg
Posthumous; Veiled Constantine standing right, SMKN, Cyzicus 24 viewsDivus Constantine AE4. 347-348 A.D. 1,3 g, 14 mm. D V CONSTANTINVS P T AVGG, veiled head right / VN-MR, Constantine, veiled, standing right, SMKN in ex. RIC VIII 46 CyzicusPodiceps
QIANLONG_S-_H_28_87.JPG
QIANLONG S- H 28.87 (QC) Type GX10.ql.1 & 22.392 (CCC)28 viewsGuangxu (1875-1908) Period

10 cash (cast copper), 1880s, Xinjiang Province, Aksu mint for Kashgar, 25 mm.

Obv: Qianlong tongbao.

Rev: Aksu (left, in Manchu) Aqs(u) (right, in Turkic Arabic), Ka(shgar) shi (top and bottom).

This coin has a two dot tong and the tail of the Aqsu curves to the left.

In 1799, Jiaqing (1796-1820) issued an edict ordaining the posthumous use of the Qianlong (1736-1795) reign title on 20% of the coinage of Xinjiang for ever to commemorate Qianlong’s conquest of the region.

Hartill rarity 8 (QC) & 14 (CCC).
Stkp
Antoninus_Pius_5~0.jpg
RIC 3, p.247, 438 - Antoninus Pius, Consecratio, Funeral pyre10 viewsAntoninus Pius (Reg. 138-161 AD)
Posthumous Denarius,161 AD
Obv.: Divus Antoninus Pius / Laureate bust r., drapery on l. shoulder.
Rv: CONSECRATIO, Funeral pyre
Ag, 3.30g, 16.6x17.5mm
Ref.: RIC 438 (Aurelius), RSC 164a
Ex Pri stina Hoard
Ex David L. Tranbarger
1 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_RIC_749_MA.jpg
RIC 749 MA51 viewsPosthumous denarius, 176-180
Obv: DIVAE FAVSTIN AVG MATR CASTROR
Bust r., veiled
Rev: CONSECRATIO
Funeral pyre surmounted by biga.

3.43g, 19mm
1 commentsklausklage
MA_Coin.jpg
RIC III Commodus 268 - Marcus Aurelius21 viewsMarcus Aurelius AR denarius, posthumous issue, struck under Commodus. AD 180. 18 mm, 2.60 gr. DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS: Bare head of Divus Marcus Aurelius right / CONSECRATIO: Eagle flying right carrying sceptre in its claws. RIC 268; RSC 81; Sear 5970 var (eagle type).1 commentsStuart J
Quadriga.jpg
RIC VIII Heraclea 1413 viewsConstantine
337-340, posthumous
D/ DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled head right.
R/ anepigraph, emperor veiled in quadriga right, horses rearing up, hand of God reaching down to him; SMH and officina letter (probably epsilon) in ex.
RIC VIII Heraclea 14
Matteo
divus_augustus.jpg
Roman Augustus As85 viewsPosthumous issues by Tiberius
Copper As.
Obv.:DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER ; rad. hd. of Augustus l.
Rev.: PROVIDENT S C , facade of altar-enclosure of the Ar Providentiae Augusti, with double panelled door and horns of the altar visible above.

RIC 81
3 commentsTanit
FAUSTINA_SR_DIVA.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - Faustina Sr.12 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - Faustina Sr. (died 141 AD) Posthumous issue AR Denarius. Obv.: Bust right. DIVA FAV - STINA Rev.: Pietas standing left with right hand over altar and holding box in left. AVGVSTA Reference: RIC-374.1dpaul7
faustina sr.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - FAUSTINA, SR. - Posthumus Issue18 viewsFaustina I - AR Denarius
OBVERSE: DIVAFAVSTINA - Bust right REVERSE: CERES - Ceres standing with corn ears and scepter
SIZE: 18mm WEIGHT: 2.4g DATE: 141 AD REFERENCE: RIC 359; RSC 84
NOTES: This coin was issued posthumously, hence "DIVA".
dpaul7
CLAUDIUS_II_DIVO.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE -- Claudius II Gothicus106 viewsROMAN EMPIRE -- Claudius II Gothicus - Posthumous Issue Antoninianus (270 AD) Milan mint. Obv.: Radiate bist right. DIVO CLAVDIO Rev.: Plain altar with flames above. CONSECRATION. Reference: RIC V-1, 261 Milan.dpaul7
CARUS_DIVO_Tetradrachm_Altar.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, CARUS. Commemorative Billon Tetradrachm of Alexandria. Struck A.D.283 - 28415 viewsObverse: ΘEω KAPω CEB. Laureate head of Carus facing right.
Reverse: AΦIEPωCIC. Round, burning and garlanded altar on base, star in upper left field.
GICV : 4777 | Emmett 3995.

This coin is an undated posthumous type struck under Carinus and Numerian and bearing the legend AΦIEPωCIC, one of the most interesting features of the Alexandrian coinage of Marcus Aurelius Carus.
*Alex
Agrippina-Ses-Ob-_-Rev~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Agrippina the Elder (ca. 14 B.C.-33 A.D)191 viewsAgrippina the Elder (ca. 14 B.C.-33 A.D)
Sestertius
Daughter of Julia and Marcus Agrippa, wife of Germanicus and mother of Emperor Caligula. The most beautiful woman of all Caesars in the most incredible condition. The finest known specimen orriginally from the Morreti Collection.
Obv.Posthumous portrait ordered by Caligula to commemorate his mother who had tragically died in exile. Rev.The carpentum drawn by two mules, the vehicle reserved for the use of the women of the imperial family in the city.
Cohen 1 ; RIC 42
3 commentsPetitioncrown
Agrippina-Ses-Ob-&-Rev.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Agrippina the Elder (ca. 14 B.C.-33 A.D)1783 viewsAgrippina the Elder (ca. 14 B.C.-33 A.D)
Sestertius
Daughter of Julia and Marcus Agrippa, wife of Germanicus and mother of Emperor Caligula. The most beautiful woman of all Caesars in the most incredible condition. The finest known specimen orriginally from the Morreti Collection.
Obv. Posthumous portrait ordered by Caligula to commemorate his mother who had tragically died in exile. Rev.The carpentum drawn by two mules, the vehicle reserved for the use of the women of the imperial family in the city.
Cohen 1 ; RIC 42
25 commentsPetitioncrown
022-3-horz~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Antoninus Pius, Commemorative AR Denarius, RIC 438107 viewsAD138 – 161 a posthumous issue
Rome Mint 161-180 AD (under Marcus Aurelius)
2.65 grams
Obv.: DIVVS ANTONINVS Bare head right
Rev.: CONSECRATIO Funeral pyre of four tiers, surmounted by quadriga.
Richard M10
2994LG.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Antoninus Pius, Posthumous Denarius104 viewsobv: DIVVS ANTONINVS. Bare head right
rev: DIVO PIO. Cult image of Antoninus seated left, holding branch and scepter
Struck under Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus after 161 A.D.
RIC 442

Jericho
augustus_mini.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Augustus31 viewsAugustus, AE As
Posthumous issue, struck 34-37 AD by Tiberius.
obv. DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER,
bare head left
rev. winged thunderbolt between S-C
Ref.: Sear 1791, RIC 83 [tib], Cohen 249 [aug], BMC 157
JaniO
Augustus-moeda1.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Augustus - 27BC - 14 AC.22 viewsAE As of Augustus - 27BC - 14 AC.

Posthumous coin minted by Tiberius 14-37 AC.

Weight: 8.1gr
Ř: 29mm

Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER - Radiate head of Augustus left.

Rev: PROVIDENT SC - Façade of altar-enclosure of the Ara Providencia Augusti, with double panelled door and horns on the altar visible above.

F/F

Ref: Sear Mil 1789 - RIC 81
Jorge C
009~0.JPG
Roman Empire, Augustus, Posthumous As277 viewsDivus Augustus Ć As. Commemorative by Tiberius. DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER, radiate head left / Eagle standing on globe facing, wings spread, head right, S C at sides. RIC 82


Click and enlarge for better photo
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
0030-510.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, AUGUSTUS, posthumous AS, RIC 81377 viewsAs struck under the reign of Tiberius
DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER, Radiate head of Augustus left
PROVIDENT AVG, Altar, S C in field
11.02 gr
Ref : Cohen #228, RCV #1789, RIC I # 81

This example comes with a black, even and glossy patina

6 commentsPotator II
TiberiusRIC49.jpg
Roman Empire, Augustus, Posthumous Sestertius103 viewsĆ Sestertius, 26,9g, Ř 35-36mm, 12h, Rome, AD 22-23
Obv.: DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER, Augustus radiated seated left, feet on stool, holding laurel branch and long sceptre, altar in front
Rev.: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST P M TR POT XXIIII around large S C.
RIC (Tiberius) 49 (R); Cohen 74; Sear (RCV I) 1782; Foss (Roman Historic Coins) Tiberius:5

This type, issued under Tiberius, refers to the consecration of Augustus after his death in AD 14. According to Sear (RCV I) this type may represent the statue of Divus Augustus set up near the Theatre of Marcellus in Rome.
1 commentsCharles S
0530-510.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, CARUS, Posthumous antoninianus RIC 29248 viewsLugdunum mint, 2nd officina, AD 284-285
DIVO CARO PIO, Radiate head of Carus right
CONSECRATIO, Eagle facing, II at exergue
3.50 gr
Ref : Cohen #18, RCV #12394, RIC # 29
3 commentsPotator II
gothico~0.jpg
Roman Empire, CLAUDIUS II Gothicus. Commemorative AE Posthumous Antoninianus of Mediolanum, struck 270 - 271.507 viewsDivus Claudius Gothicus
Obv: DIVO CLAVDIO GOTHICO
Radiate head right,
Rev: CONSECRATIO
Altar, with flame above, divided in four squares with a dot inside of each square.
Base Antoninianus, traces of silvering (3.09g).
RIC Milan 264; Normanby 1141; Cunetio 2317; [Online RIC temp. #1272].
Quite possibly the finest known!
5 commentsOldMoney
bpC1P1Constantinople.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine I (Posthumous), Constantinople RIC VIII:37 C399 viewsAe4 1.5 gm 14.7 mm Struck: 337-340 Mark: CONS
Obv: DV CONSTANTINUS PT AVG
Veiled head, right.
Rev: Anepigraphic
Emperor in four horse quadriga, galloping right. Above, hand of God.
Massanutten
posthumous_cgreat_mini.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine I 347-348 AD12 viewsobv. DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
Shrouded bust of Constantine, right.
rev. VN MR
Standing figure of Constantine, shrouded and facing right.
14-15 mm
JaniO
Picture_11~2.png
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine I, Posthumous commemorative AE3/44 viewsDivus Constantine AE3/4. 347-348 AD. DV CONSTANTINVS P T AVGG, veiled head right / VN-MR to either side of Constantine, standing right, togate & veiled, 1G, 14MM

jessvc1
CONSTANTINE_DIVO_IVN_MAR.JPG
Roman Empire, CONSTANTINE I, Posthumous Commemorative AE4 of Antioch. Struck A.D.347 - 348 under Constantius II25 viewsObverse: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG. Veiled head of Constantine facing right.
Reverse: Constantine I, veiled and togate, standing facing right; across field, VN - MR; in exergue, SMANE.
RIC VIII : 112
*Alex
176.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine I, Posthumous commemorative, Arelate (SCON)73 viewsPosthumous Commemorative
Obv: DIVOCONS-(TANTINO)
Reverse: Emperor Standing with Globe,
AETERNA PIETAS
RIC VIII 41
2 commentsLaetvs
moneta 454.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine I, Posthumous Commemorative, Alexandria - RIC VII 32142 viewsConstantine I Posthumous AE4
obv: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG. Head of Constantine, veiled, right.
rev: VN MR. Constantine, veiled, standing between VN/MR.
exergue: SMAL delta
Struck 347-348 A.D. at Alexandria
RIC VII 32d
Ex: Lord Best
1 commentsJericho
Constantine_commemorative~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine I, Posthumous Commemorative, Hand of god403 viewsConstantine I the Great Posthumous death commemorative coin
Obverse: Constantine veiled
Reverse: Constantine riding quadriga reaching up towards the hand of God, star above.
Beautiful rainbow iridescent toning
Great detail and very clean surface.
10 commentsmihali84
moneta 299 best.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine I, Posthumous Commemorative, Nicomedia - RIC VII 1851 viewsConstantine I Posthumous AE4
obv: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG. Head of Constantine, veiled, right
rev: Constantine veiled in a quadriga right, with the hand of god extending from sky to receive him.
exergue: SMN gamma
Struck 337-340 A.D. at Nicomedia
RIC VII 18
Van Meter 95
Jericho
Constantine AE4 posthumous VN MR.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine I, posthumous issue, AE413 viewsAE4, 13mm.
Obv: veiled head right.
Rev: VN MR, togate and veiled figure of Constantine standing right.
E Pinniger
bpC1P5Cyzicus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine Posthumous, Cyzicus RIC VIII:54 R87 viewsAe4 1.4 gm 15.1 mm Struck: 347-48 Mark: •SMKI
Obv: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG Veiled head, right.
Rev: VN MR Constantine, veiled, standing right.
Massanutten
image.jpg
Roman Empire, Domitian156 viewsDenarius circa 88-96, AR 3.51 g. IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M Laureate head r. Rev. DIVVS CAESAR IMP DOMITIANI F Infant seated on globe, raising both hands; around him, seven stars. RIC 209a (hybrid). BMC –. C –. CBN –.

Extremely rare. Good very fine
Ex NFA sale XXVII, 1991, 118.


Throughout the course of Imperial Roman coinage seven children were honored posthumously, with five of them being presented as gods. One of these divine children was an infant son born to Domitia, the wife of Domitian. Virtually nothing is known about him, and if he had not appeared on this rare coin type, he would have been little more than a footnote in the historical record. We may deduce from a passage in Suetonius, from historical circumstances, and from his infantile appearance on memorial coins that he probably was born in 83 and died soon thereafter. Regrettably, his name is nowhere recorded. Since the boy usually appears on the reverse of coins of Domitia, and Domitian seems to have divorced her in about 83 (roughly the time she would have given birth to the boy), it seems obvious that he died in infancy and that Domitian immediately deified him and celebrated him on coinage before he exiled his wife. Domitian’s grief must have been profound, for the boy’s presentation ranks among the most inventive on all Roman coinage; he is shown as a young Jupiter seated on a globe with his hands raised toward seven stars that represent the constellation of the Great Bear (Ursa Major). The boy is also represented on two other rare issues: denarii inscribed PIETAS AVGVST that show him standing before Domitia in the guise of Pietas, and sestertii with a similar scene but inscribed DIVI CAESAR MATRI or DIVI CAESARIS MATER. This particular denarius is a notable rarity, and is considered to be a muling of a Domitian obverse with a Domitia reverse.
5 commentscarthago
moneta 705 large.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina Sr. Posthumous Denarius, Rome67 viewsobv: DIVA AVG FAVSTINA. Draped bust right.
rev: AETERNITIS. Aeternitas standing left, holding globe and scepter.
Struck after 143 A.D. by Antoninus Pius
RIC 350a
RSC 34a
Jericho
Picture_8~2.png
ROMAN EMPIRE, Helena, The mother of Constantine the Great 330 A.D.9 viewsHELENA . mother of Constantine The Great. 330 A.D. Fourth Bronze (16mm, 2gms), posthumous commemorative minted c. 337-340 ADjessvc1
M_Aurelius_Consecratio.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Marcus Aurelius, AR Posthumous Denarius32 viewsOptimus
0431-210~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, MARINIANA, Posthumous Antoninianus RIC 6103 viewsViminacum mint, AD 253-254
DIVAE MARINIANAE, veiled, diademed and draped bust right, above a crescent
CONSECRATIO, peacock walking right, its tail in splendor
4.0 gr
Ref : Cohen # 11, RCV # 10069, RIC # 6, Eauze Hoard #1429, 3 specimens
Thanks to Curtisclay for additionnnal informations
1 commentsPotator II
Mariniana_Diva_Antoninianus~0.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, MARINIANA. Commemorative AR Antoninianus of Rome. Struck A.D.253 - 254 under Valerian I18 viewsObverse: DIVAE MARINIANAE. Diademed and veiled bust of Mariniana, resting on crescent, facing right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO. Mariniana being borne to heaven seated on the back of a peacock flying right.
Diameter: 21mm | Weight: 2.18gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC V i : 6
RARE

Mariniana was the wife of Valerian I but it would seem that she must have died before he became emperor because all of her coins are posthumous commemoratives.
*Alex
Maximian Posthumous RIC 41 obv and rev.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Maximianus Posthumous, RIC 41v91 viewsMaximianus (issued by Constantine I)
AE3
Siscia Mint. 318 A.D.
Obv: DIVO MAXIMIANO SEN FORT IMP - Laureate and veiled head right.
Rev: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM - Emperor seated left on curule chair, raising hand and holding sceptre.
Exergue: SIS
Ref: RIC 41 (variant)
Notes: RIC does not list this legend break. Bought from FORVM ANCIENT COINS.
1 commentsseraphic
Maximianus Ae4.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Maximianus, AE4 Posthumous bronze45 viewsOptimus
posthumousweb.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - HERC DEVSONIENSI92 viewsATTRIBUTION-RIC 64--Cohen 91--Sear 3111
OBV. IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG-Radiate bust right draped and cuirassed
REV. HERC DEVSONIENSI-Hercules Standing right leaning on club
EX. N.A
black-prophet
Titus Vespasian Posthumous RIC Titus 63 obv and rev.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Vespasian Posthumous Issue, RIC (Titus) 63105 viewsVespasian (minted by Titus)
AR Denarius
Rome Mint. 80-81 A.D.
Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS - Laureate bust right.
Rev: [anepigraphic] - SC on shield supported by two Capricorns, globe below.
Ref: RIC (Titus) 63. Cohen 497. RCV 2564. VM 102. RSC 497.
seraphic
brutustripod.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus, AR Denarius - Crawford 502/214 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Brutus, 44-42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.76g; 17mm).
Military Mint, Spring-Summer 42 BCE.

Obverse: LˇSESTI - PROˇQ; Veiled and draped bust of Libertas, facing right.

Reverse: QˇCAEPIOˇBRVTVSˇPROˇCOS; Tripod with axe on left and simpulum on right.

References: Crawford 502/2; HCRI 201; Syd 1290; BMCRR East 41; Junia 37; Sestia 2.

Provenance: Ex Alan J. Harlan Collection [Triton XXII (9 Jan 2019), Lot 951]; Kunker 288 (13 Mar 2017) Lot 314; Theodor Prowe Collection [Hess (20 May 1912) Lot 933].

Marcus Junius Brutus was posthumously adopted by his maternal uncle, Quintus Servilius Caepio. Afterward, Brutus sometimes used the name Quintus Servilius Caepio Brutus, which both honored his uncle and advertised his maternal descent from Gaius Servilius Structus Ahala. Ahala was a Roman Republican hero who had killed someone with regal aspirations. In his early political career, Brutus issued coins with the portrait of Ahala on one side (see Crawford 433/2; http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-144687). Following the assassination of Caesar, Brutus resurrected his use of the name Quintus Servilius Caepio Brutus, as on this coin, again alluding to this Servilian connection in his family tree. Combined with the bust of Liberty on the obverse of this coin, the message is clear: that the assassins were liberators from monarchy in the old Republican tradition of their ancestors. The reverse shows the symbols of Brutus’ membership in the college of priests.

This example comes from the collection of Theodor Prowe of Moscow, one of the great collections of the early 20th century, which was auctioned in three separate 1912 sales by Bruder Egger (Greek) and Hess (Roman).
2 commentsCarausius
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Roman Imperial, Lucius Verus (Posthumous Issue), Orichalcum Sestertius.20 viewsRome After 169 A.D. 20.31g - 33mm, Axis 4h.

Obv: DIVVS VERVS - Bare head right.

Rev: CONSECRATIO / S-C - Four-tier funeral pyre decorated with statues standing between draped colonnades and surmounted by a quadriga.

RIC III, 1511; BMC M. Aurelius 1363; Cohen 59; Sear'88 1563.
2 commentsChristian Scarlioli
Mariniana.jpg
Roman Mariniana Sestertius34 viewsMARINIANA, wife of Valerianus I, †254.
AE Sestertius, posthumous. AE 16.16 g.
Obv: DIVAE MARINIANAE Draped, veiled and diademed bust r.
Rev: CONSECRATIO / S-C Peacock in splendour standing facing, head turned l.

RIC V/1, 65, 9var. (peacock looking r.). C. 7
Extremely rare
Tanit
Agrippina-Ses-Ob-_-Rev~2.jpg
Roman, Agrippina the Elder (ca. 14 B.C.-33 A.D)1334 viewsAgrippina the Elder (ca. 14 B.C.-33 A.D)
Sestertius
Daughter of Julia and Marcus Agrippa, wife of Germanicus and mother of Emperor Caligula. The most beautiful woman of all Caesars in the most incredible condition. The finest known specimen originally from the Morreti Collection.

Posthumous portrait ordered by Caligula to commemorate his mother who had tragically died in exile.

Cohen 1 ; RIC 42
9 commentsPetitioncrown
0621-310np_noir.jpg
Romulus, Posthumous follis - *132 viewsPosthumous issue under the reign of his father Maxentius
Ostia mint, 1st officina, AD 309-310
DIVO ROMVLO N V BIS CONS, Bare head of Romulus right
AETERNAE MEMORIAE, Temple with domed roof surmounted by eagle, M OST P at exergue
7.35 gr
RCV # 15050 (550), Cohen #6, RIC VI # 34
3 commentsPotator II
edward-v-groat-1.jpg
S.2155 Edward V42 viewsGroat of Edward V, king of England 1483
Mint: London
Mintmark: boar's head 1 over sun and rose 1/sun and rose 1
S.2155

This issue was probably struck under Richard III but before Edward's death in the tower. The coin's obverse depicts the boar's head mint-mark, which replaced the halved sun-and-rose, which was in use probably from the end of Edward IV's reign until Richard. The sun and rose groats in the name of Edward cannot conclusively be attributed to either Edward IV or Edward V. On the other hand, coins with the boar's head are presumably from Richard's time, since the boar's head was Richard's symbol.

This leads to a confusing coinage of 1483, where major events occurred during a period of 3 months. Edward IV died on April 9. His eldest son Edward was styled Edward V, though never had a coronation. The 12 year-old Edward unfortunately became a political pawn, and his uncle Richard, unsatisfied with his role as Lord Protector, managed to have Edward and his brother Richard of Shrewsbury declared illegitamate and marginalized. Uncle Richard became King Richard III on June 26. Edward and his brother were prisoners in the tower, and it is likely that they were murdered that year, though nobody really knows when they died. Bones purporting to be the two princes were found in the 17th century, but have never been analyzed by modern DNA testing.

So we are left with a coin in the name of Edward, but depicting Richard III's badge. The Edward could be Edward IV, and there are plenty of situations of coinage continuing in the name of the recently deceased king (coins of Richard I in the name of Henry II, coins of Edward I in the name of Henry III, and Edward VI in the name of Henry VIII). It could also be Edward V, since Richard was trying, at least initially, to appear to be ruling in Edward V's name as Lord Protector. It can possibly be considered that ths coin was struck by Richard in Edward V's name before the demise of the young king, perhaps during Richard's protectorate. Or it could be a posthumous issue as it seems to be contemporaneous with other coins in the name of Richard himself.

My take is that the Edward written on the coin is most likely to be Edward V, making this one of the very few coins that come from that reign.

Ex- DNW 3 Jul 2019 (lot 802), M Lessen, Spink, SNC Jan/Feb 1926 (lot 49003)
2 commentsNap
QIANLONG_S-_H_28_41.JPG
Schjöth ---, Hartill 28.41 Type GX1.1 (QC) & 22.377 (CCC), KM C 30-1.110 viewsGuangxu (1875-1908) Period

1 cash (cast copper), 1878 [?] – 1883 [?], Sinkiang Province, Aksu mint, 25 mm.

Obv: Qianlong tongbao.

Rev: Aksu (left, in Manchu) Aqs(u) (right, in Turkic Arabic).

Type GX1 coins have a closed head, two dot tong, with the A in Aqsu written with one stroke. In Type GX1.1, the tail of Aqsu curves to the right. This coin has six dots in Aqsu.

In 1799, Jiaqing (1796-1820) issued an edict ordaining the posthumous use of the Qianlong (1736-1795) reign title on 20% of the coinage of Xinjiang for ever to commemorate Qianlong’s conquest of the region.

Hartill rarity 8 (QC) & 14 (CCC).
Stkp
QIANLONG_S-_H_28_47-50.JPG
Schjöth ---, Hartill 28.47-50 Type GX2.2 (QC) & 22.380 (CCC), KM C 30-1.110 viewsGuangxu (1875-1908) Period

1 cash (cast copper), 1878 [?] – 1883 [?], Sinkiang Province, Aksu mint, 25 mm.

Obv: Qianlong tongbao.

Rev: Aksu (left, in Manchu) Aqs(u) (right, in Turkic Arabic).

Type GX2 coins have a closed (more or less) head, one dot tong, with the A in Aqsu written with one stroke. In Type GX2.2, the tail of Aqsu is curly. The coin has five dots.

In 1799, Jiaqing (1796-1820) issued an edict ordaining the posthumous use of the Qianlong (1736-1795) reign title on 20% of the coinage of Xinjiang for ever to commemorate Qianlong’s conquest of the region.

Hartill rarity 8 (QC) & 14 (CCC).
Stkp
QIANLONG_S-_H_28_78.JPG
Schjöth ---, Hartill 28.78 Type GX9.ql.1 (QC) & 22.391 (CCC), KM C 30-313 viewsGuangxu (1875-1908) Period

10 cash (cast copper), 1885 [?] – 1892 [?], Xinjiang Province, Aksu mint, 25 mm.

Obv: Qianlong tongbao.

Rev: Aksu (left, in Manchu) Aqs(u) (right, in Turkic Arabic), A(ksu) shi (top and bottom).

This coin has five dots in Aqsu.

In 1799, Jiaqing (1796-1820) issued an edict ordaining the posthumous use of the Qianlong (1736-1795) reign title on 20% of the coinage of Xinjiang for ever to commemorate Qianlong’s conquest of the region.

Hartill rarity 8 (QC) & 14 (CCC).
Stkp
Ancient_Greek_Alexander_the_Great_AR_tetradrachm__Seleucid_Kingdom.jpg
Selecus I Nikator AR tetradrachm 111 viewsAncient Greek / Seleucid Kingdom / Selecus I Nikator / in the name of Alexander the Great / AR tetradrachm

Obverse: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's headdress. 
Reverse:  Zeus seated right, anchor , A to right , M under throne.  
AΛEΞANΔPOY / BAΣIΛEΩΣ
Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint. 311 - 300 B.C.
Weight 16.87 grams,  Max. Dia., 28 mm.
Price 3359, SC 94.6b.

Posthumous issue struck circa 311-300 B.C. under Selecus I, (312-281) BC

From the Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
26_Seleucids,_Philippos-I__Philadelphos_(93-83_BC),_AR-Tetrdr,_Diademed_Head_r__Zeus_seated_l_,_SC_2488,_95-75_BC,_Q-001,_0h,_25,5-27mm,_15,4g-s.jpg
Seleucia, Seleukid Kingdom, 26 Philippos I. Philadelphos, (93-83 B.C.), SC 2488, AR-Tetradrachm, Zeus seated left on throne, #198 viewsSeleucia, Seleukid Kingdom, 26 Philippos I. Philadelphos, (93-83 B.C.), SC 2488, AR-Tetradrachm, BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟY/ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟYΣ ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛΦΟY, Zeus seated left on throne, #1
avers: Diademed head right.
reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟY/ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟYΣ ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛΦΟY, Zeus seated left on throne, holding sceptre and crowning Nike, all within wreath. Controls: I to inner left, monogram below throne, Π in exergue.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 25,5-27,0mm, weight: 15,4g, axes: 0h,
mint: Antioch on the Orontes. Posthumous issue., Seleukid Kingdom, Philippos I. Philadelphos, date: 95/4-76/5 B.C., ref: SC 2488, HGC 9, 1323.
Q-001
quadrans
Antiochus_VII.jpg
SELEUCID EMPIRE: Antiochus VII Euergetes33 viewsSELEUCID EMPIRE
Antiochus VII Euergetes
Ruled 138-129 BC
AR tetradrachm (28mm, 16.54 gm, 12h). Cappadocian mint, posthumous issue.
O: Diademed head right
R: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY EYEPΓETOY, Athena standing l., holding Nike ,scepter, and shield decorated with face; to outer l., monogram above A; O to inner l., Λ to inner r.; all within wreath.

SC 2148. HGC 9, 1069. EF

Ex Heritage
2 commentsSosius
SC_68.jpg
Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Babylonia, Uncertain Mint 6A 101 viewsHead of Herakles right wearing lion skin headdress.
ΒΑΣΙΛEΩΣ ФIΛIΠΠOY Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, star symbol beneath throne, Π recut over an earlier mint control in left field.

Taylor, Triparadeisos to Ipsos, Series IV, 189 (this coin), Plate 12, 189 (this coin), dies A50/P1; HGC 9, 11a (same dies); SC 68 (same dies); WSM 1241 (same dies); Price P167 (same dies).

Uncertain Mint 6A in Babylonia, 303-302 BC.

Struck under Seleukos utilising a reverse die from an earlier lifetime Philip issue (Price P160) with the left field mint control recut. Obverse die linked to examples of SC 67 (Alexander), SC 69 (Seleukos) and SC 50.1 (Alexander Uncertain Mint 1) .

One of four examples known and the only one outside the ANS (Newell) collection.

(26 mm, 17.0 g, 3h).

This very late posthumous issue in the name of Philip III is a unique numismatic circumstance. It was struck from a Philip III lifetime reverse die used about twelve years previously, paired to an obverse die that was also used to strike coins in the name of Alexander and Seleukos. This was not a matter of happenstance, but rather a deliberate pairing of dies that symbolically linked the name of Seleukos to the preceding Argead kings in a ritual numismatic statement of legitimacy. This occurred in Uncertain Mint 6A, which by this time was a mobile military mint, attached to the army of Seleukos on the campaign to Ipsos. This ritual symbolic numismatic acclamation of kingship paralleled the acclamation of Seleukos as king by the assembled army in a long-standing Macedonian tradition.

Reference: Taylor, L. W. H. 2015. From Triparadeisos to Ipsos: Seleukos I Nikator’s Uncertain Mint 6A in Babylonia. AJN Second Series 27: 41-97.
3 commentsn.igma
antiochos_vii_resbrev.jpg
SELEUKID KINGDOM-- ANTIOCHOS VII EUERGETES30 views138 - 129 BC (posthumous issue)
AR Tetradrachm 28 mm 16.54 g
O: BASILEOS ANTIOXOY/EYERGETOY Diademed head right
R: Athena Nikephoros standing left, holding Athena and spear; to outer left, monogram above A; O to inner left; L to inner right; all within laurel wreath.
Syria, Cappadocian mint
SC 2148, SNG Spaer 1872, HCG 9, 1069
laney
antiochos_vii_resb.jpg
SELEUKID KINGDOM--(07) ANTIOCHOS VII EUERGETES32 views138 - 129 BC (posthumous issue)
AR Tetradrachm 28 mm 16.54 g
O: BASILEOS ANTIOXOY/EYERGETOY Diademed head right
R: Athena Nikephoros standing left, holding Athena and spear; to outer left, monogram above A; O to inner left; L to inner right; all within laurel wreath.
Syria, Cappadocian mint
SC 2148, SNG Spaer 1872, HCG 9, 1069
laney
9727.jpg
Selinus in Cilicia, Philippus I., AE 29, Apollo136 viewsSelinus in Cilicia, Philippus I., AE 29, 244-249 AD
Obv.: AY K M IOYΛ [ΦI]ΛΠΠOC CE , Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right (seen from behind
Rev.: TPAIANO[Π CEΛINO]YCI ΘHC [IEPAC] , Apollo standing front, patera in his right hand, rod/staff in left hand, on right side: bird (raven?) beneath
SNG France 2,686; SNG Levante 467; Lindgren I,1595; SNG Pfalz 6,1105 , (thanks to Markus for ID)

Selinus: City in Cilicia Aspera, among the principal ones on this coast and mentioned by most of the ancient geographers from Pseudo-Skylax on. It was one of the towns taken by Antiochos III in 197 B.C. (Livy 33.20), but is best known as the place where Trajan died in A.D. 117 on his way back from the East. Then it took the name of Trajanopolis (as on this), but the old one prevailed (as on this), shown by coins and other documents.

In mid-summer 117, when Trajan was returning from his Parthian campaigns, he fell ill while at Selinus in Cilicia and died on August 8. The following day his adoption of Hadrian was announced by Plotina and Attianus, the praetorian prefect who had earlier been Hadrian's guardian, with some question whether Trajan had indeed performed the act or whether it was posthumous, thanks to his widow. On August 11, which he considered his dies imperii, the army of Syria hailed its legate, Hadrian, as emperor, which made the senate's formal acceptance an almost meaningless event. This was an example of the historian Tacitus' famous dictum that an emperor could be made elsewhere than at Rome. Hadrian must then have proceeded to Selinus at once from Antioch, to catch up with Attianus, Plotina, and Matidia. He then returned to his province no later than September and stayed there at least into the new year, consolidating his administration.

Basil,of Seleucia (Vita S. Theclae, II, 17) said that the city cof Selinus, which was formerly of much importance, lost it from his time to the fifth century. Constantine Porphyrogenitus, in the tenth century, called it a small town. Today it is the little village of Selinti (near the city Gazipaşa) in the vilayet of Adana; there are ruins of a theatre, aqueduct, market-place, bath, etc. .
The coinage begins under the kingdom of Antiochos IV of Kommagene, and continues later from Trajan to Philip. A bishop of Selinos is recorded, under the metropolitan of Seleukeia. . Le Quien (Oriens christianus, II, 1019) names four bishops: Neon, present at the council of Constantinople, 381; Alypius, at Ephesus, 431; AElianus, at Chalcedon, 451; Gheon, signer of the letter of the bishops of the province to Emperor Leo, 458. The see is in the Greek "Notitiae Episcopatuum" of the Patriarchate of Antioch from the fifth to the tenth century (Vailhé in "Echos d'Orient", X, 95, 145). It was also perhaps an Armenian bishopric until the tenth century. (Alishan, Sissouan, Venice, 1899, p. 60). Eubel (Hierarchia catholica medii aevi, I, 468) names a Latin bishop in 1345.

my ancient coin database
Arminius
septimius_severus_03.jpg
Septimius Severus Posthumous AE Limes Denarius26 viewsObv: DIVO SEVERO PIO - Bare head with long beard right.
Rev: CONSECRATIO - Wreath on throne, below, a stool.
Date: circa 211 AD
Ref: Cohen 87, RIC IVa 191e
Notes: Scarce
oa
5456_5457.jpg
Septimius Severus, Denarius, CONSECRATIO25 viewsAR Denarius
Septimius Severus
Augustus: 193 - 211AD
Issued Posthumously under Caracalla: 211AD
19.61mm 3.36gr
O: DIVO SEVERO PIO; Bare head, right.
R: CONSECRATIO: Eagle standing 3/4 facing right on globe, head left, wings spread.
Rome Mint
RIC IV Caracalla 191c; RSC 84; Sear (RCV 2000) 7051; BMC Caracalla 21. Scarce: 10 Specimens in the Reka Devnia hoard.
Aorta: 892: B1, O90, R387, T45, M4.
Ancient Imports/Marc Breitsprecher Inv. #38569
10/12/17 10/17/17
Quote from Gemini Numismatic Auctions, LLC, Auction XIV, Lot 539, April 18-19, 2018, by Harlan J. Berk: “The round object in the eagle’s talons is usually called a globe, but on this specimen it has a separate outer border, so apparently represents an honorary shield.”
The globe or shield is worn on my example, but an interesting note.
2 commentsNicholas Z
Mariniana_Diva_Antoninianus.JPG
Struck A.D.253 - 254 under Valerian I. DIVA MARINIANA. Commemorative AR Antoninianus of Rome8 viewsObverse: DIVAE MARINIANAE. Diademed and veiled bust of Mariniana, resting on crescent, facing right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO. Mariniana being borne to heaven seated on the back of a peacock flying right.
Diameter: 21mm | Weight: 2.18gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC V i : 6
RARE

Mariniana was the wife of Valerian I but it would seem that she must have died before he became emperor because all of her coins are posthumous commemoratives.
1 comments*Alex
CARUS_DIV_ALTAR_TET.JPG
Struck A.D.283 - 284 under Carinus and Numerian. CARUS. Posthumous commemorative AE Tetradrachm of Alexandria.7 viewsObverse: ΘEW KAPW CEB. Laureate head of Carus facing right.
Reverse: AΦIEPOCIC. Round, burning and garlanded altar on base, star in upper left field.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 7.1gms | Die Axis: 12
GICV : 4777 | Emmett 3995

This coin is an undated posthumous type bearing the legend AΦIEPOCIC, one of the most interesting features of the Alexandrian coinage of Marcus Aurelius Carus.
*Alex
DV_CARUS_TET_EAGLE.JPG
Struck A.D.283 - 284 under Carinus and Numerian. CARUS. Posthumous commemorative AE Tetradrachm of Alexandria.10 viewsObverse: ΘEW KAPW CEB. Laureate head of Carus facing right.
Reverse: AΦIEPOCIC. Eagle standing facing on rod, head right, wings open.
Diameter: 19mm | Weight: 7.96gms | Die Axis: 12
GICV : 4776
Ex Zurqieh (Dubai)

This coin is an undated posthumous type bearing the legend AΦIEPOCIC, one of the most interesting features of the Alexandrian coinage of Marcus Aurelius Carus.
*Alex
CARUS_DIVO_EAGLE_BILLON_TET.JPG
Struck A.D.283 - 284 under Carinus and Numerian. DIVUS CARUS. Commemorative AE Tetradrachm of Alexandria3 viewsObverse: ΘEW KAPW CEB. Laureate head of Carus facing right.
Reverse: AΦIEPOCIC. Eagle standing facing on rod, head right, wings open.
Diameter: 19mm | Weight: 7.96gms | Die Axis: 12
GICV : 4776

This coin is an undated posthumous type bearing the legend AΦIEPOCIC, one of the most interesting features of the Alexandrian coinage of Marcus Aurelius Carus.

Carus died in mysterious circumstances during his Persian campaign against the Sassanids, it was claimed that during a violent dust storm he had been killed by a stroke of lightning. Carus was succeeded by his eldest son Carinus, who had been left in Rome and Numerian, Carinus' younger brother, who had accompanied Carus on the Persian campaign and had been proclaimed emperor by the troops when Carus was killed.
*Alex
CARUS_DIV_ALTAR_TET~0.JPG
Struck A.D.283 - 284 under Carinus and Numerian. DIVUS CARUS. Commemorative AE Tetradrachm of Alexandria.12 viewsObverse: ΘEW KAPW CEB. Laureate head of Carus facing right.
Reverse: AΦIEPOCIC. Round, burning and garlanded altar on base, star in upper left field.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 7.1gms | Die Axis: 12
GICV : 4777 | Emmett 3995

This coin is an undated posthumous type bearing the legend AΦIEPOCIC, one of the most interesting features of the Alexandrian coinage of Marcus Aurelius Carus.

Carus died in mysterious circumstances during his Persian campaign against the Sassanids, it was claimed that during a violent dust storm he had been killed by a stroke of lightning. Carus was succeeded by his eldest son Carinus, who had been left in Rome and Numerian, Carinus' younger brother, who had accompanied Carus on the Persian campaign and had been proclaimed emperor by the troops when Carus was killed.
*Alex
THEODORA-1.jpg
Theodora, 2nd wife of Constantius I. Augusta, Posthumously(?).143 viewsĆ 4 (15 mm, 1.12 gm). Uncertain mint, 337-340 CE.
Obv: FL MAX THEODORAE AVG, diademed bust right.
Rev: PIETAS ROMANA, Pietas standing right, child in arms.
RIC 50; Cohen 4; Sear 3911.
EmpressCollector
0581-310np_noir.jpg
Theodora, AE4 - *106 viewsPosthumous issue under the reigns of the sons of Constantine the great
Trier mint, 2nd officina
FL MAX THEODORAE AVG, draped and diademed bust right
PIETAS ROMANA, Pietas standing holding child. TRS at exergue
1.54 gr
Ref : Cohen # 4, Roman coins # 3911
Potator II
te1.jpg
Theodora, Augustus 293-306 CE.17 viewsAE 4, posthumous issue
Obverse: FL MAX THEO DORAE AVG, laureate and draped bust right
Reverse: PIETAS ROMANA, Pietas standing, facing, holding a child to her breast.
Mint: Trier, struck between 337-340 CE 15 mm diam., 2.08 g
RIC VIII Trier 65
sold 2-2018
NORMAN K
theodora_Trier56.jpg
Theodora, RIC VIII, Trier 5619 viewsTheodora, 2nd wife of Constantius I, died AD 337
AE 4, 14mm, 1.60g
Trier, 1st officina, struck posthumous past AD 337-340
obv. FL MAX THEODO - RAE AVG
Bust, draped and wearing necklace, hair elaborately dressed
rev. PIETAS - ROMANA
Pietas stg. frontal, head r., holding with l. arm an infant to her breast
in ex. TRP dot
RIC VIII, Trier 56
Rare, about VF
Jochen
Tiberius_Posthumous_Augustus_1.JPG
Tiberius Posthumous Augustus 118 viewsTiberius 14 - 37 A.D 10.3g, 28mm, Rome, Minted posthumously for Augustus
Struck under Tiberius, circa AD 15-16.
OBV: DIVVS AVGV - STVS PATER Radiate head left; star above, thunderbolt before
REV: Seated female figure right, feet on stool, holding patera and
Scepter. RIC I 72 (Tiberius); Sutherland, Divus 2, BMC 151, Cohen 244

SCARCE
Romanorvm
Tiberius_Posthumous_Augustus_2.JPG
Tiberius Posthumous Augustus 225 viewsCommemorative Ć As of Divus Augustus struck under Tiberius.
Obj: Radiate head of Divus Augustus left, DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER,
Rev: Eagle standing on globe facing, wings spread, head right, S C at sides.
Augustus - 27 BC - 14 AD, this coin is posthumous and struck under Tiberius during 34 - 37 AD. 24mm by 29mm, 11.1g, RCV 2000 1790, RIC I 82 (Tiberius), Cohen 247 , BMCRE 155 (Tiberius), SR 526, BN 135 (Tiberius)

RARE
Romanorvm
Tiberius_Posthumous_Augustus_3~0.JPG
Tiberius Posthumous Augustus 343 viewsDivus Augustus AE, AS. 31 - 37 AD, RIC 81 (Tiberius) BMCRE 146, BN 132, Cohen 228,
OBV: DIVVS AUGUSTUS PATER, radiate head of Divus Augustus left
REV: Alter PROVIDENT in exergue, S-C in fields
2 commentsRomanorvm
Valerian_II_1_opt.jpg
VALERIAN II Antoninianus, RIC 9, Caesar Riding Eagle23 viewsOBV: DIVO VALERIANO CAES, radiate & draped bust right
REV: CONSACRATIO, eagle flying right, bearing the deceased young Caesar to heaven
3.2, 23mm

Posthumous, 257-8 AD
Legatus
Valerian_II_RIC_9~0.JPG
Valerian II, son of Gallienus (Posthumous)33 viewsObv: DIVO VALERIANO CAES, radiate, draped bust of Valerian II facing right.

Rev: CONSECRATIO, Valerian II, raising his right hand and holding a scepter, seated left on the back of an eagle soaring right.

Billon Antoninianus, Cologne mint, 258 AD

3.5 grams, 21.7 mm, 315°

RIC Vi 9, RSC 5, S10606, VM 1/3
1 commentsMatt Inglima
Valerian_II_black1.png
Valerian II. Posthumous Antoninianus.11 viewsValerian II. Posthumous Antoninianus.

257-258 AD.

21mm., 2.69g.

DIVO VALERIANO CAES, radiate & draped bust right

CONSACRATIO, eagle flying right, bearing the deceased young Caesar to heaven

RIC 9; Cohen 5.

AAHZ
RL
Vespasian_Elephant_Quadriga.JPG
Vespasian Elephant Quadriga20 viewsVespasian, Struck Posthumously (after death) under Titus, 32mm, AE Sestertius, 22.83g
OBV: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG PM TRP PP COS VIII Around a large SC
REV: DIVO AVG VESP To upper right of an elephant quadriga that pulls Vespasian, who holds a victory; SPQR in exergue
RIC II 143 Rated Rare, Van Meter 103, Cohen 205.

RARE
Romanorvm
vespasian_posthumous_RIC_T359.jpg
Vespasian RIC II T0359a31 viewsVespasian memorial under Titus. AR Denarius. Rome Mint 80-81 A.D. (3.2 g./17mm. 5 h). Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, laureate head right. Obv: Column mounted with shield and topped by urn, flanked by two laurels, in field EX, on shield SC. RIC II T359a.

One of a series of 4 posthumous denarii struck in Rome by Titus following the deification of Vespasian in 80 A.D.. The EX SC rarely seen on the reverse of precious metal coinage during the empire likely refers to the deification honor bestowed by the Senate.
Lucas H
Vespasian_RIC_II_T364.jpg
Vespasian RIC II T036487 viewsVespasian memorial under Titus. AR denarius. Rome Mint, 80-81 A.D. (3.45 g, 21.7mm, 6h). Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, laureate head right. Rev: EX SC in fields, Victory, draped, stepping l., placing shield on trophy, mourning captive Jewess seated beneath. RIC T364, BMCRE 112, RSC 144. Ex David Hendin.

Posthumous issue under Titus, this type celebrates Vespasian’s deification, and commemorates his most important victory, that over the Jews during the First Revolt which raised Vespasian to the purple. This example is minted on a notably wide flan.
1 commentsLucas H
Vespasian_RIC_T58a.JPG
Vespasian, 69 - 79 AD (Posthumous issue)37 viewsObv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, laureate head of Vespasian facing right.

Rev: EX SC, Victory standing left, placing a shield on a trophy, at her feet is Judaea represented as a captive seated left, in an attitude of mourning.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 80 AD

3.2 grams, 19 mm, 180°

RIC II Titus 58a, RSC 144, S2565, VM 99
SPQR Coins
Vespasian_RIC_T63.JPG
Vespasian, 69 - 79 AD (Posthumous issue)23 viewsObv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, laureate head of Vespasian facing right.

Rev: No legend, SC inscribed on a circular shield supported by two capricorns, globe below.

Silver denarius, Rome mint, 80 AD

2.8 grams, 20 mm, 180°

RIC II Titus 63, RSC 497, S2569, VM 102
SPQR Coins
divi vesp.JPG
Vespasian-RIC-357(1)170 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD (Titus)
Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS•; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: Capricorns, l. and r., back to back, supporting round shield inscribed S C : below, globe
RIC 357 (C2). BMC 129. RSC 497. BNC 101.
Acquired from Old Roman Coins, October 2003.

A posthumous type issued by Titus to commemorate the deification of Vespasian.

I like this coin. Most examples I've seen of this reverse type are worn and don't show the S C inscribed on the shield supported by the capricorns.

Vespasian70
IMG_0418.jpg
Victorinus (deified reverse), MINT II Normanby - 21 viewsIMP C VICTORINVS P F AVG, Radiate cuirassed bust right.
CONSACRATIO, Eagle standing right, head left, wreath in beak.
A very rare mule with a lifetime obverse and a posthumous reverse.
Weight 1.69g.
Adrianus
IMG_0422.jpg
Victorinus (deified) MINT II Normanby 1454 212 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PIO, Radiate cuirassed bust right.
CONSACRATIO, Eagle standing right, head left, wreath in beak.
Normanby 1454.
Posthumous issue.
Weight.
Adrianus
IMG_0408.jpg
Victorinus (deified), MINT II Normanby 1453 1 20 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PIO, Radiate head right
CONSACRATIO Eagle standing right, head left, wreath in beak
Normanby 1453
Posthumous issue.
Ex Cottenham hoard.
Weight
Adrianus
IMG_0414.jpg
Victorinus, MINT (Irregular after MINT II) 16 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PIO, Radiate head right.
INVICTVS, Sol advancing left.
An irregular mule combining an obverse of a posthumous issue with a lifetime reverse.
Weight 1.64g.
Adrianus
rjb_vic2_01_06.jpg
Victorinus: Mint 1, Posthumous Issue26 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PIO
Radiate, cuirassed bust right
CONSECRATIO
Eagle stood on globe right, head turned back
Mint 1, Posthumous
Elmer -; Cunetio -; Normanby 1454
mauseus
rjb_2014_09_06.jpg
Victorinus: Mint 1, Posthumous Issue12 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PIO
Radiate bust right
CONSECRATIO
Eagle stood on globe right, head turned back
Mint 1, Posthumous
Elmer 785
mauseus
rjb_2014_08_03.jpg
Victorinus: Mint 2, Posthumous Issue9 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PIO
Radiate bust right
PROVIENTIA AVG
Providentia standing left
Mint 2, Posthumous
Elmer -, Cunetio -, Normanby -
mauseus
SeverusAlexanderRIC70RSC325s.jpg
[1009a] Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.83 viewsSilver denarius, RIC 70, RSC 325, S -, EF, Rome mint, 2.803g, 20.7mm, 0o, 227 A.D.; Obverse: IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate and draped bust right; Reverse: P M TR P VI COS II P P, Emperor standing left, sacrificing from patera in right over a tripod, scroll in left; cameo-like obverse with toned portrait and legend and bright fields, slightly frosty surfaces, details of head on reverse figure unstruck, slightly irregular flan. Ex FORVM.

In this year Ardashir invaded Parthia and established the Sassanid Dynasty, which claimed direct descent from Xerxes and Darius. The Eastern power grew stronger and the threat to the Romans immense.

Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexander was promoted from Caesar to Augustus after the murder of his cousin, Elagabalus. His reign was marked by great economic prosperity, and he enjoyed great success against the barbarian tribes. His mother Julia Mamaea was the real power in the empire, controlling her son's policies and even his personal life with great authority. Severus had an oratory where he prayed under the edict, written on the wall, "Do not unto others what you would not have done to yourself" and the images of various prophets including Mithras, Zoroaster, Abraham and Jesus. Mutinous soldiers led by Maximinus I murdered both Severus Alexander and his mother (Joseph Sermarini).

De Imeratoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Alexander Severus (A.D. 222-235)

Herbert W. Benario
Emory University

Introduction and Sources
"But as Alexander was a modest and dutiful youth, of only seventeen years of age, the reins of government were in the hands of two women, of his mother Mamaea, and of Maesa, his grandmother. After the death of the latter, who survived but a short time the elevation of Alexander, Mamaea remained the sole regent of her son and of the empire." (Gibbon, Decline and Fall, chap. 6: Modern Library Edition, p. 130)

"As the imperial system developed, it disclosed its various arcana one by one. How much does the personality of the ruler matter? Less and less, it should seem. Be he boy, buffoon, or philosopher, his conduct may not have much effect on the administration. Habit and routine took over, with groups and grades of bureaucrats at hand to fill the posts." (Syme, Emperors and Biography, 146)

The passages quoted above emphasize two important aspects of the principate of Severus Alexander (or Alexander Severus), his youth and the influence of women during his reign. The significance of the latter invites brief discourse about the four women known as the "Severan Julias," whose origin was Syria. Julia Domna became the second wife of Septimius Severus and bore him two sons, the later emperors Caracalla and Geta. Her role in the administration of her husband was significant, which her expansive titulature, "mother of the camp and the senate and the country," reflected. Her sister, Julia Maesa, had two daughters, each of whom produced a son who was to become emperor. Julia Soaemias was the mother of Elagabalus, and shared his fate when he was assassinated. Julia Mamaea bore Alexander, who succeeded his cousin; he was very young and hence much under the control of grandmother and mother. For the first time in its imperial history, the empire of Rome was de facto, though not de iure, governed by women.

The literary sources, while numerous, are limited in value. Chief among them, at least in scope, is the biography in the Historia Augusta, much the longest of all the lives in this peculiar collection. Though purporting to be the work of six authors in the early fourth century, it is now generally considered to have been produced by one author writing in the last years of this century. Spacious in its treatment of the emperor and extremely favorable to him on the whole, it has little historical merit, seeming rather an extended work of fiction. It must be used with the utmost caution.

Herodian, whose history covered the period 180-238, was a contemporary of Severus Alexander, and his coverage of the latter's reign is extensive. Another contemporary, Dio Cassius, who was consul in 229 and whose judgments would have been most valuable, is unfortunately useless here, since his history survives only in abbreviated form and covers barely a page of printed text for the whole reign (Book 80). Aurelius Victor, Eutropius, the Epitome de Caesaribus, and other Latin sources are extremely brief, informing us of only the occasional anecdote. Christian writers make minimal contribution; legal texts offer much instruction, particularly those dealing with or stemming from Ulpian; coins, inscriptions, papyri, and archaeology help fill the gaps left by the literary sources.

Early Life and Education
The future emperor was born in Arca Caesarea in Phoenicia on October 1, 208 although some sources put the date three years earlier (as Gibbon assumed, see above), the son of Gessius Marcianus, whose career advanced in the equestrian cursus, and of Julia Mamaea, niece of the then empress, Julia Domna, wife of Septimius Severus. He was raised quietly and well educated, at the instance of his mother. He came into the public eye only in 218, when, after Macrinus' murder of Caracalla and accession to the purple, he and his mother were declared hostes publici. In June of that year, Elagabalus defeated Macrinus and succeeded him as emperor. Alexander and Mamaea were soon rehabilitated. As his cousin's activities, religious, political, and personal, became increasingly unacceptable, Alexander was drawn ever more into public life. In mid 221, he assumed the toga virilis, was adopted by Elagabalus as a colleague, was granted the name Alexander, and elevated to the rank of Caesar. There had been talk that he was the illegitimate child of Caracalla, which won him support among the army, and this was confirmed, at least for public consumption, by his filiation in the official titulature back to Septimius. He was now styled Imp. Caes. M. Aurelii Antonini Pii Felicis Aug. fil., divi Antonini Magni Pii nepos, divi Severi pronepos M. Aurelius Alexander, nobilissimus Caesar imperi et sacerdotis, princeps iuventutis. The connection with Septimius Severus was crucial, since he was the only one of these predecessors who had been deified. Alexander was about 12˝ years old. Less than a year later, on March 13, 222, with the murder of Elagabalus, Alexander was hailed as emperor by the army. He considered this date as his dies imperii. He became thereby the youngest emperor in Rome's history. He was immediately thereafter given the titles of Augustus, pater patriae, and pontifex maximus.

His Principate; Grandmother, Mother, Ulpian
Having had no experience in government, the young emperor was largely dependent upon the two senior women in his life to guide his actions. His grandmother, Julia Maesa, may well have died as early as 223, so that his mother, Julia Mamaea, played the major role in the empire's administration from early on until the end. The only other figures who could rival her were the two Praetorian Prefects, both eminent jurists, Ulpian and Paulus, who are well-known to us because of the numerous citations of their legal views and administrative decisions preserved in the Corpus Iuris Civilis. Both were members of Alexander's consilium. Alexander attempted to restore some of the senate's prestige and functions, but with little success. He was even unable to protect Ulpian against the anger of the praetorians, who then murdered the jurist in 223.

Had his principate been peaceful, he might have developed into a significant emperor, certainly in comparison with his immediate predecessors. He was married once, in 225 to Sallustia Orbiana, who received the official titulature Sallustia Barbia Orbiana Augusta, but she was banished to Libya two years later. Her father, L. Seius Sallustius, was perhaps raised to the rank of Caesar by Alexander and was put to death in 227 on a charge of attempted murder of the emperor. The only other recorded uprising against Alexander is that of Taurinus, who was hailed as Augustus but drowned himself in the Euphrates.

According to the HA life, Alexander was a "good" person, and his mother certainly attempted to guide him well, but much of the last decade of his reign was preoccupied with serious military threats against the empire's prestige, nay existence. In those dangerous circumstances, his abilities, which had not earlier been honed, proved inadequate.

Domestic Policy
Perhaps the greatest service which Alexander furnished Rome, certainly at the beginning of his reign, was the return to a sense of sanity and tradition after the madness and fanaticism of Elagabalus. He is said to have honored and worshipped a variety of individuals, including Christ. His amiability assisted his relationship with the senate, which gained in honor under him without any real increase in its power. Besides jurists in high office, literary figures were also so distinguished; Marius Maximus, the biographer, and Dio Cassius, the historian, gained second consulships, the former in 223, the latter in 229.

The emperor's building program made its mark upon the face of Rome. The last of the eleven great aqueducts, the aqua Alexandrina, was put into service in 226; he also rebuilt the thermae Neronianae in the Campus Martius in the following year and gave them his own name. Of the other constructions, perhaps the most intriguing are the Diaetae Mammaeae, apartments which he built for his mother on the Palatine.

The Persian and German Wars
The first great external challenge appeared in the east, where the Parthian dynasty, which had ruled the Iranian plateau and other large areas for centuries, and who for long had been one of Rome's great rivals, was overthrown by the Persian family of the Sassanids by 227. They aspired to restore their domain to include all the Asian lands which had been ruled in the glory days of the Persian Empire. Since this included Asia Minor as well as all other eastern provinces, the stage was set for continuing clashes with Rome.

These began late in the decade, with significant success early on for the Sassanids. But Rome gradually developed a defense against these incursions, and ultimately the emperor, with his mother and staff, went to the east in 231. There actual military command rested in the hands of his generals, but his presence gave additional weight to the empire's policy. Persia's early successes soon faded as Rome's armies brought their power and experience to bear. The result was an acceptance of the status quo rather than a settlement between the parties. This occurred in 233 and Alexander returned to Rome. His presence in the west was required by a German threat, particularly along the Rhine, where the tribes took advantage of the withdrawal of Roman troops for the eastern war.

In 234, Alexander and Julia Mammaea moved to Moguntiacum (Mainz), the capital of Upper Germany. The military situation had improved with the return of troops from the east, and an ambitious offensive campaign was planned, for which a bridge was built across the Rhine. But Alexander preferred to negotiate for peace by buying off the enemy. This policy outraged the soldiers, who mutinied in mid March 235 and killed the emperor and his mother. He had reached the age of 26˝ years and had been emperor for almost precisely half his life. He was deified by the senate and received other posthumous honors. With the accession of Maximinus Thrax, the Severan dynasty came to an end.

Death and Evaluation
Tacitus' famous dictum about Galba, that he was properly considered capax imperii, capable of being emperor, until he showed, when emperor, that he was not, could never have been applied to Severus Alexander. A child when chance brought him to the principate, with only two recommendations, that he was different from Elagabalus and that he was part of the Severan family, he proved to be inadequate for the challenges of the time. Military experience was the prime attribute of an emperor now, which Alexander did not have, and that lack ultimately cost him his life. Guided by his mother and employing the services of distinguished men, he returned dignity to the imperial household and to the state. He did the best he could, but that best was not good enough in the early decades of the third century A.D., with the great threats from east and north challenging Rome's primacy and, indeed, existence.

Copyright (C) 2001, Herbert W. Benario. Published on De Imeratoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors; http://www.roman-emperors.org/alexsev.htm . Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
SevAl.jpg
[1009b] Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.110 viewsSilver denarius, RIC 19, S -, aF, Rome, 2.806g, 20.0mm, 0o, 223 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate and draped bust right; reverse P M TR P II COS P P, Jupiter standing left cloak over arms, holding long scepter and thunderbolt. Nice portrait. Ex FORVM.

Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexander was promoted from Caesar to Augustus after the murder of his cousin, Elagabalus. His reign was marked by great economic prosperity, and he enjoyed great success against the barbarian tribes. His mother Julia Mamaea was the real power in the empire, controlling her son's policies and even his personal life with great authority. Severus had an oratory where he prayed under the edict, written on the wall, "Do not unto others what you would not have done to yourself" and the images of various prophets including Mithras, Zoroaster, Abraham and Jesus. Mutinous soldiers led by Maximinus I murdered both Severus Alexander and his mother (Joseph Sermarini).


De Imeratoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Alexander Severus (A.D. 222-235)

Herbert W. Benario
Emory University

Introduction and Sources
"But as Alexander was a modest and dutiful youth, of only seventeen years of age, the reins of government were in the hands of two women, of his mother Mamaea, and of Maesa, his grandmother. After the death of the latter, who survived but a short time the elevation of Alexander, Mamaea remained the sole regent of her son and of the empire." (Gibbon, Decline and Fall, chap. 6: Modern Library Edition, p. 130)

"As the imperial system developed, it disclosed its various arcana one by one. How much does the personality of the ruler matter? Less and less, it should seem. Be he boy, buffoon, or philosopher, his conduct may not have much effect on the administration. Habit and routine took over, with groups and grades of bureaucrats at hand to fill the posts." (Syme, Emperors and Biography, 146)

The passages quoted above emphasize two important aspects of the principate of Severus Alexander (or Alexander Severus), his youth and the influence of women during his reign. The significance of the latter invites brief discourse about the four women known as the "Severan Julias," whose origin was Syria. Julia Domna became the second wife of Septimius Severus and bore him two sons, the later emperors Caracalla and Geta. Her role in the administration of her husband was significant, which her expansive titulature, "mother of the camp and the senate and the country," reflected. Her sister, Julia Maesa, had two daughters, each of whom produced a son who was to become emperor. Julia Soaemias was the mother of Elagabalus, and shared his fate when he was assassinated. Julia Mamaea bore Alexander, who succeeded his cousin; he was very young and hence much under the control of grandmother and mother. For the first time in its imperial history, the empire of Rome was de facto, though not de iure, governed by women.

The literary sources, while numerous, are limited in value. Chief among them, at least in scope, is the biography in the Historia Augusta, much the longest of all the lives in this peculiar collection. Though purporting to be the work of six authors in the early fourth century, it is now generally considered to have been produced by one author writing in the last years of this century. Spacious in its treatment of the emperor and extremely favorable to him on the whole, it has little historical merit, seeming rather an extended work of fiction. It must be used with the utmost caution.

Herodian, whose history covered the period 180-238, was a contemporary of Severus Alexander, and his coverage of the latter's reign is extensive. Another contemporary, Dio Cassius, who was consul in 229 and whose judgments would have been most valuable, is unfortunately useless here, since his history survives only in abbreviated form and covers barely a page of printed text for the whole reign (Book 80). Aurelius Victor, Eutropius, the Epitome de Caesaribus, and other Latin sources are extremely brief, informing us of only the occasional anecdote. Christian writers make minimal contribution; legal texts offer much instruction, particularly those dealing with or stemming from Ulpian; coins, inscriptions, papyri, and archaeology help fill the gaps left by the literary sources.

Early Life and Education
The future emperor was born in Arca Caesarea in Phoenicia on October 1, 208 although some sources put the date three years earlier (as Gibbon assumed, see above), the son of Gessius Marcianus, whose career advanced in the equestrian cursus, and of Julia Mamaea, niece of the then empress, Julia Domna, wife of Septimius Severus. He was raised quietly and well educated, at the instance of his mother. He came into the public eye only in 218, when, after Macrinus' murder of Caracalla and accession to the purple, he and his mother were declared hostes publici. In June of that year, Elagabalus defeated Macrinus and succeeded him as emperor. Alexander and Mamaea were soon rehabilitated. As his cousin's activities, religious, political, and personal, became increasingly unacceptable, Alexander was drawn ever more into public life. In mid 221, he assumed the toga virilis, was adopted by Elagabalus as a colleague, was granted the name Alexander, and elevated to the rank of Caesar. There had been talk that he was the illegitimate child of Caracalla, which won him support among the army, and this was confirmed, at least for public consumption, by his filiation in the official titulature back to Septimius. He was now styled Imp. Caes. M. Aurelii Antonini Pii Felicis Aug. fil., divi Antonini Magni Pii nepos, divi Severi pronepos M. Aurelius Alexander, nobilissimus Caesar imperi et sacerdotis, princeps iuventutis. The connection with Septimius Severus was crucial, since he was the only one of these predecessors who had been deified. Alexander was about 12˝ years old. Less than a year later, on March 13, 222, with the murder of Elagabalus, Alexander was hailed as emperor by the army. He considered this date as his dies imperii. He became thereby the youngest emperor in Rome's history. He was immediately thereafter given the titles of Augustus, pater patriae, and pontifex maximus.

His Principate; Grandmother, Mother, Ulpian
Having had no experience in government, the young emperor was largely dependent upon the two senior women in his life to guide his actions. His grandmother, Julia Maesa, may well have died as early as 223, so that his mother, Julia Mamaea, played the major role in the empire's administration from early on until the end. The only other figures who could rival her were the two Praetorian Prefects, both eminent jurists, Ulpian and Paulus, who are well-known to us because of the numerous citations of their legal views and administrative decisions preserved in the Corpus Iuris Civilis. Both were members of Alexander's consilium. Alexander attempted to restore some of the senate's prestige and functions, but with little success. He was even unable to protect Ulpian against the anger of the praetorians, who then murdered the jurist in 223.

Had his principate been peaceful, he might have developed into a significant emperor, certainly in comparison with his immediate predecessors. He was married once, in 225 to Sallustia Orbiana, who received the official titulature Sallustia Barbia Orbiana Augusta, but she was banished to Libya two years later. Her father, L. Seius Sallustius, was perhaps raised to the rank of Caesar by Alexander and was put to death in 227 on a charge of attempted murder of the emperor. The only other recorded uprising against Alexander is that of Taurinus, who was hailed as Augustus but drowned himself in the Euphrates.

According to the HA life, Alexander was a "good" person, and his mother certainly attempted to guide him well, but much of the last decade of his reign was preoccupied with serious military threats against the empire's prestige, nay existence. In those dangerous circumstances, his abilities, which had not earlier been honed, proved inadequate.

Domestic Policy
Perhaps the greatest service which Alexander furnished Rome, certainly at the beginning of his reign, was the return to a sense of sanity and tradition after the madness and fanaticism of Elagabalus. He is said to have honored and worshipped a variety of individuals, including Christ. His amiability assisted his relationship with the senate, which gained in honor under him without any real increase in its power. Besides jurists in high office, literary figures were also so distinguished; Marius Maximus, the biographer, and Dio Cassius, the historian, gained second consulships, the former in 223, the latter in 229.

The emperor's building program made its mark upon the face of Rome. The last of the eleven great aqueducts, the aqua Alexandrina, was put into service in 226; he also rebuilt the thermae Neronianae in the Campus Martius in the following year and gave them his own name. Of the other constructions, perhaps the most intriguing are the Diaetae Mammaeae, apartments which he built for his mother on the Palatine.

The Persian and German Wars
The first great external challenge appeared in the east, where the Parthian dynasty, which had ruled the Iranian plateau and other large areas for centuries, and who for long had been one of Rome's great rivals, was overthrown by the Persian family of the Sassanids by 227. They aspired to restore their domain to include all the Asian lands which had been ruled in the glory days of the Persian Empire. Since this included Asia Minor as well as all other eastern provinces, the stage was set for continuing clashes with Rome.

These began late in the decade, with significant success early on for the Sassanids. But Rome gradually developed a defense against these incursions, and ultimately the emperor, with his mother and staff, went to the east in 231. There actual military command rested in the hands of his generals, but his presence gave additional weight to the empire's policy. Persia's early successes soon faded as Rome's armies brought their power and experience to bear. The result was an acceptance of the status quo rather than a settlement between the parties. This occurred in 233 and Alexander returned to Rome. His presence in the west was required by a German threat, particularly along the Rhine, where the tribes took advantage of the withdrawal of Roman troops for the eastern war.

In 234, Alexander and Julia Mammaea moved to Moguntiacum (Mainz), the capital of Upper Germany. The military situation had improved with the return of troops from the east, and an ambitious offensive campaign was planned, for which a bridge was built across the Rhine. But Alexander preferred to negotiate for peace by buying off the enemy. This policy outraged the soldiers, who mutinied in mid March 235 and killed the emperor and his mother. He had reached the age of 26˝ years and had been emperor for almost precisely half his life. He was deified by the senate and received other posthumous honors. With the accession of Maximinus Thrax, the Severan dynasty came to an end.

Death and Evaluation
Tacitus' famous dictum about Galba, that he was properly considered capax imperii, capable of being emperor, until he showed, when emperor, that he was not, could never have been applied to Severus Alexander. A child when chance brought him to the principate, with only two recommendations, that he was different from Elagabalus and that he was part of the Severan family, he proved to be inadequate for the challenges of the time. Military experience was the prime attribute of an emperor now, which Alexander did not have, and that lack ultimately cost him his life. Guided by his mother and employing the services of distinguished men, he returned dignity to the imperial household and to the state. He did the best he could, but that best was not good enough in the early decades of the third century A.D., with the great threats from east and north challenging Rome's primacy and, indeed, existence.

Copyright (C) 2001, Herbert W. Benario. Published on De Imeratoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors; http://www.roman-emperors.org/alexsev.htm . Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Antiochos1ARTetPhiletairos.jpg
[2400c] Pergamene Kingdom: Attalid Dynasty: Philetairos: 282-- 263 B.C. 51 viewsPergamene Kingdom, Attalid Dynasty; AR Tetradrachm (17.10 gm, 29 mm), VF, Struck in Pergamon under Philetairos, in the name of Seleukos I, circa 279-274 BC. Obverse: head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress; Reverse: Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre; helmeted head of Athena in left field; crescent under throne. SC 308a. Nicely toned and scarce. Ex Eukratides. Photo by Eukratides.

Philetairos first struck in the name of Lysimachos, then posthumous Alexander types under Seleukos I (such as this specimen), then Seleukos portrait types under Antiochos I, and lastly a type with his own portrait.

The Attalid dynasty was a Hellenistic dynasty that ruled the city of Pergamon after the death of Lysimachus, a general of Alexander the Great. The Attalid kingdom was the rump state left after the collapse of the Lysimachian Empire. One of Lysimachus' officers, Philetaerus, took control of the city in 282 BC. The later Attalids were descended from his father, and they expanded the city into a kingdom. Attalus I proclaimed himself King in the 230s BC, following his victories over the Galatians. The Attalids ruled Pergamon until Attalus III bequeathed the kingdom to the Roman Republic in 133 BC to avoid a likely succession crisis.

On the interior of the Pergamon Altar is a frieze depicting the life of Telephos, son of Herakles, whom the ruling Attalid dynasty associated with their city and utilized to claim descendance from the Olympians. Pergamon, having entered the Greek world much later than their counterparts to the west, could not boast the same divine heritage as older city-states, and had to retroactively cultivate their place in Greek mythos.

The Attalid Dynasty of Pergamum

Philetaerus (282 BC–263 BC)
Eumenes I (263 BC–241 BC)
Attalus I Soter (241 BC–197 BC)
Eumenes II (197 BC–158 BC)
Attalus II Philadelphus (160 BC–138 BC)
Attalus III (138 BC–133 BC)
Eumenes III Aristonicus (pretender, 133 BC–129 BC)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attalid_dynasty


The Relationship between the Attalids and the Seleucids

September 281 A.D.: death of Seleucus I; accession of Antiochus I; Philetaerus of Pergamon buys back the corpse of Seleucus I (the father of Antiochos I and a member of the Diodochi: the period of the Diadochi is said to end with the victory of Seleucus I over Lysimachus at the battle of Corupedion in 281, fixing the boundaries of the Hellenistic world for the next century).

Antiochus I Soter (Greek Ἀντίoχoς Σωτήρ, i.e. "Saviour"; 324/​323-​262/​261 B.C.), was an emperor of the Hellenistic Seleucid Empire. He reigned from 281 - 261 B.C. He was half Persian, his mother Apama being one of the eastern princesses whom Alexander the Great had given as wives to his generals in 324 B.C. In in 294 B.C., prior to death of his father Seleucus I, Antiochus married his step-mother, Stratonice, daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes. His elderly father reportedly instigated the marriage after discovering that his son was in danger of dying of lovesickness.

On the assassination of his father in 281 B.C., the task of holding together the empire was a formidable one, and a revolt in Syria broke out almost immediately. Antiochus was soon compelled to make peace with his father's murderer, Ptolemy Keraunos, abandoning apparently Macedonia and Thrace. In Asia Minor he was unable to reduce Bithynia or the Persian dynasties that ruled in Cappadocia.

In 278 BC the Gauls broke into Asia Minor, and a victory that Antiochus won over these hordes is said to have been the origin of his title of Soter (Gr. for "saviour").

At the end of 275 B.C. the question of Coele-Syria, which had been open between the houses of Seleucus and Ptolemy since the partition of 301 B.C., led to hostilities (the First Syrian War). It had been continuously in Ptolemaic occupation, but the house of Seleucus maintained its claim.

About 262 B.C. Antiochus tried to break the growing power of Pergamum by force of arms, but suffered defeat near Sardis and died soon afterwards. His eldest son Seleucus, who had ruled in the east as viceroy from 275 BC(?) till 268/267 BC, was put to death in that year by his father on the charge of rebellion. He was succeeded (261 BC) by his second son Antiochus II Theos

263 A.D.: Eumenes I of Pergamon, successor of Philetaerus, declares himself independent.

262 A.D.: Antiochus defeated by Eumenes.
http://www.livius.org/am-ao/antiochus/antiochus_i_soter.html

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
PhiletairosMyFirstCoinPortrait250408.jpg
[2400d] Pergamene Kingdom, Mysia, Western Asia Minor, Philetairos I, 282 - 263 B.C.46 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Meydancikkale 3000, SNG Paris 1603 var, SNG Von Aulock -, SNG Cop -, VF, Pergamon mint, 16.629g, 28.1mm, 0o, c. 265 - 263 B.C. Obverse: head of Philetaerus right in taenia; Reverse: FILETAIROU downward on right, Athena enthroned left, right hand on shield before her, spear over shoulder in left, leaf above arm, bow right; high relief portrait; very rare. Ex FORVM. Photo by jpfjr.

This coin bears the first portrait of Philetairos, the founder of the Pergamene Kingdom, 282 -263 B.C. Hoard evidence and recent studies indicate it was struck at the end of his reign. Philetairos first struck in the name of Lysimachos, then posthumous Alexander types under Seleukos I, then Seleukos and Herakles (see coin 309p) portrait types under Antiochos I, and lastly this type with his own portrait. This same reverse was used for the Seleukos I portrait types. Philetairos' coinage is known for its magnificent realistic portraits and this coin is an excellent example. Very rare and absent from most major collections (Joseph Sermarini).

Attalid Dynasty(270-133 BC) - capital at Pergamum

Founded by Philetairos, the Greek secretary of Alexander the Great's general Lysimachus.

In his monograph "The Pergamene Mint Under Philetaerus" (The American Numismatic Society, No.76, 1936), Edward T. Newell notes, "The event which precipitated the end of Lysimachus' empire and resulted in the rise to power of the Attalid Dynasty, was the execution in 286-5 B.C. of his son, the heir apparent Agathocles. For Philetareus the situation had now become impossible. He belonged to the faction which had gathered about that able and much beloved young man--in opposition to the party headed by Lysimachus' wife, the ambitious Arsinoe, scheming for the preferment of her own children. So after having functioned for many years as the governor of Pergamum and the trusted guardian of the great treasure there deposited, Philetaerus was now forced to take steps for his own safety. Sometime between 284 and 282 B.C. many of the Asiatic cities and certain officers of Lysimachus openly rebelled and called upon Seleucus for aid. Philetaerus also wrote to the Syrian king, placing himself, and the treasure under his care, at the latter's disposal. Seleucus led his army, together with a large contingent of elephants, into the Asiatic provinces of Lysimachus. On the plain of Corupedium in Lydia there occurred the final and decisive battle in which, as is well known, Lysimachus lost both life and empire" (3-5).

When [Lysimachus] fell fighting Seleucus, Philetairos (a eunuch) withdrew with his commander's military war chest to a mountain fortress that ultimately became his palace acropolis of Pergamum. He gained royal recognition through his successful efforts at repulsing the Gallic invasion of western Anatolia in 270-269 BC. Philetairos drove the Gauls into the Phrygian highlands where they settled in the region thereafter known as Galatia. He became recognized by the Greek cities of the coastal region as a liberator and savior and established his hegemony over them. Since he had no children, his domain passed to the four sons of his brother, Attalus I. Normally, so many rival dynasts would have spelled disaster (as it eventually did in Syria and Egypt), but the Attalids became celebrated for their cooperation at state building. They handed the royal authority from one to another in succession and managed to elevate their realm into the top echelon of Mediterranean states.

Particularly skillful diplomacy with Rome enabled the Attalids to enjoy further success during the early second century BC. At their peak under Eumenes II, c. 190-168 BC, they controlled the entire western seaboard of Anatolia and much of Phrygian highland as well. In direct competition with the Ptolemies and the Seleucids, the Attalids succeeded at establishing Pergamum as a leading cultural center, its library second only to that of Alexandria, its sculpture, woven tapestries, and ceramics prized throughout the Mediterranean. An expressive, highly baroque style of sculpture known as the Asian school, set important trends in the Greek world and profoundly influenced artistic development at Rome. The Attalids likewise competed for control of the eastern luxury trade, relying on the overland route of the now ancient Persian Royal Road across Anatolia.

When a dynastic dispute threatened to undermine the stability of Pergamum at the end of the second century BC, King Attalus III (138-133) left his royal domain to the people of the Roman Republic in his will. His nobles were concerned about security after his passing, and to prevent a dynastic dispute (which ultimately did arise) he wrote this into his will as a form of "poison pill." At his demise in 133 BC, ambassadors brought the report of his bequest to Rome, where it was accepted and secured by military intervention. By 126 BC the royal territories of Pergamum became the Roman province of Asia, the richest of all Roman provinces.

Abusive exploitation by Roman tax collectors (publicans) induced a province-wide revolt in Asia in 88 BC (encouraged by Mithridates VI Eupator), culminating in the massacre reportedly of some 80,000 Romans, Italians, their families, and servants throughout the province. L. Cornelius Sulla restored order in 84 BC just prior to his assumption of the dictatorship at Rome. Indemnities imposed by Sulla remained burdensome throughout the following decade, but the resilience and economic vitality of the province ultimately enabled impressive recovery.

In 63 BC the Roman orator and senator, M. Tullius Cicero, stated that approximately 40% of tribute raised by the Republican empire came from Asia alone. The merger of Greco-Roman culture was probably most successfully achieved here. In the imperial era, cities such as Pergamum, Ephesus, Sardis, and Miletus ranked among the leading cultural centers of the Roman world.

http://72.14.235.104/search?q=cache:n9hG5pYVUV0J:web.ics.purdue.edu/~rauhn/hellenistic_world.htm+Philetairos&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=29

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
1stPhiletairosTet.jpg
[2400d] Pergamene Kingdom, Mysia, Western Asia Minor, Philetairos I, 282 - 263 B.C.52 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Meydancikkale 3000, SNG Paris 1603 var, SNG Von Aulock -, SNG Cop -, VF, Pergamon mint, 16.629g, 28.1mm, 0o, c. 265 - 263 B.C. Obverse: head of Philetaerus right in taenia; Reverse: FILETAIROU downward on right, Athena enthroned left, right hand on shield before her, spear over shoulder in left, leaf above arm, bow right; high relief portrait; very rare. Ex FORVM.

This coin bears the first portrait of Philetairos, the founder of the Pergamene Kingdom, 282 -263 B.C. Hoard evidence and recent studies indicate it was struck at the end of his reign. Philetairos first struck in the name of Lysimachos, then posthumous Alexander types under Seleukos I, then Seleukos and Herakles (see coin 309p) portrait types under Antiochos I, and lastly this type with his own portrait. This same reverse was used for the Seleukos I portrait types. Philetairos' coinage is known for its magnificent realistic portraits and this coin is an excellent example. Very rare and absent from most major collections.

Attalid Dynasty(270-133 BC) - capital at Pergamum

Founded by Philetairos, the Greek secretary of Alexander the Great's general Lysimachus.

In his monograph "The Pergamene Mint Under Philetaerus" (The American Numismatic Society, No.76, 1936), Edward T. Newell notes, "The event which precipitated the end of Lysimachus' empire and resulted in the rise to power of the Attalid Dynasty, was the execution in 286-5 B.C. of his son, the heir apparent Agathocles. For Philetareus the situation had now become impossible. He belonged to the faction which had gathered about that able and much beloved young man--in opposition to the party headed by Lysimachus' wife, the ambitious Arsinoe, scheming for the preferment of her own children. So after having functioned for many years as the governor of Pergamum and the trusted guardian of the great treasure there deposited, Philetaerus was now forced to take steps for his own safety. Sometime between 284 and 282 B.C. many of the Asiatic cities and certain officers of Lysimachus openly rebelled and called upon Seleucus for aid. Philetaerus also wrote to the Syrian king, placing himself, and the treasure under his care, at the latter's disposal. Seleucus led his army, together with a large contingent of elephants, into the Asiatic provinces of Lysimachus. On the plain of Corupedium in Lydia there occurred the final and decisive battle in which, as is well known, Lysimachus lost both life and empire" (3-5).

When [Lysimachus] fell fighting Seleucus, Philetairos (a eunuch) withdrew with his commander's military war chest to a mountain fortress that ultimately became his palace acropolis of Pergamum. He gained royal recognition through his successful efforts at repulsing the Gallic invasion of western Anatolia in 270-269 BC. Philetairos drove the Gauls into the Phrygian highlands where they settled in the region thereafter known as Galatia. He became recognized by the Greek cities of the coastal region as a liberator and savior and established his hegemony over them. Since he had no children, his domain passed to the four sons of his brother, Attalus I. Normally, so many rival dynasts would have spelled disaster (as it eventually did in Syria and Egypt), but the Attalids became celebrated for their cooperation at state building. They handed the royal authority from one to another in succession and managed to elevate their realm into the top echelon of Mediterranean states.

Particularly skillful diplomacy with Rome enabled the Attalids to enjoy further success during the early second century BC. At their peak under Eumenes II, c. 190-168 BC, they controlled the entire western seaboard of Anatolia and much of Phrygian highland as well. In direct competition with the Ptolemies and the Seleucids, the Attalids succeeded at establishing Pergamum as a leading cultural center, its library second only to that of Alexandria, its sculpture, woven tapestries, and ceramics prized throughout the Mediterranean. An expressive, highly baroque style of sculpture known as the Asian school, set important trends in the Greek world and profoundly influenced artistic development at Rome. The Attalids likewise competed for control of the eastern luxury trade, relying on the overland route of the now ancient Persian Royal Road across Anatolia.

When a dynastic dispute threatened to undermine the stability of Pergamum at the end of the second century BC, King Attalus III (138-133) left his royal domain to the people of the Roman Republic in his will. His nobles were concerned about security after his passing, and to prevent a dynastic dispute (which ultimately did arise) he wrote this into his will as a form of "poison pill." At his demise in 133 BC, ambassadors brought the report of his bequest to Rome, where it was accepted and secured by military intervention. By 126 BC the royal territories of Pergamum became the Roman province of Asia, the richest of all Roman provinces.

Abusive exploitation by Roman tax collectors (publicans) induced a province-wide revolt in Asia in 88 BC (encouraged by Mithridates VI Eupator), culminating in the massacre reportedly of some 80,000 Romans, Italians, their families, and servants throughout the province. L. Cornelius Sulla restored order in 84 BC just prior to his assumption of the dictatorship at Rome. Indemnities imposed by Sulla remained burdensome throughout the following decade, but the resilience and economic vitality of the province ultimately enabled impressive recovery.

In 63 BC the Roman orator and senator, M. Tullius Cicero, stated that approximately 40% of tribute raised by the Republican empire came from Asia alone. The merger of Greco-Roman culture was probably most successfully achieved here. In the imperial era, cities such as Pergamum, Ephesus, Sardis, and Miletus ranked among the leading cultural centers of the Roman world.

http://72.14.235.104/search?q=cache:n9hG5pYVUV0J:web.ics.purdue.edu/~rauhn/hellenistic_world.htm+Philetairos&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=29

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
ATGlifetime TetMemphis.jpg
[300mem] Alexander III, The Great, 336-323 BC, AR Tetradrachm (Possible Lifetime Issue)81 viewsAlexander III, The Great; 336-323BC. AR tetradrachm; Price 3971, SNG Cop.7; 16.07g. Memphis mint, Egypt. Possible Lifetime issue. Obverse: Beardless bust of young Herakles right wearing lions scalp. Reverse: Zeus enthroned left; holding eagle in outstretched right hand and sceptre in left , rose in left field; between legs of throne and O next to right leg of throne; gVF/VF, light encrustation obverse, small chip reverse; together with several light scratches both sides. Ex Pavlos S. Pavlou. Ex FORVM, "The Memphis issues are among the finest style Alexander coins. Experts disagree on the date of this issue. Some identify it as a lifetime issue and others as a posthumous issue (Joseph Sermarini)..

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC)

"Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.

Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr. Joann Fletcher
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml

"When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."--attributed to Plutarch, The Moralia.
http://www.pothos.org/alexander.asp?paraID=96

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
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