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Diva_Faustina_Senior_new.jpg
103 viewsDiva Faustina Senior, AD 141, AR Denarius (3.42g). Rome after AD 147.
Obverse: DIVA FAVSTINA draped bust of Diva Faustina right.
Reverse: AVGVSTA, Ceres standing left, holding grain ears in right hand and torch in left.
Ex: Freeman and Sear Fixed Price List 12, Lot 123
3 commentspaul1888
Macedon__Acanthus_new.JPG
106 viewsMacedon. Acanthus. Late 5th Century – 348 BC. AR Tetrobol (2.16 gm).
Obverse: Forepart of bull running left, head reverted
Reverse: Quadripartite incuse with granular surface.
Ex: Freeman and Sear Fixed Price List 10, lot 152
7 commentspaul1888
Roma_front_ionic_column_back_B_.jpg
51 viewsC. Augurinus, ca 135 B.C., Denarius.
Obverse: Roam right, X beneath chin.
Reverse: Ionic column surmounted by statue flanked by togate and grain ears.
EX: Laurion Numismatics Winter 1992 fixed price list - the first coin I purchased from a fixed price list.
3 commentspaul1888
Drachm_from_Ionia,_Magnesia.jpg
29 views Drachm from Ionia, Magnesia. AR18mm
Left field: Δ within wreath. Beneath throne: Ε
319-305 BC, Price 1983.
( Thanks Rover1.3 for the ID!)
Lee S
Samos_didrachm.jpg
105 viewsIslands off Ionia, Samos. Circa 310-300 BC. AR Didrachm (6.24 gm, 19mm). Asklepiades. Obv.: lion’s mask facing. Rev.: ΣΑ / [Α]ΣΚΛΗΠΙΑΔ[ΗΣ] Forepart of an ox to right, with a dotted truncation and an olive branch to right. Barron p. 214, 2 b (this coin). Ex:Münzen und Medaillen AG, Basel - fixed price list 169 (1957), lot 183 commentspaul1888
Faustina.jpg
51 viewsDiva Faustina Senior, AD 141, AR Denarius (3.42g). Rome after AD 147.
Obverse: DIVA FAVSTINA draped bust of Diva Faustina right.
Reverse: AVGVSTA, Ceres standing left, holding grain ears in right hand and torch in left.
Ex: Freeman and Sear Fixed Price List 12, Lot 123
1 commentspaul1888
stuff-01.jpg
13 viewsMassachusetts Treasury Loan Certificate £15 June 1, 1780 MA-8
This certificate is listed as MA-8 in Anderson's The Price of Liberty. It bears the Sword in Hand vignette encircled by a rattlesnake. Anderson rates this piece as a low R7, indicating only 7 to 12 examples are known.
1 commentsSpongeBob
Price-1151.jpg
24 viewsTHRACE, Odessos. Circa 280-225 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 16.44 g, 11h). In the name and types of Alexander III of Macedonia. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, monogram above civic monogram. Topalov, Odesos 23; Price 1151; HGC 3.2, 1584. Quant.Geek
Macedonian_Kingdom,_Alexander_III_The_Great,_AR_teradrachm_Amphipolis_Mint~0.jpg
Kings of Macedon, Alexander III the Great, 336-323 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Amphipolis Mint under Antipater84 viewsHead of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress.
AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; janiform head vase in left field. Graffiti in upper left field - Aramaic kaph (k) and sadhe (s).

Price 6; Troxell, Studies, Issue A3; SNG Cop 660; Muller 853.
Struck at Amphipolis in the period 332-329 BC.

(29 mm, 17.15 g, 2h)

This is one of the first emissions of Alexander’s coinage struck in his homeland, albeit about three years after he departed for Asia Minor. Recent scholarship places the start of Alexander’s distinctive coinage in 333/2 BC at Tarsos, in eastern Asia Minor, shortly after which the design was transferred to Macedonia where Alexander’s coinage was struck under the authority of his regent in Greece, Antipater. Die studies indicate that this coin was from the fourth tetradrachm emission of a mint in Macedonia, most probably Amphipolis. It was most probably struck in the period 332-329 BC. The Aramaic graffiti on the reverse, plus the obverse reverse rim test cut are pointers to the likelihood that this coin travelled beyond its location of issue in Macedonia, into the eastern Mediterranean where Aramaic was the main spoken language.
3 commentsn.igma
a_046.JPG
Lysimachos 34 viewsLysimachos
Drachm Colophon 301-297 b.c

Obverse:Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
Reverse:ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ;Zeus on throne holding eagle; forepart of lion and torch at left field, pentagram under throne

17.31mm 4.10gm

Price L26 ; Thompson 126
maik
greek9.jpg
Macedon,Alexander III. AR tetradrachm32 viewsprice 1679 / Themnos mint /188-170BC
obv: head of Herakles r. wearing lion-skin
rev: Zeus Aetophoros seated l. M l. in field. monograms
above oinoche withen vine tendril,eagle and sceptre
1 commentshill132
ao.jpg
Macedonia, Alexander III The Great Tetradrachm, c. 325-320 BC173 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 17.190g

Obv: Bust of Alexander as Herakles r., wearing lion-skin headdress.

Rx: Zeus seated l. on throne; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ in exergue, AΛEΧANΔΡOY in r. field; wreath in l. field, ΔΙ beneath throne

References: Price-2949

Mint: Side

ex Harlan J. Berk
7 commentsDino
greek3.jpg
Macedonia, Alexander III, Ar drachm29 viewsPrice 1382 / 310-301 BC
obv: Head of young Heraclea r. wearing lion-skin headdress
rev: ALEXANDROU Zues enthrond l. holding eagle and scepter forpart of
Pegasus l. monogram NO below throne
hill132
coin179.JPG
002a. Agrippa 53 viewsAgrippa

A close friend of Octavian (later Emperor Augustus), he won a name in the wars in Gaul before becoming consul in 37 He organized Octavian's fleet and is generally given much credit for the defeat (36 ) of Sextus Pompeius in the naval battles at Mylae and Naulochus (N Sicily). Agrippa took part in the war against Antony, and his naval operations were the basis of Octavian's decisive victory at Actium in 31 He was perhaps the most trusted of all Augustus' lieutenants and rendered many services, notably in putting down disorders in both the East and West. His third wife was Augustus' daughter Julia.

AS. M AGRIPPA L F COS III Head left, wearing rostral crown. / Neptune standing, head left, S C at sides.

It seems like the quality and price of Agrippa coins run the whole spectrum...I think a decent example can be had for as little as $20. This is a bit more than that but I am happy with the quality of the metal and portrait.
ecoli
Caligula_RIC_16.jpg
004 Gaius (Caligula) AR Denarius66 viewsSH86638. Silver denarius, RIC I 16 (R2, Rome), RSC I 2, Lyon 167, BnF II 21, BMCRE I 17, cf. SRCV I 1807 (aureus), VF, toned, attractive portraits, bumps and marks, some pitting, lamination defects, ex jewelry, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, weight 3.443g, maximum diameter 18.2mm, die axis 180o, 2nd emission, 37 - 38 A.D.; obverse C CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR POT (counterclockwise from lower right), laureate head of Caligula right; reverse DIVVS AVG PATER PATRIAE (counterclockwise from lower right), radiate head of Divus Augustus right; ex Classical Numismatic Group, e-auction 69 (23 July 2003), lot 90
Ex: Forum Ancient coins, March 2, 2018.


This is my second denarius of Gaius. I was extremely happy to get this one. I know the surfaces are a bit rough, but it is still a VF example of a rare coin. Denarii of Caligula do not show up for sale very often outside of large auction houses. When they do appear they are often very expensive. I waited for about 2 1/2 years for a coin like this to show up. As soon as it did I bought it.

I want to share a quick word about where I bought this coin. It was a purchase from Forum Ancient Coins. Coins are guaranteed authentic for eternity, and the service is second to none. Forum is also an incredible source of information concerning ancient coins. If you have a question about ancient coins, chances are that question has been asked and answered on Forum Ancient Coins. Many experts frequent this site and they are always willing to share their expertise.

Anyone trying to assemble a set of the 12 Caesars in silver will need to find a denarius of Gaius. His is one of the most difficult to add along with denarii of Claudius and Otho. It has also been suggested by some that it is the fault of 12 Caesars collectors that drives the prices so high. While true that there is a lot of competition for these coins when they appear, it is also true that there are alternatives to the denarii of Gaius. One popular choice is the Vesta As. These are quite common and can be had in nice condition for reasonable prices.

On the obverse we have the typical portrait of Gaius, while on the reverse we see a portrait of his great grandfather Augustus. Augustus is depicted as a Divus or god. The reverse legend "Pater Patriae" refers to Augustus as the father of the country. One reason Augustus was on the reverse was to remind the people of Rome of their emperor's connection to the Julio-Claudian ruling dynasty.

Why are denarii of Gaius so scarce? One explanation is has to do with Gresham's law or bad money drives out good money. The theory is that the monetary reforms of Nero, which debased to coinage in both weight and fineness, caused people to hoard the older more valuable coins of emperors like Caligula and Claudius. The problem with this explanation is that there are plenty of "tribute penny" denarii of Tiberius. The other possibility is that perhaps smaller numbers of Gaius' denarii were originally minted. Maybe there was already enough silver coinage circulating and therefore fewer were needed. Whatever the real reason, we are unlikely to ever get a satisfactory answer.
5 commentsorfew
0130.jpg
0130 - Drachm Alexander III the Great 310-01 BC51 viewsObv/ Head of Heracles r. wearing lion-skin headdress.
Rev/ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, Zeus Aëtophoros seated on backless throne l., holding eagle on outstretched r.h. and scepter in l.h.; under throne, monogram; before, Φ.

Ag, 18.0 mm, 4.15 g
Mint: Colophon.
Price 1828
ex-Numismatik Lanz, eBay jul 2011 - art. #300569784336
1 commentsdafnis
0132.jpg
0132 - 1/2 AE Alexander III the Great 325-10 BC28 viewsObv/ Macedonian shield with thunderbolts inside.
Rev/ Macedonian helmet, (dolphin), AI monogram below; B A on each side of the field.

AE, 15.5 mm, 4.48 g
Mint: Macedonia uncertain.
Price 415
ex-Numismatik Lanz, eBay jul 2011 - art. #300569816457
dafnis
0139.jpg
0139 - AE Alexander III the Great 336-23 BC48 viewsObv/ Head of Heracles r. wearing lion-skin headdress.
Rev/ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ in middle, with goryte, bow and mallet at sides; bunch of grapes and circle on r.

AE, 19.1 mm, 6.33 g
Mint: Macedonia uncertain.
Price -- - Drama 103
ex-CGB, auction 49, lot 155
dafnis
0146.jpg
0146 - Drachm Alexander III the Great 295-75 BC48 viewsObv/ Head of Heracles r. wearing lion-skin headdress.
Rev/ Zeus Aëtophoros seated on backless throne l., holding eagle on outstretched r.h. and scepter in l.h.; before, MI in monogram; behind, (Α)ΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟ(Υ).

Ag, 19.0 mm, 4.28 g
Mint: Miletus.
Price 2151
ex-CNG, auction e260, lot 234
dafnis
0161.jpg
0161 - 1/2 AE Alexander III the Great 336-23 BC39 viewsObv/ Head of Heracles r. wearing lion-skin headdress.
Rev/ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, eagle on thunderbolt r., head turned; above, crescent.

AE, 17.1 mm, 3.59 g
Mint: Amphipolis.
Price 91b
ex-Numismatik Lanz, eBay jan 2012 - art. #230732403614
dafnis
0176.jpg
0176 - Drachm Alexander III the Great 328-23 BC28 viewsObv/ Head of Heracles r. wearing lion-skin headdress.
Rev/ Zeus Aëtophoros seated on backless throne l., holding eagle on outstretched r.h. and scepter in l.h.; before, Demeter with two torches; behind, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ; under throne, monogram with circle, line and triangle.

Ag, 17.5 mm, 4.32 g
Mint: Lampsacus.
Price 1356
ex-Gitbud & Naumann, auction Pecunem 12, lot 119
dafnis
VHC02-coin.jpg
02- BRITISH GUIANA (GUYANA), 4 PENCE, KM26.29 viewsSize: 19.5 mm. Composition: .925 Silver/.0560 oz. Mintage: 60,000.
Grade: Raw VG (minor nicks and marks).
Comments: From an eBay seller in Mexico. I paid around ten times catalog price at the time, but these are tough to find and likely undervalued.
lordmarcovan
0215_Pr2562.jpg
0215 - Drachm Alexander III the Great 328-23 BC12 viewsObv/ Head of Heracles r. wearing lion-skin headdress.
Rev/ Zeus Aëtophoros seated on backless throne l., holding eagle on outstretched r.h. and scepter in l.h.; behind, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, club on field r.; under throne, monogram with circle, lines and dot.

Ag, 15.9 mm, 4.29 g
Mint: Sardes.
Price 2562
ex-vAuctions (Triskeles), auction 320, lot 75
dafnis
03-Alex-Babylon-P2619.jpg
03. Alexander the Great.123 viewsTetradrachm, ca 325 - 323 BC, "Babylon" mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ / Zeus sitting, holding his attendant eagle and sceptre. M and a bee at left, monogram under throne.
17.12 gm., 26 mm.
P. #3619; M. #696.

Martin J. Price assigns this coin to the mint at "Babylon," but he says (p. 456 -57) it is possible that coins of "group two" may have been minted at Susa or Ecbatana.
3 commentsCallimachus
05-Philip-III.jpg
05. Philip III.80 viewsTetradrachm, 323 - 317 BC, "Babylon" mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΟΣ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ / Zeus sitting, holding his attendant eagle and sceptre. M at left, ΛΥ between the rungs of the throne.
16.99 gm., 27 mm.
P. #P181; M. #99; S. #6749.

Martin J. Price assigns this coin to the mint at "Babylon," but he says (p. 455) that coins with the M-ΛΥ monograms may have to be assigned to Susa after further study.
Callimachus
780_P_Hadrian_RPC728.jpg
0728 THRACE, Bizya, Hadrian AE 31 117-19 AD City gate 23 viewsReference.
RPC 3, 728; Jurukova Bizye, pl. 1, 3; 6 (same dies) 1A; Price-Trell p. 247, 83; Varbanov 1421 var.

Magistrate Maec- Nep- (presbeutès and antistrategos)

Obv. ΑΥΤΟ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟС ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС ΚΑΙСΑΡ СΕΒ ΓΕΡ
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, r., with paludamentum

Rev. ΕΠΙ ΜΑΙ ΝΕΠ ΠΡΕСΒ ΚΑΙ ΑΝΤ ΒΙΖΥΗΝΩΝ
City gate, flanked by two towers, surmounted by a figure in quadriga, r.

18.00 gr
31 mm
6h

Note.
The portrait of Hadrian is based on the features of Trajan, as were the earliest coins of Hadrian in Rome.

ex Numismatik Lanz auction 160, lot 414
ex FORVM
okidoki
Vitellius_RIC_I_81.jpg
09 01 Vitellius RIC I 8167 viewsVitellius 69 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. Late April-Dec 20, 69 A.D. (2.91g, 18.8mm, 5h). Obv: A VITELLIVS GERMAN IMP TR P, laureate head right. Rev: LIBERTAS RESTITVTA, Libertas, draped, standing facing, head right, r. holding pileus, l. scepter. RIC I 81, RSC 48. Ex CNG 258, Lot 367.

In the year of 4 emperors, Vitellius assumed the throne after his German legions proclaimed him emperor, marched on Rome, and murdered Otho. Vitellius only ruled for mere months before Vespasian’s eastern legions arrived and murdered him in turn. He was known for his gluttony. I have a Vitellius denarius, but couldn't help picking up this nice example from a reputable dealer for a reasonable price.
2 commentsLucas H
13-Alex-Phaselis-P2853.jpg
13. Phaselis: Tetradrachm in the name of Alexander the Great.22 viewsTetradrachm, 206 / 05 BC, Phaselis mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ / Zeus sitting, holding his attendant eagle and sceptre. ΙΓ and Φ at left.
16.59 gm., 30 mm.
P. #2853.

The letters ΙΓ are a date: year 13. The dated coinage of Phaselis runs from year 1 through year 33. The coinage of Phaselis came to an end in 186 BC when the Treaty of Apamea gave Rhodes control over Lycia. That makes year 13 correspond to 206 / 205 BC. See pages 346 - 49 of Price, vol. I.
Callimachus
DiocleAnt.jpg
1301a, Diocletian, 284-305 A.D. (Antioch)89 viewsDIOCLETIAN (284 – 305 AD) AE Antoninianus, 293-95 AD, RIC V 322, Cohen 34. 20.70 mm/3.1 gm, aVF, Antioch. Obverse: IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, Radiate bust right, draped & cuirassed; Reverse: CONCORDIA MILITVM, Jupiter presents Victory on a globe to Diocletian, I/XXI. Early Diocletian with dusty earthen green patina.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Diocletian ( 284-305 A.D.)

Ralph W. Mathisen
University of South Carolina


Summary and Introduction
The Emperor Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (A.D. 284-305) put an end to the disastrous phase of Roman history known as the "Military Anarchy" or the "Imperial Crisis" (235-284). He established an obvious military despotism and was responsible for laying the groundwork for the second phase of the Roman Empire, which is known variously as the "Dominate," the "Tetrarchy," the "Later Roman Empire," or the "Byzantine Empire." His reforms ensured the continuity of the Roman Empire in the east for more than a thousand years.

Diocletian's Early Life and Reign
Diocletian was born ca. 236/237 on the Dalmatian coast, perhaps at Salona. He was of very humble birth, and was originally named Diocles. He would have received little education beyond an elementary literacy and he was apparently deeply imbued with religious piety He had a wife Prisca and a daughter Valeria, both of whom reputedly were Christians. During Diocletian's early life, the Roman empire was in the midst of turmoil. In the early years of the third century, emperors increasingly insecure on their thrones had granted inflationary pay raises to the soldiers. The only meaningful income the soldiers now received was in the form of gold donatives granted by newly acclaimed emperors. Beginning in 235, armies throughout the empire began to set up their generals as rival emperors. The resultant civil wars opened up the empire to invasion in both the north, by the Franks, Alamanni, and Goths, and the east, by the Sassanid Persians. Another reason for the unrest in the army was the great gap between the social background of the common soldiers and the officer corps.

Diocletian sought his fortune in the army. He showed himself to be a shrewd, able, and ambitious individual. He is first attested as "Duke of Moesia" (an area on the banks of the lower Danube River), with responsibility for border defense. He was a prudent and methodical officer, a seeker of victory rather than glory. In 282, the legions of the upper Danube proclaimed the praetorian prefect Carus as emperor. Diocletian found favor under the new emperor, and was promoted to Count of the Domestics, the commander of the cavalry arm of the imperial bodyguard. In 283 he was granted the honor of a consulate.

In 284, in the midst of a campaign against the Persians, Carus was killed, struck by a bolt of lightning which one writer noted might have been forged in a legionary armory. This left the empire in the hands of his two young sons, Numerian in the east and Carinus in the west. Soon thereafter, Numerian died under mysterious circumstances near Nicomedia, and Diocletian was acclaimed emperor in his place. At this time he changed his name from Diocles to Diocletian. In 285 Carinus was killed in a battle near Belgrade, and Diocletian gained control of the entire empire.

Diocletian's Administrative and Military Reforms
As emperor, Diocletian was faced with many problems. His most immediate concerns were to bring the mutinous and increasingly barbarized Roman armies back under control and to make the frontiers once again secure from invasion. His long-term goals were to restore effective government and economic prosperity to the empire. Diocletian concluded that stern measures were necessary if these problems were to be solved. He felt that it was the responsibility of the imperial government to take whatever steps were necessary, no matter how harsh or innovative, to bring the empire back under control.

Diocletian was able to bring the army back under control by making several changes. He subdivided the roughly fifty existing provinces into approximately one hundred. The provinces also were apportioned among twelve "dioceses," each under a "vicar," and later also among four "prefectures," each under a "praetorian prefect." As a result, the imperial bureaucracy became increasingly bloated. He institutionalized the policy of separating civil and military careers. He divided the army itself into so-called "border troops," actually an ineffective citizen militia, and "palace troops," the real field army, which often was led by the emperor in person.

Following the precedent of Aurelian (A.D.270-275), Diocletian transformed the emperorship into an out-and-out oriental monarchy. Access to him became restricted; he now was addressed not as First Citizen (Princeps) or the soldierly general (Imperator), but as Lord and Master (Dominus Noster) . Those in audience were required to prostrate themselves on the ground before him.

Diocletian also concluded that the empire was too large and complex to be ruled by only a single emperor. Therefore, in order to provide an imperial presence throughout the empire, he introduced the "Tetrarchy," or "Rule by Four." In 285, he named his lieutenant Maximianus "Caesar," and assigned him the western half of the empire. This practice began the process which would culminate with the de facto split of the empire in 395. Both Diocletian and Maximianus adopted divine attributes. Diocletian was identified with Jupiter and Maximianus with Hercules. In 286, Diocletian promoted Maximianus to the rank of Augustus, "Senior Emperor," and in 293 he appointed two new Caesars, Constantius (the father of Constantine I ), who was given Gaul and Britain in the west, and Galerius, who was assigned the Balkans in the east.

By instituting his Tetrarchy, Diocletian also hoped to solve another problem. In the Augustan Principate, there had been no constitutional method for choosing new emperors. According to Diocletian's plan, the successor of each Augustus would be the respective Caesar, who then would name a new Caesar. Initially, the Tetrarchy operated smoothly and effectively.

Once the army was under control, Diocletian could turn his attention to other problems. The borders were restored and strengthened. In the early years of his reign, Diocletian and his subordinates were able to defeat foreign enemies such as Alamanni, Sarmatians, Saracens, Franks, and Persians, and to put down rebellions in Britain and Egypt. The easter frontier was actually expanded.

.
Diocletian's Economic Reforms
Another problem was the economy, which was in an especially sorry state. The coinage had become so debased as to be virtually worthless. Diocletian's attempt to reissue good gold and silver coins failed because there simply was not enough gold and silver available to restore confidence in the currency. A "Maximum Price Edict" issued in 301, intended to curb inflation, served only to drive goods onto the black market. Diocletian finally accepted the ruin of the money economy and revised the tax system so that it was based on payments in kind . The soldiers too came to be paid in kind.

In order to assure the long term survival of the empire, Diocletian identified certain occupations which he felt would have to be performed. These were known as the "compulsory services." They included such occupations as soldiers, bakers, members of town councils, and tenant farmers. These functions became hereditary, and those engaging in them were inhibited from changing their careers. The repetitious nature of these laws, however, suggests that they were not widely obeyed. Diocletian also expanded the policy of third-century emperors of restricting the entry of senators into high-ranking governmental posts, especially military ones.

Diocletian attempted to use the state religion as a unifying element. Encouraged by the Caesar Galerius, Diocletian in 303 issued a series of four increasingly harsh decrees designed to compel Christians to take part in the imperial cult, the traditional means by which allegiance was pledged to the empire. This began the so-called "Great Persecution."

Diocletian's Resignation and Death
On 1 May 305, wearied by his twenty years in office, and determined to implement his method for the imperial succession, Diocletian abdicated. He compelled his co-regent Maximianus to do the same. Constantius and Galerius then became the new Augusti, and two new Caesars were selected, Maximinus (305-313) in the east and Severus (305- 307) in the west. Diocletian then retired to his palace at Split on the Croatian coast. In 308 he declined an offer to resume the purple, and the aged ex-emperor died at Split on 3 December 316.

Copyright (C) 1996, Ralph W. Mathisen, University of South Carolina
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

1 commentsCleisthenes
DicletianConcordCyz.jpg
1301b, Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 March 305 A.D.56 viewsDiocletian. RIC V Part II Cyzicus 256 var. Not listed with pellet in exegrue
Item ref: RI141f. VF. Minted in Cyzicus (B in centre field, XXI dot in exegrue)Obverse:- IMP CC VAL DIOCLETIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Reverse:- CONCORDIA MILITVM, Diocletian standing right, holding parazonium, receiving Victory from Jupiter standing left with scepter.
A post reform radiate of Diocletian. Ex Maridvnvm.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Diocletian ( 284-305 A.D.)

Ralph W. Mathisen
University of South Carolina


Summary and Introduction
The Emperor Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (A.D. 284-305) put an end to the disastrous phase of Roman history known as the "Military Anarchy" or the "Imperial Crisis" (235-284). He established an obvious military despotism and was responsible for laying the groundwork for the second phase of the Roman Empire, which is known variously as the "Dominate," the "Tetrarchy," the "Later Roman Empire," or the "Byzantine Empire." His reforms ensured the continuity of the Roman Empire in the east for more than a thousand years.

Diocletian's Early Life and Reign
Diocletian was born ca. 236/237 on the Dalmatian coast, perhaps at Salona. He was of very humble birth, and was originally named Diocles. He would have received little education beyond an elementary literacy and he was apparently deeply imbued with religious piety He had a wife Prisca and a daughter Valeria, both of whom reputedly were Christians. During Diocletian's early life, the Roman empire was in the midst of turmoil. In the early years of the third century, emperors increasingly insecure on their thrones had granted inflationary pay raises to the soldiers. The only meaningful income the soldiers now received was in the form of gold donatives granted by newly acclaimed emperors. Beginning in 235, armies throughout the empire began to set up their generals as rival emperors. The resultant civil wars opened up the empire to invasion in both the north, by the Franks, Alamanni, and Goths, and the east, by the Sassanid Persians. Another reason for the unrest in the army was the great gap between the social background of the common soldiers and the officer corps.

Diocletian sought his fortune in the army. He showed himself to be a shrewd, able, and ambitious individual. He is first attested as "Duke of Moesia" (an area on the banks of the lower Danube River), with responsibility for border defense. He was a prudent and methodical officer, a seeker of victory rather than glory. In 282, the legions of the upper Danube proclaimed the praetorian prefect Carus as emperor. Diocletian found favor under the new emperor, and was promoted to Count of the Domestics, the commander of the cavalry arm of the imperial bodyguard. In 283 he was granted the honor of a consulate.

In 284, in the midst of a campaign against the Persians, Carus was killed, struck by a bolt of lightning which one writer noted might have been forged in a legionary armory. This left the empire in the hands of his two young sons, Numerian in the east and Carinus in the west. Soon thereafter, Numerian died under mysterious circumstances near Nicomedia, and Diocletian was acclaimed emperor in his place. At this time he changed his name from Diocles to Diocletian. In 285 Carinus was killed in a battle near Belgrade, and Diocletian gained control of the entire empire.

Diocletian's Administrative and Military Reforms
As emperor, Diocletian was faced with many problems. His most immediate concerns were to bring the mutinous and increasingly barbarized Roman armies back under control and to make the frontiers once again secure from invasion. His long-term goals were to restore effective government and economic prosperity to the empire. Diocletian concluded that stern measures were necessary if these problems were to be solved. He felt that it was the responsibility of the imperial government to take whatever steps were necessary, no matter how harsh or innovative, to bring the empire back under control.

Diocletian was able to bring the army back under control by making several changes. He subdivided the roughly fifty existing provinces into approximately one hundred. The provinces also were apportioned among twelve "dioceses," each under a "vicar," and later also among four "prefectures," each under a "praetorian prefect." As a result, the imperial bureaucracy became increasingly bloated. He institutionalized the policy of separating civil and military careers. He divided the army itself into so-called "border troops," actually an ineffective citizen militia, and "palace troops," the real field army, which often was led by the emperor in person.

Following the precedent of Aurelian (A.D.270-275), Diocletian transformed the emperorship into an out-and-out oriental monarchy. Access to him became restricted; he now was addressed not as First Citizen (Princeps) or the soldierly general (Imperator), but as Lord and Master (Dominus Noster) . Those in audience were required to prostrate themselves on the ground before him.

Diocletian also concluded that the empire was too large and complex to be ruled by only a single emperor. Therefore, in order to provide an imperial presence throughout the empire, he introduced the "Tetrarchy," or "Rule by Four." In 285, he named his lieutenant Maximianus "Caesar," and assigned him the western half of the empire. This practice began the process which would culminate with the de facto split of the empire in 395. Both Diocletian and Maximianus adopted divine attributes. Diocletian was identified with Jupiter and Maximianus with Hercules. In 286, Diocletian promoted Maximianus to the rank of Augustus, "Senior Emperor," and in 293 he appointed two new Caesars, Constantius (the father of Constantine I ), who was given Gaul and Britain in the west, and Galerius, who was assigned the Balkans in the east.

By instituting his Tetrarchy, Diocletian also hoped to solve another problem. In the Augustan Principate, there had been no constitutional method for choosing new emperors. According to Diocletian's plan, the successor of each Augustus would be the respective Caesar, who then would name a new Caesar. Initially, the Tetrarchy operated smoothly and effectively.

Once the army was under control, Diocletian could turn his attention to other problems. The borders were restored and strengthened. In the early years of his reign, Diocletian and his subordinates were able to defeat foreign enemies such as Alamanni, Sarmatians, Saracens, Franks, and Persians, and to put down rebellions in Britain and Egypt. The easter frontier was actually expanded.

.
Diocletian's Economic Reforms
Another problem was the economy, which was in an especially sorry state. The coinage had become so debased as to be virtually worthless. Diocletian's attempt to reissue good gold and silver coins failed because there simply was not enough gold and silver available to restore confidence in the currency. A "Maximum Price Edict" issued in 301, intended to curb inflation, served only to drive goods onto the black market. Diocletian finally accepted the ruin of the money economy and revised the tax system so that it was based on payments in kind . The soldiers too came to be paid in kind.

In order to assure the long term survival of the empire, Diocletian identified certain occupations which he felt would have to be performed. These were known as the "compulsory services." They included such occupations as soldiers, bakers, members of town councils, and tenant farmers. These functions became hereditary, and those engaging in them were inhibited from changing their careers. The repetitious nature of these laws, however, suggests that they were not widely obeyed. Diocletian also expanded the policy of third-century emperors of restricting the entry of senators into high-ranking governmental posts, especially military ones.

Diocletian attempted to use the state religion as a unifying element. Encouraged by the Caesar Galerius, Diocletian in 303 issued a series of four increasingly harsh decrees designed to compel Christians to take part in the imperial cult, the traditional means by which allegiance was pledged to the empire. This began the so-called "Great Persecution."

Diocletian's Resignation and Death
On 1 May 305, wearied by his twenty years in office, and determined to implement his method for the imperial succession, Diocletian abdicated. He compelled his co-regent Maximianus to do the same. Constantius and Galerius then became the new Augusti, and two new Caesars were selected, Maximinus (305-313) in the east and Severus (305- 307) in the west. Diocletian then retired to his palace at Split on the Croatian coast. In 308 he declined an offer to resume the purple, and the aged ex-emperor died at Split on 3 December 316.

Copyright (C) 1996, Ralph W. Mathisen, University of South Carolina
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


Cleisthenes
Theo1Ae3Ant.jpeg
1505b, Theodosius I, 19 January 379 - 17 January 395 A.D. (Antioch)66 viewsTheodosius I, 19 January 379 - 17 January 395 A.D. Bronze AE 3, RIC 44(b), VF, Antioch, 2.17g, 18.1mm, 180o, 9 Aug 378 - 25 Aug 383 A.D. Obverse: D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: CONCORDIA AVGGG, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, r. foot on prow, globe in l., scepter in r., Q and F at sides, ANTG in ex; scarce.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

THEODOSIUS I (379-395 A.D.)
David Woods
University College of Cork


Origin and Early Career
Flavius Theodosius was born at Cauca in Spain in about 346 to Thermantia and Theodosius the Elder (so-called to distinguish him from his son). Theodosius the Elder was a senior military officer serving in the Western empire and rose to become the magister equitum praesentalis under the emperor Valentinian I from late 368 until his execution in early 375. As the son of a soldier, Theodosius was legally obliged to enter upon a military career. He seems to have served under his father during his expedition to Britain in 367/8, and was the dux Moesiae Primae by late 374. Unfortunately, great controversy surrounds the rest of his career until Gratian had him hailed as his imperial colleague in succession to the emperor Valens at Sirmium on 19 January 379. It is clear that he was forced to retire home to Spain only to be recalled to active service shortly thereafter, but the circumstances of his forced retirement are shrouded in mystery. His father was executed at roughly the same time, and much speculation has centred on the relationship between these events.

[For a very detailed and interesting discussion of the Foreign Policy of Theodosius and the Civil Wars that plagued his reign, please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/theo1.htm]

Family and Succession
Theodosius married twice. His first wife was the Spanish Aelia Flavia Flaccilla. She bore him Arcadius ca. 377, Honorius on 9 September 384, and Pulcheria ca. 385. Theodosius honoured her with the title of Augusta shortly after his accession, but she died in 386. In late 387 he married Galla, daughter of Valentinian I and full-sister of Valentinian II. She bore him Gratian ca. 388, Galla Placidia ca. 388/390, and died in childbirth in 394, together with her new-born son John. Of his two sons who survived infancy, he appointed Arcadius as Augustus on 19 January 383 and Honorius as Augustus on 23 January 393. His promotion of Arcadius as a full Augustus at an unusually young age points to his determination right from the start that one of his own sons should succeed him. He sought to strengthen Arcadius' position in particular by means of a series of strategic marriages whose purpose was to tie his leading "generals" irrevocably to his dynasty. Hence he married his niece and adoptive daughter Serena to his magister militum per Orientem Stilicho in 387, her elder sister Thermantia to a "general" whose name has not been preserved, and ca. 387 his nephew-in-law Nebridius to Salvina, daughter of the comes Africae Gildo. By the time of his death by illness on 17 January 395, Theodosius had promoted Stilicho from his position as one of the two comites domesticorum under his own eastern administration to that of magister peditum praesentalis in a western administration, in an entirely traditional manner, under his younger son Honorius. Although Stilicho managed to increase the power of the magister peditum praesentalis to the disadvantage of his colleague the magister equitum praesentalis and claimed that Theodosius had appointed him as guardian for both his sons, this tells us more about his cunning and ambition than it does about Theodosius' constitutional arrangements.

Theodosius' importance rests on the fact that he founded a dynasty which continued in power until the death of his grandson Theodosius II in 450. This ensured a continuity of policy which saw the emergence of Nicene Christianity as the orthodox belief of the vast majority of Christians throughout the middle ages. It also ensured the essential destruction of paganism and the emergence of Christianity as the religion of the state, even if the individual steps in this process can be difficult to identify. On the negative side, however, he allowed his dynastic interests and ambitions to lead him into two unnecessary and bloody civil wars which severely weakened the empire's ability to defend itself in the face of continued barbarian pressure upon its frontiers. In this manner, he put the interests of his family before those of the wider Roman population and was responsible, in many ways, for the phenomenon to which we now refer as the fall of the western Roman empire.


Copyright (C) 1998, David Woods.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

There is a nice segue here, as we pick-up John Julius Norwich's summation of the reign of Theodosius, "Readers of this brief account of his career may well find themselves wondering, not so much whether he deserved the title of 'the Great' as how he ever came to acquire it in the first place. If so, however, they may also like to ask themselves another question: what would have been the fate of the Empire if, at that critical moment in its history after the battle of Adrianople, young Gratian had not called him from his Spanish estates and put the future of the East into his hands? . . . the probability is that the whole Empire of the East would have been lost, swallowed up in a revived Gothic kingdom, with effects on world history that defy speculation.

In his civil legislation he showed, again and again, a consideration for the humblest of his subjects that was rare indeed among rulers of the fourth century. What other prince would have decreed that any criminal, sentenced to execution, imprisonment or exile, must first be allowed thirty days' grace to put his affairs in order? Or that a specified part of his worldly goods must go to his children, upon whom their father's crimes must on no account be visited? Or that no farmer should be obliged to sell his produce to the State at a price lower than he would receive on the open market?

Had he earned his title? Not, perhaps, in the way that Constantine had done or as Justinian was to do. But, if not ultimately great himself, he had surely come very close to greatness; and had he reigned as long as they did his achievements might well have equalled theirs. He might even have saved the Western Empire. One thing only is certain: it would be nearly a century and a half before the Romans would look upon his like again" (Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium, the Early Centuries. London: Penguin Group, 1990. 116-7;118).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.



Cleisthenes
Theod1GlrMan.jpg
1505c, Theodosius I, 379 - 395 A.D. (Constantinople)76 viewsTheodosius I (379 - 395 AD) AE3. 388-394 AD, RIC IX 27(a)3, Third Officina. Seventh Period. 20.27 mm. 4.8gm. Near VF with black and earthen patina. Constantinople. Obverse: DN THEODO-SIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, & cuirassed bust right; Reverse: GLORIA-ROMANORVM, Theodosius I standing, facing, holding labarum and globe, CONSB in exergue (scarcer reverse). A Spanish find.



De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

THEODOSIUS I (379-395 A.D.)
David Woods
University College of Cork


Origin and Early Career
Flavius Theodosius was born at Cauca in Spain in about 346 to Thermantia and Theodosius the Elder (so-called to distinguish him from his son). Theodosius the Elder was a senior military officer serving in the Western empire and rose to become the magister equitum praesentalis under the emperor Valentinian I from late 368 until his execution in early 375. As the son of a soldier, Theodosius was legally obliged to enter upon a military career. He seems to have served under his father during his expedition to Britain in 367/8, and was the dux Moesiae Primae by late 374. Unfortunately, great controversy surrounds the rest of his career until Gratian had him hailed as his imperial colleague in succession to the emperor Valens at Sirmium on 19 January 379. It is clear that he was forced to retire home to Spain only to be recalled to active service shortly thereafter, but the circumstances of his forced retirement are shrouded in mystery. His father was executed at roughly the same time, and much speculation has centred on the relationship between these events.

[For a very detailed and interesting discussion of the Foreign Policy of Theodosius and the Civil Wars that plagued his reign, please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/theo1.htm]

Family and Succession
Theodosius married twice. His first wife was the Spanish Aelia Flavia Flaccilla. She bore him Arcadius ca. 377, Honorius on 9 September 384, and Pulcheria ca. 385. Theodosius honoured her with the title of Augusta shortly after his accession, but she died in 386. In late 387 he married Galla, daughter of Valentinian I and full-sister of Valentinian II. She bore him Gratian ca. 388, Galla Placidia ca. 388/390, and died in childbirth in 394, together with her new-born son John. Of his two sons who survived infancy, he appointed Arcadius as Augustus on 19 January 383 and Honorius as Augustus on 23 January 393. His promotion of Arcadius as a full Augustus at an unusually young age points to his determination right from the start that one of his own sons should succeed him. He sought to strengthen Arcadius' position in particular by means of a series of strategic marriages whose purpose was to tie his leading "generals" irrevocably to his dynasty. Hence he married his niece and adoptive daughter Serena to his magister militum per Orientem Stilicho in 387, her elder sister Thermantia to a "general" whose name has not been preserved, and ca. 387 his nephew-in-law Nebridius to Salvina, daughter of the comes Africae Gildo. By the time of his death by illness on 17 January 395, Theodosius had promoted Stilicho from his position as one of the two comites domesticorum under his own eastern administration to that of magister peditum praesentalis in a western administration, in an entirely traditional manner, under his younger son Honorius. Although Stilicho managed to increase the power of the magister peditum praesentalis to the disadvantage of his colleague the magister equitum praesentalis and claimed that Theodosius had appointed him as guardian for both his sons, this tells us more about his cunning and ambition than it does about Theodosius' constitutional arrangements.

Theodosius' importance rests on the fact that he founded a dynasty which continued in power until the death of his grandson Theodosius II in 450. This ensured a continuity of policy which saw the emergence of Nicene Christianity as the orthodox belief of the vast majority of Christians throughout the middle ages. It also ensured the essential destruction of paganism and the emergence of Christianity as the religion of the state, even if the individual steps in this process can be difficult to identify. On the negative side, however, he allowed his dynastic interests and ambitions to lead him into two unnecessary and bloody civil wars which severely weakened the empire's ability to defend itself in the face of continued barbarian pressure upon its frontiers. In this manner, he put the interests of his family before those of the wider Roman population and was responsible, in many ways, for the phenomenon to which we now refer as the fall of the western Roman empire.


Copyright (C) 1998, David Woods.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

There is a nice segue here, as we pick-up John Julius Norwich's summation of the reign of Theodosius, "Readers of this brief account of his career may well find themselves wondering, not so much whether he deserved the title of 'the Great' as how he ever came to acquire it in the first place. If so, however, they may also like to ask themselves another question: what would have been the fate of the Empire if, at that critical moment in its history after the battle of Adrianople, young Gratian had not called him from his Spanish estates and put the future of the East into his hands? . . . the probability is that the whole Empire of the East would have been lost, swallowed up in a revived Gothic kingdom, with effects on world history that defy speculation.

In his civil legislation he showed, again and again, a consideration for the humblest of his subjects that was rare indeed among rulers of the fourth century. What other prince would have decreed that any criminal, sentenced to execution, imprisonment or exile, must first be allowed thirty days' grace to put his affairs in order? Or that a specified part of his worldly goods must go to his children, upon whom their father's crimes must on no account be visited? Or that no farmer should be obliged to sell his produce to the State at a price lower than he would receive on the open market?

Had he earned his title? Not, perhaps, in the way that Constantine had done or as Justinian was to do. But, if not ultimately great himself, he had surely come very close to greatness; and had he reigned as long as they did his achievements might well have equalled theirs. He might even have saved the Western Empire. One thing only is certain: it would be nearly a century and a half before the Romans would look upon his like again" (Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium, the Early Centuries. London: Penguin Group, 1990. 116-7;118).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
1791_Leeds_Halfpenny.JPG
1791 AE Halfpenny Token. Leeds, Yorkshire.31 viewsObverse: ARTIS NOSTRÆ CONDITOR •. Standing figure of Bishop Blaize (patron saint of woolcombers) holding a wool comb in his raised right hand and a book and crosier in his left; at his feet, to right, a lamb facing right with it's head turned to left.
Reverse: LEEDS HALFPENNY 1791. Coat of arms of the City of Leeds consisting of a shield containing three stars and a hanging fleece, crested by an owl. The date, 17 - 91, bisected by the base of the shield.
Edge: “PAYABLE AT THE WAREHOUSE OF RICHARD PALEY •XX•".
Diameter: 29mm | Axis: 6
Dalton & Hamer: 45 | Conder: 20 (Yorkshire)

This token was issued by Richard Paley, a freeholder, maltster, soap-boiler and chandler with a business in a locality known as the “Calls” in Leeds. The token was manufactured by Matthew Bolton at his SOHO Mint in Birmingham, the dies were engraved by Henry Brownbill.

Bishop Blaise, also known as Saint Blasius, was a well-known martyr from Armenia, who as the price of his faith, back in the 4th century, had been put to death by being raked with red-hot rakes. Later he was adopted as the Patron Saint of Woolcombers and, appropriately, his effigy is usually shown holding a rake. On this token, however, Bishop Blaise is shown holding the traditional bishop's crosier.
*Alex
1792_YARMOUTH_HALFPENNY.JPG
1792 AE Halfpenny Token. Yarmouth, Norfolk.23 viewsObverse: LET YARMOUTH FLOURISH :. Coat of Arms of Yarmouth over crossed sprigs of oak. Small incuse rosette countermark in field to right of shield. The Coat of Arms combines three lion's heads from the Royal Arms with the tails of three silver herrings, believed to come from the original arms of Yarmouth.
Reverse: YARMOUTH HALFPENNY. Three masted ship sailing right; 1792, in panel below.
Edge: PAYABLE AT THE GLASS WAREHOUSE OF W. ABSOLON • X •.
Diameter 29mm | Die Axis 6
Dalton & Hamer: 52

This token was issued by William Absolon (1751 – 1815), a British ceramist who, from 1784, sold English and foreign china and glass but also later offered gilding, enameling and painting services at his shop, No 4, at the lower end of Market Row in Yarmouth.
Absolon bought in wares from the Wedgewood, Davenport, Turner and Staffordshire factories, which he then decorated. He painted dessert services with botanical subjects with the Latin name of the plant inscribed on the plate or dish and also his mark; Absolon Yarm and No 25. He also decorated Turner Ware and Cream Ware Jugs adding mottoes, such as; a Trifle from Yarmouth, or Success to the Trade. Absolon died in 1815 and although his business continued, the quality declined. Today, his work attracts high prices at auction.
*Alex
s-1946-2c.jpg
1946a JOHN II METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1946 DOC 13 CLBC 3.4.219 views1946 JOHN II METROPOLITIAN TETARTERON S-1946 DOC 13 CLBC 3.4.2

OBV Bust of Virgin nimbate, orans, wearing tunic and maphorion.

REV Full length figure of Emperor wearing stemma, divitision, collar piece and jeweled loros of a simplified type. Holds in r. hand jeweled scepter and in l. hand gl. cr.

Size

Weight

Cosmopolitan Issue were minted in Constantinople, each of these coins had an added silver content of 3% and were also issued with a very light silver wash (Silver traces are common on Cosmopolitan issues but intact fully silvered coins are very rare.) These more than likely were tariffed at a higher rate than the Thessalonica issues that have been shown to have no silver content. Cosmopolitan issue are in general far scarcer than the Thessalonica issues.

DOC lists 9 examples with weights from 2.97gm to 4.57gm and sizes from 17mm to 20mm

Very old example in my collection, would grade as only fine. These coins rarely come to market and when they do the design does not command a high price. Mary was the patron of Constantinople, she is seen in much of the coinage minted there.
Simon
BOTLAUREL_2011.JPG
201151 viewsTHIS YEAR'S WINNERS
CLICK ON A COIN FOR ITS DETAILS

*Alex
2014-105-4_AE18MacedoniaAlexanderIIIClubBowInCase-Forum.jpg
2014.105.437 viewsAlexander III, The Great, Uncertain Macedonian Mint (336-323 BC)

AE18; 5.91 g; 6h

Obverse: Head of Heracles right, wearing lion's skin.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, between club and bow in case.
Ref: Price 266; SNG Munich Part 10/11 827;
1 commentsgordian_guy
2014-105-5_AE15MacedoniaAlexanderIIIHorseRight-Forum.jpg
2014.105.534 viewsAlexander III, The Great, Uncertain Macedonian Mint (336-323 BC)

AE15; 3.66 g; 7h

Obverse: Male head right, wearing Taenia.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝ[ΔΡΟΥ]; Horse advancing right. Below E.
Ref: Price 356;
2 commentsgordian_guy
2014-105-6_AE18AsiaMinorAlexanderTheGreatBowInCaseClub-Forum.jpg
2014.105.634 viewsAlexander III, The Great, Uncertain Mint Western Asia Minor (c. 323 - c. 310 BC)

AE18; 5.71 g; 3h

Obverse: Head of Heracles right, wearing lion's skin.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, between bow in decorated case and club, torch to left in exergue.
Ref: Price 2800(f); SNG Munich 919;
1 commentsgordian_guy
2014-141-2_ARDrachmMiletosAlexanderTheGreatZerus-Forum.jpg
2014.141.241 viewsAlexander III, The Great, Miletos

AR Drachm; 20 mm; 4.00 g; 3h

Obverse: Head of Heracles right, wearing lion's skin.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ; downward in right filed, Monogram in left field; Zeus seated left, holding eagle, standing right, in extended right hand; scepter in left.
Ref: Price 2151(a) [3h die axis]
1 commentsgordian_guy
2014-141-3_AE18_TarsusAlexanderTheGreatClubBowinBowcase-Forum.jpg
2014.141.327 viewsAlexander III, The Great, Tarsus

AE18; 5.60 g; 9h

Obverse: Head of Heracles right, wearing lion's skin, before Caduceus.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, between club and bow in case; above Caduceus, to left.
Ref: Price 3058; cf SNG Cop 1046-1047;
gordian_guy
22-Celtic-Alex-tet.jpg
22. Celtic Alexander Tetradrachm (?)41 viewsTetradrachm, ca 2'nd century BC, Danube region.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ / Zeus sitting, holding his attendant eagle and sceptre. Tripod at left.
17.25 gm., 28 mm.

In researching this coin, I found five coins which are from the same pair of dies as this one. These are the only examples of this type (tripod on reverse) that I've been able to find.

1. Palladium sale #10 (Nov. 1995), attributed to the mint at Pella and catalogued as Muller #146.

2. Palladium sale #11 (April 1996), described as "unlisted in Price, and apparently unknown before a recent hoard find. Variant of Price 633."

3. CNG sale #54, lot 99, described as a Celtic imitation of Alexander's coinage from the Danube region, ca 2'nd century BC. c.f. Goble, OTA, 566. This is the coin pictured above.

4. CNG sale #72, lot 13, described as "Celtic, Lower Danube, uncertain tribe, early 3'rd century BC . . . . Unpublished in the standard references . . . . By virtue of its style, fabric, and weight, this Alexander imitation is certainly an early issue, probably struck during the first decades of the third century BC."

5. Harlan J Berk 156th Buy or Bid Sale (Oct. 2007), lot 75, described as "Possibly unpublished . . . Somewhat unusual style on the obverse."

Five coins from the same pair or dies, five different attributions. I will agree, though, with the last statement of coin #4 above, that this appears to be an early issue. This coin is on a thick flan resembling coins minted during Alexander's lifetime and immediately thereafter and is made from good silver. There is something a bit barbaric about the style of this coin, although there are genuine Alexander coins listed and pictured in Martin J. Price's book which are more barbaric than this one. An interesting coin.
1 commentsCallimachus
24-Seleukos-I.jpg
24. Seleukos I.96 viewsTetradrachm, ca 305 - 304 BC, Seleuceia ad Tigram mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΟΣ ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ / Zeus sitting, holding his attendant eagle and sceptre. Monogram at left, ΔΙ under throne.
16.93 gm., 26 mm.
Houghton #941; ESM #4; BMC 4.1, 5.

In Eastern Seleucid Mints, E.T. Newell has this coin in Series 1, Group A. He suggests a date of 305 - 304 BC. Martin J. Price lists a coin in the name of Alexander the Great (#3784) with the exact same monograms. He suggests a date of ca 295 BC for the coin, but admits the whole attribution is very tentative.
2 commentsCallimachus
a_054.JPG
319-310 BC Philip III 25 viewsPhilip III Arrhidaeus
Drachm Colophon

Obverse:Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
Reverse:FILIPPOY ;Zeus on throne;Lyre left throne

17.20mm 4.02gm

Price P 43a
maik
g_082.JPG
323-317 BC Philip III 38 viewsPhilip III Arrhidaeus
Tetradrachm Babylon

Obverse:Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
Reverse:ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ;Zeus on throne;M left throne, LY under throne

25.93mm 17.00 g
PRICE P 181b
maik
a_005.JPG
323-317 BC Philip III 36 viewsPhilip III Arrhidaeus
AE 1/4 Unit Salamis Cyprus 323-317 BC

Obverse:Head of Herakles wearing lions skin right
Reverse:Bow at bow case and club;ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ at canter;caduceus above

1.27gm 10.95mm

Price P131; rare
maik
a_003.JPG
323-317 BC Philip III 39 viewsPhilip III Arrhidaeus
AE Unit Miletos 323-317 BC

Obverse:Head of Apollo wearing tainia right
Reverse:ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ;Horseman galloping right; double axe at left;monogram below

5.29gm 19.26mm

Price P64;SNG ANS 1003-1004;SNG München 981-984
1 commentsmaik
a_042.JPG
323-317 BC Philip III 36 viewsPhilip III Arrhidaeus
Tetradrachm Babylon

Obverse:Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
Reverse:FILIPPOY BASILEOS;Zeus on throne;M left throne, LY under throne

25.24mm 17.12gm

Price P181b
maik
s007.jpg
323-317 BC Philip III16 viewsPhilip III Arrhidaeus
Drachm Colophon

Obverse:Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
Reverse:Zeus on throne;ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ;Monogram at left field

17.57mm 4.17gm


PRICE P 46c
maik
g_086.JPG
323-317 BC Philip III Aridaios 15 viewsPhilip III Aridaios
Drachm Colophon

Obverse:Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
Reverse:Zeus on throne;FILIPPOY;Monogram at left field

16.41mm 4.03g
PRICE P 46c
maik
3210034.jpg
324-323 BC, Alexander the great, AR Didrachm 18mm 8.18 g 3h65 viewsBabylon mint,head of Herakles right,wearing lion skin.Rev Zeus Aetophoros seated left,M in left field,.Struck under Stamenes or Archon circa 324/3 BC very rare.
From the last issue of Alexanders lifetime coinage in the city where he died,contemporary with his dekadrachm issue.
1 commentsGrant H
sht_014.JPG
48 BC Ancient Greece Aeolis - Kyme Silver Hemiobol Coin49 viewsAncient Greece 48 B.C Aeolis - Kyme Silver Hemiobol Coin Finest & Rare type
For auction, an original & finest, scarce type, Ancient central Greece issue of the Aeolis region - issued within the city of Kyme, circa 48 BC, solid Silver composition, hemiobol type Coin. The coin is presented in VF ( very fine ) grade. Some very slight spend ware on both obverse & reverse. See KrAuse world coins price guide & Spink Coins 2010 Catalogues. Even better in hand. The coin has not been chemically cleaned.
Obverse : Head of eagle left, K in left field.
Reverse : Quadripartite incuse square.
Classical and hellenistic periods
Specification. ORIGINAL - Uncleaned
0.46 grams weight
Silver Composition
8.0 mm diameter
Scarce issue / finest state
2458
SOLD
Antonio Protti
01860q00.jpg
604. Leo I378 viewsImperator Caesar Flavius Valerius Leo Augustus or Leo I of the Byzantine Empire (401–474), reigned from 457 to 474, also known as Leo the Thracian, was the last of a series of emperors placed on the throne by Aspar, the Alan serving as commander-in-chief of the army. His coronation as emperor on February 7, 457, was the first known to involve the Patriarch of Constantinople. Leo I made an alliance with the Isaurians and was thus able to eliminate Aspar. The price of the alliance was the marriage of Leo's daughter to Tarasicodissa, leader of the Isaurians who, as Zeno, became emperor in 474.

During Leo's reign, the Balkans were ravaged time and again by the West Goths and the Huns. However, these attackers were unable to take Constantinople thanks to the walls which had been rebuilt and reinforced in the reign of Theodosius II and against which they possessed no suitable siege engines.

Leo's reign was also noteworthy for his influence in the Western Roman Empire, marked by his appointment of Anthemius as Western Roman Emperor in 467. He attempted to build on this political achievement with an expedition against the Vandals in 468, which was defeated due to the treachery and incompetence of Leo's brother-in-law Basiliscus. This disaster drained the Empire of men and money.

Leo's greatest influence in the West was largely inadvertent and at second-hand: the great Goth king Theodoric the Great was raised at the Leo's court in Constantinople, where he was steeped in Roman government and military tactics, which served him well when he returned after Leo's death to become the Goth ruler of a mixed but largely Romanized people.

Leo also published a New Constitutions or compilation of Law Code[1], Constitution LV concerned Judaism: "JEWS SHALL LIVE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE RITES OF CHRISTIANITY. Those who formerly were invested with Imperial authority promulgated various laws with reference to the Hebrew people, who, once nourished by Divine protection, became renowned, but are now remarkable for the calamities inflicted upon them because of their contumacy towards Christ and God; and these laws, while regulating their mode of life, compelled them to read the Holy Scriptures, and ordered them not to depart from the ceremonies of their worship. They also provided that their children should adhere to their religion, being obliged to do so as well by the ties of blood, as on account of the institution of circumcision. These are the laws which I have already stated were formerly enforced throughout the Empire. But the Most Holy Sovereign from whom We are descended, more concerned than his predecessors for the salvation of the Jews, instead of allowing them (as they did) to obey only their ancient laws, attempted, by the interpretation of prophesies and the conclusions which he drew from them, to convert them to the Christian religion, by means of the vivifying water of baptism. He fully succeeded in his attempts to transform them into new men, according to the doctrine of Christ, and induced them to denounce their ancient doctrines and abandon their religious ceremonies, such as circumcision, the observance of the Sabbath, and all their other rites. But although he, to a certain extent, overcame the obstinacy of the Jews, he was unable to force them to abolish the laws which permitted them to live in accordance with their ancient customs. Therefore We, desiring to accomplish what Our Father failed to effect, do hereby annul all the old laws enacted with reference to the Hebrews, and We order that they shall not dare to live in any other manner than in accordance with the rules established by the pure and salutary Christian Faith. And if anyone of them should be proved to, have neglected to observe the ceremonies of the Christian religion, and to have returned to his former practices, he shall pay the penalty prescribed by the law for apostates."

Leo died of dysentery at the age of 73 on January 18, 474.

Bronze AE4, RIC 671, S 4340 var, VG, 1.17g, 10.3mm, 180o, Alexandria mint, obverse D N LEO P F AVG (or similar), pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Lion standing left, head right, cross above, ALEA in ex; very rare (R3); ex Forum
ecoli73
VespasianPax_RICii10.jpg
710a, Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.132 viewsSilver denarius, RIC II, 10, aVF, 3.5 g, 18mm, Rome mint, 69-71 AD; Obverse: IMP CAESA[R] VESPASIANV[S AV]G - Laureate head right; Reverse: COS ITER [T]R POT - Pax seated left holding branch and caduceus. Ex Imperial Coins.


De Imperatoribus Romanis:
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Titus Flavius Vespasianus (A.D. 69-79)

John Donahue
College of William and Mary

Introduction

Titus Flavius Vespasianus (b. A.D. 9, d. A.D. 79, emperor A.D. 69-79) restored peace and stability to an empire in disarray following the death of Nero in A.D. 68. In the process he established the Flavian dynasty as the legitimate successor to the Imperial throne. Although we lack many details about the events and chronology of his reign, Vespasian provided practical leadership and a return to stable government - accomplishments which, when combined with his other achievements, make his emperorship particularly notable within the history of the Principate.

Early Life and Career

Vespasian was born at Falacrina near Sabine Reate on 17 November, A.D. 9, the son of T. Flavius Sabinus, a successful tax collector and banker, and Vespasia Polla. Both parents were of equestrian status. Few details of his first fifteen years survive, yet it appears that his father and mother were often away from home on business for long periods. As a result, Vespasian's early education became the responsibility of his paternal grandmother, Tertulla. [[1]] In about A.D. 25 Vespasian assumed the toga virilis and later accepted the wearing of the latus clavus, and with it the senatorial path that his older brother, T. Flavius Sabinus, had already chosen. [[2]] Although many of the particulars are lacking, the posts typically occupied by one intent upon a senatorial career soon followed: a military tribunate in Thrace, perhaps for three or four years; a quaestorship in Crete-Cyrene; and the offices of aedile and praetor, successively, under the emperor Gaius. [[3]]

It was during this period that Vespasian married Flavia Domitilla. Daughter of a treasury clerk and former mistress of an African knight, Flavia lacked the social standing and family connections that the politically ambitious usually sought through marriage. In any case, the couple produced three children, a daughter, also named Flavia Domitilla, and two sons, the future emperors Titus and Domitian . Flavia did not live to witness her husband's emperorship and after her death Vespasian returned to his former mistress Caenis, who had been secretary to Antonia (daughter of Marc Antony and mother of Claudius). Caenis apparently exerted considerable influence over Vespasian, prompting Suetonius to assert that she remained his wife in all but name, even after he became emperor. [[4]]

Following the assassination of Gaius on 24 January, A.D. 41, Vespasian advanced rapidly, thanks in large part to the new princeps Claudius, whose favor the Flavians had wisely secured with that of Antonia, the mother of Germanicus, and of Claudius' freedmen, especially Narcissus. [[5]] The emperor soon dispatched Vespasian to Argentoratum (Strasbourg) as legatus legionis II Augustae, apparently to prepare the legion for the invasion of Britain. Vespasian first appeared at the battle of Medway in A.D. 43, and soon thereafter led his legion across the south of England, where he engaged the enemy thirty times in battle, subdued two tribes, and conquered the Isle of Wight. According to Suetonius, these operations were conducted partly under Claudius and partly under Vespasian's commander, Aulus Plautius. Vespasian's contributions, however, did not go unnoticed; he received the ornamenta triumphalia and two priesthoods from Claudius for his exploits in Britain. [[6]]

By the end of A.D. 51 Vespasian had reached the consulship, the pinnacle of a political career at Rome. For reasons that remain obscure he withdrew from political life at this point, only to return when chosen proconsul of Africa about A.D. 63-64. His subsequent administration of the province was marked by severity and parsimony, earning him a reputation for being scrupulous but unpopular. [[7]] Upon completion of his term, Vespasian returned to Rome where, as a senior senator, he became a man of influence in the emperor Nero's court. [[8]] Important enough to be included on Nero's tour of Greece in A.D. 66-67, Vespasian soon found himself in the vicinity of increasing political turbulence in the East. The situation would prove pivotal in advancing his career.

Judaea and the Accession to Power

In response to rioting in Caesarea and Jerusalem that had led to the slaughter in the latter city of Jewish leaders and Roman soldiers, Nero granted to Vespasian in A.D. 66 a special command in the East with the objective of settling the revolt in Judaea. By spring A.D. 67, with 60,000 legionaries, auxiliaries, and allies under his control, Vespasian set out to subdue Galilee and then to cut off Jerusalem. Success was quick and decisive. By October all of Galilee had been pacified and plans for the strategic encirclement of Jerusalem were soon formed. [[9]] Meanwhile, at the other end of the empire, the revolts of Gaius Iulius Vindex, governor of Gallia Lugdunensis, and Servius Sulpicius Galba , governor of Hispania Tarraconensis, had brought Nero's reign to the brink of collapse. The emperor committed suicide in June, A.D. 68, thereby ensuring chaos for the next eighteen months, as first Galba and then Marcus Salvius Otho and Aulus Vitellius acceded to power. Each lacked broad-based military and senatorial support; each would be violently deposed in turn. [[10]]

Still occupied with plans against Jerusalem, Vespasian swore allegiance to each emperor. Shortly after Vitellius assumed power in spring, A.D. 69, however, Vespasian met on the border of Judaea and Syria with Gaius Licinius Mucianus, governor of Syria, and after a series of private and public consultations, the two decided to revolt. [[11]] On July 1, at the urging of Tiberius Alexander, prefect of Egypt, the legions of Alexandria declared for Vespasian, as did the legions of Judaea two days later. By August all of Syria and the Danube legions had done likewise. Vespasian next dispatched Mucianus to Italy with 20,000 troops, while he set out from Syria to Alexandria in order to control grain shipments for the purpose of starving Italy into submission. [[12]] The siege of Jerusalem he placed in the hands of his son Titus.

Meanwhile, the Danubian legions, unwilling to wait for Mucianus' arrival, began their march against Vitellius ' forces. The latter army, suffering from a lack of discipline and training, and unaccustomed to the heat of Rome, was defeated at Cremona in late October. [[13]] By mid-December the Flavian forces had reached Carsulae, 95 kilometers north of Rome on the Flaminian Road, where the Vitellians, with no further hope of reinforcements, soon surrendered. At Rome, unable to persuade his followers to accept terms for his abdication, Vitellius was in peril. On the morning of December 20 the Flavian army entered Rome. By that afternoon, the emperor was dead. [[14]]

Tacitus records that by December 22, A.D. 69, Vespasian had been given all the honors and privileges usually granted to emperors. Even so, the issue remains unclear, owing largely to a surviving fragment of an enabling law, the lex de imperio Vespasiani, which conferred powers, privileges, and exemptions, most with Julio-Claudian precedents, on the new emperor. Whether the fragment represents a typical granting of imperial powers that has uniquely survived in Vespasian's case, or is an attempt to limit or expand such powers, remains difficult to know. In any case, the lex sanctioned all that Vespasian had done up to its passing and gave him authority to act as he saw fit on behalf of the Roman people. [[15]]

What does seem clear is that Vespasian felt the need to legitimize his new reign with vigor. He zealously publicized the number of divine omens that predicted his accession and at every opportunity he accumulated multiple consulships and imperial salutations. He also actively promoted the principle of dynastic succession, insisting that the emperorship would fall to his son. The initiative was fulfilled when Titus succeeded his father in A.D. 79.[[16]]

Emperorship

Upon his arrival in Rome in late summer, A.D. 70, Vespasian faced the daunting task of restoring a city and a government ravaged by the recent civil wars. Although many particulars are missing, a portrait nevertheles emerges of a ruler conscientiously committed to the methodical renewal of both city and empire. Concerning Rome itself, the emperor encouraged rebuilding on vacated lots, restored the Capitol (burned in A.D. 69), and also began work on several new buildings: a temple to the deified Claudius on the Caelian Hill, a project designed to identify Vespasian as a legitimate heir to the Julio-Claudians, while distancing himself from Nero ; a temple of Peace near the Forum; and the magnificent Colosseum (Flavian Amphitheatre), located on the site of the lake of Nero 's Golden House. [[17]]

Claiming that he needed forty thousand million sesterces for these projects and for others aimed at putting the state on more secure footing, Vespasian is said to have revoked various imperial immunities, manipulated the supply of certain commodities to inflate their price, and increased provincial taxation. [[18]] The measures are consistent with his characterization in the sources as both obdurate and avaricious. There were occasional political problems as well: Helvidius Priscus, an advocate of senatorial independence and a critic of the Flavian regime from the start, was exiled after A.D. 75 and later executed; Marcellus Eprius and A. Alienus Caecina were condemned by Titus for conspiracy, the former committing suicide, the latter executed in A.D. 79.
As Suetonius claims, however, in financial matters Vespasian always put revenues to the best possible advantage, regardless of their source. Tacitus, too, offers a generally favorable assessment, citing Vespasian as the first man to improve after becoming emperor. [[19]] Thus do we find the princeps offering subventions to senators not possessing the property qualifications of their rank, restoring many cities throughout the empire, and granting state salaries for the first time to teachers of Latin and Greek rhetoric. To enhance Roman economic and social life even further, he encouraged theatrical productions by building a new stage for the Theatre of Marcellus, and he also put on lavish state dinners to assist the food trades. [[20]]

In other matters the emperor displayed similar concern. He restored the depleted ranks of the senatorial and equestrian orders with eligible Italian and provincial candidates and reduced the backlog of pending court cases at Rome. Vespasian also re-established discipline in the army, while punishing or dismissing large numbers of Vitellius ' men. [[21]]
Beyond Rome, the emperor increased the number of legions in the East and continued the process of imperial expansion by the annexation of northern England, the pacification of Wales, and by advances into Scotland and southwest Germany between the Rhine and the Danube. Vespasian also conferred rights on communities abroad, especially in Spain, where the granting of Latin rights to all native communities contributed to the rapid Romanization of that province during the Imperial period. [[22]]

Death and Assessment

In contrast to his immediate imperial predecessors, Vespasian died peacefully - at Aquae Cutiliae near his birthplace in Sabine country on 23 June, A.D. 79, after contracting a brief illness. The occasion is said to have inspired his deathbed quip: "Oh my, I must be turning into a god!" [[23]] In fact, public deification did follow his death, as did his internment in the Mausoleum of Augustus alongside the Julio-Claudians.

A man of strict military discipline and simple tastes, Vespasian proved to be a conscientious and generally tolerant administrator. More importantly, following the upheavals of A.D. 68-69, his reign was welcome for its general tranquility and restoration of peace. In Vespasian Rome found a leader who made no great breaks with tradition, yet his ability ro rebuild the empire and especially his willingness to expand the composition of the governing class helped to establish a positive working model for the "good emperors" of the second century.

Bibliography

Since the scholarship on Vespasian is more comprehensive than can be treated here, the works listed below are main accounts or bear directly upon issues discussed in the entry above. A comprehensive modern anglophone study of this emperor is yet to be produced.

Atti congresso internazionale di studi Flaviani, 2 vols. Rieti, 1983.

Atti congresso internazionale di studi Vespasianei, 2 vols. Rieti, 1981.

Bosworth, A.B. "Vespasian and the Provinces: Some Problems of the Early 70s A.D." Athenaeum 51 (1973): 49-78.

Brunt, P. A. "Lex de imperio Vespasiani." JRS (67) 1977: 95-116.

D'Espèrey, S. Franchet. "Vespasien, Titus et la littérature." ANRW II.32.5: 3048-3086.

Dudley, D. and Webster, G. The Roman Conquest of Britain. London, 1965.

Gonzalez, J. "The Lex Irnitana: A New Copy of the Flavian Municipal Law." JRS 76 (1986): 147-243.

Grant, M. The Roman Emperors: A Biographical Guide to the Rulers of Rome, 31 B.C. - A.D. 476. New York, 1985.

Homo, L. Vespasien, l'Empereur du bons sens (69-79 ap. J.-C.). Paris, 1949.

Levi, M.A. "I Flavi." ANRW II.2: 177-207.

McCrum, M. and Woodhead, A. G. Select Documents of the Principates of the Flavian Emperors Including the Year of the Revolution. Cambridge, 1966.

Nicols, John. Vespasian and the Partes Flavianae. Wiesbaden, 1978.

Scarre, C. Chronicle of the Roman Emperors. The Reign-by-Reign Record of the Rulers of Imperial Rome. London, 1995.

Suddington, D. B. The Development of the Roman Auxiliary Forces from Caesar to Vespasian, 49 B.C. - A.D. 79. Harare: U. of Zimbabwe, 1982.

Syme, R. Tacitus. Oxford, 1958.

Wardel, David. "Vespasian, Helvidius Priscus and the Restoration of the Capitol." Historia 45 (1996): 208-222.

Wellesley, K. The Long Year: A.D. 69. Bristol, 1989, 2nd ed.


Notes

[[1]] Suet. Vesp. 2.1. Suetonius remains the major source but see also Tac. Hist. 2-5; Cass. Dio 65; Joseph. BJ 3-4.

[[2]] Suetonius (Vesp. 2.1) claims that Vespasian did not accept the latus clavus, the broad striped toga worn by one aspiring to a senatorial career, immediately. The delay, however, was perhaps no more than three years. See J. Nicols, Vespasian and the Partes Flavianae (Wiesbaden, 1978), 2.

[[3]] Military tribunate and quaestorship: Suet. Vesp. 2.3; aedileship: ibid., 5.3, in which Gaius, furious that Vespasian had not kept the streets clean, as was his duty, ordered some soldiers to load him with filth;,they complied by stuffing his toga with as much as it could hold. See also Dio 59.12.2-3; praetorship: Suet. Vesp. 2.3, in which Vespasian is depicted as one of Gaius' leading adulators, an account consistent with Tacitus' portrayal (Hist 1.50.4; 2.5.1) of his early career. For a more complete discussion of these posts and attendant problems of dating, see Nicols, Vespasian, 2-7.

[[4]] Marriage and Caenis: Suet. Vesp. 3; Cass. Dio 65.14.

[[5]] Nicols, Vespasian, 12-39.

[[6]] Suet. Vesp. 4.1 For additional details on Vespasian's exploits in Britain, see D. Dudley and G. Webster, The Roman Conquest of Britain (London, 1965), 55 ff., 98.

[[7]] Concerning Vespasian's years between his consulship and proconsulship, see Suet. Vesp. 4.2 and Nicols, Vespasian, 9. On his unpopularity in Africa, see Suet. Vesp. 4.3, an account of a riot at Hadrumentum, where he was once pelted with turnips. In recording that Africa supported Vitellius in A.D. 69, Tacitus too suggests popular dissatisfaction with Vespasian's proconsulship. See Hist. 2.97.2.

[[8]] This despite the fact that the sources record two rebukes of Vespasian, one for extorting money from a young man seeking career advancement (Suet. Vesp. 4.3), the other for either leaving the room or dozing off during one of the emperor's recitals (Suet. Vesp. 4.4 and 14, which places the transgression in Greece; Tac. (Ann. 16.5.3), who makes Rome and the Quinquennial Games of A.D. 65 the setting; A. Braithwaite, C. Suetoni Tranquilli Divus Vespasianus, Oxford, 1927, 30, who argues for both Greece and Rome).

[[9]] Subjugation of Galilee: Joseph. BJ 3.65-4.106; siege of Jerusalem: ibid., 4.366-376, 414.

[[10]] Revolt of Vindex: Suet. Nero 40; Tac. Ann. 14.4; revolt of Galba: Suet. Galba 10; Plut. Galba, 4-5; suicide of Nero: Suet. Nero 49; Cass. Dio 63.29.2. For the most complete account of the period between Nero's death and the accession of Vespasian, see K. Wellesley, The Long Year: A.D. 69, 2nd. ed. (Bristol, 1989).

[[11]] Tac. Hist. 2.76.

[[12]] Troops in support of Vespasian: Suet. Vit. 15; Mucianus and his forces: Tac. Hist. 2.83; Vespasian and grain shipments: Joseph. BJ 4.605 ff.; see also Tac. Hist. 3.48, on Vespasian's possible plan to shut off grain shipments to Italy from Carthage as well.

[[13]] On Vitellius' army and its lack of discipline, see Tac. Hist. 2.93-94; illness of army: ibid., 2.99.1; Cremona: ibid., 3.32-33.

[[14]] On Vitellius' last days, see Tac. Hist. 3.68-81. On the complicated issue of Vitellius' death date, see L. Holzapfel, "Römische Kaiserdaten," Klio 13 (1913): 301.

[[15]] Honors, etc. Tac. Hist. 4.3. For more on the lex de imperio Vespasiani, see P. A. Brunt, "Lex de imperio Vespasiani," JRS (67) 1977: 95-116.

[[16]] Omens: Suet. Vesp. 5; consulships and honors: ibid., 8; succession of sons: ibid., 25.

[[17]] On Vespasian's restoration of Rome, see Suet. Vesp. 9; Cass. Dio 65.10; D. Wardel, "Vespasian, Helvidius Priscus and the Restoration of the Capitol," Historia 45 (1996): 208-222.

[[18]] Suet. Vesp. 16.

[[19]] Ibid.; Tac. Hist. 1.50.

[[20]] Suet. Vesp. 17-19.

[[21]] Ibid., 8-10.

[[22]] On Vespasian's exploits in Britain, see esp. Tac., Agricola, eds. R. M. Ogilvie and I. A. Richmond (1967), and W. S. Hanson, Agricola and the Conquest of the North (1987); on the granting of Latin rights in Spain, see, e.g., J. Gonzalez, "The Lex Irnitana: a New Copy of the Flavian Municipal Law." JRS 76 (1986): 147-243.

[[23]] For this witticism and other anecdotes concerning Vespasian's sense of humor, see Suet. Vesp. 23.

Copyright (C) 1998, John Donahue. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis, an Online Encyplopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/vespasia.htm
Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.





Cleisthenes
Price-1690.jpg
Aeolis, Temnos: Magistrates Echenikos and Geitas (ca. 150-143 BCE) AR Tetradrachm (Price 1690)19 viewsObv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, EXENI/KOΣ in two lines above oinochoe within vine tendril; ΓEI/TAΣ in two lines below throne
Quant.Geek
alex_mac.JPG
Alexander III 67 viewsMacedonian AE18 - Price 2102Ghengis_Jon
v_048.JPG
Alexander III31 viewsAlexander III the Great 356 BC
Bronze Hemitetartemorio Cyprus

Obverse:Head of Alexander the great as Herakles,wearing lions skin
Reverse:Club and quiver between ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ

10.88mm 1.45gm



PRICE bronze
maik
g_095.JPG
Alexander III56 viewsAlexander the great
AE17 336-323 b.c

Obverse:Head of Alexander as Herakles right
Reverse:ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ across field;above club; bow in cases ; down Π

17.33mm 6.76gm

PRICE 311 ;SEAR 6739 ;(Drama hoard)
maik
b_032.JPG
Alexander III45 viewsAlexander the great
AE17 336-323 BC
Obverse:Head of Alexander the Great as Herakles wearing lion's skin
Reverse:Club and quiver between ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ ;A below

16.52mm 6.04gm

Price 332
maik
13.jpg
Alexander III 88 viewsAlexander the Great 328-320 b.c
Tetradrachm
ARADOS

Obverse:Head of Alexander as Herakles wearing lions skin
Reverse:Zeus Aetophoros on throne;ALEXANDROU BASILEOS;caduceus left throne,AP under

26.95mm 16.81g
PRICE:3332

Why it is here?I don't like it

I bought it (2005) as original 300euro from not blacklisted seller.
1 commentsmaik
v_058.JPG
Alexander III26 viewsAlexander III the Great 356 BC
Amathus Cyprus 325-323 BC

Obverse:Head of Alexander the Great as Herakles wearing lions skin.
Reverse:Bow in bow-case and club;ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ;Eagle flying left below

15.41mm 5.08gm

Price 3090, Tziampazis 39/12
maik
003~0.JPG
Alexander III31 viewsAlexander III the Great 356 b.c
AE 17 After 325-310 b.c

Obverse:Head of Alexander the Great as Herakles wearing lions skin
Reverse:Bow in bow-case and club;B-A at center;Ivy leaf? at lower field

17.40mm 5.24gm

Price 383


maik
001~0.JPG
Alexander III24 viewsAlexander III the Great 356 b.c
AE 17 325-310 b.c

Obverse:Head of Alexander the Great as Herakles wearing lions skin
Reverse:Bow in bow-case and club; B-A at center; Thunderbolt in lower field

17.72mm 4.99gm

Price 376e
maik
a_048.JPG
Alexander III 29 viewsAlexander the Great
Ae 1/2 Amphipolis 325-310 B.C

Obverse:Macedonian shield with thunderbolt at center
Reverse:B-A ;Macedonian helmet; monogram below.

15.88mm 4.12gm

Price 413
Struck under Antipater, Polyperchon or Kassander
maik
a_071.JPG
Alexander III35 viewsAlexander the great
AE 17 336-323 BC

Obverse:Head of Alexander the Great as Herakles wearing lion's skin
Reverse:Club and quiver between ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ;Δ in upper field;ivy lief? below

16.70mm 6.00gm

Price 283b
maik
l_063.JPG
Alexander III35 viewsAlexander III the Great 356 b.c
Bronze Macedonia 336-323 b.c

Obverse:Head of Alexander the Great as Herakles wearing lions skin.
Reverse:Bow in bow-case,club;ALEXANDROU at center;PI in upper field

16.73mm 5.75gm

Price 310 (Drama hoard) ; Sear 6739
maik
l_061.JPG
Alexander III29 viewsAlexander The Great 356-323 b.c
AE15 1/2 Unit 325-310 b.c

Obverse:Macedonian sheild with thunderbolt at center
Reverse:B - A either side of Crested Macedonian helmet;Trident below

14.96mm 3.69gm

PRICE 420
1 commentsmaik
artet1.JPG
Alexander III538 viewsAlexander III AR Tetradrachm. ‘Amphipolis’ mint. Struck under Kassander, circa 316-314 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; shield in left field, pellet-in-Π below throne. 17.1 g.

Price 136; Troxell, Studies, issue L8.

Thanks for the atribution Lloyd!


Most lifetime issues of Alexander the Great were usualy bulky/thick, which did not alow for the entire design of the die to imprint on the coin. IMO looked better then the wide thin flan. (edit: though this one is Struck under Kassander)

The coin was hand stuck with a die/avil. Dies were usually made of Bronze because it was sofeter and easier to work with then iron, (though some were made of iron as well) then the was anealed to make it stronger and less brittle.

The planchets were made by pouring molten metal into a mold and saved until needed. When it was ready to be used, they heated it just below melting point and placed it between the dies and the punch die was struck with a hammer.


-----------------------------


"Building upon his father's success in Greece, Alexander III (Alexander the Great, reigned 336-323 BC) set about the conquest of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. By the time of his death at the age of 31, he ruled most of the known world from Greece to Afghanistan. Initially Alexander continued to mint Philip's gold and silver coins. Soon, however, the need for a silver coinage that could be widely used in Greece caused him to begin a new coinage on the Athenian weight-standard. His new silver coins, with the head of Herakles on one side and a seated figure of Zeus on the other, also became one of the staple coinages of the Greek world. They were widely imitated within the empire he had forged."

--------------------------------------

"......Alexander seems to have liked Amphipolis, because one of his last plans was to spend no less than 315 ton silver for a splendid new temple in the city that was to be dedicated to Artemis Tauropolus. It was never built, but after Alexander's death on 11 June 323 in Babylon, his wife queen Roxane settled in Amphipolis, which appears to have become one of the residences of the Macedonian royals. In 179, king Philip V died in the town."


------------------

Amphipolis , ancient city of Macedonia, on the Strymon (Struma) River near the sea and NE of later Thessaloníki. The place was known as Ennea Hodoi [nine ways] before it was settled and was of interest because of the gold and silver and timber of Mt. Pangaeus (Pangaion), to which it gave access. Athenian colonists were driven out (c.464 BC) by Thracians, but a colony was established in 437 BC Amphipolis became one of the major Greek cities on the N Aegean. This colony was captured by Sparta, and Brasidas and Cleon were both killed in a battle there in 422 BC After it was returned to Athens in 421 BC, it actually had virtual independence until captured (357 BC) by Philip II of Macedon. He had promised to restore it to Athens, and his retention of Amphipolis was a major cause of the war with Athens. In 148 BC it became the capital of the Roman province of Macedonia. Paul, Silas, and Timothy passed through Amphipolis (Acts 17.1). Nearby is the modern Greek village of Amfípolis."

--------------------------------

"A quick look at the WildWinds database( http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/greece/macedonia/kings/alexander_III/t.html ) indicates that the style and monograms are consistent with an Amphipolis issue, with perhaps a little less care than usual in the engraving of the reverse. The closest I could locate with a quick look is Price 133 (variant), although yours appears to have a shield rather than dolphin in the left field reverse."
16 commentsrandy h2
2.JPG
Alexander III38 viewsAlexander the Great
Amphipolis 336 BC 1/2 Unit

Obverse:Head of Alexander the great as Herakles wearing lion's skin
Reverse:ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ;Eagle standing right on thunderbolt;A at left

3.59gm 16mm

Price 160
maik
3~0.jpg
Alexander III44 viewsAlexander the great
Miletus 323-319 BC AE Unit

Obverse:Diademed head of Apollo right
Reverse:ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ;Horseman galloping right;Monogram and double axe at left;ME below

4.34gm 19mm

Price 2131;SNG München 905-906
maik
a3881.JPG
Alexander III151 viewsNew photo.

http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-40517


Alexander III AR Tetradrachm. ‘Amphipolis’ mint. Struck under Kassander, circa 316-314 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; shield in left field, pellet-in-Π below throne.

Price 136; Troxell, Studies, issue L8.

Thanks for the atribution Lloyd!
6 commentsRandygeki(h2)
2450079.jpg
Alexander III12 viewsAR Obol (8mm, 0.48 g, 11h). ‘Babylon’ mint. Struck circa 325-323 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; uncertain letter in left field, monogram below throne. Cf. Price 3606.TLP
alextetcoll1.jpg
Alexander III 'The Great'38 viewsKingdom of Macedon
Alexander III 'The Great' (336-323 BCE)
AR Tetradrachm (24mm, 16.75g)
Amphipolis mint c. 336-323 BCE
Lifetime issue

O: Head of Herakles right wearing lion's skin

R: AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; dolphin in left field

Price 73; Müller 539
Salaethus
AADPb_small.png
Alexander III 'the Great' Æ188 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III 'the Great' (336-323).

Macedonian mint. 336-323 BC.

18mm., 5.6g.

Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.

AΛEΞANΔPOY. Club and quiver. YE monogram in exergue

References: Price 2552

AADP
RL
AAESb_small.png
Alexander III 'the Great' Æ1911 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III 'the Great' (336-323).

Macedonian mint. 336-323 BC.

19mm., 3.99g.

Macedonian shield with head of Herakles ornamenting boss facing three-quarters right in centre, five double crescent-like ornaments around

B - A (BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY) flanking. Macedonian officer's helmet facing with ear flaps and crest from side to side; grain-ear

References: SNG Alpha Bank 849 (?); Price 2806 (?)

AAES
RL
Alexander_III.jpg
Alexander III 'The Great', Price 2800, 323-310 BC, Western Asia Minor5 viewsHead of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion skin headdress. Quiver, bow, and club, torch below.

BASILEWS
King
Jonathan N
Clipboard.jpg
Alexander III "The Great" 29 viewsLIFETIME ISSUE
Macedonian Empire
AR-Drachm;Abydus Mint; 328-323 BC
Obv: Head of young Herakles facing right,wearing lion skin headdress.
Rev: ΑΛΕΞΑΝ∆ΡΟΥ at right;-Zeus enthroned,Legs apart,Zeus seated left holding eagle and scepter,
Pegasus forepart in field left, ΑΞ monogram below throne.
Size:17mm;4.15gms
Ref: Price 1502
2 commentsbrian l
Price_121_75.jpg
Alexander III "the Great"57 views336-323 B.C.
Silver Tetradrachm
17.0 gm, 27 mm
Obv.: Head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean lion skin headdress tied at neck
Rev.: Zeus enthroned left holding large eagle and scepter, monogram left;
BAΣIΛEΩΣ left, AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ to right
Macedonian (Amphipolis) mint,
323-320 B.C.
Price 121
1 commentsJaimelai
Alexander_Zeus_3b.jpg
Alexander III 'The Great' | Zeus - Macedonian Kingdom, AR Drachm, 337 to 323 BC.78 views
Alexander III 'The Great' | Zeus - Silver drachm

Obv: Head of Alexander in guise of Herakles, wearing lion-skin headdress, right-facing.
Rev: Zeus enthroned, nude to waste, left-facing, holding and gazing at eagle in outstretched right hand, scepter in raised left hand; monogram TI before the god, below the eagle - second eagle below the monogram(?): [A]LEXANDROY down-vertical in right field.

Exergue: None.

Mint: Sardis
Struck: 310-301 BC. (Posthumous issue)

Size: 14.9 x 15.9 mm.
Weight: 4.27 grams.
Die axis: 0°

Condition: Quite fine. Beautiful, bright, clear, lustrous with subtle but distinctive toning. Nicely centered, well struck with excellent images, legend and monogram, in fine relief.

Refs:*
Müller 186.
Reference: Price - 2617
Tiathena
index-2.png
Alexander III (359-336). AR Drachm, Miletos c. 325-323.7 views Head of Herakles r., wearing lion skin / Zeus Atophoros seated l.; thunderbolt in l. field, monogram below throne. Price 2088. Britanikus
Lysimachos_Sardis_Price_2605~1.jpg
Alexander III (?) , Macedonian shield, helmet, Sardes mint.28 viewsMacedonian Kings, AE14, 3.6 g, Sardes mint.

Obv.: Macedonian shield with caduceus.
Rev.: B-A across upper fields, Macedonian helmet, caduceus
to left, FIL at lower left, rose at lower right.

Price 2605 var. Unlisted fieldmarks and positions.
Price (different numbers) lists the rose as being
in the right field, and a monogram below.
Steff V
35- Alexander III AR Tet.JPG
Alexander III , Price 3229-S49 views'Alexander III AR Tetradrachm. Myriandros mint. Struck 325-323 BC. Head of Herakles right in lionskin / Zeus seated left with eagle & scepter; BAI monogram left, MI monogram under throne. Müller 1302. Price 3229.


jdholds
Alexander_III_AE.jpg
Alexander III - AE 196 viewsMiletos ?
323-319 BC
head of young Heracles in lionskin righ
bow in quiver and club
AΛEΞANΔPOY
?
Price 2102?
7,10g
ex Dionysos
Johny SYSEL
Alexander_III_Ae_Asia~0.jpg
Alexander III - AE 194 viewsAsia Minor
323-310 BC
head of young Heracles in lionskin right
bow in quiver and club; torch
BAΣIΛEΩΣ
Price 2800
5,38g

countermark
Johny SYSEL
Alexander_III_Kolophon.jpg
Alexander III - AR drachm67 viewsPhilip III in the name of Alexander III
Kolophon
322-319 BC
head of young Heracles in lion's skin right
Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter, barleycorn under throne, spear-spike right
AΛEΞANΔPOY
Price 1751
3,86 g 17,5-16,5 mm
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
Alexander_III_-_countermark.jpg
Alexander III - AR drachm13 viewsmint ?
323-200 BC ?
head of young Heracles in lionskin right
countermark: Kalchedon ? - head of Demeter ?, bee below, (KA) right
Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter
AΛEΞANΔPOY
zum Gegenstempel vgl. Price, Alexander, S. 69
probably same as: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-10207
ex Sol numismatic
Johny SYSEL
Alexander_III_Abydos.jpg
Alexander III - AR Drachm4 viewsstruck by Antigones I
Lampsakos
c. 310-301 BC
head of young Heracles in lion's skin right
Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter, forepart of pegasus left in the left field
AΛEΞANΔPOY
(NO)
Price 1382; Müller 612
Johny SYSEL
Alexander_III_Chios.jpg
Alexander III - AR drachm9 viewsChios
c. 290-275 BC
head of young Heracles in lionskin right
Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter; grape bunch
AΛEΞANΔPOY
(ΠYPΦ)
Price 2322; HGC 6, 1134
ex Lanz
Johny SYSEL
Alexander_III_Amphipolis.jpg
Alexander III - AR tetradrachm7 viewsstruck under Antipater
Amphipolis
c. 325 - 323/322 BC
head of young Heracles in lionskin right
Zeus seated left, leaning on scepter, holding eagle; cock left
AΛEΞANΔPOY
Price 79; Troxell, Studies, Issue E3
ex Roma Numismatics
Johny SYSEL
Alexander_III_Alabanda.jpg
Alexander III - AR tetradrachm18 viewsAlabanda
169 - 168 BC
head of young Heracles in lionskin right
Zeus seated left, leaning on scepter, holding eagle; Pegasos left
AΛEΞANΔPOY
E
Price 2464
ex Roma Numismatics
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
Alexander_Tarsos_tetra.jpg
Alexander III - AR tetradrachm3 viewsstruck under Balakros

Tarsos
327-323 BC
head of young Heracles in lionskin right
Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter, plow left
AΛEΞANΔPOY
· / Θ
Price 3019; vgl. SNG Oxford 2891; SNG München 10/11, 697
ex Gitbud and Naumann
Johny SYSEL
Alexander_III_Babylon~0.jpg
Alexander III - AR tetradrachm6 viewsstruck by Peithon in the name of Alexander III
Babylon
315-311 BC
head of young Heracles in lionskin right
Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter
monogram in wreath: (HYP); monogram under throne: (XA)
AΛEΞANΔPOY
BAΣIΛEΩΣ
Price 3723
17,10g

ex Gitbud-Naumann
Johny SYSEL
679_Alexander_III_Pella3.jpg
Alexander III - AR tetradrachm3 viewsstruck by Kassander in the name of Alexander III

Pella
317-314 BC
head of young Heracles in lionskin right
Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter
boeotian shield left; snake under the throne
AΛEΞANΔPOY
Price 249; SNG Copenhagen 728. Muller 754
17,19g

ex CNG
ex Aurea auction 49
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
1343_Alexander_III_Perge.jpg
Alexander III - AR tetradrachm1 viewsPerge
200 - 199 BC
head of young Heracles in lionskin right
Zeus seated left, leaning on scepter, holding eagle;
AΛEΞANΔPOY
KB
Price 2936
ex Naumann
Johny SYSEL
1440_Alexander_III_Mytilene.jpg
Alexander III - AR tetradrachm0 viewsMytilene
c. 188-170 BC
head of young Heracles in lionskin right
Zeus seated left, leaning on scepter, holding eagle; lyre left
AΛEΞANΔPOY
monogram / Δ
Price 1718
ex Dionysos
Johny SYSEL
1447_Alexander_III_Temnos.jpg
Alexander III - AR tetradrachm5 viewsTemnos
c. 188-170 BC
head of young Heracles in lionskin right
Zeus seated left, leaning on scepter, holding eagle; oinochoe within vine tendril left
AΛEΞANΔPOY
(ΠA) E
Price 1676; Müller 956
16,20g
ex Dionysos
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
5878a.jpg
Alexander III - Lifetime Drachm91 viewsAbydus 328-23 BC
Price:1501 Muller :906
Ghengis_Jon
aradostetra.jpg
Alexander III - Philip III74 viewsKings of Macedon. Alexander III - Philip III
AR Tetradrachm (24mm, 17.13g)
Circa 324/3-320 BC
Arados mint. Struck under Menes or Laomedon.

O: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin

R: AΛEΞANΔPOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; monogram below throne

Price 3309; Duyrat group IV, series 1.
Salaethus
Alexander_TG.jpg
Alexander III - Tarsos75 viewsObv: Head of Herakles right wearing lionskin headdress
Rev: ALEXANDROU between club above, quiver and bow below. No symbols
Size: 17 mm, 5,47 g
Mint: Tarsos, 323-317 BC
Ref: Likely Price 3056
Notes: Discussion on this coin at http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=91693.msg569052#new
2 commentsickster
AlexanderIII_4drachm_Price_481.jpg
Alexander III - tetradrachm, Amphipolis48 viewsAlexander III "the Great", AR tetradrachm, struck under Kassander, Philip IV or Alexander (son of Kassander), 315-294 BC, 17.15 g; Obv: head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin; Rev: ALEXANDROY;, Zeus Atephoros seated left, holding sceptre and eagle; in left field, Lambda above torch, below throne, M above star.
Price 481
Bartosz Awianowicz
alexander_III_03~0.jpg
Alexander III AE45 viewsObv: Youthful male head right.
Rev: ALEXANDPOY - Galloping horse to the right; between its legs, dolphin to the right.
Date: 336-323 BC
Ref: Price 339, SNG Cop. 1029
oa
Alexander_III_2.jpg
ALEXANDER III AE Half Unit, Price 3162, Macedonian helmet39 viewsOBV: Gorgoneion in the center of a Macedonian shield
REV: Macedonian helmet; caduceus and NK monogram flanking below (Struck under Nikokreon)
4.9g, 15mm

Minted at Salamis, Cyprus, 323-315 BC
Legatus
B-alexander_III_01.jpg
Alexander III AR Drachm34 viewsObv: Head of Alexander the Great as Hercules right, wearing lion-skin knotted at base of neck.
Rev: ALEXANDROU - Zeus seated left, N before, and B below throne.
Year: 310-301 BC
Mint: Colophon
Weight: 4.20g
Cat #: Muller.1335, Price.1800
oa
alexander_miletos.jpg
Alexander III AR Drachm 118 viewsKings of Macedon Alexander III the Great, 336-323 BC

Head of Herakles in lion skin facing right

AΛEΞANΔPOY in right field, Zeus enthroned facing left holding eagle and sceptre; double-head (bipennis) axe beneath throne, circled ΠPYA monogram in left field.

Price 2148; Thompson DM 260; Newell 49.

3.97g

Struck under Demetrios Poliorketes ca. 300-294 BC at Ionia, Miletos Mint.

Some encrustations remain around Zeus

Sold Forum Auction May 2019
2 commentsJay GT4
Alexander_III.jpg
ALEXANDER III AR Drachm Price 1505, Zeus42 viewsOBV: Head of Herakles right in lionskin headdress
REV: ALEXANDROU, Zeus Aetophoros seated left, holding eagle and sceptre. Forepart of Pegasos left in left field, X on W monogram beneath throne.


Minted at Abydos, 325-323 BC
Legatus
aldrachm2.jpg
Alexander III AR Drachm, Teos Mint, 310-301 BC39 viewsOBV: Head of Herakles in lionskin headdress
REV: Zeus seated left with right knee raised, holding eagle in right hand and sceptre in left. ALEXANDROU written vertically to right of sceptre. Monograms HDelta in left field below eagle and O looped inside the letter PI below the throne.

Price 2290 (courtesy lloyd T and altamura). The mintmark below the throne also bears some similarity to Price 2292 in which the "o" is fully separate from the PI. Added to the Wildwinds database.

diam 17 mm, wt 4.00 gm
1 commentsdaverino
AlexIIIObol.jpg
Alexander III AR Hemiobol20 viewsKingdom of Macedon, Alexander III 'the Great' AR Hemiobol. Uncertain Eastern mint, circa 325-300 BC. 0.56g, 9mm
O: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
R: Bow, quiver and club; monogram in field.
- Cf. Price 4013-4014.
Nemonater
alexander_III_03~1.jpg
Alexander III AR Tetradrachm66 viewsObv: Head of Herakles right in lion's skin.
Rev: Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre; in left field, monogram and aplustre; beneath throne, amphora; in right field, inscription ALEXANDROU.
Mint: Amphipolis
Date: 315 - 294 BC
Weight: 17.00g
Ref: Price 4680
1 commentsoa
alexander_III_02~0.jpg
Alexander III AR Tetradrachm35 viewsObv: Head of Heracles facing right, wearing lion skin.
Rev: Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle.
Mint: Myriandrus
Date: 325-323 BC
Weight: 17.1g
Ref: Price 3223
oa
Alexander_III_Drachm.jpg
Alexander III Drachm94 viewsOBV: Herakles' head right, clad in lion-skin head-dress.
REV: "ALEXANDROU", Zeus enthroned left, eagle in
extended right, scepter in left, "MU" monogram
within wreath left, head wearing Phrygian hat
below throne.

Price 1565
posthumous, c. 310 - 297 B.C.
4.24gm 17.1mm

7 commentsgoldenancients
Alexander_III_Lifetime_Tetradrachm.jpg
Alexander III Lifetime Tetradrachm -- Amphipolis -- 332-326 BC52 views17.08 g, 24 mm, 220°
Amphipolis Mint
Silver Tetradrachm; Old Cabinet Toning
Minted during reign of Alexander III; Struck Under Antipater
Price 36; Troxell, Studies, Group C1

Obverse: Head of Herakles Wearing Nemean Skin Headdress Right.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ (Of Alexander). Zeus Aëtophoros Enthroned Left Holding Eagle and Staff. Caduceus with Fillets in Left Field.
4 commentsHydro
alexbrz.JPG
Alexander III of Macedon AE18 336-323 BC49 viewsAlexander III bronze unit, 4.8 gms.
OBV: Head of Herakles with lionskin headdress
REV: Bow and quiver above and left-facing club below. ALEXANDROY in between.
EXERGUE: Delta in field above the quiver and bow. Below the club is a a trident. Both marks are weak and partially obscured.
Price 280 ( courtesy, Reid Goldsborough)
2 commentsdaverino
altd.jpg
Alexander III of Macedon AR Tetradrachm ca 310 BC62 viewsOBV: Head of Herakles with lionskin headdress
REV: Zeus Ateophotos seated left holding eagle and scepter, ALEXANDROY vertical to right of scepter. Obscure date or mintmark under eagle.

The style of the coin strongly suggests the Ake mint (possibly Price 3301 or similar) with bellcovers on the throne legs and the slanted footstool on which Zeus rests his feet. The posture and arrangement of his robes also was typical of Ake tetradrachmae in the decade following Alexander's death in 323 BC. The weight of Ake tetradrachms is almost uniformly 17.1 gm ( Newell: The Dated Alexander Coinage of Sidon and Ake) corresponding exactly to this coin.

Bought at the Baltimore coin show 2010

Diam 26 mm, wt 17.1 gm
1 commentsdaverino
albabylon.jpg
Alexander III of Macedon Babylon Mint, 315-311 BC31 viewsTetradrachm minted in Babylon, probably under Peithon.
Head of Herakles in Lionskin Headdress/ Zeus Aetophoros on Reverse, MTP in wreath in left field, PiDT monogram in circle below throne. BASILEUW below, ALEXANDROY to right.

Price 3733 (ref.Wildwinds), 16.6 grms
1 commentsdaverino
alexander_drachm1.jpg
Alexander III of Macedon Drachm Colophon (uncertain) 319 B.C. To 310 B.C.10 viewsHead of beardless Heracles right wearing lion skin headdress
Zeus seated on stool-throne left, eagle on outstretched right hand, sceptre in left hand ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ

Price 1783
Britanikus
AG-Macedon,_Alexander_III-3.jpg
Alexander III of Macedon, 336-323 BC - Signed Die8 viewsAR Drachm (16mm, 4.26 g)
Grade Ch VF*; Strike 5/5; Surface 4/5: Price 2090A
Obv.: Head of Heracles right, wearing lion skin headdress, K on skin behind ear
Rev.: AΛEΞANΔPOY, Zeus seated left, holding scepter and eagle; monogram in left field.
This drachm is a lifetime issue from Miletos, circa 325-323 BC. It is signed by the artist who placed a "K" on the lion skin headdress behind Alexander's ear. Extremely Rare. Only two specimens noted in ADM I (both in the ANS collection) and three specimens shown in acsearch.

This issue (Price 2090A) and an equally rare contemporary issue at Magnesia ad Maeandrum are the only two instances of signed dies struck for Alexander.

Because this coin is so rare you can actually follow it from auction to auction and for at least the last three times it sold it got cheaper each time. I may have to pay to sell it the next time :>)
Richard M10
Alexander_III_Tetradrachm2.jpg
Alexander III Posthumous Tetradrachm -- Amphipolis -- ~323 BC16 views16.80 g, 25 mm, 270°
Amphipolis Mint
Silver Tetradrachm
Minted during reign of Alexander III; Posthumous
Price 104

Obverse: Head of Herakles Wearing Nemean Skin Headdress Right.
Reverse: AΛEΞAN∆POY (Of Alexander), Zeus Aëtophoros Enthroned Left Holding Eagle and Staff.

Alexander III the Great, the King of Macedonia and conqueror of the Persian Empire is considered one of the greatest military geniuses of all times. He became king upon his father’s death in 336 BCE and went on to conquer most of the known world of his day. He is known as 'the great' both for his military genius and his diplomatic skills in handling the various populaces of the regions he conquered. He is further recognized for spreading Greek culture, language, and thought from Greece throughout Asia Minor, Egypt, and Mesopotamia to India and thus initiating the era of the Hellenistic World.
___________________
What a nose.
Hydro
Alexander_III_Tetradrachm_3.jpg
Alexander III Posthumous Tetradrachm -- Arados -- 328-323 BC21 views16.03 g, 26 mm, 90°
Arados Mint
Silver Tetradrachm
Minted during reign of Alexander III; Posthumous
Price 3325

Obverse: Head of Herakles Wearing Nemean Skin Headdress Right.
Reverse: AΛEΞAN∆POY (Of Alexander), Zeus Aëtophoros Enthroned Left Holding Eagle and Staff.

Alexander III the Great, the King of Macedonia and conqueror of the Persian Empire is considered one of the greatest military geniuses of all times. He became king upon his father’s death in 336 BCE and went on to conquer most of the known world of his day. He is known as 'the great' both for his military genius and his diplomatic skills in handling the various populaces of the regions he conquered. He is further recognized for spreading Greek culture, language, and thought from Greece throughout Asia Minor, Egypt, and Mesopotamia to India and thus initiating the era of the Hellenistic World.
Hydro
Alexander_III_Tetradrachm.jpg
Alexander III Posthumous Tetradrachm -- Phocis -- ~323 BC23 views16.95 g, 30 mm, 100°
Phocis Mint
Silver Tetradrachm
Minted during reign of Alexander III; Posthumous
Price 834; Muller 750

Obverse: Head of Herakles Wearing Nemean Skin Headdress Right.
Reverse: AΛEΞAN∆POY (Of Alexander), Zeus Aëtophoros Enthroned Left Holding Eagle and Staff.

Alexander III the Great, the King of Macedonia and conqueror of the Persian Empire is considered one of the greatest military geniuses of all times. He became king upon his father’s death in 336 BCE and went on to conquer most of the known world of his day. He is known as 'the great' both for his military genius and his diplomatic skills in handling the various populaces of the regions he conquered. He is further recognized for spreading Greek culture, language, and thought from Greece throughout Asia Minor, Egypt, and Mesopotamia to India and thus initiating the era of the Hellenistic World.
________________________
A nice coin, but a past owner was way too harsh in chemically cleaning this. On the obverse, the lower jaw of the lion and Herakle's cheek contains a thin line of what I believe to be black chemical burn.
Hydro
AlexanderB.jpg
Alexander III Price 300043 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’, 336-323 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 25 mm, 17.16 g, 3 h), Tarsos, struck under Balakros or Menes, circa 333-327.
O: Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and eagle standing right with closed wings in his right; below throne, B.
- Price 3000.
2 commentsNemonater
G_4_w.jpg
Alexander III tetradrachm62 viewsTetradrachm, Amphipolis mint, lifetime issue, c.336-334, Price 9 (same obv. die.), 17.0 gm, 25.5 mm

This was the first expensive Greek coin I bought, just over 30 years ago when I was still a student. It strained my food budget for some time, but i just had to have it.
1 commentsManzikert
Alexander_III_Tetradrachm.jpg
Alexander III Tetradrachm Pella Mint40 viewsOBV: Head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion's skin headdress.
REV: ALEXANDROU
Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and sceptre in left
hand; Phrygian helmet in left field with crossed palm branches
above, monogram under throne, and exergue.
Price 629; Müller 233. ANACS # 4684706
ca. 275-270 B.C.
Pella Mint
2 commentsgoldenancients
AlexanderA.jpg
Alexander III Tetradrachm Price 299354 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’, 336-323 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 25 mm, 17.25 g, 4 h), Tarsos, struck under Balakros or Menes, circa 333-327.
O:Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and eagle standing right with closed wings in his right; below throne, A.
- Price 2993.
1 commentsNemonater
Alexander.jpg
Alexander III Tetradrachm Price 299968 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’, 336-323 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 25 mm, 17.13 g, 12 h), Tarsos, struck under Balakros or Menes, circa 333-327.
O: Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and eagle standing right with closed wings in his right.
- Price 2999. A rare early and unusual issue from Tarsos, "Officina B", bearing no symbol.

By comparing these early Tarsos tetradrachms to the staters of Mazaios (Pictured below) it is easy to see the identical forms of the throne, scepter, footstool and other details. The drapery is rendered in a similar manner, the Aramaic inscription of the one and the Greek inscription of the other share the same curve following the dotted border. This evidence indicates the two series of coins were the common product of a single mint.

2 commentsNemonater
Alexander_III_the_Great_NEW.jpg
Alexander III The Great513 viewsAlexander III The Great Silver Tetradrachm
Macedonia
Amphipolis mint 323-315 B.C.
24mm, 16.72g, 180o
ob: Herakles draped in Nemean Lion skin
rev: Zeus seated left holding sceptre in left and eagle in right. L above bucranium, E under throne. ALEXAN∆POY
Price 432; Ehrhardt 18
5 commentsmihali84
Alex_III_sardes_1.jpg
Alexander III the Great301 viewsSilver Drachm
Sardes Mint, c. 334-323 BC
16mm, 4.28g
Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Rev: Zeus seated left; monogram below throne.
Price 2558; Mueller 525
7 commentsmihali84
20110425-2059332.jpg
Alexander III the Great19 viewsStruck under Antigonos I Monophthalmos,
Obverse: Hercules wearing lion skin headress
Reverse: Zeus enthroned holding eagle
Magnesia Mint
319-305 BC
3.9 gm 18mm
Price 1970
1 commentswileyc
alex.jpg
Alexander III the Great (336 - 323 B.C.)60 viewsLifetime Issue
AR Tetradrachm
O: Head of Alexander as Hercules right, wearing lion-skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, bow on left.
Salamis mint, struck 332-323 B.C.
16.95g
25mm
Price 3139 ; SNG Alpha Bank 662; Newell. Salamis 7.
5 commentsMat
Alexander_the_Great_AR_Drachm_Abydos.JPG
ALEXANDER III THE GREAT (336-323)77 viewsAR drachm, (4,14 g. - 17-18 mm)
Abydos mint. Struck circa 310-301 BC.
under Antigonos I Monophthalmos. As Strategos of Asia, 320-306/5 BC, or king, 306/5-301 BC.
Vs: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin.
Rs: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, head of Ammon right; ivy leaf below throne.
Price 1551. _17988 sold
2 commentsAntonivs Protti
Alexander_the_Great_Ar_Drachm_Sardes_Mint_T_over_Eagle.JPG
ALEXANDER III THE GREAT (336-323) AR drachm. Sardes mint. Struck circa 322-319/8 BC. 45 views(3,99 g. - 16-17 mm) Price 2617; ADM I 258 BC.
Vs: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin.
Rs: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, TI above eagle standing left. _6992 sold
Antonivs Protti
Alexander_III_the_Great_hemidrachm.jpg
Alexander III the Great - Drachm - Colophon, Lydia57 viewsDate: 310-301 BC (posthumous)
Size: 16 mm
Weight: 4.3 g
Obv: Head of Herakles wearing lion's scalp right
Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, legs crossed, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right; crescent in left field, N below throne
Price 1798
Viriathus
28314.jpg
Alexander III the Great - King of Macedonia c. 336-323 B.C.18 viewsBronze 18mm (6.24 grams) Macedonian mint, c. 336-323 B.C.
Obv: Head of Alexander the Great as Hercules right, wearing the lion-skin headdress.
Rev: AΛEΞANΔΡOY between Hercules' weapons, club above and bowcase below; thunderbolt above; Δ below.
Ref: Sear 6739; Price 275; Mueller 22; SNG Cop 1035
mjabrial
Alexander_the_Great_001_B.png
Alexander III the Great - Tetradrachm - Amphipolis, Macedon40 viewsDate: 336-323 BC (lifetime)
Size: 24 mm
Weight: 17.2 g
Obv: Head of Herakles wearing lion's scalp right
Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, legs open, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right; club and monogram in left field
Price 70
Viriathus
a_(27).jpg
Alexander III the Great 336 - 323 BC. 13 viewsAlexander III the Great 336 - 323 BC. Region of Macedonia


Obv: Alexander as Herakles clad in lion's skin head-dress right

Rev: AΛEΞANΔΡOY, club right above, bow in case below, >E above.

Diameter: 17 mm. / Weight: 5,35 gms. / Material: Æ Bronze

Refs: Muller 1709; Price 316
emporiton
aallex.jpg
Alexander III the Great 336 - 323 BC.5 viewsAlexander III the Great 336 - 323 BC. Region of Macedonia


Obv: Alexander as Herakles clad in lion's skin head-dress right

Rev: AΛEΞANΔΡOY, club right above, bow in case below, Π above.

Diameter: 18 mm. / Weight: 6,59 gms. / Material: Æ Bronze

Refs: Price 310; Muller 1702; SNG Cop 1042; cf Sear 6739.
emporiton
DES.jpg
Alexander III the Great 336 - 323 BC.8 viewsAlexander III the Great 336 - 323 BC. Region of Macedonia


Obv: Herakles clad in lion's skin head-dress right

Rev: AΛEΞANΔΡOY, club right above, bow in case below, dolphin left below.

Diameter: 17 mm. / Weight: 6,07 gms. / Material: Æ Bronze

Refs: Mueller 541, SNG Cop. 1057. Price 323
emporiton
alex29~0.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm61 viewsUncertain mint.
Price -; Müller -; Hersh -.
1 commentsMinos
alex37.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm37 viewsAbydos mint (323-317 BC).
Price 1512
Minos
alex10.jpg
Alexander III the Great Ar Drachm107 viewsMiletos mint (295-275 BC).
Price 2148
3 commentsMinos
alex9.jpg
Alexander III the Great Ar Drachm48 viewsKolophon mint (310-301).
Price 1808
Minos
alex13.jpg
Alexander III the Great Ar Drachm92 viewsChios mint (290-275 BC).
Price 2322
1 commentsMinos
alex11.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm74 viewsMiletos mint (336-323).
Price 2090
1 commentsMinos
dra3.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm81 viewsSardes mint (334-323).
Price 2564
1 commentsMinos
dra2.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm43 viewsMagnesia mint (305-297 BC).
Price 1995
1 commentsMinos
alex14.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm59 viewsMagnesia mint (319-305 BC).
Price 1980
1 commentsMinos
alex5.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm31 viewsMagnesia mint (319-305 BC).
Price 1970
Minos
alex15.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm58 viewsLampsakos mint (310-301 BC).
Price 1406
Minos
alex19.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm37 viewsMagnesia mint (319-305 BC).
Price 1965
Minos
alex18.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm31 viewsKolophon mint (319-310 BC).
Price 1776
1 commentsMinos
alex21.jpg
Alexander III the Great Ar Drachm16 viewsKolophon mint (301-294 BC).
Price 1832
Minos
alex20.jpg
Alexander III the Great Ar Drachm28 viewsKolophon mint (323-319).
Price 1770
Minos
alex22.jpg
Alexander III the Great Ar Drachm15 viewsSardes mint (334-323 BC).
Price 2571
Minos
alex27~0.jpg
Alexander III the Great Ar Drachm49 viewsLampsakos mint (310-301 BC).
Price 1385
Minos
alex29.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm69 viewsLampsakos mint (310-301 BC).
Price 1416
6 commentsMinos
dra5.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm39 viewsKolophon mint (310-301 BC).
Price 1823
Minos
dra4.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm52 viewsKolophon mint (310-301 BC).
Price 1825
1 commentsMinos
dra2~0.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm90 viewsMagnesia mint (323-319 BC).
Price 1936
4 commentsMinos
dra.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm57 viewsSardis mint (334-323 BC).
Price 2578
1 commentsMinos
alex31.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm39 viewsKolophon mint (322-319 BC).
Price 1759
1 commentsMinos
alex32.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm61 viewsAbydos mint (323-317 BC).
Price 1515
1 commentsMinos
alex33.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm46 viewsKolophon mint (319-310 BC).
Price 1794
1 commentsMinos
alex38~0.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm77 viewsSardes mint (334-323 BC).
Price 2578
3 commentsMinos
alex39.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm 44 viewsAbydos mint (325-323 BC).
Price 1505
Minos
alex40.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm 36 viewsSide mint (323-317 BC).
Price 2969
3 commentsMinos
alex42.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm 33 viewsTeos mint (310-301 BC).
Price 2279
Minos
alex41~0.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm 51 viewsSardes mint (323-317 BC).
Price 2595
2 commentsMinos
alex43.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm 43 viewsKolophon mint (310-301 BC).
Price 1827
2 commentsMinos
alex44.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Drachm 48 viewsLampsakos mint (323-317 BC).
Price 1380
1 commentsMinos
alex30.jpg
Alexander III the Great Ar Tetradrachm267 viewsBabylon mint (331-325 BC).
Price -
14 commentsMinos
alex24.jpg
Alexander III the Great Ar Tetradrachm22 viewsAmphipolis mint (336-323 BC).
Price 93
Minos
alex23.jpg
Alexander III the Great Ar Tetradrachm 56 viewsAmphipolis mint (323-317 BC).
Price 112
2 commentsMinos
alex46.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Tetradrachm52 viewsAmphipolis mint (315-294 BC).
Price 481
2 commentsMinos
alex48.jpg
Alexander III the Great AR Tetradrachm49 viewsOdessos mint (120-90 BC).
Price 1181
Minos
2_1.jpg
Alexander III the Great Bronze Coin (336 B.C. - 323 B.C) four chalkoi (hemiobol)2 viewsObverse: Head of Herakles, wearing lion skin.
Reverse: AΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, thunderbolt and club above, quiver and bow below.
Mint: Macedon.
Reference: Price 269.
Weight: 4,85g (four chalkoi (hemiobol))
Size: 17mm
Pavlos
Lifetime_Issue!_Signed_by_the_artist_EX_FORVM~0.jpg
Alexander III The Great Lifetime Issue Drachm ! Signed by the artist 122 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C.




Silver drachm, Price 2090A, ADM I 80 (same dies), VF, 4.214g, 16.0mm, 0o, Miletos mint, lifetime issue, c. 325 - 323 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck, K on lion's jaw behind Herakles' ear; reverse ALEXANDROU, Zeus seated left, legs uncrossed, right leg forward, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, monogram before;

EX; FORVM Ancient Coins ' Shop.


Lifetime Issue! Signed by the artist!(?) The K behind Herakles ear had traditionally been identified as the signature of the artist. Matt Kreuzer, however, believes the K (the Greek numeral 20) was used c. 325 B.C. to introduce the Attic drachm to Miletos by indicating either that 20 of these was equal to a gold stater, or that one of these drachm was equal to 20 of the 3 to 4 gram bronzes circulating at the time.


*With my sincere thank and appreciation , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.

**This coin is considered as Best of The Type :
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-108526


From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
s-l1600_(24).jpg
ALEXANDER III THE GREAT, 323-319 BC.7 viewsSilver Drachm; Magnesia mint.
3,97 g. 17 mm.
Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Rev: AΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ.
Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, bee right; spearhead in outer right field.
Price 1936.
_42.43
Antonivs Protti
s-l40ff0.jpg
ALEXANDER III THE GREAT, Circa 336-323 BC.15 viewsBronze; Uncertain macedonian mint. Struck c.325-310 B.C.
6,48 g. 17 mm.
Obv: Head of Herakles facing right, wearing a lion's skin headdress.
Rev: AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ; quiver and bow below, club above, branch left in exergue.
Price 310. _1016
Antonivs Protti
price1959.jpg
Alexander III The Great, drachm; Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, Price 195933 viewsAlexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C. Silver drachm, Price 1959, SNG Cop 965, VF/F, Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, 3.889g, 17.0mm, 0o, posthumous, c. 319 - 305 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse “ALEXANDROU”, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long vertical scepter in left, right leg drawn back, “PA” monogram right, AT monogram under throne, B outer right (off-flan). Ex FORVMPodiceps
Alexander_III__Lifetime_Issue_B_unit.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Lifetime Issue Bronze unit. 44 viewsLifetime Issue Bronze unit , 18 mm . 6.38 gr.
Price 337 , Cop. 1053 Var.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
ATGlifetimeDrachmLydiaSardes.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C. Lifetime Issue104 viewsSilver drachm, Price 2553, VF, 4.297g, 16.4mm, 0o, Lydia, Sardes mint, c. 334 - 323 B.C. Lifetime Issue; Obverse: Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; Reverse: BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, scepter in left, EYE monogram left, rose under throne. Ex FORVM.

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC)

"Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.

Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the 13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr. Joann Fletcher
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml

"When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."--attributed to Plutarch, The Moralia.
http://www.pothos.org/alexander.asp?paraID=96

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
alex3_miletos_pan.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C. Miletos mint85 viewsBronze AE 1/4 Unit, Price 2102Ab, weight 1.1g, max. diameter 11.65 mm, Miletos mint, Posthumous issue c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obv. Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; rev. ΑΛΕΞΑΝ∆ΡΟ[Υ], bow in case above, club and stalk of grain below. Dark brown and green patina with some earthen residue. Appears to have little or no wear! (much better in hand) Very scarce denomination from this mint.1 commentsSteve E
25643q00.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Ancient Counterfeit38 viewsFouree silver plated didrachm, cf. Price 3603 (official, Babylon mint, 325 -323 B.C., very rare), F, plating breaks, 4.936g, 17.2mm, 270o, obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse ALEXAND[POY], Zeus seated left, legs uncrossed, holding eagle and scepter; M in left field, monogram below throneCaffaro
Macedonian Kingdom 1a img.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue, Silver tetradrachm, Price 3599 (same dies) 165 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:- Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:- ALEXANDROU, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, monogram and M below throne;
Price 3599 (same dies), Müller 67, 17.206g, 25.9mm, 255o, Babylon mint, lifetime issue, c. 325 - 323 B.C.;
EF, obverse off-center;

Dies by 'The Alexander Dekadrachm Master'. From the same highly-skilled hand as the famous dekadrachms, including Price 3598, with which this shares all symbols and their arrangement. A massive issue of coinage was struck for the mass-weddings of the soldiers of Alexander the Great to Persian women, and their subsequent return to Macedonia. The best style of the lengthy issue of Alexander coinage
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1a_img.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue, Silver tetradrachm, Price 3599 (same dies)96 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:- Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:- ALEXANDROU, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, monogram and M below throne;
Price 3599 (same dies), Müller 67, 17.206g, 25.9mm, 255o, Babylon mint, lifetime issue, c. 325 - 323 B.C.;
EF, obverse off-center;

Dies by 'The Alexander Dekadrachm Master'. From the same highly-skilled hand as the famous dekadrachms, including Price 3598, with which this shares all symbols and their arrangement. A massive issue of coinage was struck for the mass-weddings of the soldiers of Alexander the Great to Persian women, and their subsequent return to Macedonia. The best style of the lengthy issue of Alexander coinage

Ex-Forum

Old coin - new photo.

Click to zoom.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1a_img~0.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue, Silver tetradrachm, Price 3599 (same dies)53 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:- Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:- ALEXANDROU, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, monogram and M below throne;
Price 3599 (same dies), Müller 67, 17.206g, 25.9mm, 255o, Babylon mint, lifetime issue, c. 325 - 323 B.C.;
EF, obverse off-center;

Dies by 'The Alexander Dekadrachm Master'. From the same highly-skilled hand as the famous dekadrachms, including Price 3598, with which this shares all symbols and their arrangement. A massive issue of coinage was struck for the mass-weddings of the soldiers of Alexander the Great to Persian women, and their subsequent return to Macedonia. The best style of the lengthy issue of Alexander coinage

Ex-Forum

Updated image using new photography setup.
maridvnvm
Alexander_III_The_Great_Lifetime_Issue_Ionia_,_Miletos_Mint_.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue. Ionia, Miletos mint.26 viewsSilver Drachm, Müller Alexander 763; SNG Cop 895; SNG Alpha Bank 629; SNG Saroglos 771; SNG München - ; Price 2090, Choice good Very Fine , as found Superb Fine Style, toned, centered, bumps and marks, Ionia, Miletos mint, weight 4.004g, maximum diameter 18.0mm, die axis 0o, struck between 325 - 323 B.C.,.
Obverse ; head of Alexander the Great as Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck.
Reverse ; AΛEΞAN∆POY ( means " Of Alexander " in Ancient Greek ), Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, feet on footstool, right leg forward, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter topped with lotus vertical behind in left hand, ∆H monogram left.


*Lifetime issue. This coin was issued during the lifetime and rule of Alexander the Great. Most Alexander coins were issued after his death.

*Alexander the great believed if the world ruled by one king or leader , will be better for all.
Alexander the great was considered a god after his death.



FORVM Ancient Coins. / From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
3 commentsSam
AlexTheGreatMemphisTet.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Possible Lifetime Issue103 viewsThis is the same coin in my collection, different picture, as the Alexander tetradrachm listed as [300mem].

Silver tetradrachm, Price 3971, VF, 16.081g, 26.1mm, 0o, Egypt, Memphis mint, c. 332 - 323 or 323 - 305 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse ALEXANDROU, Zeus enthroned left, legs crossed, eagle in right, scepter in left, rose left, DI-O under throne. Ex Pavlos S. Pavlou. Ex FORVM, "The Memphis issues are among the finest style Alexander coins. Experts disagree on the date of this issue. Some identify it as a lifetime issue and others as a posthumous issue (Joseph Sermarini).

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC)

"Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.

Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr. Joann Fletcher
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml

"When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."--attributed to Plutarch, The Moralia.
http://www.pothos.org/alexander.asp?paraID=96

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsJames Fitzgerald
s-l1600_(23)~0.jpg
ALEXANDER III THE GREAT. 336-323 BC7 viewsSilver Drachm; Lampsakos. Struck under Kalas or Demarchos, circa 328/5-323 BC.
4,20 g. 18 mm.
Obv: Youthful head of Heracles right, wearing lion’s skin.
Rev: AΛEΞANΔPOY; Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, Artemis Phosphoros standing facing, holding two torches; Δ below throne.
Price 1356; ADM II Series V.
_62.68
Antonivs Protti
s-l1600_(22).jpg
ALEXANDER III THE GREAT. 336-323 BC5 viewsSilver Drachm; Lampsakos. Struck under Kalas or Demarchos, circa 328/5-323 BC.
4,20 g. 18 mm.
Obv: Youthful head of Heracles right, wearing lion’s skin.
Rev: AΛEΞANΔPOY; Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, Artemis Phosphoros standing facing, holding two torches; Δ below throne.
Price 1356; ADM II Series V.
_62.68
Antonivs Protti
s-l1600_(21)~0.jpg
ALEXANDER III THE GREAT. 336-323 BC8 viewsSilver Drachm; Miletos, 325-323 BC. Struck under Philoxenos..
4,05 g. 17 mm.
Obv: Youthful head of Heracles right, wearing lion’s skin.
Rev: AΛEΞANΔPOY; Zeus seated left holding eagle and scepter, monogram in left field.
Price 2090.
_3545
Antonivs Protti
s-l1600_(20).jpg
ALEXANDER III THE GREAT. 336-323 BC5 viewsSilver Drachm; Miletos, 325-323 BC. Struck under Philoxenos..
4,05 g. 17 mm.
Obv: Youthful head of Heracles right, wearing lion’s skin.
Rev: AΛEΞANΔPOY; Zeus seated left holding eagle and scepter, monogram in left field.
Price 2090.
_3545
Antonivs Protti
s-l1600_(25)~0.jpg
ALEXANDER III THE GREATm 323-319 BC.5 viewsSilver Drachm; Magnesia mint.
3,97 g. 17 mm.
Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Rev: AΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ.
Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, bee right; spearhead in outer right field.
Price 1936.
_42.43
Antonivs Protti
001~8.JPG
Alexander III ‘the Great’44 views336-323 B.C.
Silver Drachm
4.19 gm, 18 mm
Obv.: Head of Alexander as Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress
Rev.: Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left holding large eagle and scepter; star in left field, spearhead in right field, AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ to right
Colophon mint, 322-319 B.C.
Price 1759; Müller 317
1 commentsJaimelai
AlexanderSardesDrachm.jpg
Alexander III ‘the Great’86 viewsAlexander III ‘the Great’ AR Drachm (18mm 4.24g) Sardes mint. Lifetime issue, circa 334/25-323 BC.
O: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin R: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; torch in left field, monogram below throne. Price 2567.
1 commentsNemonater
1800_33.jpg
Alexander III ‘the Great’44 views336-323 B.C.
Silver Drachm
3.98 gm, 16.4 mm
Obv.: Head of Alexander as Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress
Rev.: Zeus enthroned left holding eagle and scepter, N at left, B under throne, AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ to right
Colophon mint, 310-301 B.C.
Price 1800;
[Muller 1335]
1 commentsJaimelai
Alexander_the_Great_AR_Drachm_-_Miletos_Mint.jpg
Alexander III “The Great” AR Drachm, Miletos mint.46 viewsKings of Macedon, 18mm 4.15g Posthumous issue 310-301 BC.
O: Head Herakles r. in lionskin.
R: Zeus enthroned l., one foot back, holding eagle and sceptre, ALEXANDROU (partial, at edge of flan) to r, Miletos monogram in l. field, XE monogram beneath throne.
SG6730-31v(letters, monogram),Price 2151v(second monogram). _6830
1 commentsAntonivs Protti
alex_iii_half_unit_k.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC2 viewsÆ Half Unit, 16mm, 4.1g, 12h; Salamis, Cyprus mint.
Obv.: Head of Heracles right, in lion skin headdress.
Rev.: AΛEΞANΔΡOY; club right above, bow and quiver below, ΣA above.
Reference: Price 3143
John Anthony
LarryW2300.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Abydos 323-317 BC126 viewsSilver drachm, 17.2mm, 4.27g, nice EF
Head Herakles right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck / [A]ΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left holding eagle and sceptre, feet spread wide and resting on stool. Horse leg in left field, ΔY under throne.
Price 1511
1 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2351.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Abydos 323-320 BC28 viewsAR drachm, 16.6mm, 4.28g, Nice EF
Head Herakles right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck / [AΛ]EΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, feet spread wide and resting on stool. Dolphin swimming downwards in left field, ΔY monogram below throne.
Price -, Müller -; Thompson II, 79, series IV
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2298.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Abydos 328-323 BC89 viewsAR drachm, 17.8mm, 4.3g, Choice VF
Head Herakles right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck / AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, both feet forward. Pegasus forepart in left field, monogram below throne. Lifetime issue.
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Price 1505b, Müller 610; Thompson 44, series II
1 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2299.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Abydos mint, 328-323 BC45 viewsAR drachm, 16.8mm, 4.24g, aEF/gVF
Head Herakles right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck / AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left holding eagle and sceptre, feet forward resting on stool. Pegasus forepart in left field, monogram below strut under throne. Lifetime issue.
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Price 1505a; Müller 610; Thompson 39v, series II
Consigned to Forvm
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2322.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Ake 308-307 BC67 viewsSilver tetradrachm, 27.3mm, 17.12g, VF
Head Herakles right wearing lion skin knotted at neck / AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left holding eagle and sceptre, right leg drawn back. Intricate date monogram in left field.
Ex: Forvm Ancient Coins
Price 3297
2 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2316.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Amphipolis 315-294 BC56 viewsAR tetradrachm, 27.9mm, 17.24g, Ch EF
Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress / AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and sceptre, Λ over torch in left field, monogram below throne.
Price 447c; Müller 37.
1 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2359.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Amphipolis 315-294 BC29 viewsAR tetradrachm, 17.19g, Choice VF
Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin knotted at neck / AΛEΞANΔPOY, Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and sceptre, Λ over torch in left field, ant below throne. Nicely toned.
Price 454
Consigned to Forvm
1 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2294.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Amphipolis mint c. 294-290 BC66 viewsAR 4Dr., 27mm, 17.04g, VF
Head Herakles right wearing lion skin knotted at neck / AΛEΞANΔP[OY] Zeus seated left holding eagle and sceptre, right leg drawn back. Thunderbolt and I (Z) in left field, dolphin below throne.
Price 501; Müller 16
Consigned to Forvm
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2319.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Amphipolis mint, 315-294 BC35 viewsAR 4Dr., 27.2mm, 17.26g, aEF
Head of Herakles wearing lion skin knotted at neck / AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus enthroned left holding eagle and sceptre, legs crossed, Λ over torch in left field, YE monogram under throne.
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Consigned to Forvm
Price 465; Müller 34
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2336.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Arados mint, 311-300 BC38 viewsAR 4dr, 25.9mm, 16.72g, aEF
Head of Herakles right wearing lion skin headdress / BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus enthroned left holding eagle and sceptre, legs crossed. Anchor and monogram in left field, Π under throne. Scarce issue of Seleukos I.
Price 3349; Müller 1504
Consigned to Forvm
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2249.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Chios 290-275 BC71 viewsAR drachm, 17.7mm, 4.15g, VF
Head Herakles right, clad in lion's skin knotted at neck / [AΛEΞANΔPOY] behind Zeus seated left on throne with back, holding eagle and sceptre. M within O above bunch of grapes with tendril in left field. Scarce.
Ex: Harlan Berk
Price 2324, Müller 1529
Certificate of Authenticity from David R. Sear, ACCS
Consigned to Forvm
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2360.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Corinth 310-290 BC19 viewsAR tetradrachm, 16.83g, Choice VF
Head Herakles right wearing lion skin knotted at neck / BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY, Zeus seated left on throne ornamented with Nikai, holding eagle and sceptre; statue of Athena in left field, OΛ within wreath under throne. Rare.
Price 694; Noe, Sicyon 37
Consigned to Forvm
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2202.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Kolophon 310-301 BC67 viewsAR drachm, 18mm, 4.28g, aUnc
Head Herakles right clad in lion's skin / AΛEΞANΔPO[Y] Zeus seated left, right leg drawn back and feet on stool. KA in left field, crescent under throne.
Ex: Calgary Coin
Price 1825a, Müller 274v
Consigned to Forvm
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2297.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Kolophon 323-319 BC61 viewsAR drachm, 16.8mm, 4.31g, aEF/VF
Head Herakles right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck / AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left holding eagle and sceptre, right leg drawn back and feet on stool. Lyre in left field.
Price 1768, Müller 240
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2349.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Kolophon 323-319 BC24 viewsAR drachm, 17.5mm, 4.3g, Nice EF
Head Herakles right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck / AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, right foot back and feet on stool. Caduceus below throne, spear head outer right field.
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Price 1756, Müller 208
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2215.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Lampsakos 328-323 BC45 viewsAR drachm, 16.9mm, 4.29g, Nice VF
Head Herakles right wearing lion skin knotted at neck / AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left holding eagle and sceptre, feet forward resting on stool. Club in left field. Early lifetime issue, featuring a youthful portrait.
Price 1347; Müller 136; Thompson 8, series II
For Sale
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2335.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Lampsakos mint, 328-323 BC18 viewsAR drachm, 16mm, 4.25g, aEF
Head Herakles right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck / AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, both feet forward. Demeter facing with two torches in left field, Δ over O below throne. Lifetime issue.
Price 1356, Müller 398; Thompson 71, series V
Sold by Forvm
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2296.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Magnesia 319-305 BC104 viewsAR drachm, 16.5mm, 4.3g, EF
Head Herakles right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck / AΛEΞANΔP[OY] Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, right leg drawn back. MTo in left field, ATI under throne, B in right field.
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Price 1957
2 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2350.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, 323-319 BC21 viewsAR drachm, 17mm, 4.27g, EF
Head Herakles right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck / AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, right leg drawn back and feet on stool. Bee below throne, spear-head outer right field
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Price 1938v; Müller 323
Consigned to Forvm
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2320.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Miletos 300-295 BC33 viewsAR drachm, 17.6mm,4.25g, gVF
Head of young Herakles right, clad in lion's skin / AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus enthoned facing left, holding eagle and sceptre, his legs are crossed and resting on a stool, helmet crest in left field, double axe under throne.
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Price 2138, Müller 1133
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2305.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Mylasa 300-280 BC47 viewsSilver drachm, 18.9mm, 4.13g, aVF
Head Herakles right wearing lion skin headdress / [AΛ]EΞANΔPO[Y] Zeus seated left holding eagle and sceptre, legs crossed. Artemis Kindyas figure in left field, Σ below throne. Rare.
Ex: Forvm Ancient Coins
Price 2493A
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2317.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Mylasa 300-280 BC73 viewsSilver tetradrachm, 29.6mm, 17.01g, Nice VF
Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress / AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, double axe left field.
Price 2074; Müller 1128.
2 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2216.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Sardes 324-323 BC60 viewsAR drachm, 16.6mm, 4.23g, gVF
Head Herakles right wearing lion skin headdress / AΛEΞANΔPO[Y] Zeus seated left holding eagle and sceptre, both feet forward resting on stool. IoP erased from die in left field, rose below throne. Lifetime issue.
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Price 2570; Thompson 83a, series X
Note: Reason for erasure of the monogram in the left field for this die is not known.
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2266.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Side 323-317 BC87 viewsAR drachm, 17mm, 4.28g, Ch EF
Head Herakles right wearing lion's skin headdress / [A]ΛEΞANΔPO[Y] Zues seated left, right leg drawn back and feet on stool, holding eagle and sceptre. A under throne.
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Price 2968, Müller 1665
Lawrence Woolslayer
Larry W2365.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Sidon 333-305 BC22 viewsAV stater, 8.54g, VF
Head Athena right wearing crested Corinthian helmet / AΛEΞANΔPOY, winged Nike standing 3/4 to left, holding wreath and stylis; barley corn in right field.
Price 3464; Newell (Dated) 6, pl. 1, #9
Consigned to Forvm
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2321.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Tarsos 323-317 BC53 viewsSilver tetradrachm, 28.3mm, 17.09g, VF
Head Herakles right wearing lion skin knotted at neck / BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left holding eagle and sceptre, both feet forward resting on stool. Nike bearing wreath in left field, ATI monogram below throne. Cabinet toned.
Ex: Harlan Berk
Price 3038a, this also same as cover coin on Price dust jacket.
1 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2262.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Teos 323-319 BC59 viewsAR drachm, 17.8mm, 4.06g, gF
Head Herakles right clad in lion's skin headdress / [A]ΛEΞANΔP[OY] Zeus seated left, right leg drawn back, holding eagle and sceptre. Πo in left field, AT below throne.
Price 2266, Müller 846
Consigned to Forvm
Lawrence Woolslayer
Alexander_AE20~0.jpg
Alexander III, AE2081 viewsuncertain mint in Asia minor, ca. 323-310 BC
20mm, 4.72g
obv: head of Alexander as Herakles right
rev: BAΣIΛEOΣ between club and bow in bow case, below, racing torch
countermark (lion's head)
Price 2800
3 commentsareich
J03-Alex III.jpg
Alexander III, AR drachm, 336-323 BCE63 viewsAR drachm of Alexander III “The Great”, 17 mm, 4.13 grams, seemingly lifetime issue (336–323 BCE), however, dated 323 -317 BCE. Lampsacus mint.

Obverse: Head of Herakles wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: Zeus seated left, legs parallel, on stool, holding eagle and scepter. Legend in Greek AΛEΞANΔPOY. Monograms in the left field an "A" with an "overhang" - below is a serpent.

Reference: Price 212, 1363, SNG Vol. VIII 441, Margaret Thompsons' "Alexander's Drachm Mints II" as 148 to 152.

Added to collection: June 5, 2005
Daniel Friedman
1~0.jpg
Alexander III, Cyprus Amathus34 viewsAlexander the great AE
Amathus,Cyprus
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles right
Reverse: Club and quiver,below ,eagle flying left,star over quiver.Between ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ
16.47mm 4.48g
PRICE 3090 ,TZIAMBAZIS 38/3

maik
alexander_III_price_1560.jpg
Alexander III, drachm, Price 156032 viewsAlexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C. Silver drachm, Price 1560, SNG Cop 972, nice VF, Troas, Abydus? mint, 4.229g, 17.4mm, 0o, posthumous, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse “ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ”, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long vertical scepter in left, right leg drawn back, ME monogram left, ivy leaf under throne. Price attributes this coin to Abydus but notes that the attribution can be made "only with caution." ex FORVMPodiceps
Alexander_price1799.jpg
Alexander III, drachme, Price 179920 viewsMacedonian kingdom, Alexander III, Colophon, Price 1799

Obv.: Head of Heracles wearing lionskin
Rev.: Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre ; wreath at left ; ALEXANDROU at right ; N beneath throne
1 commentsSteff V
ATGshield.jpg
Alexander III, macedonian shield/helmet27 viewsAlexander the great

obv.: shield, thunderbolt
rev.: helmet, BA below, o in Pi right (?)

Price 401A
Steff V
9899LG.jpg
Alexander III, macedonian shield/helmet, Sardis52 viewsMacedonian Kings, Alexander III, The Great, 336-323 BC. AE 15mm (3.41 gm). Sardis mint. Cf. Price 2614 (unlisted monogram)

Obv.: Macedonian shield with kerykeion.
Rev.: Macedonian helmet; in between, B-A, below, monogram; to the right, rose; to the left kerykeion.
2 commentsSteff V
Alexander_Tet_Alabanda_Price2464_AR33x30_16_32g.jpg
Alexander III, tetradrachm, Alabanda65 viewsAlexander III (336-323 BC)
AR tetradrachm 33x30mm, 16.32 g
Alabanda, ca. 169/8.
Head of Heracles right in lion-skin headdress
ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡοΥ, Zeus seated left, holding eagle and grasping scepter, Pegasus alighting left before, date E (Year 5) under throne
Price 2464.

ex Freeman & Sear

CLICK PICTURE FOR A LARGER AND BETTER VERSION
1 commentsareich
AlexTetTyros_Price3534_Müller1592_28mm_17_1g.jpg
Alexander III, tetradrachm, Tyre245 views28mm, 17.1g
obv: head of Herakles wearing lion-skin head dress right
rev: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, rev: Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter, monograms
Price 3534, Müller 1592

CLICK for full-size picture
9 commentsareich
Macedon_Alexander_1.jpg
Alexander III, the Great50 viewsMacedonian Kingdom
Alexander (III) the Great
AE13
c.323-315 BC
Salamis, Cyprus
(no legend)
Facing gorgon at center of ornamented Macedonian shield
B | A
Macedonian helmet
Caduceus in exergue
13mm
Price 3158; Müller --
WindchildPunico
4215_4216.jpg
Alexander III, the Great, AE17, Bow, Bowcase and Club17 viewsAE17 (Drachma?)
Greek Provincial
Macedon
Alexander III, the Great
King: 336 - 323BC
Issued: 325 - 310BC
16.5mm 4.28gr
O: NO LEGEND; Head of young Herakles, wearing lionskin headdress, right.
R: NO LEGEND; Bow and bow case above club.
Exergue: BA, between bow/bowcase and club; thunderbolt, below club.
SNG Alpha Bank 782; Price 376.
tina0116g11 121098479798
4/27/13 4/30/17
Nicholas Z
Alexander_III,_King_of_Macedon_Silver.jpg
Alexander III, The Great, King of Macedon 336-323 BC. Silver Tetradrachm87 viewsPrice 3725a
struck betweem 317-311 DC. BABYLON mint,

Obverse: Head of Hercules right wearing lion skin headdress knotted at the base of neck
Reverse: ALEXANDROU behind Zeus enthroned left holding eagle & sceptre, XA monogram before on left field, monogram MYP in wreath beneath throne
17.1 gram _20800 Sold
2 commentsAntonivs Protti
Alexander_b2.jpg
Alexander III. "The Great" tetradrachm133 viewsBabylon mint, ca. 325-323 B.C.
Price #3679: lifetime issue
17.00 gr., 28 mm
1 commentsTibsi
Silber_Drachme_Alexander_yhe_Great.JPG
ALEXANDER III. DER GROSSE (336 - 323) KöNIGREICH MAKEDONIEN Griechenland 33 viewsDrachme, ca. 310-301, Abydos.
Vs.: Kopf des jugendlichen Herakles im Löwenskalp rechts.
Rs: ALEXANDROU. Zeus mit Adler und Szepter auf Thron nach links sitzend, im Feld links Monogramm, unter dem Thron Efeublatt.
3,66 g. 16,5 mm. Price: 1527 _2866
Antonivs Protti
Silber_Drachme_Alexander.JPG
Alexander III. der Große, 336 - 323 v. Chr. GRIECHEN MAKEDONISCHE KÖNIGE 42 viewsAR Drachme, ca. 323 - 319 v. Chr., Mzst. "Kolophon"
Vs: Kopf des Herakles mit Löwenfell n. r.
Rs: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, Zeus mit Adler thront n. l., l. Stern, r. Lanzenspitze
4,0 gr 17 mm, Price 1759; Müller 317 _4606
Antonivs Protti
Alexander_III_Drachm_VF.jpg
ALEXANDER III. THE GREAT - DRACHM - COLOPHON 75 viewsALEXANDER III. THE GREAT - DRACHM - COLOPHON - ZEUS - HERAKLES - SPEAR - IVY LEAF

Alexander III. The Great

Colophon

Drachm

Obv. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin right

Rev. ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ
Zeus seated left with sceptre and eagle. rightt in field spear head, under throne ivy leaf

Condition:very fine fine

4.2 g., 18 mm

Price 1764

Ex Gitbud Naumann

Philoromaos
Alexander_III_Drachm_EF.jpg
ALEXANDER III. THE GREAT - DRACHM - COLOPHON 150 views ALEXANDER III. THE GREAT - DRACHM - COLOPHON - ZEUS - HERAKLES - SPEAR HEAD - STAR


Alexander III. The Great

Colophon

Drachm

Obv. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin right

Rev. ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ
Zeus seated left with sceptre and eagle. left in field star, right in field spear head

Condition: almost extremely fine

4.2 g., 18 mm

Price 1759

Ex Gitbud Naumann
6 commentsPhiloromaos
Alexander_Price_6.jpg
Alexander Lifetime AR Tetradrachm9 viewsKings of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great' (336-323 BC). AR Tetradrachm
(26mm, 17.00g, 9h). Amphipolis, c. 332-326 BC.
Obv: Head of Herakles r., wearing lion skin.
Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros seated l.; janiform head in l. field.
Price 6; Troxell, Studies, Issue A3. Some roughness, VF
Saint Paul Antiques Auction 2 Lot 10, March 18, 2017.
orfew
Alexander Lifetime Tet Price 57.JPG
Alexander Lifetime Tetradrachm, Price 5723 viewsAR Tetradrachm, Amphipolis mint, 336-323 BC

Obverse: Head of Alexander right wearing lion skin headdress.
Reverse: Zeus seated left holding eagle and scepter. Globe left
Price 57
25mm, 17.1gm
Jerome Holderman
fullsizeoutput_2464.jpeg
Alexander Price 3836 Obverse4 viewsPrice 3836 Alexander the Great tetradrachm: Susa mint, circa 320-325 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus Aëtophoros left, holding eagle and sceptre; monogram under throne. Very Rare. Both have similar style.Luis R
fullsizeoutput_2462.jpeg
Alexander Price 3836 Obverse11 viewsPrice 3836 Alexander the Great tetradrachm: Susa mint, circa 320-325 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus Aëtophoros left, holding eagle and sceptre; monogram under throne. Very Rare. Both have similar style.1 commentsLuis R
fullsizeoutput_2469.jpeg
Alexander Price 3836 Reverse6 viewsPrice 3836 Alexander the Great tetradrachm: Susa mint, circa 320-325 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus Aëtophoros left, holding eagle and sceptre; monogram under throne. Very Rare. Both have similar style.Luis R
fullsizeoutput_2463.jpeg
Alexander Price 3836 Reverse5 viewsPrice 3836 Alexander the Great tetradrachm: Susa mint, circa 320-325 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus Aëtophoros left, holding eagle and sceptre; monogram under throne. Very Rare. Both have similar style.Luis R
price_3000.jpg
Alexander tetradrachm Price 300025 viewsTarsos mint. Among the first issues struck of all the Alexander coins. B under the throne.Chance Vandal
price_3025.jpg
Alexander tetradrachm Price 302544 viewsAlexander lifetime Tarsos. Plough to the left. Bunch of grapes under the throne.2 commentsChance Vandal
price_3203.jpg
Alexander tetradrachm Price 320238 viewsDamaskos issue, 330-323 bc forepart of ram to the left, pellet between struts of throne, ΔA below. I don't see any pellet (globule) makes it a Price 32021 commentsChance Vandal
price_6.jpg
Alexander tetradrachm Price 631 views Amphipolis mint. Lifetime issue. Janiform-head vase to the left. Looks like a worn die on the lion-skin headress and a punch on the thundergod's hip.1 commentsChance Vandal
alex_tet.jpg
Alexander the Great61 viewsAlexander III "The Great". 336-323 BC. AR Tetradrachm, struck circa 325-323 BC.
Obverse: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand, sceptre in left; grapes and M before, monogram below throne.
Price 3641b (same obverse die); Müller 692. 26mm, 16.62 g. Babylon mint.
b70
033.JPG
Alexander the Great36 views336-323 B.C.
Silver Drachm
4.11 gm, 17 mm
Obv.: Head of Alexander as Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress
Rev.: Zeus enthroned left holding eagle and scepter, mintmaster's monogram AH (or ΔH) to left,
AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ to right
Miletos mint, 325-323 B.C.
Price 2090; Müller 763.

Ex R.J. O'Hara (this coin featured on his most excellent webpage: http://rjohara.net/coins/alexander-lifetime/ Coin No. RJO 103)
Jaimelai
Capture_00001_(2).JPG
Alexander the Great37 views336-323 B.C.
Silver Drachm
3.90 gm, 17 mm
Obv.: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin
Rev.: Zeus enthroned left holding large eagle and scepter, forepart of Pegasus at left with monogram A Ξ above, cross strut under throne,
AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ to right
Abydos mint, 328-323 B.C.
Price 1506; Müller 609

Interesting note: This coin was previously purchased from B.A. Seaby, Ltd., London, on 9-12-63 for $2.10.
1 commentsJaimelai
Capture_00016_(2).JPG
Alexander the Great29 views336-323 B.C.
Silver Drachm
4.00 gm, 18-20 mm
Obv.: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin
Rev.: Zeus enthroned left holding eagle and scepter, K at left, crescent under throne, AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ to right
Colophon mint, 310-301 B.C.
Price 1826; Müller 274.
Jaimelai
Alexander_Akko_Price_3283.JPG
Alexander the Great43 viewsMacedon, Kings
Alexander the Great
Date: 315/4 BC (Year 32)
Size: AR Tetradrachm 17.12g
Mint: Akko-Ptolemais
Obverse: Heracles r.
Reverse: Zeus w/eagle
Reference: Price 3283
2 commentsJohn K
006~1.JPG
Alexander the Great31 views294-260 B.C.
Silver Drachm
4.08 gm, 18 mm
Obv.: Head of Alexander as Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress
Rev.: Zeus enthroned left holding eagle and scepter, city monogram MI to left, AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ to right
Miletos mint, 294-260 B.C.
Price 2151; Müller 1057.

Ex R.J. O'Hara (this coin featured on his most excellent webpage: http://rjohara.net/coins/alexander-posthumous/ Coin No. RJO 104)
1 commentsJaimelai
Alexander_the_Great.jpg
Alexander the Great22 viewsMacdonian Kingdom
336-323BC
AR tetradrachm
15.52g
Price 2930
Samson L2
Alexander_the_Great_002.png
Alexander the Great62 viewsIssuer: Alexander III "the Great"
Date ruled: 336-323 BC

Date struck: 332-326 BC (lifetime)
Mint: Amphipolis, Macedon

Denomination: Tetradrachm
Reference: Price 13

Size: 25 mm
Weight: 17.2 g

Obv: Head of Herakles wearing lion's scalp right
Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, legs open, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right; amphora in left field

Appears in: Lighting - which one's better?

Click here to see the new photo. (Please comment/rate there.)
4 commentsViriathus
IMG_4652_+_4655.jpg
Alexander the Great82 viewsIssuer: Alexander III "the Great"
Date ruled: 336-323 BC

Date struck: 332-326 BC (lifetime)
Mint: Amphipolis, Macedon

Denomination: Tetradrachm
Reference: Price 13

Size: 25 mm
Weight: 17.2 g

Obv: Head of Herakles wearing lion's scalp right
Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, legs open, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right; amphora in left field

Appears in: Lighting - which one's better?

Click here to see the old photo.
2 commentsViriathus
price3143.jpg
Alexander the Great22 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Alexander III 'the Great' Æ18.
Salamis mint, struck c.332-323 BC.
Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress;
Rev: ΣA over Club / ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ / quiver (gorytos) within bow / A below.
Price 3143; SNG Cop. 1049; BMC (Cyprus) 86-7.
(dealer's image, with thanks)
OldMoney
IMG_4617.PNG
Alexander the Great35 viewsCNG description:

KINGS of MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’. 336-323 BC. AR Tetradrachm (25.5mm, 17.19 g, 11h). Babylon mint. Struck under Stamenes or Archon, circa 324/3 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, horizontal ear above M; monogram below throne. Price 3611 corr. (symbol). Good VF, lightly toned, slight die shift on obverse, reverse a little off center. Ex CNG.
4 commentsMolinari
alexanderx.jpg
Alexander the Great43 viewsObv: Head of beardless Herakles, right, wearing lion skin headdress.
Rev: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ in exergue; Charioteer in Biga right, Trident below.
"Alexandria (Antigoneia)" mint, struck c.310-301 BC. Extremely rare!

Attribution to this mint has been questioned of late (Meadows, NC 2004),
although no firmer alternative has yet been put forward. A mint in the Troad
seems to be likely, given that three were found in the excavations at Troy.

This is an extremely desirable and very difficult to find item. It appears that
there are none on any of the modern sales databases, and I know of only
one other that has been offered via a 'small seller' on an online auction site.

There is one in the British museum, at least one in Berlin (I-B), one in
the Portolos collection (Athens); another in Paris (B 80); the three that
were found at Troy, the one offered online, and now this one.
Please feel free to let me know of any other known specimens.

Among the rarest bronzes of the series.
Price 1587; Gaebler p.169, 7 pl.XXXI,26;
Bellinger Troy A1; BM 1921,0213.196.
(dealer's image {edited})
OldMoney
alexamphipolis.jpg
Alexander the Great AR Tetradrachm 325-320 BC21 viewsOBVERSE: Head of Herakles clad in the skin of the Nemean lion
REVERSE: Zeus Aeotophoros enthroned left, ALEXANDROY in right field, Cornucopia in left field.

This classic type was probably minted at Amphipolis in Macedon at or near the end of Alexander's brief reign (333-323BC). The lion was the symbol of Persia and the obverse likely represents his conquest of that Empire. The Figure of Zeus enthroned is almost the same as that of Baal on the silver shekels of the Persian satraps. The significance of the conquest of the East by Greeks was not lost on Alexander or his contemporaries
Price 104 (ref.Wildwinds) Weight 17.1 gm
1 commentsdaverino
aluncleaned.jpg
Alexander the Great AR Tetradrachm 332-323 BC12 viewsObverse: Head of Herakles in Lion Skin Headdress
Reverse: Zeus enthroned holding eagle and staff, ALEXANDROY in right field., Rooster mint mark in left field.

A lifetime issue minted at Amphipolis, the coin cracked in antiquity due to silver crystallization and is held together by carbonate encrustation. It was left uncleaned. A handsome coin nonetheless. Price 79 (ref. Wildwinds) Weight 16.6 grams
daverino
Alexandre le Grand Tetrad..jpg
Alexander The Great Silver Tetradrachm42 viewsPella Mint, 285/275 B.C., 29 mm
Obv: Head of Herakles
Rev: Zeus with eagle, monograms K M
Ref: Price Cat. # 563 of The British Museum
1 commentsJean Paul D
Alexander_the_Great.png
Alexander the Great ( or Alexander III ) Tetradrachm Lifetime Issue. 135 viewsAncient Greek / Alexander the Great (336 - 323) BC Tetradrachm

Obverse : head of Alexander the Great as Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck.

Reverse :Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, sickle and M before, AΛEΞAN∆POY ( means Alexander in Ancient Greek ) behind . ΦIΛH monogram under throne over BAΣIΛEΩΣ ( means King in Ancient Greek ) .

Babylon mint, struck 325 to 323 BC , lifetime issue, 17.01 gr . Very rare . Choice gVF.


**A Lifetime Issue , according to FORVM Classical Numismatics Discussion Board .

References : Müller 703, Price 3624*.

The Sam Mansourati Collection.


Sam
Alexander_the_Great__Tetradrachm_Lifetime_Issue_.png
Alexander the Great (336 - 323) BC ( or Alexander III ) Tetradrachm Lifetime Issue.46 viewsObverse : head of Alexander the Great as Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck.

Reverse :Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, sickle and M before, AΛEΞAN∆POY ( means Alexander in Ancient Greek ) behind . ΦIΛH monogram under throne over BAΣIΛEΩΣ ( means King in Ancient Greek ) .

Babylon mint, struck 325 to 323 BC , lifetime issue, 17.01 gr . Very rare . Choice gVF.


**A Lifetime Issue , according to FORVM Classical Numismatics Discussion Board .

References : Müller 703, Price 3624*.

EX The Sam Mansourati Collection.

Jovan Lee Delavega Ancient Coins Collection.
Jovan D
Alexander_III_4d.jpg
Alexander the Great * Colophon, Ionia, 337 to 323 BC. Silver drachm147 views
Alexander III * Colophon, Ionia, Macedonian Kingdom * AR drachm

Obv: Portrait head of Alexander right, wearing the lion's skin in style of Herakles.
Rev: Zeus enthroned seated left, holding a scepter in left hand, arm raised, and eagle in his right hand, arm extended to front, with [A]ΛEXANΔΡOY vertical in left field. Interesting set of mint marks: Male lion's head left-facing in left field, above ornate Φ - ornate pentagram below the throne.

Exergue: (None)

Mint: Colophon
Struck: 301-297 BC.
* Posthumous issue
* Issued under Lysimachos

Size: 17.34 x 17.18 mm.
Weight: 4.11 grams
Die axis: 180°

Condition: Apparent in photo which is quite faithful to the coin in hand. Very lovely bright and clear silvery luster.

Refs:*
Price 1836d

1 commentsTiathena
087.JPG
Alexander the Great - Bronze Half Unit46 views336-323 B.C.
4.03 gm, 17 mm
Obv.: Macedonian shield with head of Herakles wearing lion skin facing slightly right in center
Rev.: Macedonian helmet; B A to either side
grain ear (or rose bud) below left
Price 2807
Jaimelai
001~3.JPG
Alexander the Great - Bronze Half Unit48 views336-323 B.C.
4.20 gm, 16 mm
Obv.: Macedonian shield with thunderbolt in center (boss), double crescents alternating with star design
Rev.: Crested, laureate Macedonian helmet; B-A to either side; thunderbolt below
Macedonian mint (325-310 B.C.)
Price 416a
2 commentsJaimelai
004~0.JPG
Alexander the Great - Bronze Half Unit53 views336-323 B.C.
3.39 gm, 15 mm
Obv.: Head of Apollo right, hair bound with tainia
Rev.: Horse galloping right,
AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ above,
star below.
Price 349 ; Sear 6744 var.
3 commentsJaimelai
024~0.JPG
Alexander the Great - Bronze Half Unit37 views336-323 B.C.
4.79 gm, 15.5 mm
Obv.: Head of Apollo right, hair bound with tainia
Rev.: Horse galloping right, AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ above, kantharos below.
Price 345; Sear 6744 var.
1 commentsJaimelai
005~3.JPG
Alexander the Great - Bronze Quarter Unit32 views336-323 B.C.
1.58 gm, 12 mm
Obv.: Head of Heracles, beardless, wearing lionskin, right; dotted border
Rev.: AΛE / ΞANΔΡOΥ above and beneath club right; bow and quiver below; linear border.
Price 267; Sear 6745v.
Jaimelai
140.jpg
Alexander the Great - Bronze Unit84 views336-323 B.C.
5.08 gm, 18 mm
Obv.: Head of Herakles right, in lion skin headdress
Rev.: AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, club above, bow in case below,
dolphin in ex..
Macedonian mint
Price 323
(Muller 541; Drama 91; SNG Cop 1057)
4 commentsJaimelai
018~0.JPG
Alexander the Great - Bronze Unit54 views336-323 B.C.
6.56 gm, 19 mm
Obv.: Head of Alexander as Herakles right, in lion skin headdress
Rev.: AΛEΞANΔΡ, club above, bow and quiver below, thunderbolt above, Δ in ex.
Macedonian mint
Price 275 (Drama 104, E. Macedonia; SNG Cop 1035)
2 commentsJaimelai
004~1.JPG
Alexander the Great - Bronze Unit37 views336-323 B.C.
5.65 gm, 17 mm
Obv.: Head of Alexander as Herakles right, in lion skin headdress
Rev.: B A, bow and quiver above, club below, mouse in ex.
Macedonian mint
325-310 B.C.
Price 382, (SNG Cop 1027)
Jaimelai
002a.jpg
Alexander the Great - Bronze Unit29 views336-323 B.C.
5.85 gm, 17 mm
Obv.: Head of young Herakles right, in lion skin headdress
Rev.: B A, bow and quiver above, club below, trident in ex.
Macedonian mint
325-310 B.C.
Price 386, Sear 6742v
Jaimelai
Alexander the Great - Lifetime issue.jpg
Alexander the Great - Lifetime issue24 viewsSilver drachm, Price 2544, VF, slightly porous, Lydia, Sardes mint, 4.179g, 16.41mm, 0o, c. 334 - 323 A.D.; obverse head of Herakles right clad in lion's scalp; reverse , Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, scepter in left, male head left in Phrygian cap left, trisceles under throneDumanyu2
image~3.jpg
Alexander the Great . 325-323 BC . AR hemidrachm .25 views Alexander the Great . 325-323 BC . AR hemidrachm 12mm, 1.92g . Babylon mint lifetime issue .
Obverse : Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin .
Reverse : Zeus seated left, holding an eagle and sceptre
M in left field, ALEXANDROY behind .
Price 3605.
Ex Baumheckel. Ex JHE.
Vladislav D
alexander_drachm.jpg
Alexander the Great 336-323 b.c.214 viewsLifetime Issue Silver Drachm
aEF, 4.253g 16.3mm 45 deg, Lampsakos mint, Price 1356, Muller 398; Thompson 71, Series V
O: Herakles head right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck.
R:Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, both feet forward, Demeter facing with two torches in left field.
3 commentsb70
20180222_114742.jpg
Alexander the great AE unit, Phoenicia, Sidon mint, 333-305 B.C.8 viewsObv. Head of beardless Heracles right wearing lion skin headdress.
Rev. Quiver on bow and club, Legend: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, Symbol: ΣΙ (Below)
References: Price 3492
19mm and 8.03 grams.
Canaan
Alexander_the_Great_AR_Drachm__Kolophon_Mint_.jpg
Alexander the Great AR Drachm - Kolophon Mint103 viewsKings of Macedon, Alexander III “The Great” AR Drachm 18mm 4.20g Posthumous issue 310-301 BC.
O: Head Herakles r. in lionskin.
R: Zeus enthroned l., one foot back, holding eagle and sceptre, ALEXANDROU to r, B over TI in l. field, G beneath throne.
SG - , Price 1808. _6930 _sold
Antonivs Protti
AlexSmall.jpg
Alexander the Great Bronze18 viewsA lifetime issue Alexander the Great bronze coin.

Obverse: the head of a young man, probably Apollo, inside a dotted border.

Reverse: a horse rearing up, with the name ALEXANDROY written above, and the letter Phi, a mintmark, written below

Minted in Macedonia, 336-323 BC, probably at the royal mint at the capital city of Pella.

Attribution: Price 361
chuy1530
Alexander_2b.jpg
Alexander the Great drachm43 viewsNK monogram and bee
lifetime issue, 334-323 BC
Sardes mint
Price 2576
1 commentsTibsi
kolophon_AIII.jpg
Alexander the Great Drachm, Colophon Mint. Price 182316 viewsAlexander the Great (336-323 B.C.) Drachm, 4,2g. 18mm. Colophon Mint. Obv: Head of Herakles wearing lion's skin / Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔPOY, Zeus on throne holding eagle; left in field K,A, under throne: Φ. Price: 1823.Podiceps
Alexander_The_Great_Gorytos~0.JPG
Alexander The Great Gorytos146 viewsAlexander The Great, bronze, gorytos type, four chalkoi (hemiobol), 336 - 323 BC, 17mm, 4.4g
Western Asia Minor, M.J. Price 322, Müller 1699, SNG Saraglos 843, SNG Milano 145,
SNG Stockholm 284, SNG Cop. 1059, McClean 3516.
This Alexander bronze type, like the first, also features Herakles on the obverse and a soldier's weapons on the reverse.
But in this case the weapons are a gorytos (case for bow and quiver) along with a club, and the bow lies within the gorytos
rather than underneath the quiver.
Often the gorytos is referred to as a bow case, but it also holds arrows as well so is probably best referred to as a gorytos.
Sometimes it's erroneously referred to as an arrow case or quiver, by dealers as well as attribution references,
with no distinction made between the gorytos and quiver bronze types.
SNG Manchester mistakenly referred to it as a bull's head based upon the worn specimen they had to attribute.
Gorytos bronzes are seen less frequently than the quiver bronzes. The mint mark on this particular variety, below the gorytos, is the letter E.
Romanorvm
20181212_4340018.jpg
Alexander the great lifetime issue14 viewsKINGS of MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’. 336-323 BC. AR Tetradrachm (21mm, 17.22 g, 12h). Tarsos mint, “officina B”. Struck under Balakros or Menes, circa 333-327 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; B below throne. Price 3000; Newell, Tarsos, Series I, Second Group, 4 (unlisted obv. die). VF, lightly toned, compact flan, slightly off center on obverse.

Ex Classical Numismatic Group XXXIII (15 March 1995), lot 148 (part of).
Ex CNG auction 434 lot 18
arash p
3.jpg
Alexander the great tetradrachm58 viewsObverse:Head of Alexander as Herakles wearing lions skin
Reverse:Zeus on throne holding eagle;S at left and SI under throne
SIDON
25.31mm 15.74g
PRICE False85 same reverse dies

MODERN STRUCK FAKE
One good fake

I bought it (2005) as original 300euro from not blacklisted seller.
maik
AlexanderTetra~0.jpg
Alexander the Great Tetradrachm11 viewsA lifetime issue tetradrachm of Alexander the Great. 24.5mm, 16.4g. Minted from 336-323 BC.

Obverse: Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck

Reverse ALEXANDROU, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, right leg forward, feet on low footstool, crescent horns left on left

Attribution: Price 89, Müller Alexander 259, Demanhur 579 - 613, SNG Cop 674
chuy1530
alex.jpg
Alexander the great Tetradrachm21 viewsAlexandre III, Tarsos 327-323 BC Tétradrachme 17,12g
A/ Tête d'Heraclès, imberbe, à dr. coiffé de la peau de Lion.
R/ AΛEΞANΔPOY , Zeus aétophore, demi nu, assis à g., s'appuyant sur un sceptre, à g. un gouvernail, globule sous le trône et à dr.
Price 3018, Tarsos mint
Brennos
Alexander_tetra.jpg
Alexander the Great Tetradrachm, Amphipolis Mint. Price 45921 viewsSilver tetradrachm, 16.7g, maximum diameter 26mm, Amphipolis mint, posthumous, c. 315 - c. 294 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse ΑΛΕΞΑΝ∆ΡΟΥ, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long vertical scepter in left, right leg drawn back, holding eagle and scepter, Λ and torch l., Pegasus forepart r. under throne. Price 459Podiceps
Macedonian_Kingdom_1g_img.jpg
Alexander the Great, Alexander III, silver drachm, Abydus, Struck under Antigonos I Monophthalmos39 viewsObv:– Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:– ALEXANDPOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, lion right looking left in left field, Ivy Leaf beneath throne
Minted in Abydus mint. c. 310-301 BC. Struck under Antigonos I Monophthalmos.
Reference:– Price 1554. Müller 327. Thomson ADM II series XIV, 206-215.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1f_img.jpg
Alexander the Great, Alexander III, silver drachm, Abydus, Struck under Antigonos I Monophthalmos29 viewsObv:– Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:– ALEXANDPOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, MI monogram in left field, Ivy Leaf beneath throne
Minted in Abydus mint. circa 310-301 BC. Struck under Antigonos I Monophthalmos.
Reference:– Price 1527. Müller 254. Thomson ADM II series XIV, 247-65.
maridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1i_img.jpg
Alexander the Great, Alexander III, silver drachm, Colophon 38 viewsObv:– Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:– ALEXANDPOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, K in left field, F throne
Minted in Colophon mint. c. 310-301 BC
Reference:– Price cf 1823 (K monogram / F). Müller -
maridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1h_img.jpg
Alexander the Great, Alexander III, silver drachm, Magnesia ad Maeandrum, struck under Philip III Arrhidaios36 viewsObv:– Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:– ALEXANDPOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, bee right in left field; spear head in right field
Minted in Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint. circa 323-319 BC under Philip III Arrhidaios.
Reference:– Price 1936
maridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1e_img.jpg
Alexander the Great, Alexander III, silver tetradrachm, Marathus 78 viewsObv:– Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:– BASILEOS ALEXANDPOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, Anchor, EP monogram in left field, HD monogram beneath throne
Minted in Marathus mint.c. 323-300 BC
Reference:– Price 3438.

ex Coincraft, London
3 commentsmaridvnvm
ALEXANDER.jpg
Alexander the Great, Amphipolis, Thrace, c. 315 - 394 B.C.87 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Price 490, choice VF, 16.96g, 26.5mm, 90o, Amphipolis mint, c. 315 - 394 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right wearing lion head headdress; reverse ALEXANDROU, Zeus enthroned left holding eagle in right and scepter in left, L and torch left, OK monogram below; bold well centered strikesalem
amphipolis_alex_eagle.jpg
Alexander the Great, Amphipolis; eagle, Æ177 viewsAlexander the Great 336-323 B.C. 4g. 17mm. Mint: Amphipolis. Bronze. Obv. Head of Alexander as Herakles clad in lion's skin headdress. Rev. Eagle standing right on thunderbolt, head turned left, crescent?, ALEXAN/DROU. Sear 6743 var (instead of leaf in upper field left a crescent?), Cf. also M. Price 160a. Podiceps
Alexander_drachm.jpg
Alexander the Great, drachm19 viewsAlexander the Great. AR Drachm. Ionia, Colophon mint. Posthumous, c. 323-319 B.C.. Price 1769. Obverse: Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck. Reverse: Greek inscription, Zeus on throne, right leg drawn back, holding eagle and scepter, lyre left, A under throne. Ex Forvm.Lucas H
drach2.jpg
Alexander The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, (336 - 323 B.C.)73 viewsAR Drachm
Posthumous
O: Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck.
R: ΑΛΕΞΑΝ∆ΡΟΥ, Zeus seated left, right leg drawn back, eagle in right, long vertical scepter in left, X within Ω left, KH under throne.
Mylasa mint 310-300 B.C.
4.1g
16mm
Price 2480
1 commentsMat
Alexander_tet.jpg
Alexander The great, Mesembria, tetradrachm80 viewsKings of Macedon. Alexander III. "the Great" (336-323 BC). AR Tetradrachm (29 mm, 16.74 g). Civic issue, Mesembria mint, c. 250-187 BC.
Obv. Head of Herakles wearing lion's skin right.
Rev. BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, rev: Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter; to left, corinthian helmet above monogram.
Price p. 182, 992 var. (slightly different monogram).
ex Auctiones eAuction #10, Lot 12
2 commentsareich
platedTet.jpg
Alexander the Great, plated tetradrachm, imitating one of Pella mint72 views28mm, 10.97g
obv: head of Herakles wearing lion skin right
rev: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ; Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter, Macedonian helm to left, monogram below throne
seems to match most closely Price 625 but the monogram seems to have only two cross bars instead of three
ex Gitbud & Naumann
CLICK picture for a larger, sharper version
areich
Thrace_1i_img.jpg
Alexander the Great, silver tetradrachm, Mesembria 36 viewsObv:- Head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion-scalp headdress
Rev:- ΑΛΕΞΑΝ∆ΡΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Zeus seated left, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, Corinthian helmet right over ΠΑ monogram in inner left field under arm;
Minted in Mesembria c. 275 - 225 B.C.
References:- Karayotov p. 80 and pl. VII, 41 (O7/R18); Price 992; Müller 436
17.000g, 31.6mm, 180o

Ex- Forvm Ancient Coins
maridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1d_img.jpg
Alexander the Great, silver tetradrachm, Phaselis 57 viewsObv:– Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:– ALEXANDPOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, IA/F in left field
Minted in Phaselis mint. Civic issue, dated CY 11 (208/7 BC).
Reference:– Price 2849.
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Alexander_Tet_Alabanda.jpg
Alexander, Tet, Alabanda20 viewsAlabanda, 169-168
30 mm, 16.45 g
obv: head of Herakles wearing lion skin right
rev: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ; Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter, Pegasos to left, date (year 6 of local era) below throne
(Price 310, 2466. SNG Cop. 757)
ex Münzen und Medaillen GmbH, Auction 32, Lot 41 (26.05.2010)
areich
Alexander_Tet_Byblos.jpg
Alexander, Tet, Byblos85 viewsByblos, 330-320
obv: head of Herakles wearing lion skin right
rev: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ; Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter
Price 431, 3426. SNG Oxford 3009
Numismatica Ars Classica AG, Zürich M (2002), 2253.
Hess-Divo AG 317/147
Fritz Rudolf Künker GmbH & Co. KG 226/325
3 commentsareich
Alexander_tet1.jpg
Alexander, Tet, Byblos(?), 330-32031 viewsByblos(?), 330-320
27 mm, 16.95 g
obv: head of Herakles wearing lion skin right
rev: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ; Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter
(Price 3426; SNG Oxford cf. 3009)

ex De La Tour, ex Hess-Divo Auction 314/1083 (04.05.2009) and The Lugdunum Sale 1/ 25 (23.07.2013)
areich
Alexander_Tet_Mesembria.jpg
Alexander, Tet, Mesembria38 viewsMesembria, ca. 150-125 BC
31 mm, 16.25 g
obv: head of Herakles wearing lion skin right
rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter;Corinthian helmet and ΔA to left, ΓOP monogram below throne
(Price 1062)
areich
Alexander_Tet_Amphipolis_Price83_17_10g.jpg
Alexander, tetradrachm, Amphipolis, Price 8344 viewsAmphipolis mint, 336-323 BC
28x25 mm, 17.10 g
obv: head of Herakles wearing lion skin right
rev: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter; to left, TE monogram
Zeus seated left, holding spear and eagle
Price 83
areich
alexandre.JPG
Alexandre III de Macédoine (de 336 à 323 av. J.-C.)12 viewsDrachme d'Alexandre le Grand
frappé à Lampsaque en Troade
frappe posthume
non daté ( approximativement entre 310-301 avant JC)
4,14g
16mm
MUELLER 912
PRICE 1389a

Avers, tête d'Héraclès à droite, coiffé de la dépouille de lion (la léonté).
Revers, Zeus aétophore (qui porte l'aigle) assis les jambes croisés sur un trône à gauche, tenant un long sceptre. Devant, protomé de Pégase. Sous le trône, AΛ
ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟY
Alexandre
PYL
tetradrachme_alexandre-16,96g-27mm.JPG
Alexandre III de Macédoine (de 336 à 323 av. J.-C.)10 viewsTétradrachme d'Alexandre III de Macédoine
(Alexandre le Grand)
frappé à Sidé en Pamphylie
non daté (approximativement entre 325-320 avant JC)
16,96g
27mm
PRICE 2951
MUELLER 217 Dium en Pieriae

Avers anépigraphe, tête d'Héraklès (Hercule) à droite, coiffée de la léonté.
Revers, Zeus (Jupiter) aétophore (porteur d'aigle) assis à gauche sur un trône avec dossier, les jambes parallèles, nu jusqu'à la ceinture, tenant un aigle posé sur sa main droite et un long sceptre bouleté de la gauche. ΔI dans le champ gauche. Un monogramme sous le siège.
AΛEΞANΔPOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ
ALEXANDROU BASILEWS
Alexandre roi
PYL
Ancient_Greek__Alexander_the_Great_Drachm.jpg
Ancient Greek / Alexander the Great (336 - 323) BC Drachm49 viewsPhilip III Arrhidaios. 323-317 BC. AR Drachm . In the name of Alexander III. Kolophon mint. Struck under Menander or Kleitos, circa 322-319 BC.
OBVERSE : Head of Alexander, as Hercules, clad in lion’s skin.
REVERSE : Zeus Aëtophoros seated left holding eagle and scepter, Lyre before.

17.9 MM AND 4.16 GRAMS , VF . Price 1768.


From the Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
253-3-horz.jpg
Anglo-Gallic Coinage, Edward The Black Prince, 1355-1375 Aquitaine30 viewsPoitiers Mint

Hardi d'Argent (type of coin) - Roberts #6832

Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall, Prince of Aquitaine, KG (1330 –1376) was the eldest son of King Edward III of England and his wife Philippa of Hainault as well as father to King Richard II of England.

He was called Edward of Woodstock in his early life, after his birthplace, and has more recently been popularly known as the Black Prince. He was an exceptional military leader, and his victories over the French at the Battles of Crécy and Poitiers made him very popular during his lifetime. In 1348 he became the first Knight of the Garter, of whose Order he was one of the founders.

Edward died one year before his father, becoming the first English Prince of Wales not to become King of England. The throne passed instead to his son Richard II, a minor, upon the death of Edward III.

Edward was created Earl of Chester on 18 May 1333, Duke of Cornwall on 17 March 1337 (the first creation of an English duke) and finally invested as Prince of Wales on 12 May 1343 when he was almost thirteen years old.

The seller of this coin sent it to me in the dealer envelope it was purchased in many decades ago. The price on the envelope was $2.25 and it was graded UNC.

Purchased on eBay

NGC XF-45 – An exceptional grade

Cost $315
1 commentsRichard M10
Antigonas_Gonatus_Pan_2b.jpg
Antigonos Gonatas * War-helmed Athena * Pan, 277-239 BC. Æ20154 views
Antigonos Gonatas * Athena * Pan, Bronze Drachm

Obv: Head of Athena right wearing crested Corinthian helmet.
Rev: Pan standing right erecting a trophy; B-A, to left and right of Pan respectively. Φ in lower-left field, ligate monogram between Pan's legs.

Exergue: (Blank)

Mint: Pella (?)
Struck: 277-239 BC.

Size: 18.15 mm.
Weight: 6.64 grams
Die axis: 005°

Condition: Nicely centered strike with good images on both sides. Lovely dark-olive patina (near-black). Showing signs of wear, long usage and the passage of time. Still a lovely coin and very pleasing to the eye.

Refs:*
Price 71
SNG Copenhagen 1205(ff)

1 commentsTiathena
IMG_9991.JPG
Antigonos I monophthalmos7 viewsKINGS of MACEDON. Antigonos I Monophthalmos. As king, 306/5-301 BC. Æ Unit (16mm, 4.56 g, 12h). Salamis mint. Struck under Demetrius I Poliorketes. Macedonian shield, boss decorated with facing gorgoneion / Macedonian helmet; kerykeion and monogram to lower left and right. Price 3159 (c. 323-315 BC); Zapiti & Michaelidou 7–8..ecoli
AADIb_small.png
Antigonos I Monophthalmos, AR Drachm14 viewsAntigonos I Monophthalmos, 306–301 BC.

Abydos Mint, c. 310-301 BC

17mm., 4.12g.

Head of Alexander III assimilated to Herakles right, wearing lionskin, knotted at base of neck

AΛEΞANΔΡOY, Zeus seated left, nude to waist, holding eagle in out-stretched hand, and sceptre, MY monogram in left field, ivy leaf beneath chair.

References: Price 1527

AADI
1 commentsRL
AG-Antigonos_I_Monophthalmos-3.jpg
Antigonos I Monophthalmos. As Strategos of Asia, 320-306/5 BC, or king, 306/5-301 BC., AR Drachm 11 views4.30 grams
Obv.: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
Rev.:Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; ME monogram in left field, ivy leaf below throne.
Price 1560; ADM II Series XIX
This coin was purchased form the Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. (CNG)
NGC Ch AU; Strike 4/5; Surface 55

Normally such coins are listed as a posthumous issue of Alexander III which I have no interest in since I rather a coin of Alexander III that is in fact a lifetime issue. However CNG attributed this coin to the actual issuer something that has more meaning to me that simply a posthumous issue of Alexander III.
Richard M10
Antigonus_I.jpg
Antigonos I Monophthalmus, Price 1827, 310 - 301 BC, Colophon, Ionia2 viewsHead of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck. Zeus seated left, nude to waist, himation around waist and legs, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, right leg drawn back, crescent horns left in left field, KPA monogram under throne.

ALEXANDROU
Of Alexander
Jonathan N
s-l1600_(18).jpg
Antigonos I Monopthalmos6 viewsAs Strategos of Asia, 320-306/5 BC, or king, 306/5-301 BC.
Silver Drachm. In the name and types of Alexander III. Lampsakos mint.
18 mm. 3,96 g.
Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Rev: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ; Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, A-in-wreath above B, monogram below throne.
Price 1979.
_61.39
Antonivs Protti
s-l1600_(26).jpg
Antigonos I Monopthalmos8 viewsAs Strategos of Asia, 320-306/5 BC, or king, 306/5-301 BC.
Silver Drachm. In the name and types of Alexander III. Lampsakos mint.
18 mm. 3,96 g.
Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Rev: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ; Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, A-in-wreath above B, monogram below throne.
Price 1979.
_61.39
Antonivs Protti
Antigonus_I_Monophthalmus.jpg
Antigonus I Monophthalmus30 viewsAntigonus I Monophthalmus, Silver drachm, Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, 17.9mm, 4.120g, Price 1979, Müller Alexander 555, SNG Cop,
OBV: Herakles' head right, clad in lion-skin head-dress;
REV: AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle raised high in extended right,
long scepter vertical behind in left, A within wreath over B left, IAY monogram under throne;

EX: Forum Ancient Coins

RARE

Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C.,
he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus,
answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C.
Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. - Wikipedia
1 commentsRomanorvm
ppsectetORweb.jpg
Antioch, Revised Posthumous Philip, RPC 413653 viewsAntioch Mint, revised posthumous Philip, year = 19 (31/30 B.C.) AR, 26mm 14.39g, RPC 4136, Newell, no. 23
O: Diademed head of Philip Philadelphus, r.
R: BAEILEWE FILIPPOY EPIFANOYE FILADELFOY, Zeus, seated l., holding Nike and scepter
EX: THI
* "In the early fifties, the Romans revived the coinage of King Philip Philadelphus to be their coinage of Syria, copying his types (portrait of Philip/Zeus seated l.), though in a debased style. The coinage lasted from then until the reign of Augustus, and was discussed most recently by H.R. Baldus (in CRWLR, pp. 127-30, with earlier references for H. Scying, E. T. Newell, A. R. Bellinger and C. M. Kraay). The first issues were made with the monogram of Gabinius (57-55 BC), Crassus (54/53 BC) and Cassius (52/51 BC). There after the establishment of a Caesarian era at Antioch in 44/48 BC, their monogram was replaced by one standing for Antioch )or ‘autonomous’: see Wr. 21) and the coins were dated in the exergue by the years of this era. Year 3-12 and, then with a new style (see E. T. Newell, NC, 1919, pp. 69ff.; Baldus, p. 150, n. 14) 19-33 are known.
It may seem odd that the Romans chose the Tetradrachm of Philip (92-83 BC) to revive, rather than those of the last king, Antiochus XII; it is true that the last substantial issue of Seleucid tetradrachms was made by Philip, so that his would have comprised a most important proportion of the currency (so Newell, pp 80-4; M. J. Price ap. Baldus, op. cit., p. 127), but it is hard to see that this provides a sufficient reason, and it is possible that some other consideration might be relevant. While Antiochus (c. 69-65 BC) was away campaigning against the Arabs, the people of Antioch revolted and put forward, as king, Philip, the son of Philip Philadelphus. As the claims of Antiochus were rejected by Pompey when he formed the province, the Roman view may have been that Philip was the last legitimate Seleucid king, and, if so, his coins would naturally have been chosen as the prototype of the Roman coinage in Syria.
The Philips were interrupted from year 12 until year 19, and it seems that in this gap the tetradrachms of Cleopatra and Antony were produced. The evidence for their production at Antioch, however, does not seem sufficient, and they have been catalogued elsewhere, under ‘Uncertain of Syria’ (4094-6). It is certain, however, that a unique drachm portraying Antony was produced at Antioch during this period, as it bears the ethnic ANTIOXEWN MHTPOPOLEWS. See also addenda 4131A.
After the defeat of Antony, the coinage of posthumous Philip was revived in 31/30 BC, though it is not clear whether this represents a conscious decision to avoid putting Octavian’s portrait on the coinage, as happened in Asia and Egypt (similarly, the portrait does not appear on city bronzes of Syria before the last decade BC) or whether it is just the simple reinstatement of the previous type, after the new type of Antony and Cleopatra became unacceptable. At any rate the coinage continued until at least year 33 (= 17/16 BC). Current evidence does not permit us to be sure that it continued any later, to the year 36 (= 14/13 BC), as Newell thought, though this is not impossible."

RPC I, pp. 606-607
casata137ec
messanaTD.jpg
AR Tetradrachm of Messana, Sicily 461-445 BC22 viewsOBVERSE: seated charioteer holding reins of slow biga of mules to right. Nike flying above crowning mules with wreath. Olive leaf in Exergue
REVERSE: Hare springing right with legend MESSAN I ON with 'C' above the hare.
The charioteer theme on the obverse was introduced by the Tyrant Anaxilas in 480 BC to celebrate his victory in the races at the Olymics of either 480 or 484 BC. Anaxilas died in 475 BC but his sons succeeded him until they were expelled in 461, at which time the winged Nike was added to the obverse. The earliest of the Nike/charioteer types had A, B, C or D above the hare and the old style Greek S in the legends (not visible on this coin)
A bit rough but within my price range! The coin has an elegant design and illustrates the homely subjects that caught the eye of the Greeks and which they rendered so beautifully on their coins

Weight 17.5 gms, Diameter 25-27 mm
daverino
markianopolis_24_macrinus_diadum_HrJ(2013)6_24_46_02+.jpg
ARCH, Macrinus & Diadumenian, Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 24. HrJ (2013) 6.24.46.02 (plate coin)110 viewsMacrinus, AD 217-218
AE 27, 12.49g, 26.91mm, 195°
struck under governor Furius Pontianus
obv. AVT K OPEL CEV MAKREIN[OC KM] OPEL ANTWNEINOC
confronted heads of Macrinus, laureate, r., and Diadumenianus, bare-headed, l.
rev. VP PONTIAN - OV MARKIANO / POLEITW / N (OV ligate)
Triumphal arch with three doors, the door in the midth much higher, four figures
on postaments above. The outer two are Victories holding wreath in upraised
hand, the other two male figures, draped, the left holding up his r. hand, the
right one holding spear in his l. hand.
E in l. field (for pentassarion)
ref. a) not in AMNG
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1220
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No.6.24.46.2 (plate coin)
d) Price/Trell p.51, fig. 85 var.
very rare, F+/VF
added to www.wildwinds.com
Jochen
Siglos_king_dagger_bow.jpg
Artaxerxes II - Darius III178 viewsPersian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Artaxerxes II - Darius III, c. 375 - 340 B.C., Silver siglos, 5.490 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0, Carradice Type IV (late) C, 46 ff.; BMC Arabia 172 ff.; SNG Kayhan 1031; SGCV II 4683; Rosen 674; Klein 763; Carradice Price p. 77 and pl. 20, 387 ff.

Following Darius II came Artaxerxes II (called Mnemon), during whose reign Egypt revolted and relations with Greece deteriorated. His reign (dated as from 404 to 359 B.C.E.) was followed by that of his son Artaxerxes III (also called Ochus), who is credited with some 21 years of rule (358-338 B.C.E.) and is said to have been the most bloodthirsty of all the Persian rulers. His major feat was the reconquest of Egypt.
This was followed by a two-year rule for Arses and a five-year rule for Darius III (Codomannus), during whose reign Philip of Macedonia was murdered (336 B.C.E.) and was succeeded by his son Alexander. In 334 B.C.E. Alexander began his attack on the Persian Empire.

Siglos was the Greek transliteration of the Semitic denomination ""shekel"" which became a standard weight unit for silver in the Achaemenid Persian Empire after the conquest of Babylonia by Cyrus the Great in 539 B.C. Ironically, silver sigloi seem to have been struck primarily in the western part of the empire and the standard went on to influence several Greek civic and royal coinages in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. There is endless debate about whether the figure on the obverse represents the Persian Great King or an anonymous royal hero, but since the Greeks regularly referred to the parallel gold denomination as the ""daric"" it seems clear that at least some contemporaries considered it a depiction of the king. Of course, whether this is what the Persian authorities intended or an example of interpretatio Graeca must remain an open question.
4 commentsNemonater
BOTH_ASPENDOS.jpg
Aspendos Alexander 111 Tetradrachm 188/7 BC2 viewsObs : Head of Herekles with lionskin
Seleucid Anchor countermark of c 161 BC
16.5gm 30mm
Price 2907
Reverse- Zeus seated holding eagle
ΑΣ = Aspendos ΚC= year 26
Spear in exergue
Inscription: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ
cicerokid
Ath_dek_elect_w.jpg
Athens, dekadrachm125 viewsThis is a British Museum electrotype (made by Robert Ready in the late 19th century with his RR mark on the edge) of the largest circulating Greek coin. With the price of these at about $500,000 dollars when they come on the market a good quality reproduction like this is the nearest most of us will come to handling one of them.
48.21 gm, 34 mm; original weighs 42.7 gm.
Manzikert
AthenTetVF.jpg
Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, 449 - 413 B.C.121 viewsSilver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526, VF, near full crest, Athens mint, 16.410g, 25.1mm, 90o. Obverse: head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; Reverse: AQE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square.

This coin is one of the most familiar of all the coins struck throughout the ancient Mediterranean. The images of Athena and her Owl, while not static, changed undramatically, in an unhurried and deliberate way. Although its production rests firmly during the time that numismatists call the Classical era (479 BC --336 BC), this coin's "style" better reflects the earlier Archaic period.

The Athenian "Owl" (until its debasement as a result of the Peloponnesian War) was the standard of its day. Between the late 5th century BC and the late 3rd century BC, these coins were the currency against which all other coins were measured. This high esteem was due to the Athenian tetradrachms' consistent weight and quality of silver.

"The little elf-like owl dear to ancient Athens had greenish-blue-gray eyes that could see clearly where humans could not. Glaukopis -- the "shining eyed one" was often shortened to glaux, a nickname for the tetradrachm that bore the owl's likeness" (http://notes.utk.edu/bio/unistudy.nsf/0/da0222e2e80272fd85256785001683e4?OpenDocument).

It is only with the emergence of the Imperial coinage of Alexander the Great (beginning quickly after his ascension to the throne in 336 BC) that the ancient world had another coin as widely accepted. As Martin J. Price notes, "“The impressive list of twenty-three mints on Asian soil and one in Egypt, all used to strike Alexander’s imperial coinage during his lifetime, shows that there was a conscious policy of providing this form of money on an empire-wide basis" (Price, Martin J. The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. Zurich: The Swiss Numismatic Society in Association with British Museum Press, 1991. 72).

More than two millennia after the Athenian Tetracrachm was first struck, the 26th President of The United States, Theodore Roosevelt (b. 1858; d. 1919), is said to have carried an Athenian "Owl" in his pocket--to remind him just how beautiful a coin could be.

J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
Bactria,_Diodotos_I_posthumous_issue_Tetradrachm_.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Diodotos II, ca. 240-230 BC, AR Tetradrachm 10 viewsPosthumous diademed idealised head of Diodotos I right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔIOΔITOY (of King Diodotos). Zeus striding left, hurling thunderbolt in right hand, aegis over extended left arm; eagle standing at his feet.

Holt B2 (Holt B2 example 3 = this coin); Kritt B2; Bopearachchi 6A; SNG ANS 9, 87; Qunduz 8; HGC 12, 21. Struck ca. 230 BC at Mint "B" - Baktra.

(25 mm, 16.42 g, 6h).
CNG 778209; ex -CNG e-Auction 124, October 2005, 139 (incorrectly attributed as Holt B1); ex- Munz und Medaillen Fixed Price List 332 (1972).

The coin was struck shortly before Euthydemos overthrew Diodotos II. The idealised posthumous image of Diodotos I on the obverse was a statement of the legitimacy of the right of Diodotos II to the throne of Baktria, as the lineal successor to Diodotos I. This B2 issue is distinguished from the preceding B1 type by the absence of a wreath beneath the extended arm of Zeus on the reverse. Holt suggested that the removal of the wreath from coinage followed Diodotos II’s treaty with the Parthians. The wreath is believed to have been instituted as a celebration of Diodotos I victory over Arsaces in the previous decade and thus potentially perceived as an insult to the Parthians on consummation of the treaty.
n.igma
H5a.jpg
Balbinus AR Denarius53 viewsBalbinus AR Denarius. April - June 238 AD. Rome mint. IMP C D CAEL BALBINVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS II PP, Emperor, togate, standing l., holding branch and parazonium. RIC 5

RARE
EXTREMELY FINE

Ex. Münzen & Medaillen AG Basel - Fixed price list 473 (1985), 39.
Ex. Hess-Divo 2007
1 commentsTrajan
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-3qs59GR6xcPDlCaligula_2.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Brass Dupondius 4 viewsNERO ET DRVSVS CAESARES - Nero and Drusus on horseback riding right
C. CAESAR. DIVI. AVG. PRON. AVG. P. M. TR. P. III. P. P. around large S. C. - Legend surrounding large S C
Mint: Rome (39-40 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 13.04g / 32mm / 6h
Rarity: R3
References:
RIC I 42 (Gaius)
BMCRE p. 156, n. ‡
Provenances:
Artemide Aste
Acquisition/Sale: Artemide Aste Internet 46e #266 $0.00 02/19

The Gary R. Wilson Collection

The TR P III (39-40 AD) date of Caligula's base coinage is the scarcest of all his dates. The TR P (37-38 AD) is the most common followed by his TR P IIII (40-41 AD). Caligula did not issue base coinage from Rome with the TR P II (38-39 AD) date.

From: Incitatus Coins
Nero and Drusus were the elder brothers of Caligula, and the sons of Germanicus. Both were heirs of Tiberius and both were killed by the machinations of Sejanus. Caligula survived Sejanus, and the subsequent years, to become emperor. He immediately proclaimed his informed uncle Claudius as his co-consul, an appointment made so that Caligula could, in essence, rule as sole consul. Claudius was given the modest
task of preparing a celebration of Caligula's brothers, including statues in their honor. According to 'I Claudius', Claudius encountered difficulty in completing these statues on time. The completed statues appear on this coinage.

ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA


From Joe Geranio:
The dupondii issues of the brothers of Caligula , Nero and Drusus Caesar was no doubt to remind the Roman populace about the Dioscuri the saviors of the Roman state. The Dioscuri won a miraculous battle in 496 B.C. and then on the same day appear in the Roman Forum to tell the populace about the victory, no doubt Caligula wanted to associate himself with the Dioscuri with this issue of the gods represented as Nero and Drusus Caesars galloping on their horses with ease as though the wind is blowing in their hair. This familial propaganda would cement that the sons of Germanicus and Agrippina would reign and were in control.

This type was issued by Caligula for his two deceased brothers, Nero Julius Caesar and Drusus Julius Caesar Germanicus. Nero Caesar was Tiberius' oldest adoptive grandson and was the emperor's most obvious successor until 29 A.D. when he was accused of treason along with his mother, Agrippina the Elder. He was exiled to the island of Ponza where he was either induced to commit suicide or starved to death before October 31. In 30, his brother Drusus Caesar was also accused of treason and exiled and imprisoned. He starved to death in prison in 33, reduced to chewing the stuffing of his bed.

From Suetonius:
But he (Claudius) was exposed also to actual dangers. First in his very consulship, when he was all but deposed, because he had been somewhat slow in contracting for and setting up the statues of Nero and Drusus, the emperor's brothers.


From COINWEEK:
THE ANNALS OF THE ROMAN HISTORIAN TACITUS (56 – 117 CE) survived in one damaged medieval manuscript at the Monte Cassino monastery. The section covering the reign of Emperor Caligula is missing, and we rely largely on fragmentary chapters of Cassius Dio’s Roman History (155-235 CE) and the Twelve Caesars of Suetonius (c.69 – 140 CE), a gossip writer who was the Perez Hilton of Imperial Rome. There are few contemporary eyewitness sources – some passages in the writings of Seneca (4 BCE – 65 CE) and Philo of Alexandria (c. 25 BCE – 50 CE ).

The story is not a happy one.

The future emperor was born on August 31 in the year 12, probably at Antium (Anzio) south of Rome. His father Germanicus, nephew of Emperor Tiberius, was a successful and popular general. His mother, Agrippina “the Elder”, was the daughter of Marcus Agrippa, the brilliant organizer who was largely responsible for Octavian’s victory in the Roman civil war (32-30 BCE).

“Caligula” is a nickname. It means “little boot” in Latin, because as a child he wore a miniature military uniform including tiny hobnailed boots, much to the delight of his father’s veteran legionaries. He grew up to dislike it. His given name, which appears on his coins, variously abbreviated, was Gaius (or Caius) Julius Caesar Germanicus. “Caesar” here is not a title, but a personal name, inherited through Germanicus Julius Caesar, grandson of Emperor Augustus, the adopted son of the famous Julius Caesar (100 – 44 BCE).

A New Hope
“TO MAKE AN INEXPERIENCED AND ALMOST UNKNOWN YOUNG MAN, BROUGHT UP UNDER A SERIES OF AGED AND REPRESSIVE GUARDIANS, MASTER OF THE WORLD, ALMOST LITERALLY OVERNIGHT, ON THE SOLE RECOMMENDATION THAT HIS FATHER HAD BEEN A THOROUGHLY DECENT FELLOW WAS TO COURT DISASTER IN A QUITE IRRESPONSIBLE FASHION.”
–BARRETT, CALIGULA: THE CORRUPTION OF POWER (1990)

When the reclusive, miserly and increasingly paranoid Emperor Tiberius died on March 16, 37 CE at the age of 78, most Romans greeted Caligula’s accession joyfully. Caligula’s early coinage celebrates his descent from his great-grandfather, the deified Augustus.

Caligula’s laurel-crowned portrait appears on the obverse of his gold aurei and silver denarii surrounded by his titles. On one reverse, which bears no inscription, the head of Augustus, wearing the sun god’s spiky radiate crown, appears between two stars. Another type omits the stars and adds the inscription, “Divine Augustus, Father of the Nation”. On some examples, the portrait seems to have the features of the unpopular Tiberius, who was never deified by the Senate. Perhaps the mint engravers, who had copied and recopied the portrait of Tiberius for 22 years, automatically reproduced a familiar face.

On his birthday in the year 37, Caligula dedicated the Temple of Augustus, which had been under construction for over two decades in the Roman forum. The event is commemorated on a magnificent brass sestertius. On the obverse a veiled seated figure is labeled PIETAS (“piety”) – an untranslatable Latin term for the Roman virtue that combined profound respect for ancestral traditions and meticulous observance of ritual obligations. The reverse shows Caligula in his role as Pontifex Maximus, high priest of the state religion, sacrificing an ox before a richly decorated temple. The finest known example of this coin sold for over $269,000 USD in a November 2013 Swiss auction.

Addressing the Guards
The orderly succession and survival of any Roman emperor depended on the Praetorian Guard, an elite force of bodyguards stationed in the capital. It was organized into nine battalions, or “cohorts”, each of 500 to 1,000 men.

On his accession, one of Caligula’s first official acts was to present each guardsman with a thousand sestertii bequeathed by Tiberius in his will, adding another thousand of his own. The reverse of a rare bronze sestertius, which may have been specially struck for this payment, shows Caligula standing on a platform with his arm raised in a formal gesture of greeting to a rank of guards. The abbreviated inscription ADLOCUT COH means “Address to the Cohorts”. Remarkably, this coin lacks the inscription SC (“by decree of the Senate”), which normally appeared on all Roman bronze coinage. An outstanding example of this type (“undoubtedly the finest specimen known”) brought over $634,000 in a 2014 European auction.

Family Ties
Caligula issued numerous types honoring the memory of his parents. Some of these continued under the reign of his uncle and successor, Claudius.

A handsome brass dupondius (worth half a sestertius or two asses) shows Germanicus riding in a chariot, celebrating his triumph (May 26, 17 CE) over German tribes. On the reverse, Germanicus stands in armor, holding an eagle-tipped scepter as a symbol of command. The inscription reads, “Standards Regained From the Defeated Germans”. This commemorates the return of sacred eagle standards captured when Roman legions of P. Quinctilius Varus were ambushed and annihilated eight years previously (September, 9 CE) in the Teutoburg Forest of north-central Germany. Examples of this type have sold for $500 to $3,000 in recent auctions.

Agrippina the Elder, mother of Caligula, was honored on a bronze sestertius. The obverse inscription surrounding her strong, dignified portrait translates: “Agrippina, daughter of Marcus, mother of emperor Gaius Caesar”. On the reverse, the legend “To the Memory of Agrippina” appears beside a carpentum, a ceremonial cart drawn by two mules that paraded an image of Agrippina on special occasions.

A superb, pedigreed example of this coin (“Very rare and among the finest specimens known. A delicate portrait of sublime style, Tiber tone”) sold for over $98,000 in a November 2013 Swiss auction. More typical examples sell for $1,000 to $3,000.

Perhaps the best-known coin of Caligula is a rare sestertius that depicts his three sisters, Agrippina the Younger, Drusilla and Julia Livilla as the personifications of Securitas, Concordia and Fortuna respectively. Caligula was close to his sisters, and lavished public honors on them in a way that shocked traditional Roman values. This inevitably led later writers to charge the emperor with incestuous relations, a rumor that is almost certainly false.

In recent auctions, exceptional examples of this type have sold for prices ranging from $15,000 to 21,000. Worn or corroded examples that have been “tooled” to improve the detail can sometimes be found for under $2,000. Cast forgeries are common, mostly modern, some dating back to the Renaissance that are collectable in their own right.

Small Change
Perhaps the most enigmatic coin of Caligula’s reign was the smallest regular Roman denomination, the quadrans. It took 64 of these little coppers to equal the value of one silver denarius – a day’s pay for a manual worker. On the obverse, the emperor’s name and titles surround a “liberty cap” – the felt hat worn by freed slaves – bracketed by the letters “SC”. The reverse inscription continues the emperor’s titles, surrounding the large letters “RCC”.

For many years, the consensus of numismatic scholars was that this abbreviation stood for remissa ducentesima, celebrating Caligula’s repeal of an unpopular one-half percent sales tax (“one part in two hundred” – “CC” being the Roman numeral for 200). A brilliant 2010 study by David Woods argues that this interpretation is unlikely, and RCC probably stands for something like res civium conservatae (“the interests of citizens have been preserved”).

The quadrans is probably the most affordable coin of Caligula, with decent examples appearing at auction for under $100.

The Making of a Monster
SO MUCH FOR CALIGULA THE EMPEROR; THE REST OF THIS HISTORY MUST NEEDS DEAL WITH CALIGULA THE MONSTER.
— SUETONIUS, THE TWELVE CAESARS, 22.1

Caligula fell seriously ill in October, 37 CE. After he recovered, his personality (always rather dark) took a decided turn for the worse. He became increasingly paranoid, ordering the execution or forcing the suicide of many who were previously close to him. He reportedly took special delight in having people tortured to death in his presence. As his increasingly bizarre expenditures emptied the treasury, he had wealthy Romans executed in order to seize their assets. Nevertheless, Suetonius reports that Caligula was devoted and faithful to his fourth and last wife, Milonia Caesonia, “who was neither beautiful nor young”.



The Death of Caligula

On January 24, 41 CE, conspirators including Cassius Chaerea, an officer of the Praetorian Guard, stabbed Caligula to death as he left a theatrical performance. Caesonia and her young daughter were also murdered. The only certainly identifiable contemporary portrait of Caesonia appears on a rare provincial bronze issued by Caligula’s childhood friend, Herod Agrippa I (11 BCE – 44 CE), the Roman client-king of Judaea.

Collecting the Monster
Gold and silver issues of Caligula are scarce, and in high demand from collectors, especially those determined to complete a set of the “Twelve Caesars” – all the Roman rulers from Julius Caesar to Domitian. Some of the bronzes are quite common, particularly the bronze as with Vesta reverse – decent examples can be found at auction for well under $200. For bronzes in the highest grades, with pristine surfaces and untouched patinas, the sky’s the limit.

For an emperor who was supposedly feared and hated by the Romans by the end of his short reign – only three years and 10 months – Caligula’s coins seem to have a good survival rate, and few that reach the numismatic market are mutilated. Some have the first ‘C’ of the emperor’s personal name filed off or scratched out, but it is rare to find deliberate ancient gouges or cuts across the portrait.

Any collector approaching the coinage of Caligula seeking evidence of madness, decadence and depravity will be disappointed. Coinage is conservative, and these coins present an idealized portrait of a rather dorky young man, along with a series of stock images reflecting the conventions of classical art that the Romans adopted from the Greeks
Gary W2
Caligula_Three_Siste.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Brass Sestertius 6 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT - Laureate head left
AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA - AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA, the three sisters of Caligula standing, in the guises of Securitas, Concordia, and Fortuna, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue
Exergue: SC


Mint: Rome (37-38AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 27.88g / 35.6mm / 180
Rarity: Rare
References:
RIC I 33
BMCRE p. 152, 36
BnF II 47
Cohen I 4
SRCV I 1800
Provenances:
Forvm Ancient Coins
Acquisition/Sale: Forvm Ancient Coins Internet

ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

From Numismatica Ars Classica:
Many aspects of Caligula's reign have captured the imagination of historians, but the sexual relationships he is said to have pursued with his sisters is perhaps most shocking of all. It is on par with the exploits of Elagabalus or the alleged seduction of young Nero by his deranged mother Agrippina Jr., who, by no mere coincidence, was one of Caligula's sisters.
Caligula's incestuous relationships with his sisters are alleged by the relatively contemporary historians Suetonius and Josephus. Much later, in the fourth and fifth centuries, these original claims were echoed by various writers, including Eutropius, Aurelius Victor, St. Jerome, Orosius and the anonymous compiler of the Epitome de caesaribus. The truth of the claims, of course, is impossible to confirm, and there is a healthy dose of scepticism among modern scholars.
Whatever personal or sexual affection Caligula may have felt toward his sisters, this coinage is purely political and dynastic in flavour. His sisters are each named and are shown in the guise of personifications: the eldest, Agrippina Junior, as Securitas, the middle-sister, Drusilla, as Concordia, and the youngest, Julia Livilla, as Fortuna.
This remarkable type was produced on two occasions, his initial coinage of 37-38, and again in 39-40. The example offered here belongs to the first coinage, which was issued when all three of the imperial women were alive. Drusilla, Caligula's favourite sister (and the one with whom he is said to have had an enduring incestuous relationship), died tragically on June 10, 38, nearly three months after the last coins of the initial issue were struck.
By the time the last issue was produced (beginning March 18, 39), Drusilla had been accorded the status of a goddess, providing the curious circumstance of a goddess being portrayed in the guise of a personification. Life in the palace worsened after Drusilla's death and Caligula's affection for his remaining two sisters declined.
The circumstances reported by the ancient sources are nothing short of bizarre: Drusilla had been married to Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, who had also been Caligula's lover. After Drusilla died, Lepidus extended his sexual liaisons to include Agrippina and Julia Livilla, his former sisters-in-law. By late in 39 this web of relationships seems to have evolved into a failed plot by Lepidus against Caligula, who executed Lepidus and sent his two sisters into exile out of their suspected complicity.
All of this palace intrigue occurred in the midst of the second issue of 'three sisters' sestertii, the production of which Caligula probably halted immediately since of the three sisters shown, one was dead and two were in exile for having plotted against his life.

From Wikisource:
It is easy to understand why the peace and harmony which had been reestablished for a moment in the troubled imperial family by the advent of Caligula should have been of brief duration. His grandmother and his sisters were Romans, educated in Roman ideals, and this exotic madness of his could inspire in them only an irresistible horror. This brought confusion into the imperial family, and after having suffered the persecutions of Sejanus and his party, the unhappy daughters of Germanicus found themselves in the toils of the exacting caprices of their brother. In fact, in 38, Caligula had already broken with his grandmother, whom the year before he had had proclaimed Augusta; and between the years 38 and 39, catastrophes followed one another in the family with frightful rapidity. His sister Drusilla, whom, as Suetonius tells us, he already treated as a lawful wife, died suddenly of some unknown malady while still very young. It is not improbable that her health may have been ruined by the horror of the wild adventure, which was neither human nor Roman, into which her brother sought to drag her by marriage. Caligula suddenly declared her a goddess, to whom all the cities must pay honors. He had a temple built for her, and appointed a body of twenty priests, ten men and ten women, to celebrate her worship; he decreed that her birthday should be a holiday, and he wished the statue of Venus in the Forum to be carved in her likeness.

But in proportion as Caligula became more and more fervid in this adoration of his dead sister, the disagreement between himself and his other two sisters became more embittered. Julia Livilla was exiled in 38; Agrippina, the wife of Domitius Enobarbus°, in 39, and about this same time the venerable Antonia died. It was noised about that Caligula had forced her to commit suicide, and that Agrippina and Livilla had taken part in a conspiracy against the life of the emperor. How much truth there may be in these reports it is difficult to say, but the reason for all these catastrophes may be affirmed with certainty. Life in the imperial palace was no longer possible, especially for women, with this madman who was transforming Rome into Alexandria and who wished to marry a sister. Even Tiberius, the son of Drusus and co-heir to the empire with Caligula, was at about this time defeated in some obscure suit and disappeared.

Many aspects of Caligula’s reign have captured the imagination of historians, but the sexual relationships he is said to
have pursued with his sisters is perhaps most shocking of all. It is on par with the exploits of Elagabalus or the alleged
seduction of young Nero by his deranged mother Agrippina Jr., who, by no mere coincidence, was one of Caligula’s
sisters.
Caligula’s incestuous relationships with his sisters are alleged by the relatively contemporary historians Suetonius and
Josephus. Much later, in the fourth and fifth centuries, these original claims were echoed by various writers, including
Eutropius, Aurelius Victor, St. Jerome, Orosius and the anonymous compiler of the Epitome de caesaribus. The truth of
the claims, of course, is impossible to confirm, and there is a healthy dose of skepticism among modern scholars.
Whatever personal or sexual affection Caligula may have felt toward his sisters, this coinage is purely political and
dynastic in flavour. His sisters are each named and are shown in the guise of personifications: the eldest, Agrippina Junior,
as Securitas, the middle-sister, Drusilla, as Concordia, and the youngest, Julia Livilla, as Fortuna.
This remarkable type was produced on two occasions, his initial coinage of 37-38, and again in 39-40. The example
offered here belongs to the first coinage, which was issued when all three of the imperial women were alive. Drusilla,
Caligula’s favourite sister (and the one with whom he is said to have had an enduring incestuous relationship), died
tragically on June 10, 38, nearly three months after the last coins of the initial issue were struck.
By the time the last issue was produced (beginning March 18, 39), Drusilla had been accorded the status of a goddess,
providing the curious circumstance of a goddess being portrayed in the guise of a personification. Life in the palace
worsened after Drusilla’s death and Caligula’s affection for his remaining two sisters declined.
The circumstances reported by the ancient sources are nothing short of bizarre: Drusilla had been married to Marcus
Aemilius Lepidus, who had also been Caligula’s lover. At least after Drusilla died, Lepidus extended his sexual liaisons to
include Agrippina and Julia Livilla, his former sisters-in-law. By late in 39 this web of relationships seems to have evolved
into a failed plot by Lepidus against Caligula, who executed Lepidus and sent his two sisters into exile out of their
suspected complicity.
All of this palace intrigue occurred in the midst of the second issue of ‘three sisters’ sestertii, the production of which
Caligula probably halted immediately since of the three sisters shown, one was dead and two were in exile for having
plotted against his life.
Gary W2
Caligula_Three_Siste~0.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Brass Sestertius17 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT - Laureate head left
AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA - AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA, the three sisters of Caligula standing, in the guises of Securitas, Concordia, and Fortuna, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue
Exergue: SC


Mint: Rome (37-38AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 27.88g / 35.6mm / 180
Rarity: Rare
References:
RIC I 33
BMCRE p. 152, 36
BnF II 47
Cohen I 4
SRCV I 1800
Provenances:
Forvm Ancient Coins
Acquisition/Sale: Forvm Ancient Coins Internet

ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

From Numismatica Ars Classica:
Many aspects of Caligula's reign have captured the imagination of historians, but the sexual relationships he is said to have pursued with his sisters is perhaps most shocking of all. It is on par with the exploits of Elagabalus or the alleged seduction of young Nero by his deranged mother Agrippina Jr., who, by no mere coincidence, was one of Caligula's sisters.
Caligula's incestuous relationships with his sisters are alleged by the relatively contemporary historians Suetonius and Josephus. Much later, in the fourth and fifth centuries, these original claims were echoed by various writers, including Eutropius, Aurelius Victor, St. Jerome, Orosius and the anonymous compiler of the Epitome de caesaribus. The truth of the claims, of course, is impossible to confirm, and there is a healthy dose of scepticism among modern scholars.
Whatever personal or sexual affection Caligula may have felt toward his sisters, this coinage is purely political and dynastic in flavour. His sisters are each named and are shown in the guise of personifications: the eldest, Agrippina Junior, as Securitas, the middle-sister, Drusilla, as Concordia, and the youngest, Julia Livilla, as Fortuna.
This remarkable type was produced on two occasions, his initial coinage of 37-38, and again in 39-40. The example offered here belongs to the first coinage, which was issued when all three of the imperial women were alive. Drusilla, Caligula's favourite sister (and the one with whom he is said to have had an enduring incestuous relationship), died tragically on June 10, 38, nearly three months after the last coins of the initial issue were struck.
By the time the last issue was produced (beginning March 18, 39), Drusilla had been accorded the status of a goddess, providing the curious circumstance of a goddess being portrayed in the guise of a personification. Life in the palace worsened after Drusilla's death and Caligula's affection for his remaining two sisters declined.
The circumstances reported by the ancient sources are nothing short of bizarre: Drusilla had been married to Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, who had also been Caligula's lover. After Drusilla died, Lepidus extended his sexual liaisons to include Agrippina and Julia Livilla, his former sisters-in-law. By late in 39 this web of relationships seems to have evolved into a failed plot by Lepidus against Caligula, who executed Lepidus and sent his two sisters into exile out of their suspected complicity.
All of this palace intrigue occurred in the midst of the second issue of 'three sisters' sestertii, the production of which Caligula probably halted immediately since of the three sisters shown, one was dead and two were in exile for having plotted against his life.

From Wikisource:
It is easy to understand why the peace and harmony which had been reestablished for a moment in the troubled imperial family by the advent of Caligula should have been of brief duration. His grandmother and his sisters were Romans, educated in Roman ideals, and this exotic madness of his could inspire in them only an irresistible horror. This brought confusion into the imperial family, and after having suffered the persecutions of Sejanus and his party, the unhappy daughters of Germanicus found themselves in the toils of the exacting caprices of their brother. In fact, in 38, Caligula had already broken with his grandmother, whom the year before he had had proclaimed Augusta; and between the years 38 and 39, catastrophes followed one another in the family with frightful rapidity. His sister Drusilla, whom, as Suetonius tells us, he already treated as a lawful wife, died suddenly of some unknown malady while still very young. It is not improbable that her health may have been ruined by the horror of the wild adventure, which was neither human nor Roman, into which her brother sought to drag her by marriage. Caligula suddenly declared her a goddess, to whom all the cities must pay honors. He had a temple built for her, and appointed a body of twenty priests, ten men and ten women, to celebrate her worship; he decreed that her birthday should be a holiday, and he wished the statue of Venus in the Forum to be carved in her likeness.

But in proportion as Caligula became more and more fervid in this adoration of his dead sister, the disagreement between himself and his other two sisters became more embittered. Julia Livilla was exiled in 38; Agrippina, the wife of Domitius Enobarbus°, in 39, and about this same time the venerable Antonia died. It was noised about that Caligula had forced her to commit suicide, and that Agrippina and Livilla had taken part in a conspiracy against the life of the emperor. How much truth there may be in these reports it is difficult to say, but the reason for all these catastrophes may be affirmed with certainty. Life in the imperial palace was no longer possible, especially for women, with this madman who was transforming Rome into Alexandria and who wished to marry a sister. Even Tiberius, the son of Drusus and co-heir to the empire with Caligula, was at about this time defeated in some obscure suit and disappeared.

Many aspects of Caligula’s reign have captured the imagination of historians, but the sexual relationships he is said to
have pursued with his sisters is perhaps most shocking of all. It is on par with the exploits of Elagabalus or the alleged
seduction of young Nero by his deranged mother Agrippina Jr., who, by no mere coincidence, was one of Caligula’s
sisters.
Caligula’s incestuous relationships with his sisters are alleged by the relatively contemporary historians Suetonius and
Josephus. Much later, in the fourth and fifth centuries, these original claims were echoed by various writers, including
Eutropius, Aurelius Victor, St. Jerome, Orosius and the anonymous compiler of the Epitome de caesaribus. The truth of
the claims, of course, is impossible to confirm, and there is a healthy dose of skepticism among modern scholars.
Whatever personal or sexual affection Caligula may have felt toward his sisters, this coinage is purely political and
dynastic in flavour. His sisters are each named and are shown in the guise of personifications: the eldest, Agrippina Junior,
as Securitas, the middle-sister, Drusilla, as Concordia, and the youngest, Julia Livilla, as Fortuna.
This remarkable type was produced on two occasions, his initial coinage of 37-38, and again in 39-40. The example
offered here belongs to the first coinage, which was issued when all three of the imperial women were alive. Drusilla,
Caligula’s favourite sister (and the one with whom he is said to have had an enduring incestuous relationship), died
tragically on June 10, 38, nearly three months after the last coins of the initial issue were struck.
By the time the last issue was produced (beginning March 18, 39), Drusilla had been accorded the status of a goddess,
providing the curious circumstance of a goddess being portrayed in the guise of a personification. Life in the palace
worsened after Drusilla’s death and Caligula’s affection for his remaining two sisters declined.
The circumstances reported by the ancient sources are nothing short of bizarre: Drusilla had been married to Marcus
Aemilius Lepidus, who had also been Caligula’s lover. At least after Drusilla died, Lepidus extended his sexual liaisons to
include Agrippina and Julia Livilla, his former sisters-in-law. By late in 39 this web of relationships seems to have evolved
into a failed plot by Lepidus against Caligula, who executed Lepidus and sent his two sisters into exile out of their
suspected complicity.
All of this palace intrigue occurred in the midst of the second issue of ‘three sisters’ sestertii, the production of which
Caligula probably halted immediately since of the three sisters shown, one was dead and two were in exile for having
plotted against his life.

Per RIC-Rare
2 commentsGary W2
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-zg2aP0ewwCVrhb-Caligula_damnatio.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Bronze AS3 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT - Bare head left
Vesta SC - Vesta, veiled and draped, seated left, on throne with ornamented back and legs, holding patera in right hand and long transverse sceptre in left
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (37-38 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 10.40g / 28mm / 6h
Rarity: Common
References:
RIC I 38
BMCRE 46
BN 54
Cohen 27
Acquisition/Sale: indalocolecciones eBay

This coin seems to have suffered a 'Damnatio Memoriae'. It looks as if the portrait has had cut marks applied to the jaw and neck areas. Interestingly, the ancient writers said that on his assassination, the first strike to Caligula was to his jaw or neck/shoulder areas. Damnatio memoriae is a modern Latin phrase meaning "condemnation of memory", i.e., that a person is to be excluded from official accounts.


ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

From The Dictionary of Roman Coins:
Caligula, the grand nephew and murderer of Tiberius, most worthy to succeed that emperor, because of an equally infamous, though not so able a tyrant, reigned from A.D. 37 to A.D. 41.

His real appellation was Caius Caesar, but about the time of Augustus' death, he, still a child, being with the army of the lower Rhine, the soldiers, with whom he was a great favorite, were accustomed in the joking parlance of the camp, to give him the nickname of Caligula (from Caligae) because he constantly appeared in the usual military leggings.

Hence Ausonius, in his poem, referring to this cruel wretch, says --

Post hunc castrensis caligae cognomine
Caesar Successit, saevo saevior ingenio.

As emperor, however, he was always called Caius, and he considered himself insulted by the name of Caligula.

He was the youngest son of Germanicus, the nephew of Tiberius and Agrippina; born in 12 A.D. on the day before the calends of September, at Antium, as Suetonius has proved at great length (in Caligula, ch. 8). In 17 A.D., he went into Syria with his father, at whose death, within two years, he returned to Rome with his mother. After she was banished, he was transferred to his great grand-mother Julia and when she diet to his grand-mother Antonia.

In 31 A.D., after the violent deaths of his brothers Nero and Drusus, and also of Sejanus, whose plots he alone had escaped he was he was the apparent successor to the empire and invested with the Pontificate.

In 33 A.D., on the same day he assumed the toga he laid aside his beard, he was nominated questor and Tiberius invited him to Capraea. He moved in with Tiberius, feigning ignorance or indifference, regarding the murder of his relations, as though it did not concern him. He so obsequiously obeyed Tiberius the it was a common expression, that "there never was a better servant, or a worse master." (Sueton, ch. 10)

In 37 A.D., Tiberius was attacked with a severe illness from which he was recovering when Caligula, at the instigation of Maero, the praetorian prefect, put and end to his life by smothering him.

Caligula entered Rome after Tiberius' death and compelled the Senate to join him, by a Senatus Consultum, in depriving Tiberius, son Drusus junior and the elder Tiberius' heir in his last will, of his right to the empire.

The funeral ceremonies of were performed with due pomp by Caligula.

On the eighth month of his reign he was attacked with severe sickness. On his recovery, he adopted his brother Tiberius, gave him the title of Princeps Juventutis, and afterwards put him to death.

In the calends of July he entered upon the office of Consul Suffectus, as colleague to his uncle Claudius, and after two months resigned it.

In 38 A.D. he conceded to Soaemus, the kingdom of Arabians of Ituraea; to Cotys, Armenia Minor; to Polemon, the son of Polemon, his father's dominions.

Dion wrote, "In a short time he assumed so much the air of a king, that all those honors, which Augustus had accepted only when duly arrived at the sovereignty, and even then with hesitation as they were decreed from time to time, and many of which Tiberius altogether declined, were by Caligula grasped in one day, with the exception only of Pater Patriae, which, however was not long deferred."

In 39 A.D., in the calends of January, he entered his second Consulate and resigned the office in thirty days. (Sueton ch. 17)

Having exhausted the treasury by his profuse expenditure on public spectacles and other extravagances, he endeavoured to repair the deficiency by the slaughter of wealthy citizens; and then proceeded to Gaul, their to practice the like system of murder and spoliation.

The name of Germanicus does not appear on coins of this year, nor ever subsequently.

In 40 A.D., Caligula, without a colleague, entered his third consulate, at Lugdunum (Lyon), in Gaul; and resigned it on the ides of January. (Sueton. ch. 17)

Having invited over from Africa, Ptolemy, the son of Juba, he put him to death on the pretence of the young prince's ostentatious bearing. (Dion, B. lix. 25)

Proceeding to the ocean, as if about to invade Britain, he ordered his soldiers to gather shell-fish, and returned as a conqueror, laden with the spoils of the sea. (Sueton. ch. 46)

L. Vitellius, prefect of Syria, the same year, gave such a lesson to Artabanus, the Persian, who was threatening an invasion of Armenia that the later abandoned his design, and paid his adoration to the statues of Augustus and of Caligula. (Dion, I. e.)

In 41 A.D., he began hid fourth consulate, on the 7th of the ides of January. Shortly afterwards (viz. on the 9th of the calends of February), he was assassinated by the conspirators Cassius Chaerea and Cornelius Sabinus.

Caligula's accession to the empire was hailed with joy by the Roman people; but their satisfaction was based on no solid foundations, being the result rather of their deep-rooted attachment to his father Germanicus. He seeming, indeed, responded to the fond wishes of the nation, by many acts of piety, justice, and moderation. But it too soon became apparent that these virtues were not of natural growth but owed their exhibition to the policy of Tiberius, who wished through their influences to consolidate his own power in the empire. For there was not act of cruelty, folly, meanness or infamy, which this monster and madman did not delight in perpetrating. He caused his horse, whom he called Incitatus, to be introduced at dinner time, setting before him gilded corn, and drinking his health in golden cups; and he would have created him consul, had he lived long enough. He imitated all the gods and goddesses, in the adoration which he caused to be paid to him, becoming by turns Jupiter, Bacchus, Hercules, Juno, Diana, and Venus. He constructed a bridge of vessels joined together from Puteoli to Baiae, and crossing over with his troops invaded puteoli and then recrossed it in a kind of triumph, delighting in hearing himself called Alexander the Great. By his absurd and extravagant undertakings of this kind, before the year was fully expired, he had squandered the enormous sums of money left by Tiberius. (Vicies ae septics millies IIS. -- See Sestertium).

He both claimed and receive divine worship, and was the greatest blasphemer that ever lived; yet he quailed in the conviction of a deity, and crept under his bed whenever he heard thunder. With savage inhumanity he attended executions in person, and made parents behold the merciless torments inflicted on their children. He contracted and dissolved marriages with equal caprice and dishonesty. Besides his incestuous union with Drusilla, he seized and repudiated three wives, and was at last permanently attached to Caesonia a mother of children by another man, and without your or beauty, but of depravity corresponding with his own.

Other instances of his incredible cruelty and lust may be found in Suetonius, Philo, and Dion. Such infatuations are evident tokens not only of a brutal nature, but also of a distempered intellect. Nor is it possible to entertain other than supreme contempt for the base servility of the Romans, who could offer solemn adoration to a wretch openly guilty of the most detestable and unnatural crimes; and whose adage was oderint, dum metuant (Let them hate so long as they fear).

The gold and silver coins of Caligula are of considerable rarity. Sestertii are also rare. Ases are more common, yet still expensive due to popularity of collecting the infamous emperor and because they generally exhibit good workmanship. When Caligula was destroyed, the dastardly senators, who had so recently sacrificed to him, ordered all his statues to be demolished, his acts abrogated, his money melted down and his inscriptions defaced, in order that his memory might be extinguished forever. Yet this sentence has not prevented a considerable number of his coins from reaching us, though consequently, except for ases, they are of considerable rarity when in good preservation. The coins of Caligula, minted at Rome, do not exhibit Imperator as a surname. This title is used on colonial coins. The only imperial coin of Caligula bearing IMP is a denarius.

On his coins, Caligula resembles his grandfather, but is less noble and has a malignant expression. He was at great pains to cherish this horrid index of his cruel disposition.

Gary W2
Gary W2
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-2WcIZv40JXVImci-Caligula_69.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Bronze As3 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT - Bare head left
VESTA SC - Vesta Seated Left, Holding Patera & Sceptre
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (37-38AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 11.61g / 29mm / 180
Rarity: Common
References:
RIC I 38
Acquisition/Sale: timeman21 Ebay

ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

From The Dictionary of Roman Coins:
Caligula, the grand nephew and murderer of Tiberius, most worthy to succeed that emperor, because of an equally infamous, though not so able a tyrant, reigned from A.D. 37 to A.D. 41.

His real appellation was Caius Caesar, but about the time of Augustus' death, he, still a child, being with the army of the lower Rhine, the soldiers, with whom he was a great favorite, were accustomed in the joking parlance of the camp, to give him the nickname of Caligula (from Caligae) because he constantly appeared in the usual military leggings.

Hence Ausonius, in his poem, referring to this cruel wretch, says --

Post hunc castrensis caligae cognomine
Caesar Successit, saevo saevior ingenio.

As emperor, however, he was always called Caius, and he considered himself insulted by the name of Caligula.

He was the youngest son of Germanicus, the nephew of Tiberius and Agrippina; born in 12 A.D. on the day before the calends of September, at Antium, as Suetonius has proved at great length (in Caligula, ch. 8). In 17 A.D., he went into Syria with his father, at whose death, within two years, he returned to Rome with his mother. After she was banished, he was transferred to his great grand-mother Julia and when she diet to his grand-mother Antonia.

In 31 A.D., after the violent deaths of his brothers Nero and Drusus, and also of Sejanus, whose plots he alone had escaped he was he was the apparent successor to the empire and invested with the Pontificate.

In 33 A.D., on the same day he assumed the toga he laid aside his beard, he was nominated questor and Tiberius invited him to Capraea. He moved in with Tiberius, feigning ignorance or indifference, regarding the murder of his relations, as though it did not concern him. He so obsequiously obeyed Tiberius the it was a common expression, that "there never was a better servant, or a worse master." (Sueton, ch. 10)

In 37 A.D., Tiberius was attacked with a severe illness from which he was recovering when Caligula, at the instigation of Maero, the praetorian prefect, put and end to his life by smothering him.

Caligula entered Rome after Tiberius' death and compelled the Senate to join him, by a Senatus Consultum, in depriving Tiberius, son Drusus junior and the elder Tiberius' heir in his last will, of his right to the empire.

The funeral ceremonies of were performed with due pomp by Caligula.

On the eighth month of his reign he was attacked with severe sickness. On his recovery, he adopted his brother Tiberius, gave him the title of Princeps Juventutis, and afterwards put him to death.

In the calends of July he entered upon the office of Consul Suffectus, as colleague to his uncle Claudius, and after two months resigned it.

In 38 A.D. he conceded to Soaemus, the kingdom of Arabians of Ituraea; to Cotys, Armenia Minor; to Polemon, the son of Polemon, his father's dominions.

Dion wrote, "In a short time he assumed so much the air of a king, that all those honors, which Augustus had accepted only when duly arrived at the sovereignty, and even then with hesitation as they were decreed from time to time, and many of which Tiberius altogether declined, were by Caligula grasped in one day, with the exception only of Pater Patriae, which, however was not long deferred."

In 39 A.D., in the calends of January, he entered his second Consulate and resigned the office in thirty days. (Sueton ch. 17)

Having exhausted the treasury by his profuse expenditure on public spectacles and other extravagances, he endeavoured to repair the deficiency by the slaughter of wealthy citizens; and then proceeded to Gaul, their to practice the like system of murder and spoliation.

The name of Germanicus does not appear on coins of this year, nor ever subsequently.

In 40 A.D., Caligula, without a colleague, entered his third consulate, at Lugdunum (Lyon), in Gaul; and resigned it on the ides of January. (Sueton. ch. 17)

Having invited over from Africa, Ptolemy, the son of Juba, he put him to death on the pretence of the young prince's ostentatious bearing. (Dion, B. lix. 25)

Proceeding to the ocean, as if about to invade Britain, he ordered his soldiers to gather shell-fish, and returned as a conqueror, laden with the spoils of the sea. (Sueton. ch. 46)

L. Vitellius, prefect of Syria, the same year, gave such a lesson to Artabanus, the Persian, who was threatening an invasion of Armenia that the later abandoned his design, and paid his adoration to the statues of Augustus and of Caligula. (Dion, I. e.)

In 41 A.D., he began hid fourth consulate, on the 7th of the ides of January. Shortly afterwards (viz. on the 9th of the calends of February), he was assassinated by the conspirators Cassius Chaerea and Cornelius Sabinus.

Caligula's accession to the empire was hailed with joy by the Roman people; but their satisfaction was based on no solid foundations, being the result rather of their deep-rooted attachment to his father Germanicus. He seeming, indeed, responded to the fond wishes of the nation, by many acts of piety, justice, and moderation. But it too soon became apparent that these virtues were not of natural growth but owed their exhibition to the policy of Tiberius, who wished through their influences to consolidate his own power in the empire. For there was not act of cruelty, folly, meanness or infamy, which this monster and madman did not delight in perpetrating. He caused his horse, whom he called Incitatus, to be introduced at dinner time, setting before him gilded corn, and drinking his health in golden cups; and he would have created him consul, had he lived long enough. He imitated all the gods and goddesses, in the adoration which he caused to be paid to him, becoming by turns Jupiter, Bacchus, Hercules, Juno, Diana, and Venus. He constructed a bridge of vessels joined together from Puteoli to Baiae, and crossing over with his troops invaded puteoli and then recrossed it in a kind of triumph, delighting in hearing himself called Alexander the Great. By his absurd and extravagant undertakings of this kind, before the year was fully expired, he had squandered the enormous sums of money left by Tiberius. (Vicies ae septics millies IIS. -- See Sestertium).

He both claimed and receive divine worship, and was the greatest blasphemer that ever lived; yet he quailed in the conviction of a deity, and crept under his bed whenever he heard thunder. With savage inhumanity he attended executions in person, and made parents behold the merciless torments inflicted on their children. He contracted and dissolved marriages with equal caprice and dishonesty. Besides his incestuous union with Drusilla, he seized and repudiated three wives, and was at last permanently attached to Caesonia a mother of children by another man, and without your or beauty, but of depravity corresponding with his own.

Other instances of his incredible cruelty and lust may be found in Suetonius, Philo, and Dion. Such infatuations are evident tokens not only of a brutal nature, but also of a distempered intellect. Nor is it possible to entertain other than supreme contempt for the base servility of the Romans, who could offer solemn adoration to a wretch openly guilty of the most detestable and unnatural crimes; and whose adage was oderint, dum metuant (Let them hate so long as they fear).

The gold and silver coins of Caligula are of considerable rarity. Sestertii are also rare. Ases are more common, yet still expensive due to popularity of collecting the infamous emperor and because they generally exhibit good workmanship. When Caligula was destroyed, the dastardly senators, who had so recently sacrificed to him, ordered all his statues to be demolished, his acts abrogated, his money melted down and his inscriptions defaced, in order that his memory might be extinguished forever. Yet this sentence has not prevented a considerable number of his coins from reaching us, though consequently, except for ases, they are of considerable rarity when in good preservation. The coins of Caligula, minted at Rome, do not exhibit Imperator as a surname. This title is used on colonial coins. The only imperial coin of Caligula bearing IMP is a denarius.

On his coins, Caligula resembles his grandfather, but is less noble and has a malignant expression. He was at great pains to cherish this horrid index of his cruel disposition.
Gary W2
Calgula_denarius_ric_2.jpg
Caligula (Gaius) AR Denarius79 viewsGaius (Caligula), with Divus Augustus. AD 37-41. AR Denarius
(17.5mm, 3.26 g, 5h).
Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. 1st emission, AD 37.
Obv :Bare head of Gaius (Caligula) right C. CAESAR. AVG. GERM. P. M. TR. POT. COS
Rev: Radiate head of Divus Augustus right, between two stars.
RIC I 2; Lyon 157; RSC 11.
Fine, toned, deposits, chipped at edges, a few scratches.
CNG E-auction 428 Lot 344 September 5, 2018

This is my third denarius of Caligula. Yes, I know the coin has a few problems. The is a chip on the reverse, and there are deposits on both sides of the coin. Having said that, the quality of the silver is very good and the coin feels nice and solid to the touch.

I bought this coin for the artistic portrait of Caligula. I was really quite taken by it. I also like that most of the legend is present and readable. I did not need another denarius of Caligula, but when I saw the coin I had to have it. This coin will make an excellent addition to my 12 Caesars set.

Denarii of Caligula are scarce and they are sought after. It is the perfect storm as far as prices for these are concerned. It is not only the 12 Caesars collectors that drive up the prices for these denarii it is also the reputation of the man. Who would not like to have a coin of this murderous and insane monster that also happens to be a fascinating historical figure?

If you do not want to shell out the money for a denarius, the Vesta reverse As is available quite readily and for very reasonable prices. Everyone should have a coin of this remarkable and storied individual.
5 commentsorfew
getamylasa2.jpg
Caria, Mylasa. Geta AE38 Medallion. Cult statue of Artemis 78 viewsCARIA, Mylasa. GETA. As Caesar, 198-209 AD. AE Medallion (22.95 gm; 38 mm). Bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Tetrastyle temple of Zeus Labraundus, cult statue of Artemis within, holding labrys and spear; tresses hanging from each hand. Round shield with two supporters in pediment.
Akarca 90; BMC 38; Price & Trell 442.
ancientone
yong li B.jpg
CHINA - YONG LI (YONGMING, PRINCE OF GUI)61 viewsSouthern Ming Dynasty - Price of Gui Yongming (Yong Li Reign Title) - 1646-1659. H-21.45. S-1296. Small letter variety.dpaul7
WangMang2.jpg
China: Han Interregnum, Usurper Wang Mang, 7-22 A.D.88 viewsChina: Han Interregnum, Usurper Wang Mang, 7-22 A.D. AE24 mm, Cash. Obv: Huo Chuan. Schjoth-165.

"As soon as his [Wang Mang's] power was sufficiently consolidated, 3 years after his return to court, lists of his political opponents were drawn up, and hundreds were executed. Shortly after this he established a new penal colony in Tibet in the far West, a sort of ancient gulag. Unfortunately we have no direct account as to the nature of the crimes of those exiled to Tibet. In 6 AD the reins of power were still more firmly in his grasp, and Mang ordered his first reform of the coinage. Fundamentally this was a stratagem to nationalize the gold stocks, and put the empire back on a copper standard. Gold was requisitioned and exchanged against very high value bronze tokens. Two years later the tokens were demonetized. The cash assets of the aristocracy and the wealthy merchants must have been largely wiped out overnight. It is in the first couple of years of Mang's independent reign that the astonishing breadth of his reform proposals appear. His reforms include:

1) the abolition of slavery.
2) the nationalization of land.
3) standard plots of arable land for all adult males who wished to work them.
4) farming families grouped in hamlets of 6 or 8, with a common tax assessment.
5) a national bank offering fair rates of interest to all.
6) government market activity to counteract cornering and monopolization.
7) a new currency system in 15 denominations - circulating by government fiat.
8) defeat of the Huns

His new taxes include

taxes to be paid in cash or kind on cultivated land (one tenth)

triple rates to be paid on uncultivated land (parks and gardens etc.)

c) all self-employed or professional people outside farming shall register for income tax, which will be universally levied at 10% per annum. Those avoiding registration, or submitting false accounts to be sentenced to one years hard labour.

d) the state monopolies on iron, salt, silk, cloth and coinage to be retained

e) a new state monopoly on wine to be introduced.

Discussion of the proposals

1) Events in his private life show Mang's abhorrence of slavery. He vilified the political system of the legalists, established in the Chin dynasty (221-206 BC) specifically by alluding to the manner in which they established market places for male and female slaves, "putting human beings in auction pens as if they were cattle."

Reforms 2, 3, 5 & 6) The nationalization of land and its distribution amongst the peasant farmers themselves is of course one solution to the central economic problem in all pre-modern civilizations, (which presumably finds its roots in the bronze age and persisting right down to the machine age). Peasants must have security of tenure and just returns for their labour, otherwise they will not be encouraged to work effectively - and the state and all within it will thereby be impoverished. However if they are made private landowners then clever, unscrupulous, hard-working individuals within and outwith the peasantry will begin to gain land at the expense of their neighbours. The chief mechanisms of this gradual monopolization of the land by a class of people distinguished by their wealth are:

Preying upon private 'misfortune', (illness, death, and marriage expenses) by loansharking.
Preying upon public misfortunes (bad harvests) by loansharking.
Creating shortages by rigging the markets, exacerbating private and public misfortunes, and then loansharking.

Unfairly biasing tax assessments, creating and exacerbating private and public misfortunes, and then loansharking.

The end result of this tendency is likely to be that the bulk of farmers lack security of tenure and or just returns, and cease to work effectively, to the impoverishment of all. Reforms 2, 3 & 5 bear on this problem in an obvious way.

Reform 6 - the "Five Equalizations" is a little more complicated, so I shall explain it at greater length. Fundamentally it required the installation of government officials at the five important markets of the empire who would "buy things when they were cheap and sell them when they were dear." In more detail: "The superintendent of the market, in the second month of each of the four seasons, shall determine the true price of the articles under their responsibility, and shall establish high, middle and low prices for each type of item. When there are unsold goods on the market, the superintendent shall buy them up at the cost (low?) price. When goods become expensive (ie exceed the high price?) the superintendent shall intervene to sell goods from the official store (and thereby reduce the price)." The regulation thus allows markets to operate, but provides for state intervention to stop speculation . . . Mang's regulations allow for a review and revision of the trading bands four times a year.

4). In resettling the people securely on the land, Mang choose to group them into "chings" of 6 or 8 families - attempting to restore the traditional "well field" system. This provided for the regular exchange of land between the families, to give all a go at the best ground, and for joint responsibility for a common tax demand. The ching system was believed, by the Confucian party in the 1st century BC at least, to have been destroyed by the growth of mercantilist exploitation under the Chin legalists. There are hints that the state went on to use the ching structure in crime prevention measures, by making all members of the ching culpable for the unreported crime of any single member. The installation of a land nationalization scheme under the banner of a return to the ancient Chou system of 'chings' had a great deal of propaganda value amongst the Confucian elite which surrounded Mang. A sentimental view of rural working class life seems to be a common weakness amongst aristocratic and middle class intellectuals of all periods. Mang's own observations of the labouring poor would necessarily have been made at a distance - perhaps he too shared in this sentimental myopia. The evidence suggests that the peasantry did not welcome this aspect of the reforms

7) Food was the first concern of Confucian government, but coinage was the second. Only fair prices could encourage the farmers. Only markets could create fair prices. Only with coins could markets exist. Mang introduced a rational set of 15 denominations of coin, valued from 1 to 1,000 cash and circulated by government fiat. Mang did not invent the idea of fiat or fiduciary currency, a brief attempt had been made to circulate one in China a century earlier. However Mang was the first to systematically think through the matter in a practical context, and to apply it over a protracted period. Future successful ancient and medieval experiments with fiat currency, first in China, then in Japan and Central Asia, and unsuccessful ones in medieval India and Persia all looked back - directly or indirectly - to Mang. The first successful fully fiduciary currencies in Europe are products of the 20th century, more than 700 years after Europeans became aware of Chinese practices. (I am neglecting a great deal of late Roman copper coin here of course. I am by no means knowledgeable on such coins, but my understanding is that in principle, if not in practice, Rome was generally on the silver or the gold standard, and copper was exchangeable on demand.) On my own reading of the text, Mang's main concern is to get gold and silver off the market, so they could not be used to bid his tokens down - his coinage was intended to replace gold coinage, not supplement it."--Robert Tye

For a more complete study of Wang Mang, see Robert Tye's compositon about this enigmatic leader at http://www.anythinganywhere.com/info/tye/Wang%20Mang.htm
Cleisthenes
korykos_valerianI_GIC4491.jpg
Cilicia, Korykos, Valerian I, BMC 2138 viewsValerian I, AD 253-260
AE 32, 22.19g, 32.07mm, 135°
obv. AV K PO - LIK OVALERIAN / OC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, radiate, r.
rev. KWRV (in ex.) KIW TW - N AV NAVAR, in r. field XI / C
Decorated price-urn inscribed QEMIA, with palmbranch between caduceus l.,
and aphlaston r., stg. on table with Dolphin shaped feet, wine pitcher under table; Dionysos,
nude, nebris around hip, wesring boots, stg. l., holding vine-grapes in r. hand and resting on tyrsos with raised l.
hand; l. at feet panther l., head turned r., raising r. foot.
ref. BMC 21; SNG Levante 820; SNG Copenhagen 123; SNG Paris 1123; SNG von Aulock 5686; Klose & Stumpf 259
about VF/VF
Jochen
RS022-Roman-AE_as,_Claudius_(ca_41-54_AD)-014000.JPG
CLAUDIUS (41-54 AD), AE as, LIBERTAS74 viewsObverse- TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P, bare head left.
Reverse- LIBERTAS AVGVSTA/ S-C, Libertas standing facing with pileus, extending left hand.
RIC 113, 28 mm, 9.03 g.
NGC Ch F ("sand patina", Strike 3/5, Surface 3/5), cert. #4094567-003.
Ex-?, probably eBay, July 2011, purchased raw.
Comments: I've always liked "sandy" or "desert" patina on late Roman coins from the eastern empire, but have hardly ever seen it on earlier Imperial coins like this. I've forgotten who I bought this from, though I think it was off eBay. I saved some partial notes, though unfortunately they didn't include the seller's name or the exact cost. I do remember being happy with the price. The seller said this was struck at Tarraco, circa 50-54 AD. I'm not entirely sure of the attribution.

5 commentslordmarcovan
alex_k~0.jpg
Coinage in the name of Alexander III, 336-323 BC. 7 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 35mm, 16.5g, 12h; Mesembria mint. Local issue, struck 250-175 BC.
Obv.: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Rev.: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ/ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟY; Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre; Corinthian helmet before, EYΦA under throne.
Reference: Price 1035 / 17-137-275
John Anthony
CSA_T41_Back.jpg
Confederate States of America: T-41 1862 $100 (Back)5 viewsCuhaj, George S. (2012-11-30). Confederate States Paper Money

Obv: Slaves hoeing cotton. John C. Calhoun at left, Columbia at right. The central design is copied from the $ 50 note of 1861 (No. 1). The scrolls in the upper corners come in two different styles, vertical and horizontal. Black with “Hundred” in orange/ red.
Rev: Blank

Various written dates August 1862 to January 8, 1863. Plain and watermarked paper (CSA block, CSA script, J Whatman 1862, Hodgkinson & Co. Wookey Hole Mill). The J Whatman 1862 and Hodgkinson & Co. watermarks are scarcer. The scroll varieties are of approximately the same value.

Over 70 plate letter (W to Z), scroll, date and paper varieties. If frame line varieties are included, the number increases considerably. An example of the CSA block watermark shows through the back of the $ 100 note pictured below.

All of the $ 100 interest-bearing notes generally bear interest paid markings on the back, usually straight line type with or without a rectangular border. Prices are listed for this type. Markings of certain cities that are infrequently seen are worth somewhat more. Notes bearing postmarks on the back are worth double or more (Charleston, S.C. is the most common) while other circular depository markings raise value of notes up to 25%. Notes bearing Army or Navy markings on back are worth triple. Some notes bear no markings on reverse, but they command little over the listed prices. Notes with printed bogus backs, which are described in Part II of this catalog, are worth about double in nice condition. Thian gives a total of 670,400 notes of this type, a figure that appears to be greater than it should be for this type since it is somewhat scarcer than the train types, although all are common.
SpongeBob
CSA_T41_Front.jpg
Confederate States of America: T-41 1862 $100 (Front)25 viewsCuhaj, George S. (2012-11-30). Confederate States Paper Money

Obv: Slaves hoeing cotton. John C. Calhoun at left, Columbia at right. The central design is copied from the $ 50 note of 1861 (No. 1). The scrolls in the upper corners come in two different styles, vertical and horizontal. Black with “Hundred” in orange/ red.
Rev: Blank

Various written dates August 1862 to January 8, 1863. Plain and watermarked paper (CSA block, CSA script, J Whatman 1862, Hodgkinson & Co. Wookey Hole Mill). The J Whatman 1862 and Hodgkinson & Co. watermarks are scarcer. The scroll varieties are of approximately the same value.

Over 70 plate letter (W to Z), scroll, date and paper varieties. If frame line varieties are included, the number increases considerably. An example of the CSA block watermark shows through the back of the $ 100 note pictured below.

All of the $ 100 interest-bearing notes generally bear interest paid markings on the back, usually straight line type with or without a rectangular border. Prices are listed for this type. Markings of certain cities that are infrequently seen are worth somewhat more. Notes bearing postmarks on the back are worth double or more (Charleston, S.C. is the most common) while other circular depository markings raise value of notes up to 25%. Notes bearing Army or Navy markings on back are worth triple. Some notes bear no markings on reverse, but they command little over the listed prices. Notes with printed bogus backs, which are described in Part II of this catalog, are worth about double in nice condition. Thian gives a total of 670,400 notes of this type, a figure that appears to be greater than it should be for this type since it is somewhat scarcer than the train types, although all are common.
SpongeBob
CSA_T64_Front.jpg
Confederate States of America: T-64 1864 $500 (Front)11 viewsCuhaj, George S. (2012-11-30). Confederate States Paper Money.

Obv: Bust of Lieut. General T. J. (“ Stonewall”) Jackson at lower right. Confederate flag and seal atop war implements at left. Pink and black. (Not rare but its popularity with collectors has caused it to rise in price.)
Rev: Blank

Shades of pink vary on notes of this denomination. Red notes are usually valued higher than those of lighter shades. The illustrated note shows a portion of the palmetto shield overprint at the upper right comer. Four varieties, plate letters A to D. 150,428 notes (incomplete data).
SpongeBob
corinth_peg.jpg
Corinth, Corinthia36 views306 – 303 B.C.
Bronze AE12
1.26 gm, 12 mm, die axis 225o
Obv.: Pegasos flying left, koppa below
Rev.: Ornate trident head, Zeus holding thunderbolt/eagle right, Φ-I flanking trident below
BCD Corinth 263; Price Class A, Group VI, 67 corr.; BMC Corinth p. 55, 453 var.; Sear 2647 var.

Ex-Forvm, Ex-BCD Collection
1 commentsJaimelai
1~0~0.jpg
Countermark on reverse of Alexander III, Cyprus Amathus 129 viewsAlexander the great AE
Amathus,Cyprus
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles right
Reverse: Club and quiver,below ,eagle flying left,star over quiver.Between ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ
16.47mm 4.48g
PRICE 3090 ,TZIAMBAZIS 38/3
maik
88000269.jpg
CRETE, GORTYNA, 98-94 BC53 viewsDrachm, 20mm, 3.74 g, 11h

O - Diademed head of Zeus left
R - Warrior standing facing, hand on shield set on ground, and holding scepter; border of radiating lines.

Price, Gortyn, Class D, 129-48; Svoronos, Numismatique 144; cf. SNG Copenhagen 448; BMC 54.

Ex Sierra Collection
Ex Triton X (9 January 2007), lot 256
4 commentsrobertpe
Medieval.jpg
Crusaders, Antioch13 viewsCRUSADERS, Antioch. Anonymous. Circa 1136-1149. Æ Fractional Denier .

+PRICEPS (S retrograde), cross pattée; pellet in each quarter / +ANTIOCHIE , altar with five legs with chalice in center; cross above, pellets in quarters, open oval below.

Metcalf, Crusades 465; CCS 21.
Belisarius
Price_3139.jpg
CYPRUS, Salamis. Nikokreon. Circa 331-310 BC. AR Tetradrachm9 views27.5mm, 17.18 g, 1h
In the name and types of Alexander III of Macedon. Struck circa 332/1-323 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; bow in left field. Zapiti & Michaelidou 5–6; Price 3139; Newell, Some 7. Near VF, toned, sharply struck on obverse. Well centered on a broad flan.
Leo
Domitian_as_Caesar_RIC_II_V961.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC II V096142 viewsDomitian as Caesar 69-81 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 77-78 A.D. (3.43g 18.6mm 6h). Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right. Rev: COS V high across field; Wolf and twins, in exergue, boat. RIC II V 961, BMC V240, RSC 51.

A common coin of Domitian as Caesar, I’ve been looking for an example for my collection for some time. This one fit the bill balancing price and condition. While worn, all the major devices and legends are there. This was a new reverse type during this time, and most of the Flavian reverses during this period were antiquarian in style if not direct copies of older coins.
4 commentsLucas H
Domitian_as_Caesar_RIC_V1087.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC II V108731 viewsDomitian as Caesar 69-81 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 79, to 24 June A.D. (3.39g, 17.7mm, 6h). Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI, laureate head right. Rev: Vesta std. l., with Palladium and scepter. RIC II V1087, BMC 262, RSC 378.

Vesta was the virgin goddess of home, hearth, and family. This was a part of the last issue of precious metal coins before Vespasian’s death, and this reverse is not shared with Vespasian or Titus.

This is another upgrade. When I first narrowed by primary collecting area to Flavian denarii, I tended to pick up common coins without regard for condition. In the back of my mind, I wondered if another would come along at all, much less in a price range I could afford. After watching the market for a longer period of time and understanding it better, I see my mistake, and now have the patience to wait for better examples of common coins. However, this leaves me correcting some of my early mistakes with upgrades.

This example is well centered and the obverse lettering is very sharp.
2 commentsLucas H
EB0070b_scaled.JPG
EB0070 Helios / Rose5 viewsRhodes-Peraia, Caria. AR drachm, 175-170 BC.
Obverse: Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right.
Reverse: Z-Ω EΡMIAΣ, rose with bud on the right.
References: SNG Keckman 793; Price, Larissa 1968 Hoard, 247.
Diameter: 14mm, Weight: 2.685g.
EB
EB0084b_scaled.JPG
EB0084 Herakles / Zeus18 viewsAlexander III, Babylon, MACEDONIA, AR Tetradrachm, 325-317 BC.
Obverse: Head of Herakles wearing lionskin headdress right.
Reverse: AΛEΞANΔΡOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ to right and beneath Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre; M in left field, ΛY beneath chair above the strut.
References: Price 3692; Mueller 1272.
Diameter: 25.5mm Weight: 17.202g. Axis: 240°.
1 commentsEB
EB0085b_scaled.JPG
EB0085 Herakles / Zeus3 viewsAlexander III, Sidon?, MACEDONIA, obol, 333-323 BC.
Obverse: Head of Herakles right, wearing lionskin headdress.
Reverse: AΛEXANΔΡOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre. ΣI in left field.
References: Cf. Price 3475, MULLER 3934.
Diameter: 10mm, Weight: 0.653g.
EB
EB0086b_scaled.JPG
EB0086 Herakles / Zeus3 viewsAlexander III AR Drachm. Abydos mint. ca 310-297 BC.
Obverse: Head of Herakles right, wearing lionskin headdress.
Reverse: AΛEXANΔΡOY, Zeus seated left with eagle and sceptre; monogram in left field, Phrygian cap? beneath chair.
References: Cf. Price 1577.
Diameter: 18mm, Weight: 4.017g.
EB
EB0087b_scaled.JPG
EB0087 Herakles / Zeus2 viewsKingdom of Macedonia, Alexander III AR Drachm. Sardes mint, struck under Antigonos I Monophthalmos ca 320-319 BC.
Obverse: Head of Herakles wearing lionskin headdress.
Reverse: Zeus seated left; in left field, TI above star.
References: Cf. Price 2626-2629.
Diameter: 17mm, Weight: 4.132g.
EB
EB0088b_scaled.JPG
EB0088 Herakles / Zeus2 viewsAlexander III AR Tetradrachm. Temnos, late posthumous issue, ca. 188-170 BC.
Obverse: Head of young Herakles right in lionskin headdress.
Reverse: AΛEΞANΔΡOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, E and ΠA monogram above oenochoe beneath vine tendril in left field.
References: Price 1678.
Diameter: 32.5mm, Weight: 16.22g.
EB
EB0089b_scaled.JPG
EB0089 Herakles / Zeus11 viewsKingdom of Macedon, Alexander III, AR tetradrachm. Posthumous issue, year 26 = 187-188 BC.
Obverse: Head of Herakles right in lionskin headdress.
Reverse: AΛEΞANΔΡOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, right leg drawn back. AΣ over date K :Csquare: in left field, rectangular Seleukid countermark of anchor to right.
References: SNG Israel 1235, Price 2901.
Diameter: 32mm, Weight: 16.55g.
1 commentsEB
EB0199_2b_scaled.JPG
EB0199.2 Herakles / Club & Bow3 viewsAlexander III Macedonia, AE 18, 336-323 BC.
Obverse: Head of Herakles right in lionskin.
Reverse: [AΛ]EΞANΔΡOY, club above, bow and bowcase below.
References: Cf. Price 266.
Diameter: 18mm, Weight: 6.476.
EB
EB0271_scaled.JPG
EB0271 Macedon, Alexander the Great, AE1811 viewsMacedon, Alexander the Great, AE18, struck c. 323-319 BC, Miletos Mint
Obv: Head of Alexander the Great right, as Hercules, wearing lion-skin knotted at base of neck.
Rev: AΛEΞANΔΡOY Bow and bowcase above, club below.
References: Price 2110
Diameter: 18mm, Weight: 6.34 grams
EB
Elagabalus_SC_Eagle_in_Wreath~0.jpg
Elagabalus SC Eagle in Wreath40 viewsBronze AE 22, McAlee 788b (rare), BMC Syria p. 203, 426 ff., gF, Antioch mint, weight 5.425g, maximum diameter 19.3mm, die axis 135o,
OBV: ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ Μ Α ΑΝΤΩΝΕΙΝΟ C C, radiate head right;
REV: large SC, AE above, eagle wings open and head right below, all within laurel
wreath fastened with garland at the top;
Per Forvm:
This type but with the wreath fastened at the top with a star is very common. Fastened with a garland, as is this coin, is rare and fastened with
a diamond is extremely rare. Rare variations such as these have little impact on price since few collectors will pay a premium for such slight
differences.

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins

RARE
Romanorvm
Elagabalus_RIC46.jpg
Elagabalus, 218–22 CE43 viewsAR denarius, Rome, 221 CE; 2.89g. BMCRE 256, RIC 46, RSC 196. Obv: IMP ANTONINVS – PIVS AVG; laureate bust, draped, seen from the front, with horn over forehead, bearded. Rx: PM TR P IIII COS III PP; Elagabalus, standing half-left, sacrificing out of patera over lighted altar, holding branch (cypress?) upwards in left hand; star or comet in field left.

Notes: Seventh issue (May 221 to end of the reign, March 222) of the reign of Elagabalus. High-relief portrait.

Provenance: Ex Münzen & Medaillen 37 (23 November 2012), lot 218; ex Münzen und Medaillen AG, Basel – Fixed Price List 243 (May 1964), lot 304.
1 commentsMichael K5
RS020-Roman-AE_as,_Caligula_(ca_14-37_AD)-017900.jpg
GAIUS "Caligula" (14-37 AD), AE as, Caesaraugusta, Spain55 viewsObverse- C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS IMP, laureate head of Caligula left.
Reverse- C C A LICINIANO ET GERMANICO, II VIR in exergue, two bulls, led by man behind.
RPC 371, 11.12 g, 26 mm.
aVF with brown and black patina, a few old scratches.
Ex-Hellenika Ancient Numismatics, July 2012, through VCoins store.
Comments: Most Caligula portrait coins available under $500 seem to be the VESTA-reverse bronzes. I had a decent one of those in my previous collection, but didn't want another unless it was nicer than my old one, and finding one I liked within my budget proved difficult. Then I spotted this provincial, with a more interesting design and a much friendlier price (under $200), so I bought it. Yes, it has some old scratches, but I can live with those. I thought it had a lot of "meat" on it for the price. The seller had speculated as to whether the scratch on the portrait represented a damnatio attempt, but I don't think so- to my mind, a damnatio would have involved much more deliberate and vicious damage.
2 commentslordmarcovan
ankyra_caracalla_agon_neu.jpg
Galatia, Ankyra, Caracalla, unpublished?36 viewsCaracalla, AD 198-217
AE - AE 30, 15.72g, 29.83mm, 195°
obv. ANTWNINOC - AVGOVCTO - C
bearded head, laureate, r.
rev. MHTROPOLE - WC ANKYRAC
in l. field one below the other IE / RO / C
in r. field one below the other AG / W / N
athlete, nude, stg. frontal, head r., holding in l. arm long bended rod and with r. hand crowns himself with
price-crown; in l. field palmbranch
ref. not in BMC, SNG France 3, Klose, Stumpf, Sport Spiele Sieg; unpublished?
very rare, VF+, black-green patina

In the times of Caracalla the games called Asklepieia Sotereia Pythia, games in honour of Asklepios, took place in Ankyra. Because Caracalla suffered of serious sickness he visited these games. May be that this coin mentions games in honour of Asklepios too.
3 commentsJochen
RS034-Roman-AE_as,_Galba_(ca_68-69_AD)-019700.JPG
GALBA (68-69 AD), AE as, DIVA AVGVSTA, Spanish (Tarraco?) mint, ca. 68 AD53 viewsObverse- SER GALBA IMP CAESAR AVG P M TR P P P, laureate head right.
Reverse- DIVA AVGVSTA, female figure (Livia?) standing left, holding patera and sceptre.
RIC 67, 28 mm, 11.6 g.
Ex-"king_radio" (eBay), UK, February, 2012.
Comments: Galba can be moderately tough. A lot of his coins (at least the ones within my budget) are pretty miserable looking. I thought this one was pretty decent for the price (which worked out to just a hair over $200 with the exchange rate). I liked it for the clear portrait and name. The almost black patina is not bad at all. The British seller was very friendly and easy to deal with- we ended up swapping several chatty emails.
2 commentslordmarcovan
811014LG.jpg
Galba Denarius - Roma Renascens (RIC 28)66 viewsAR Denarius
Tarraco, Spain 68 AD
3.41g

Obv: Laureate bust of Galba (R)
IMP GALBA

Rev: ROMA RENASCENS
Roma walking right, holding Spear and Winged Victory.

RIC 28

Ex Dr. Michael Brandt, Klassisch Munzen
Ex MMAG, Basel (Basle) Fixed Price Listing 372 (October 1975), 23 (plate)
2 commentsKained but Able
Coin1001_quad_sm.jpg
Galerius Concordia Militum Ӕ post-reform radiate fraction (295 - 299), Cyzicus mint1 viewsGAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, radiate, draped (?) and cuirassed bust right / CONCORDIA MI-LITVM + KB in lower centre, Prince (the left figure) standing right in military dress, holding parazonium or baton of imperium, receiving small Victory with a wreath and palm branch on globe from naked Jupiter (the right figure) standing left holding tall scepter.

Ӕ, 20mm, 2.36g, die axis 6h, base metal seems red, high copper content.

Galerius ruled as Caesar from 293 to 305, but most sources give minting years for this type of coin as 295-299.

RIC VI Cyzicus 19b (18b?), Sear 3713. 19b has cuirassed and draped bust, 18b -- only cuirassed. I think the edge of the military cape on the shoulder means it is draped in this case, but distinction seems very vague to me. Looking at coins identified as 18b and 19b I cannot see any clear pattern, it seems that many are confused in this respect just like myself.

GALerius VALerius MAXIMIANUS NOBilitas CAESar (in this era the title of "junior" emperor while Augustus was a "senior" one), CONCORDIA MILITVM = [Dedicated to] harmony with the soldiers, K = Kysikos (Cyzicus) mint, B = officina Beta (workshop #2). The figure to the right is naked except for a cape, so it is a god, the sceptre points to him being Jupiter, the ruler of gods. Jupiter is also typically associated with Victory, he was often depicted with Victory in the right hand and sceptre in the left. The line across his head probably designates a wreath, also a common feature of Jupiter. Victory holds her common attributes, the triumphal wreath and a palm branch, the orb she stands on represents the world (thus meaning dominion over it). Round Earth was a firmly established concept in Roman times. The left figure, the prince (Galerius in this case) is identified by his full battle dress and the hand-held short elongated shape, which is either the ivory baton of imperium (the high command) or, more likely, a parazonium, a long triangular dagger, typically cradled in the bearer's left arm. A Roman parazonium blade tended to be leaf shape and approximately 15"-19" long. It was a ceremonial weapon, a mark of high rank, used to rally the troops.

GALERIUS, * c. 250, near Serdica, Dacia Ripensis (Sofia, Bulgaria) or in a Dacian place later called Felix Romuliana (Gamzigrad, Serbia) † late Apr or early May 311 (aged ~60), Serdica, Dacia Ripensis (Sofia, Bulgaria) ‡ 1 Mar or 21 May 293 – 1 May 305 (as Eastern Caesar, under Diocletian), 1 May 305 – late Apr or early May 311 (as Eastern Augustus with many co-emperors).

Galerius was born of humble parentage and had a distinguished military career. On March 1, 293, he was nominated as Caesar by Diocletian, the supreme ruler of the empire, to help him govern the East. Galerius divorced his wife and married Diocletian’s daughter, Valeria. After ruling from Egypt from 293 to 295, Galerius assumed command of defensive operations against the Sasanians in 297. After being defeated, he then won a decisive victory that increased his influence with Diocletian. Galerius next proceeded to the Balkans and won numerous victories in the region. A staunch pagan, he persuaded the emperor to initiate the persecution of the Christians at Nicomedia in 303.

When Diocletian abdicated on May 1, 305, Galerius became Augustus of the East, ruling the Balkans and Anatolia. Since Galerius had arranged the appointment of two of his favourites, Maximinus (his nephew) and Flavius Valerius Severus, to be Caesars in both East and West, he was in effect the supreme ruler. When Constantius Chlorus died in 306, Galerius insisted that Severus govern the West as Augustus, but he grudgingly conceded the subordinate title of caesar to Chlorus’s son, Constantine, who was correctly suspected of Christian sympathies. Galerius’s supremacy was, however, short-lived. Severus was soon overthrown (306) and killed by Maxentius (son of the former emperor Maximian). Galerius invaded Italy but was forced to retreat. In 308 he induced Diocletian and Maximian to meet him at Carnuntum on the Danube and to declare Maxentius a usurper. On November 11, Galerius proclaimed as Augustus of the West his friend Licinius, who had effective control only in the region of the Danube.

A ruthless ruler, Galerius imposed the poll tax on the urban population and maintained the persecution of the Christians. In the winter of 310–311, however, he became incapacitated with a horrible disease. Fearing, perhaps, that his illness was the vengeance of the Christian God, he issued on April 30, 311, an edict grudgingly granting toleration. Shortly afterward he died. He was succeeded by his nephew Maximinus Daia.

Diocletian's money reform of 293.

Trying to fight the runaway inflation that he did not understand and to return people's faith in Roman coins, Diocletian did a complete overhaul of the Roman monetary system. He introduced a new theoretical base monetary unit called the denarius communis or d.c. (only rarely represented by actual coins, one example being old pre-Aurelian antoniniani still in circulation, valued now at 1 d. c., another – minted only on a small scale 1.5g coin with the reverse legend VTILITAS PVBLICA, "for public use"). Then he started minting new types of coins including a gold aureus of new purity and weight standard (1/60 pound of pure gold), a quality silver coin, argenteus, roughly similar to the early imperial denarius in size and weight, a new billon coin, of a copper alloy but with a small fraction of silver mostly in the form of coating, roughly similar to the old antoninianus when it was just introduced, however bearing now a laureate rather than a radiate bust. This type of coin is now commonly referred to as a follis or a nummus. Finally, a new radiate bronze coin, now referred to as a "radiate fraction" or a radiatus was introduced, similar to the early imperial aes in value, but much smaller in weight and size. There were also rare issues of ½ and ¼ nummus coins, mostly in connection to some celebration. Interestingly, the obverses of these new coins were chosen to represent some identical "generic" image of a "good emperor" independent of the actual likeness of the August or Caesar in whose name they were issued, thus affirming the unity of all the tetrarchy rulers. Very roughly one may think of a new radiatus as a price of one loaf of bread, a new argenteus as a very good daily wage, and a new aureus as a price of a good horse. An approximate relationship between these units was as follows: 1 aureus ≈ 20 argentei ≈ 1000 d.c. (some scholars prefer 25 argentei and 1250 d.c.); 1 argenteus ≈ 5 nummi ≈ 50 d.c.; 1 nummus ≈ 5 radiati ≈ 10 d.c.; 1 radiatus ≈ 2 d.c. Of course we know that this reform was ineffective and inflation continued, so all these values were constantly shifting due to changing markets. Diocletian himself stopped minting argenteus in c. 305, and Constantine in his monetary reforms only re-established a new and highly successful gold standard, solidus (1/72 pound of pure gold, surprisingly actually first introduced also by Diocletian in 301, but only as a pilot version). As for billon and bronze coins, "folles" or "nummi", they were minted in all shapes and sizes all over the 4th century, often horribly debased by inflation, and their values at each point can only be guessed. It seems that in later times up to 1000 small bronze coins were sealed in a leather pouch to produce a reasonable unit of payment, thus giving rise to the name follis (lit. "bag" in Latin), which is now anachronistically applied to many billon and bronze coins of the late 3d and 4th century.
Yurii P
Geta_175_225_Comp.jpg
Geta (as Augustus), 209–11 CE80 viewsAR denarius, Rome, 210 CE; 3.08g. BMCRE 68, C 219 (3 Fr.), RIC 92. Obv: P SEPT GETA PIVS AVG BRIT; head laureate right. Rx: VICTORI – AE BRIT; Victory standing left, naked to waist, holding wreath and palm.

Notes: Second special issue of the joint reign of Severus, Caracalla, and Geta commemorating victories in Britain. Scarce; fewer than thirty specimens in the hoards studied by P.V. Hill (twenty in Reka Devnia).

Provenance: Ex Berk BBS 175 (May 2011), lot 225; ex Empire 9 (30 April 1988), lot 337; ex Glendining sale (21 November 1984), lot 220, hammer price £125; from the G.R. Arnold Collection, Burford, England.

Literature: H. A. Seaby (1898–1979), Roman Silver Coins, 2nd ed. (London: Seaby Publications Ltd., 1969; revised 1982), vol. 3, p. 99, no. 219 (this specimen illustrated), and Glendining & Co. and B.A. Seaby, Ltd., The G.R. Arnold Collection of Silver Coins of the Severan Dynasty (London, 21 November 1984), pl. IX, no. 220 (this specimen illustrated).
4 commentsMichael K5
GetaHadrianArtemis.JPG
Geta, AE 2638 viewsAUT K P CEPT MIOC GETAC
Bust laureate, cuirassed, draped, right, seen from behind
ADRIANO/POLITW/N
Tetrastyle temple, Artemis advancing right, holding bow and drawing arrow from quiver, hunting dog at her feet (not seen), temple flanked by laurel trees, tall garland pedestal before.
Jurukova 431 (V 219/R 418), Price/Trell, S. 248, 97.
whitetd49
Fake_-_Gothic-barbarian_imitation,_Aequitas.jpg
Gothic-barbarian imitation, Aequitas34 viewsObv: Blundered legend, Head laur. r.
Rv: Blundered legend, Aequitas (?)

17mm, 2.37
Currently on sale in an auction, starting price at 30 €.
2 commentsklausklage
alejandro2.jpg
GREEK61 viewsKings of Macedon. Alexander III "the Great".
AR Drachm. Sardes c.322-319 AD. Struck under Philip III. 4,35 grs. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus seated left holding eagle in right hand,scepter in left, bee above T I before. AΛΕΞANΔPOY behind.
Price 2626. ADM I .Series XIV 283-288.
Ex.Barry P.Murphy.
3 commentsbenito
alexandrocIII bronze-.jpg
greek - Alexander the Great AE17 bronze 33 viewsobv:Head of Apollo
rev: Horse right, above ALEXANDROY
ref:Price369
3.93g, 17mm
Rare
berserker
CNG_348-269.jpg
GREEK Lesbos Mytilene Alexander Tetratdrachm20 viewsLESBOS, Mytilene. Circa 215-200 BC. AR Tetradrachm (28mm, 16.73 g, 12h). In the name and types of Alexander III of Macedon. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, monogram above lyre. Price 1699; HGC 6, 1046.
CNG Auction 348 lot 269.
Diogenes
Achaia,_Archean_League,_Argos_AR_Hemidrachm_-_CNG_160__Lot_43.jpg
GREEK, Achaean League, Argos, ca. 175-168 BC, AR Hemidrachm - Agrinion 308274 viewsLaureate head of Zeus right. / Wreath surrounding AX monogram in centre; TK monogram above and Harpa right below.
BCD Peloponnesos 1136 (this coin); Clerk 147; Agrinion 308 (same dies).
(17 mm, 2.47 g, 12h)
ex- BCD Collection; LHS 96, Lot 1136 (8 May 2006); ex- Empire Coins Fixed Price List 76 (September 1995).

One of the more refined images of Zeus on this series of Achaian League emissions, complimented by the slightly oval flan.
3 commentsLloyd T
Alexander_III_the_Great_-_I_with_statue.png
Greek, Alexander III the Great - Tetradrachm - Amphipolis, Macedon544 viewsDate: 332-326 BC (lifetime)
Size: 25 mm
Weight: 17.4 g
Obv: Head of Herakles wearing lion's scalp right
Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, legs open, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right; amphora in left field
Price 13
5 commentsViriathus
Macedonian_Kingdom,_Alexander_III_The_Great,_336_-_323_B_C_,_Lifetime_Issue_~2.jpg
Greek, Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue.226 viewsSilver Drachm, Müller Alexander 763; SNG Cop 895; SNG Alpha Bank 629; SNG Saroglos 771; SNG München - ; Price 2090, Choice good Very Fine , as found Superb Fine Style, toned, centered, bumps and marks, Ionia, Miletos mint, weight 4.004g, maximum diameter 18.0mm, die axis 0o, struck between 325 - 323 B.C.,.
Obverse ; head of Alexander the Great as Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck.
Reverse ; AΛEΞAN∆POY ( means " Of Alexander " in Ancient Greek ), Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, feet on footstool, right leg forward, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter topped with lotus vertical behind in left hand, ∆H monogram left.



*Lifetime issue. This coin was issued during the lifetime and rule of Alexander the Great. Most Alexander coins were issued after his death.

*Alexander the great believed if the world ruled by one king or leader , will be better for all.
Alexander the great was considered a god after his death.



FORVM Ancient Coins. / From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
935293~0.jpg
Greek, Ariobarzanes I Philoromaios. Cappadocian Kingdom. AR Drachm.265 viewsCirca 96-63 B.C. AR Drachm (17mm, 3.92g, 1h). Simmoneta 9a. Obverse diademed head of Ariobarzanes to right. Reverse BASILEUS ARIOBARZANOU PHILOROMAIOU Athena standing left, holding Nike and spear and shield; to left monogram; to right, A; in exergue, gamma. Extremely Fine, beautifully toned. Ex Nomos AG 6th Price List Sale, lot 44.
Ariobarzanes I, nicknamed Philoromaios or “Lover of Rome” in the literal sense but should be translated as “Friend of Rome,” was a client king of Cappadocia during Roman expansion and hegemony in Asia Minor. He was elected by his people with the backing of Lucius Cornelius Sulla. He was removed several times by either Mithradates IV of Pontus or Tigranes II of Armenia but reinstated by the Roman Senate each time. He eventually abdicated and was replaced by his son, Ariobarzanes II.

The detail and artistry is surprisingly elegant on this small coin with a diameter of only 17mm. It is a masterpiece of miniature numismatic portraiture: most of Ariobarzanes’ coins are of inferior quality and finding one with fine portraiture of good style, such as this, is rarely encountered.

2 commentsJason T
KINGS_of_THRACE__Lysimachos.jpg
Greek, Lysimachos, Unrecorded with the dolphin310 viewsKINGS of THRACE. Lysimachos. 305-281 BC. AR Drachm (18mm, 4.14 g, 5h). Kolophon mint. Struck 299/8-297/6 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, dolphin above forepart of lion left; torch below throne. Thompson -; Müller -; Price -. Good VF, lightly toned, minor marks, small flaw on edge. Unrecorded with the dolphin.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. ( CNG e- 296 , Lot 25)
9 commentsSam
Greek_Macedon__Acanthus_new~0.jpg
GREEK, Macedon Acanthus161 viewsGreek, Macedon. Acanthus. Late 5th Century – 348 BC. AR Tetrobol (2.16 gm).
Obverse: Forepart of bull running left, head reverted
Reverse: Quadripartite incuse with granular surface.
SNG ANS 44-6.
Ex: Freeman and Sear Fixed Price List 10, lot 152
1 commentspaul1888
Alexander.jpg
GREEK, MACEDONIAN KINGDOM - Alexander III, the Great - AE Half Unit32 viewsAlexander III the Great - AE - Uncertain mint in Macedonia
335-323 B.C.
Obv : head of Herakles right, with lionskin head-dress
Rev : ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, between club above and bow and bowcase below ; NI below
16 mm - 5.97 g
(Price 309)
Avita
Alexandre.jpg
GREEK, MACEDONIAN KINGDOM - Alexander III, the Great - Drachm43 viewsAR Drachm, struck in the name of Alexander III the Great, under the reign of Antigonos I Monophthalmos - Lampsacus Mint
Circa 310-301 B.C.
Obv : Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion-skin headdress
Rev : ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, Zeus seated left, forepart of Pegasus left in left field; o on N monogram beneath throne
17 mm - 4.16 g
(Price 1382, SNG Cop 887)
1 commentsAvita
Kingdom_of_Macedonia__Alexander_III,_336_–_323_and_posthumous_issues_Tetradrachm,_Amphipolis_circa_318-317,_AR_8h_25,5-26,5mm,_17_26_g-s.jpg
Greek, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III (the Great), 323 - 317 B.C., Price 0111, AR-Tetradrachm, Zeus Aëtophoros seated on throne left, laurel branch in left field,351 viewsMacedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, (323 - 317 B.C.), AR-Tetradrachm, Price 111, Zeus Aëtophoros seated on throne left, laurel branch in left field,
avers:- No legends, Young Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck.
revers:- BAΣILEΩΣ-AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Zeus Aëtophoros seated on throne left, right leg drawn back, holding eagle and scepter, laurel branch in left field.
exerg:-/-//--, diameter: 25,5-26,5mm, weight: 17,26g, axes: 8 h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, ‘Amphipolis’ mint. Struck under Antipater, circa 322-320 B.C.,
date: posthumous, c. 322 - c. 320 B.C., ref: Price 111,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Greek-xx022_Alexandros-III_Q-001_axis-10h_15mm_3,99g-s.jpg
Greek, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III (the Great), 323 - 317 B.C., Price 2247b, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on throne left, griffin left, Rare! 272 viewsMacedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, Ionia, Theos, West Asia Minor, (323 - 319 B.C.), Ar-Drachm, Price 2247b, Zeus seated on throne left, griffin left, Rare!
avers:- Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck,
revers:- AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Zeus seated on throne left, right leg drawn back, holding eagle and scepter, griffin left;,
exerg: , diameter: 15mm, weight: 3,99g, axes: 10 h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Alexander III, The Great, Ionia, Theos, West Asia Minor, date: posthumous, c. 323 - c. 319 B.C., ref: Price 2247b,
Q-001
quadrans
4__Tétradrachme_Alexandre_Le_Grand_Cicilie_Tarse_327-325___AJC_17,28_g_26_mm.jpg
Greek, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III (the great), Tetradrachm222 views- Tétradrachme, Alexandre le Grand, Cicilie (Tarse), 327-325 avant J.-C (Argent) Price 3016 300
Avers : Tête d'Héraklès à droite coiffée de la léonté.
Revers : E. Zeus assis à gauche sur un trône et tenant un aigle. Dans le champ, un araire.
Roger D2
Alexander_III_Drachm_EF~0.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III Drachm, Colophon.395 viewsALEXANDER III. THE GREAT - DRACHM - COLOPHON - ZEUS - HERAKLES - SPEAR HEAD - STAR

Alexander III. The Great. Struck at Colophon. AR Drachm.

Obv. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin right.
Rev. ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ Zeus seated left with sceptre and eagle. left in field star, right in field spear head.

Condition: almost extremely fine. 4.2 g., 18 mm. Price 1759
5 commentsPhiloromaos
Alexander_III_AR_Tetradrachm_Amphipolis_50%j.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great40 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 17.08 gms, 'Amphipolis' mint, Lifetime issue, Struck under Antipater, circa 325-323/2 BCE.
Obverse: head of young Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Reverse: Zeus Aetophoros seated left, holding eagle and scepter, in left field, cock standing left. ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ in right field.
Price 79, Muller 392, Newell Demanhur 792, Troxell Issue E3, SNG Alphabank 478, SNG Oxford 2558
1 commentsScribonius Probus
AlexanderIII-moeda1.jpg
GREEK, MACEDONIAN KINGDOM, Alexander III The Great 336-323 BC.39 viewsAR Tetradrachm of Alexander III The Great 336-323 BC.
Weight: 17g | Ø: 23mm
Obv: Head of young Heracles right, clad in lion's skin.
Rev: ALEXANDROU Zeus seated left on a backless throne, his legs parallel, holding eagle and sceptre.
Sear 6713 - Price 61 - Jenkins 343.
Jorge C
alexanderiiimoeda2.jpg
GREEK, MACEDONIAN KINGDOM, Alexander III The Great 336-323 BC.35 viewsAR Tetradrachm of Alexander III The Great 336-323 BC.
Weight: 17.2 g | Size: 27 mm
Obv: Head of young Heracles right, clad in lion's skin.
Rev: ALEXANDROU - Zeus seated left on a backless throne, his legs parallel, holding eagle and scepter.
Ref: Sear 6713 - Price 61 - Jenkins 343.
1 commentsJorge C
bot11.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great AR Drachm158 viewsMiletos mint (336-323).
Price 2090
Minos
bot2.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great AR Drachm137 viewsMagnesia mint (319-305 BC).
Price 1980
Minos
bot12.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great AR Drachm139 viewsMiletos mint (295-275 BC).
Price 2148
Minos
bot10.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great AR Drachm134 viewsKolophon mint (319-310 BC).
Price 1794
Minos
alex46~0.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great AR Tetradrachm97 viewsAmphipolis mint (315-294 BC).
Price 481
1 commentsMinos
Lifetime_Issue!_Signed_by_the_artist_EX_FORVM.jpg
Greek, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C.261 viewsSilver drachm, Price 2090A, ADM I 80 (same dies), VF, 4.214g, 16.0mm, 0o, Miletos mint, lifetime issue, c. 325 - 323 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck, K on lion's jaw behind Herakles' ear; reverse ΑΛΕΞΑΝ∆ΡΟΥ ( means " Of Alexander " in Ancient Greek ), Zeus seated left, legs uncrossed, right leg forward, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, monogram before;

EX; FORVM Ancient Coins.
Lifetime Issue! Signed by the artist!(?) The K behind Herakles ear had traditionally been identified as the signature of the artist. Matt Kreuzer, however, believes the K (the Greek numeral 20) was used c. 325 B.C. to introduce the Attic drachm to Miletos by indicating either that 20 of these was equal to a gold stater, or that one of these drachm was equal to 20 of the 3 to 4 gram bronzes circulating at the time.
*With my sincere thank and appreciation , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
8 commentsSam
48868q00.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.9 viewsSH48868. Gold stater, Price 177, Müller Alexander 196, gVF, weight 8.595 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, c. 330 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, kantharos left, ΛO monogram lower left; nice style, high relief, good strike, and mint lusterJoe Sermarini
56812q00.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.17 viewsSH56812. Gold stater, Price 2633; Müller Alexander 30, aEF, rev die wear, fine style, Lydia, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, weight 8.597g, maximum diameter 17.0mm, die axis 180o, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, wearing necklace and pendant earring; reverse AΛEΞAN∆[POY], Nike standing half left, wreath in extended right, stylus in left, race torch left below wing, monogram off flan below right wing; a few small die breaks, lustrous fields, superb bust of AthenaJoe Sermarini
32292q00.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Gold stater14 viewsSH32292. Gold stater, Price 898 var. (monogram; cf. Price 927 tetradrachm), EF, weight 8.443 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, c. 250 - 225 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse AΛEΞAN∆P[OY], Nike standing half left, wreath in extended right, stylus in left, KAΛ monogram to left; high relief, bold, mint luster and a rare variety, small scratch on reverseJoe Sermarini
77066q00.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Gold stater13 viewsSH77066. Gold stater, Price 172, Müller 105, Choice aEF, mint luster, superb style, high relief, good strike, weight 8.580 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 270o, Macedonia, Amphipolis mint, c. 327 - 325 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left hand, trident-head downward (control symbol) in left field, struck during the lifetime of Alexander the Great.Joe Sermarini
59889q00.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Gold stater15 viewsSH59889. Gold stater, Price 164, Müller Alexander 2, SNG Cop 625, gVF, weight 8.593 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, possibly a lifetime issue, c. 325 - 320 B.C; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, fulmen (thunderbolt) in left field; ex CNG, auction 90, lot 441; high-relief and fine styleJoe Sermarini
33207q00.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Gold stater16 viewsSH33207. Gold stater, Price 2533, Müller Alexander 293, VF, weight 8.496 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 334 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, hair in ringlets; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, griffin head leftJoe Sermarini
33180q00.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Gold stater15 viewsSH33180. Gold stater, Price 2114b, Müller Alexander 577, Choice EF, weight 8.575 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, c. 311 - 305 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, hair in ringlets; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, KH monogram left, labrys lower rightJoe Sermarini
50029q00.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Gold stater19 viewsSH50029. Gold stater, Price 1358, Müller Alexander 394, IGC EF45, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 328 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, hair in ringlets; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, foreparts of conjoined horses in left field, monogram below left wing; certified (slabbed) by ICGJoe Sermarini
28064q00.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue, Gold stater21 viewsSH28064. Gold stater, Price 2084, Müller Alexander -, gVF, weight 8.578 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, 325 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet, thunderbolt below; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left holding wreath and ship's mast, H∆ monogram in lower right field; nicely centered; rare varietyJoe Sermarini
Makedonia-Königreich_Alexander_III__336-323.jpg
Greek, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336-323 BC, Gold Stater106 viewsAV Stater 336-323 BC, Sardes. Athena Av. Athena, rv. . Nike standing to the right! w/ wreath and stylis, Sun (star), 8,53 g. Price 2644. 2 commentsAkeo
325_-_310_BC_ALEXANDER_III_AE_Hemiobol~0.JPG
GREEK, Macedonian kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AE Hemiobol (4 Chalkoi). Struck 325 – 310 BC at an uncertain mint in Macedonia.34 viewsObverse: No legend. Head of Herakles facing right, wearing lion-skin knotted at base of neck.
Reverse: A quiver (arrow case) placed on top of a bow and below it a club, large B A between; mint-mark, below the club, is a laurel branch.
Diameter: 17mm | Weight: 5.1gms | Die Axis: 7
Price: 385 | Sear: 6742

This coin is a sub-type of the quiver type (Type 1B), with the inscription now reading B A (for BAΣIΛEOΣ AΛEΞANĐPOY = KING ALEXANDER). Price believed this coin type was minted both during and after Alexander's lifetime.
*Alex
336_-_323_BC_ALEXANDER_III_AE_Hemiobol.JPG
GREEK, Macedonian kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AE Hemiobol (4 Chalkoi). Struck 336 – 320 BC at Miletus, Caria.38 viewsObverse: No legend. Head of Alexander the Great as Herakles, wearing lion-skin knotted at base of neck, facing right.
Reverse: AΛEΞANĐPOY. Bow in Gorytos (a case for bow and quiver) above, club and compound ΠΥΡ monogram below.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 5.79gms | Die Axis: 3
Price:0335

Alexander the Great reigned from 336 to 323 BC but, although Price supposes this coin to be a lifetime issue, Thompson proposes the posthumous date of 321 – 320 BC (Thompson series VI) based on the ΠΥΡ control mark.

It is difficult to interpret the die orientation in these issues because not only is it unclear what the Ancient Greeks would have considered “up” with respect to the reverse design but modern scholars are ambiguous on the subject as well. I have, however, assumed that the modern conventional orientation is with the name reading horizontally, and therefore have described my example as having a 3 o’clock orientation, the “top” of the reverse being aligned with the back of Herakles’ head on the obverse.
*Alex
336_-_323_BC_ALEXANDER_III___Quarter-_Obol.JPG
GREEK, Macedonian kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AE Quarter-Obol (2 Chalkoi). Lifetime issue struck 336 – 323 BC at an uncertain mint in Macedonia.35 viewsObverse: No legend. Young male head wearing a taenia (diadem), who is sometimes identified as Apollo, facing right.
Reverse: AΛEΞANĐPOY. Horse prancing right; mint-mark, below horse, torch.
Diameter: 16mm | Weight: 4.25gms | Die Axis: 7
Price:338
SCARCE

This coin is a Type 4 (horse type) bronze Quarter-Obol (two chalkoi). This likely was one of Alexander's standard bronze denominations, half the value of his Herakles/weapons bronzes, though not seen as frequently. This specimen features a torch as a mint mark, this mint-mark was included with 34 other mint marks by Price in his work.
*Alex
323_-_315_BC_ALEXANDER_III_AE_Quarter-Obol~0.JPG
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AE Quarter-Obol (2 Chalkoi). Struck 323 – 315 BC under Nikokreon at Salamis, Cyprus.34 viewsObverse: No legend. Macedonian shield with Gorgoneion (Medusa) head as the boss in the centre. The shield boss is sometimes called the episema, the Greek name for a symbol of a particular city or clan which was placed in the centre of a soldier's shield.
Reverse: Macedonian helmet surmounted with a horse hair crest; B - A (for BAΣIΛEOΣ AΛEΞANĐPOY = King Alexander) above; mint marks below the helmet, to left, a kerykeion (caduceus) and to the right, the monogram NK (for Nikokreon).
Diameter: 14mm | Weight: 4.6gms | Die Axis: 1
Price: 3162 | Liampi, Chronologie 170-92

This coin is a Type 7 (Macedonian shield type) bronze Quarter-Obol (two chalkoi). Price dated the Macedonian Shield coins as beginning during the latter part of Alexander's life, c.325 BC, and ending c.310 BC. Liampi later argued, based on new hoard evidence, that they were minted as early as 334 BC. This particular coin is dated from c.323 to 315 BC.
*Alex
Alexander_AE_joined.jpg
GREEK, MACEDONIAN KINGDOM, Alexander III the great, AE, Lifetime Issue50 viewsPrice 3112 commentsgrattius
9899LG~0.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AE15, Macedonian shield/helmet, Sardis99 viewsMacedonian Kings, Alexander III, The Great, 336-323 BC. AE 15mm (3.41 g). Sardis mint. Cf. Price 2614 (unlisted monogram)

Obv.: Macedonian shield with kerykeion.
Rev.: Macedonian helmet; in between, B-A, below, monogram; to the right, rose; to the left kerykeion
Steff V
alex_drachm.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AR Drachm, Babylon, c.324 - 323 B.C., Price 360461 viewsKINGS of MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’. 336-323 BC. AR Drachm (16mm, 4.02 g, 8h). Babylon mint. Struck under Stamenes or Archon, circa 324/3 BC.
Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; M in left field, monogram below throne.
Price 3604.
chance v
Picture_18.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AR Drachm, Sardis mint251 viewsSilver Drachm
Sardis Mint, c. 334-323 BC
16mm, 4.28g
Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Rev: Zeus seated left; monogram below throne.
Price 2558; Mueller 525
mihali84
336_-_323_BC_ALEXANDER_III_AR_Drachm.JPG
GREEK, Macedonian kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AR Drachm, Struck 323 – 317 BC at Lampsakos, Mysia.83 viewsObverse: No legend. Head of Herakles, wearing lion-skin knotted at base of neck, facing right.
Reverse: AΛEΞANĐPOY. Zeus Aëtophoros seated facing left, right leg drawn back, feet on stool, eagle in right hand, sceptre in left; buckle in left field; Λ above Ω below throne.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 4.16gms | Die Axis: 7 | Cut mark above eyebrow on obverse.
Price: 1376

Alexander the Great reigned from 336 to 323 BC but this coin was struck shortly after his death, in around 323 to 317 BC under Leonnatos, Philip III Arrhidaios, or Antigonos I Monophthalmos.
2 comments*Alex
price_3605.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AR Hemidrachm, Babylon, Price 360541 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III 'the Great' (336-323 BC). Hemidrachm. Babylon.
Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin.
Rev: AΛΕΞΑΔΡΟΥ.
Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre. Controls: monograms in left field and below throne.
Price 3605.Very fine 1.88 g.13 mm.
chance v
price_3620.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AR Tetradrachm, Babylon, Price 362057 viewsKings of Macedon. Alexander III (336-323 BC). AR Tetradrachm (25 mm, 16.92 g), Babylon, 324/3 BC.
Obv. Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.
Rev. ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, Zeus seated left on high-backed throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and, in his right, eagle standing right with wings closed; below throne, monogram above M; in left field, bee.
Price 3620.
chance v
price_3623.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AR Tetradrachm, Babylon, Price 3623 28 viewsThe Seleucid Kings, Alexander III, 336 – 323 Babylon Tetradrachm circa 325-323, AR 21mm., 17.05g.
Head of Herakles r., wearing lion skin. Rev. Zeus Aëtophoros seated l.; in left field, sickle(?) ; below throne, monogram and in exergue, M.
Price 3623.
chance v
Price_3626.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AR Tetradrachm, Babylon, Price 362639 viewsMACEDONIA. Alexander the Great. Tetradracma . Therma ( Thessalonica ) . 334-300 B.C. Cab. Alexander with Leonte . Zeus enthroned with eagle.
17'01 g . Hairlines in rev.
Price 3626.
Lifetime issue struck in Babylon
1 commentschance v
price_3640.JPG
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AR Tetradrachm, Babylon, Price 364031 viewsAlexander III (the Great), 336-323 B.C
MACEDON. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III (the Great), 336-323 B.C. AR Tetradrachm (17.16 gms), Babylon Mint, ca. 325-323 B.C. Lifetime issue.
Head of Heracles right wearing lion's scalp; Reverse: Zeus enthroned left holding eagle and scepter, club in left field, "M" in lower left field, monogram below throne. Excellent strike with dies of fine style.
Price 3640
chance v
119-l.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AR Tetradrachm, Babylon, Price 364152 viewsAR Tetradrachm Babylon, lifetime issue (325-323 BC), 17.02 g
Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress
Rev: Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, grapes in left field (below throne, monogram and M)
Price 3641
chance v
price_3652.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, AR Tetradrachm, Babylon, Price 365262 viewsKINGS of MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’, 336-323 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 26mm, 17.15 g 12), Babylon, c. 325-323.
Obv: Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.
Rev. ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ Zeus seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and, in his right, eagle standing right with closed wings; to left, kylix above M; below throne, monogram.
Price 3652
1 commentschance v
Babylon_ATG_Price_3665~0.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, Babylon, 336-323 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Price 3664493 viewsHead of young Herakles right in lion-skin headdress, paws tied at neck. / ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡ[OΥ] Zeus enthroned left, confronting eagle held in right hand and grasping scepter with left, sea monster in left field, ΦIΛI monogram above thin strut between legs of throne, M thereunder.
Price 3664.
Babylon Royal Mint ca. 325-323 BC.
(24 mm, 17.18 gm, 6h)
Freeman & Sear Manhattan 2 Sale (4 January 2011) Lot 133
8 commentsLloyd T
alxd_d_1140x570.JPG
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, Drachm 151 viewsGREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, Drachm, Lampsakos
AR Drachm
310-301 BC
Lampsakos
17mm, 4.21g
Price 1382; Müller 612.
1 commentsXLi
Macedonian_Kingdom,_Alexander_III_the_Great,_AR_Drachm,_Sardis_Mint_325-323_BC,_Lifetime_issue~0.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, Lydia, Sardis, AR Drachm, 336-323 BC. Lifetime issue - Price 2576522 viewsHead of Herakles right wearing lion-skin headdress. / AΛΕΞANΔPOY Zeus Aëtophoros seated facing on backless throne, his left leg and torso facing front, his head, right arm and right to left; holding eagle in his right hand and long sceptre in his left; NK monogram above bee in left field.
Price 2576; Thompson 134 (same dies). Sardis mint ca. 325/4-323 BC.
(18 mm, 4.27 g, 12h)
ex- Arthur J. Frank Collection; ex- NFA Auction II (25-26 March 1976) Lot 12.
9 commentsLloyd T
alex_obol.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, obol32 viewsKingdom of Macedon. Alexander III 'the Great' AR Obol. Uncertain mint, circa 336-323 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right; monogram below throne.
Price -, cf. 3319. 0.61g, 9mm
chance v
Alexander_III______~0.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the great, Tetradrachm170 viewsstruck by Kassandros in the name of Alexander III

Pella
317-314 BC
head of young Heracles in lionskin right
Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter
boeotian shield left; snake under the throne
AΛEΞANΔPOY
Price 249; SNG Copenhagen 728. Muller 754
17,19g

ex CNG
ex Aurea auction 49
3 commentsJohny SYSEL
14006_2.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, Tetradrachm, Tarsos, Price 300049 viewsThis is supposed to be the first Alexander style issue. Kings of Macedon. Alexander III "the Great" 336-323 BC. Babylon 25mm., 17,35g.
Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress
Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left holding sceptre; B below throne, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right.
Price 3000; Newell, Tarsos 4.
chance v
AG-Macedon,_Alexander_III-3~0.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III, 336-323 BC –Drachm - Signed Die28 viewsAR Drachm (16mm, 4.26g): Price 2090A

Obv.: Head of Heracles right, wearing lion skin headdress, K on skin behind ear

Rev.: AΛEΞANΔPOY, Zeus seated left, holding scepter and eagle; monogram in left field.
This drachm is a lifetime issue from Miletos, circa 325-323 BC. It is signed by the artist who placed a "K" on the lion skin headdress behind Alexander's ear.

One could say Ho Hum just another drachm of Alexander III, however this coin is a little more interesting than most. From Roma Numismatics Limited’s 2012 description of a specimen it sold – “Extremely Rare. Only two specimens noted in ADM I (both in the ANS collection). This, and an equally rare contemporary issue at Magnesia ad Maeandrum are the only two instances of signed dies struck for Alexander.”

I was able to find two specimens in auction records. The Roma Numismatics Limited’s 2012 specimen in ACSEARCH (don’t use Price 2090A in the search use “signed die”). The Roma Numismatics Limited’s 2012 specimen should really be listed here, as pleased as I am with my specimen the Roma Numismatics Limited’s specimen is truly superior. The second specimen I found was this specimen in the NGC ancient coin auction records. The specimen shown here was sold twice in 2015 by Heritage I purchased the coin from the second sale.
Richard M10
G000004w.jpg
GREEK, MACEDONIAN KINGDOM, Alexander III, AR Tetradrachm - lifetime issue85 viewsObv: Head of Herakles r., in lion skin headdress
Rev: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle on extended arm, legs uncrossed, standing figure of Demeter with two torches before, ΔΙΟ beneath throne
Lampsacus mint, 328-323 B.C.
24.7mm - 17.17g - 270deg
Price 1355
Ex HML Schulman auction April 1962
TRPOT
1040;).jpg
GREEK, Macedonian kingdom, Kassander - Antigonos II Gonatas41 viewsKINGS of MACEDON. temp. Kassander – Antigonos II Gonatas. Circa 310-275 BC. AR Drachm (18mm, 4.26 g, 12h). In the name and types of Alexander III. Uncertain mint in Macedon or Greece. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; aplustre in left field. Price 862A.
3 commentsIlya_VK
11.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III - Lysimachos. Circa 323-280 BC. AR Drachm13 viewsKings of Macedon - Philip III – Lysimachos. Circa 323-280 BC. AR Drachm (16mm, 4.25 g). In the name and types of Alexander III. Uncertain mint in western Asia Minor. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; downward facing shell in left field. Price 2752.gapalp
86161q00.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV, c. 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander16 viewsSH86161. Silver tetradrachm, Price 113, Müller Alexander 224, Troxell issue H3, SNG Cop 682, SNG Munchen 275, SNG Alpha Bank 503, SNG Delepierre 986, Choice EF, attractive archaic style, bold well centered strike, high relief, light toning, weight 17.283 g, maximum diameter 26.8 mm, die axis 90o, Macedonia, Amphipolis mint, c. 322 - 320 A.D.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, throne without back, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Macedonian helmet (control symbol) left; Classical Numismatic Group auction 105 (10 May 2017), lot 78; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 46 (11 Sep 2016), lot 105 (realized €1,900 plus fees)Joe Sermarini
54774q00.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., Gold stater14 viewsSH54774. Gold stater, Price P203, Müller Alexander P116, aEF, weight 8.564 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 90o, Babylon mint, c. 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet ornamented with Griffin; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, facing head of Helios below left, [KY] below right; Struck under Archon, Dokimos, or Seleukos I, circa 323-318/7 BC.Joe Sermarini
bot.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaios AE Unit307 viewsMiletos mint (323-319 BC).
Obv.: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Rev.: Bow in bow case and club; grain ear below. With the name and types of Alexander III ‘the Great’.
Price 2102.
5 commentsMinos
Philip_III.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaios AR Drachm203 viewsSilver Drachm
Kolophon mint, 323-317 BC.
18mm, 4.29g, 0o
Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; monogram in left field, star below throne.
Price P49. Ex. CNG " monogram partially erased from die or maybe cut over an earlier symbol, perhaps a tripod (P42)." Excellent preservation.
1 commentsmihali84
Drachm_Phillip_III.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaios, 323-317 BC, AR Drachm169 viewsPrice P20
Abydus mint
Obv: head of Herakles right, clad in lion head headdress
Rev: FILIPPOU, Zeus enthroned left, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in right, scepter in left, horse leg left, Mo monogram under throne
Weight: 4.21 grams
Diameter: 17.9 mm
ICG#: 2011970101
Grade: VF30
Ty N.
Price_P155~1.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaios, 323-317 BC, AR Tetradrachm – Babylon under Seleukos as satrap 166 viewsHead of Herakles right wearing lion-skin headdress.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ФIΛIΠΠOY Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, ancient Greek Zeta beneath throne, circled ΣIEP monogram above grape bunch to left.
SC Ad 43.13; Price P155 (Arados).
Babylon II workshop 317/16 BC under Seleukos as Satrap 320- 315 BC.
(26 mm, 17.16 g, 8h)
8 commentsLloyd T
kuenker_p181.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III, AR Tetradrachm, Babylon, Price P18170 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 323/317 BC , Babylon ; 17.16 g .
Herakles head in lion's skin / Zeus Aetophoros sitting l .
Price P181. (N.B. Price 3692 has same control marks but says Alexander not Philip)
1 commentschance v
68257q00.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Ptolemy I, Satrap of Egypt, 323 - 305 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great, Gold stater14 viewsSH68257. Gold stater, Svoronos 11, Price 3975, Müller Alexander 6, SNG Cop 643, EF, weight 8.554 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Egypt, Memphis mint, reign of Philip III, c. 323 - 316 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, hair in ringlets; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, thunderbolt left, small ∆I at feet on left; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 215, lot 775Joe Sermarini
Lysimachos_Sardis_Price_2605.jpg
Greek, Macedonian Kingdom, shield/helmet, Sardis136 viewsMacedonian King (?), AE14, 3.6 gr. Sardes mint.

Obv.: Macedonian shield with caduceus.
Rev.: B-A across upper fields, Macedonian helmet, caduceus
to left, FIL at lower left, rose at lower right.

Price 2605 var. Unlisted fieldmarks and positions.
Price (different numbers) lists the rose as being
in the right field, and a monogram below.
Steff V
85286q00.jpg
GREEK, Mesembria, Thrace, c. 275 - 225 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great21 viewsSH85286. Silver tetradrachm, Karayotov p. 84 and pl. VII, 41 (O7/R18); Price 992; Müller Alexander 436, gVF, attractive style, light marks and scratches, weight 17.000 g, maximum diameter 31.6 mm, die axis 180o, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, c. 275 - 225 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion-scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, Zeus seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Corinthian helmet right over ΠA monogram in inner left field under arm; ex FORVM (2013)1 commentsJoe Sermarini
Pontic_Kingdom,_Mithradates_Vi_ATG_Tetradrachm,_Odessos_.jpg
Greek, Mithridates VI (The Great) as Herakles180 viewsPontic Kingdom, Thrace, Odessos, Mithridates VI Megas, 120-63 BC, AR Tetradrachm in the name of Alexander the Great, struck ca. 88-86 BC.
Head of Mithridates VI (the Great) as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress / ΒΑΣIΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ.
(Reverse is of Zeus seated left, legs draped, confronting eagle held on outstretched right arm and grasping lotus-tipped sceptre, ΛAK before, OΔΗ (Odessos ethnic) in exergue.)
Callataÿ Group 3; Price 1192. Odessos ca. 88-86 BC
(30 mm, 16.04 gm, 1h)

This is amongst the last of the coinages in the style of Alexander the Great to be minted. In this final incarnation the portrait of Herakles was adapted to the features of Mithridates VI the Great, to the extent that the image of Herakles is in fact a portrait of Mithridates. Comparison with his portrait on tetradrachms minted in Pontus proves this point.
1 commentsLloyd T
Olbia copy.jpg
GREEK, Pantipakaion, Young Pan and Bull, 4th Cent. B.C.301 viewsObv/ Head of Young Pan l., wreathed with ivy.
Rev/ PAN; Head and neck of bull l.
Ae 28mm, BMC 3.16

This coin, without any doubt, is the most beautiful issue that I have ever owned. It looked to have been cut from a pidgeon's-blood ruby, rather than struck from metal. I sold it to a very descerning Canadian collector a few years ago for an ungodly price. The money seemed good at the time...but in retrospect, I wish that I had kept it for my own.... Sad but true.
4 commentsMayadigger
V_1296~0.JPG
Greek, Ravel; Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Tarentine Coins formed by M. P. Vlasto - #129697 viewsTaras, Calabria (Plate Coin)
380-325 BC
AR Diobol (12mm, 1.22g, 11h)
O: Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with hippocamp; Ξ behind neck-flap.
R: Herakles kneeling right, strangling the Nemean lion; [club] to left, TA above.
Vlasto 1296 (this coin); HN Italy 912
From the M.P Vlasto Collection. ex Pegasi Numismatics; ex MNS

"Mr. Vlasto's collection of Tarentine coins is certainly the most complete that exists; practically all known varieties are represented; its catalog can therefore be considered a real corpus of the coinage of Tarentum. Numerous are the rare or unique specimens; but what makes this collection an outstanding one is its large number of exceptionally well preserved coins. Mr. Vlasto was never content with his specimens; if he could get a better one, he never missed the opportunity. He used to tell me that in some cases he had changed six specimens of the same coin and that he would even change the sixth if he could find a better one. The results is that many of his coins are really wonderful gems of priceless value. Any colledctor would be proud to have just one of them in his collection."
~ Oscar Ravel (Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Tarentine Coins formed by M. P. Vlasto)
1 commentsEnodia
SC_68~0.jpg
GREEK, SC 68, Price P167 - American Journal of Numismatics Second Series 27: 41-97 : Taylor L. W. H. Triparadeisos to Ipsos Series IV, 189 (this coin), Plate 12, 189 (this coin)60 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Babylonia, Uncertain Mint 6A

Head of Herakles right wearing lion skin headdress.
ΒΑΣΙΛEΩΣ ФIΛIΠΠOY Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, star symbol beneath throne, Π recut over an earlier mint control in left field.

Taylor, Triparadeisos to Ipsos, Series IV, 189 (this coin), Plate 12, 189 (this coin), dies A50/P1; HGC 9, 11a (same dies); SC 68 (same dies); WSM 1241 (same dies); Price P167 (same dies).

Uncertain Mint 6A in Babylonia, 303-302 BC.

Struck under Seleukos utilising a reverse die from an earlier lifetime Philip issue (Price P160) with the left field mint control recut. Obverse die linked to examples of SC 67 (Alexander), SC 69 (Seleukos) and SC 50.1 (Alexander Uncertain Mint 1).

One of four examples known and the only one outside the ANS (Newell) collection.

(26 mm, 17.0 g, 3h).

Reference: Taylor, L. W. H. 2015. From Triparadeisos to Ipsos: Seleukos I Nikator’s Uncertain Mint 6A in Babylonia.
AJN Second Series 27: 41-97.
2 commentsn.igma
Uncertain_MInt_6A_Hemidrachm_SC_70_1~0.jpg
GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC, AR Hemidrachm - Babylonia, Uncertain Mint 6A 112 viewsHead of Herakles right wearing lion skin.
AΛΕΞANΔPOY Zeus Aetophoros seated left, inverted anchor to left, EP beneath throne.
SC 70.1; HGC 9, 42; Price 3442 (Marathus); Müller 1493; Houghton Group III, Series A, 127.
Issued by Seleukos in the name of Alexander from Babylonia Uncertain Mint 6A, 311-305 BC.
(13 mm, 2.15 g, 7h)

Judge this coin remembering it is a hemidrachm of 13 mm diameter. It does not possess the large palette of a tetradrachm!

This coin is the best of four known examples of this emission and the only one known outside of a museum. It is an obverse die match to an example from the Hersh Collection, now housed in in the British Museum (BM 2002,0101.796). The progression of the die break on Herakles neck indicates that this coin was struck after the Hersh coin.
4 commentsLloyd T
SC_118;_Price_P229~0.jpg
GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC, AR Tetradrachm in the name of Philip III Arrhidaios, 323-317 BC – Seleukeia on the Tigris - SC 118123 viewsHead of Herakles right wearing lion-skin headdress. / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ, Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle on extended right hand and scepter in left, pentalpha in left field.
SC 118 (same obverse die); Price P229 (uncertain eastern mint); Thompson, ANSMN 31, 160 (same obverse die); Commerce (“Seleucus I”) Hoard 2005 (CH10.256) 1517-1522 (one of these coins).
Seleukeia on the Tigris
(24 mm, 17.16 g, 6h)
ex- Arthur Houghton Collection (New Series 744); ex- Commerce (“Seleucus I”) Hoard 2005 (CH10.256).
2 commentsLloyd T
Price_3704.jpg
GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos i Nikator, AR Tetradrachm, Babylon, Price 370423 viewsTetradrachme ( 16,64g ) , Babylon, posthumously , ca. 317-311 v . Chr .
Obv: Head of Herakles with lion hood.
Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros with gavel on the throne , in l . Field monogram in wreath , under the throne H.
Price 3704 , Müller 714.
HD Rauch e-auc 20 lot 11
chance v
Newer_Price_3704.jpg
GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos i Nikator, AR Tetradrachm, Babylon, Price 370440 viewsThe Seleucid Kings, Seleucus I Nicator, 312- 281 BC Babylon Tetradrachm circa 317-311, AR 26.5mm., 17.10g.
Obverse: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Reverse: Zeus Aëtophoros seated l.; in l. field, monogram in wreath and below throne, H.
SC 82.6. Price 3704.
Naville 24 lot 169
chance v
Price_3746.jpg
GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, AR Tetradrachm, Babylon, Price 374642 viewsThe Seleucid Kings, Seleucus I Nicator, 312- 281 BC Babylon Tetradrachm circa 311-300, AR 26.5mm., 17.08g.
Obv: Head of Herakles r., wearing lion skin.
Rev. Zeus Aëtophoros seated l.; in l. field, monogram within wreath, below throne MI.
SC 82.5a. Price 3746.
Naville 24 lot 172
chance v
27026.jpg
GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, AR Tetradrachm, Babylon, Price 374766 viewsMacedonian Kingdom. Alexander III the Great. 336-323 B.C. AR tetradrachm (26.5 mm, 17.03 g, 3 h). Babylon mint, struck ca. 311-305 B.C. Struck by Seleukos I Nikator.
Obverse: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, Zeus seated left, holding eagle and scepter; monogram within wreath in left field, MI below throne.
Price 3746; SC 82.5a; Müller 734. Scratch on obverse.
In hand the dot inside the wreathed monogram, which is the difference between Price 3746 and Price 3747, can easily be seen.
Agora 56 lot 24
1 commentschance v
price_3759.jpg
GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I, AR Tetradrachm, Babylon, Price 375976 viewsSeleukid Kings of Syria, Seleukos I Nikator AR Tetradrachm. In the name and types of Alexander. Babylon, circa 311-305 BC.
Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding sceptre; MI above lion's head left in left field, monogram in wreath below throne, BAΣIΛEΩΣ below, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right.
SC 82.3c; Price 3759; Müller 743. 17.09g, 26mm, 11h.
Roma auc XII lot 383
2 commentschance v
SeleuKid_kingdom,_Seleukos_I,_AR_tetradrachm,_Babylon_II_Mint_-_unpublished_with_erased_anchor.jpg
Greek, Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC, Seleukid Kingdom, Babylon, AR Tetradrachm - urecorded with the anchor normally found in the left field erased from the die193 viewsHead of Herakles right wearing lion skin. / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ AΛΕΞANΔPOY Zeus Aetophoros seated left, circled NE monogram in left field, large Π beneath throne; remnant die erased anchor symbol in outer left field.
Price 3347 var. (anchor in left field, attributed to Arados); Houghton Group II, Series H, 69-76 var. (anchor in left field); SC 94.3(c) var. (anchor in left field). Obverse die macth to SC 94.4; SNG Copenhage 670; HGC 9, 10g (C). Babylon II (Native or Satrapal Mint) 311-305 BC. A unique example of the type – undocumented with the erased anchor.
(27 mm, 17.29 g, 5h).

This is the only known example of SC 94.3c that bears a reverse struck from a die on which the anchor that is normally found in the outer left field has been erased. It is the one of two erased anchor issues in the name of Alexander outside of museum collections. The other example SC 94.5 is also to be found in the LT collection. The anchor erasure has not been documented on SC 94.3c, although it is known on three examples of SC 94.4 that bear a ΠAT monogram mint control in the place of the circled NE monogram found on this coin. The obverse of this coin is a die match to an example of SC 94.4, SNG Copenhagen 670, illustrated in Morkholm Plate V, 82. This previously unrecorded example of anchor erasure is further evidence that the erasure was a systematic and deliberate act in the Babylon II mint that appears to have occurred around the time that Seleukos adopted the royal title.
Lloyd T
Alexander_the_Great_AR_Drachm,_Abydos.JPG
Griechenland, KöNIGREICH MAKEDONIEN ALEXANDER III. DER GROSSE (336 - 323) Drachme, ca. 310-301, Abydos. 35 viewsVs.: Kopf des jugendlichen Herakles im Löwenskalp rechts.
Rs: ALEXANDROU. Zeus mit Adler und Szepter auf Thron nach links sitzend, im Feld links Monogramm, unter dem Thron Efeublatt.
gereinigt, fast sehr schön
3,74 g. 16,5 mm sold
Price: 1527 _2668
Antonivs Protti
LarryW2302.jpg
GS Alexander the Great, 336-323 BC; Tarsos 323-317 BC179 viewsSilver tetradrachm, 28.2mm, 17.16g, VF
Head Herakles right wearing lion skin knotted at neck / BACIΛEΩ(?) - AΛEΞANΔPO[Y] Zeus seated left holding eagle and sceptre, both feet forward resting on stool. Nike bearing wreath, B, and caduceus in left field; EΠ monogram below throne. Royal title partly blundered as is example in Price.
Ex: Alexander C. Boggis Collection
Price 3050b; Müller 203; SNG Cop 781v
2 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
Hacksilber.jpg
Hacksilber Fragment, Earliest Coinage Period, Holy Land93 viewsHacksilber Ingot, c. 8-6 centuries BC, Israel. 21 x 14 x 5 mm, 8.4 grams. Cut in antiquity from a larger piece. Possibly an overweight Pym or underweight Nezef?

Similar ingots were found at Ein Gedi, Israel in a terra cotta cooking pot, hidden in a building destroyed near the end of Iron Age II, early 6th century BC (Avi-Yonah Encylcopedia of the Holy Land, volume 2, p. 374.)

The basic weight in use was the shekel, weighing 11.4 g on average. Other weight groups include, but are not limited to, the following:

(1) Beqa, a half shekel (Ex. 38:26), 5.7 g. (2) Nezef, averaging 9.12 g. The Judaean equivalent to an Egyptian qedet. (3) Pym, 7.6 g. (1 Samuel 13:21) The Judaean equivalent to the Phoenician shekel.

The weight of this ingot is identical to the Mesopotamian shekel. During the 9th to 6th centuries BCE in the Assyrian and Babylonian empires, the common form of expressing prices was in quantities equivalent to one shekel (8.4 g) of silver.

In ancient times, livestock were often used in barter. Indicative of this is the fact that the Latin word for money (pecunia) is drawn from pecus, meaning “cattle.” However, livestock (Ge 47:17) and foodstuffs (1Ki 5:10, 11) were obviously not a convenient medium of exchange.

Instead, pieces of precious metals began to be used, the weight being checked at the time the transaction was made.

Ge 23:16 "Abraham weighed out to E′phron the amount of silver that he had spoken in the hearing of the sons of Heth, four hundred silver shekels current with the merchants."; Jer 32:10 "Then I wrote in a deed and affixed the seal and took witnesses as I went weighing the money in the scales."

The usual Hebrew term translated as “money,” keseph, literally means “silver.” (Ge 17:12) There was no coined money in Israel during the First Temple Period (1006-586 BCE). Rather, it consisted of cut pieces of silver and gold, or molded for convenience into bars, rings, bracelets, having a specific weight. - Ge 24:22

At Judges 5:19, bâtsa‛ keseph, which is commonly rendered as, “No gain of silver did they take,” literally means to break off or cut off silver.
Nemonater
Screen_Shot_2014-06-26_at_1_42_47_PM.png
Herakles and Zeus143 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.
GS70917. Silver drachm, Price 1515; ADM II Series V, 91 - 95; SNG München 474; Müller Alexander -, VF, attractive style, Troas, Abydus mint, weight 4.097g, maximum diameter 18.1mm, die axis 180o, Leonnatos, Arrhidaios, or Antigonos I;

obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck;

reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, horse leg left, Ξ under throne; ex Nemesis;

Herakles is the son of the divine Zeus and mortal Alcemene who was cursed by the jealous Hera to murder his entire family. He then had to overcome twelve labors given to him by King Eurystheus to repent for the atrocity. The first labor (defeating the Nemean Lion) is portrayed on the obverse of this coin.

Zeus is the main king of the Olympians ruling over the realm of man. He is known to be a notorious womanizer having affairs with several divine and mortal women, which constantly makes his wife Hera extremely jealous. He is associated with lightning and the eagle (as shown on the reverse of this coin) among other symbols.
Colby S
Herakles_plus_Zeus_Aetophoros_accompanied_by_Helios.jpg
Herakles plus Zeus Aetophoros accompanied by Helios310 viewsHerakles on the obverse with Zeus seated with his eagle (Zeus Aetophoros) on the reverse was the standard reverse typology of Alexander the Great and his immediate successors (the Diadochi). On this coin of Babylon the image of Zeus Aetophoros is accompanied by an image of Helios in the left field. Three gods for the price of one!

Further background http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-60892
3 commentsLloyd T
HUN_Zsigmond_Huszar_576_Pohl_117--.jpg
Huszár 576, Pohl 117--, Unger 449-, Réthy II 121, Frynas H.27.434 viewsHungary. Zsigmond/Sigismund of Luxembourg (1387-1437; Holy Roman Emperor 1433-1437).

AR denar, .48 g., 13.60 mm. max., 0°

Obv: mOn • SIG-ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross.

Rev: + REGIS • VnGARIE ETC, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle), H [?] above.

The type was struck in 1390-1427. The mintmark appears to be an H, which is not listed in any of the catalogs, nor recorded for any other coins struck under Zsigmond.

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4; Unger value 8 DM; Frynas rarity rating C.

This emission was struck with a fineness of 0.582 silver and an average weight of 0.51 g. (per Huszár). However, Engel notes that in 1390 Sigismund was able to temporarily restore the stability of the denar by the issuance of this new emission, which was referred to as nova moneta. For thirteen years the value of the denar remained stable, and 100 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. In 1403 debasement occurred, and 130 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. The debasements continued, so that by 1406 the price of an aranyforint was 160 denars, it was 200 in 1421, 225 in 1423 and 320 in 1426.
Stkp
HUN_Zsigmond_Huszar_576_Pohl_117-11.jpg
Huszár 576, Pohl 117-11, Unger 449c, Réthy II 121, Frynas H.27.429 viewsHungary. Sigismund (Zsigmond, in Hun.) of Luxembourg (1387-1437; Holy Roman Emperor 1433-1437).

AR denar, .47 g., 14.20 mm. max., 270°

Obv: mOn • SIG-ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross.

Rev: + REGIS VnGISmVnDI, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle), • above.

The type was struck in 1390-1427.

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4. Erroneous legend on reverse (should be, + REGIS VnGARIE ETC, but is a conflation of the obverse and reverse legends).

This emission was struck with a fineness of 0.582 silver and an average weight of 0.51 g. (per Huszár). However, Engel notes that in 1390 Sigismund was able to temporarily restore the stability of the denar by the issuance of this new emission, which was referred to as nova moneta. For thirteen years the value of the denar remained stable, and 100 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. In 1403 debasement occurred, and 130 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. The debasements continued, so that by 1406 the price of an aranyforint was 160 denars, it was 200 in 1421, 225 in 1423 and 320 in 1426.
Stkp
HUN_Zsigmond_Huszar_576_Pohl_117-16.jpg
Huszár 576, Pohl 117-16, Unger 449β, Réthy II 121, Frynas H.27.439 viewsHungary. Sigismund (Zsigmond, in Hun.) of Luxembourg (1387-1437; Holy Roman Emperor 1433-1437).

AR denar, 49 g., 14.16 mm. max., 90°

Obv: mOn SIG-ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross, n in lowest right corner.

Rev: + • REGIS VnGARIE ETC •, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle), m above.

The type was struck in 1390-1427. This privy mark was struck in 1399-1405 in Nagybánya (now Baia Mare, Romania) by Marcus of Nurenberg, oberkammergraf.
Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4. Unrecorded variety (no pellet between words on obverse; pellets with style of A on reverse).

This emission was struck with a fineness of 0.582 silver and an average weight of 0.51 g. (per Huszár). However, Engel notes that in 1390 Sigismund was able to temporarily restore the stability of the denar by the issuance of this new emission, which was referred to as nova moneta. For thirteen years the value of the denar remained stable, and 100 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. In 1403 debasement occurred, and 130 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. The debasements continued, so that by 1406 the price of an aranyforint was 160 denars, it was 200 in 1421, 225 in 1423 and 320 in 1426.
Stkp
HUN_Zsigmund_Huszar_576_Pohl_117-27.jpg
Huszár 576, Pohl 117-27, Unger 449ξ, Réthy II 121, Frynas H.27.422 viewsHungary. Zsigmond/Sigismund of Luxembourg (1387-1437; Holy Roman Emperor 1433-1437).

AR denar, .42 g., 12.29 mm. max., 90°

Obv: mOn • SIG-ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross.

Rev: [+ RE]GIS VnGARIE • ETC, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle), C above.
The type was struck in 1390-1427 (per Pohl, Huszár, Unger and Frynas). This mintmark was struck in Kassa/Kaschau/now Košice, Slovakia (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4; Unger value 8 DM; Frynas rarity rating C.

This emission was struck with a fineness of 0.582 silver and an average weight of 0.51 g. (per Huszár). However, Engel notes that in 1390 Sigismund was able to temporarily restore the stability of the denar by the issuance of this new emission, which was referred to as nova moneta. For thirteen years the value of the denar remained stable, and 100 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. In 1403 debasement occurred, and 130 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. The debasements continued, so that by 1406 the price of an aranyforint was 160 denars, it was 200 in 1421, 225 in 1423 and 320 in 1426.
Stkp
HUN_Zsigmund_Huszar_576_Pohl_117-28.jpg
Huszár 576, Pohl 117-28, Unger 449π, Réthy II 121, Frynas H.27.417 viewsHungary. Zsigmond/Sigismund of Luxembourg (1387-1437; Holy Roman Emperor 1433-1437).

AR denar, .42 g., 14.13 mm. max., 0°

Obv: mOn • SIG-ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross.

Rev: + REGIS VnGARIE ETC, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle), retrograde C above.

The type was struck in 1390-1427 (per Pohl, Huszár, Unger and Frynas). This mintmark was struck in Kassa/Kaschau/now Košice, Slovakia (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4; Unger value 8 DM; Frynas rarity rating C.

This emission was struck with a fineness of 0.582 silver and an average weight of 0.51 g. (per Huszár). However, Engel notes that in 1390 Sigismund was able to temporarily restore the stability of the denar by the issuance of this new emission, which was referred to as nova moneta. For thirteen years the value of the denar remained stable, and 100 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. In 1403 debasement occurred, and 130 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. The debasements continued, so that by 1406 the price of an aranyforint was 160 denars, it was 200 in 1421, 225 in 1423 and 320 in 1426.
Stkp
HUN_Zsigmund_Huszar_576_Pohl_117-31.jpg
Huszár 576, Pohl 117-31, Unger 449τ, Réthy II 121, Frynas H.27.422 viewsHungary. Zsigmond/Sigismund of Luxembourg (1387-1437; Holy Roman Emperor 1433-1437).

AR denar, .39 g., 13.22 mm. max., 180°

Obv: mOn • SIG-ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross.

Rev: + REGIS • VnGARIE • ETC, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle), K above.

The type was struck in 1390-1427 (per Pohl, Huszár, Unger and Frynas). This mintmark was struck in Körmöcbánya/Kremnitz, now Kremnica, Slovakia (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4; Unger value 8 DM; Frynas rarity rating C.

This emission was struck with a fineness of 0.582 silver and an average weight of 0.51 g. (per Huszár). However, Engel notes that in 1390 Sigismund was able to temporarily restore the stability of the denar by the issuance of this new emission, which was referred to as nova moneta. For thirteen years the value of the denar remained stable, and 100 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. In 1403 debasement occurred, and 130 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. The debasements continued, so that by 1406 the price of an aranyforint was 160 denars, it was 200 in 1421, 225 in 1423 and 320 in 1426.
1 commentsStkp
HUN_Zsigmund_Huszar_576_Pohl_117-33.jpg
Huszár 576, Pohl 117-33, Unger 449φ, Réthy II 121, Frynas H.27.419 viewsHungary. Zsigmond/Sigismund of Luxembourg (1387-1437; Holy Roman Emperor 1433-1437).

AR denar, .46 g., 13.84 mm. max., 90°

Obv: mOn • SIG-ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross.

Rev: + REGIS • VnGARIE • ETC, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle), n above.

The type was struck in 1390-1427 (per Pohl, Huszár, Unger and Frynas). This mintmark was struck in Nagybánya/now Baia Mare, Romania (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4; Unger value 8 DM; Frynas rarity rating C.

This emission was struck with a fineness of 0.582 silver and an average weight of 0.51 g. (per Huszár). However, Engel notes that in 1390 Sigismund was able to temporarily restore the stability of the denar by the issuance of this new emission, which was referred to as nova moneta. For thirteen years the value of the denar remained stable, and 100 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. In 1403 debasement occurred, and 130 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. The debasements continued, so that by 1406 the price of an aranyforint was 160 denars, it was 200 in 1421, 225 in 1423 and 320 in 1426.
Stkp
HUN_Zsigmund_Huszar_576_Pohl_117-34.jpg
Huszár 576, Pohl 117-34, Unger 449χ, Réthy II 121, Frynas H.27.419 viewsHungary. Zsigmond/Sigismund of Luxembourg (1387-1437; Holy Roman Emperor 1433-1437).

AR denar, .51 g., 13.66 mm. max., 180°

Obv: mOn • SIG-ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross.

Rev: + REGIS • VnGARIE • ETC, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle), O above.

The type was struck in 1390-1427 (per Pohl, Huszár, Unger and Frynas). This mintmark was struck in Offenbánya/now Baia de Arieş, Romania (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4; Unger value 8 DM; Frynas rarity rating C.

This emission was struck with a fineness of 0.582 silver and an average weight of 0.51 g. (per Huszár). However, Engel notes that in 1390 Sigismund was able to temporarily restore the stability of the denar by the issuance of this new emission, which was referred to as nova moneta. For thirteen years the value of the denar remained stable, and 100 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. In 1403 debasement occurred, and 130 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. The debasements continued, so that by 1406 the price of an aranyforint was 160 denars, it was 200 in 1421, 225 in 1423 and 320 in 1426.
Stkp
HUN_Zsigmund_Huszar_576_Pohl_117-35.jpg
Huszár 576, Pohl 117-35, Unger 449ψ, Réthy II 121, Frynas H.27.418 viewsHungary. Zsigmond/Sigismund of Luxembourg (1387-1437; Holy Roman Emperor 1433-1437).

AR denar, .57 g., 13.69 mm. max., 270°

Obv: mOn • SIG-ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross.

Rev: + REGIS VnGARIE • ETC, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle), P above.

The type was struck in 1390-1427 (per Pohl, Huszár, Unger and Frynas). This mintmark was struck in Pécs (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4; Unger value 8 DM; Frynas rarity rating C.

This emission was struck with a fineness of 0.582 silver and an average weight of 0.51 g. (per Huszár). However, Engel notes that in 1390 Sigismund was able to temporarily restore the stability of the denar by the issuance of this new emission, which was referred to as nova moneta. For thirteen years the value of the denar remained stable, and 100 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. In 1403 debasement occurred, and 130 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. The debasements continued, so that by 1406 the price of an aranyforint was 160 denars, it was 200 in 1421, 225 in 1423 and 320 in 1426.
Stkp
HUN_Zsigmund_Huszar_576_Pohl_117-36.jpg
Huszár 576, Pohl 117-36, Unger 449ω, Réthy II 121, Frynas H.27.419 viewsHungary. Zsigmond/Sigismund of Luxembourg (1387-1437; Holy Roman Emperor 1433-1437).

AR denar, .32 g., 13.63 mm. max., 0°

Obv: mOn [• SIG]-ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross.

Rev: + REGIS • [VnGA]RIE ETC, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle), S above.

The type was struck in 1390-1427 (per Pohl, Huszár, Unger and Frynas). This mintmark was struck in Szomolnok/Schmöllnitz/now Smolnik, Slovakia (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4; Unger value 8 DM; Frynas rarity rating C.

This emission was struck with a fineness of 0.582 silver and an average weight of 0.51 g. (per Huszár). However, Engel notes that in 1390 Sigismund was able to temporarily restore the stability of the denar by the issuance of this new emission, which was referred to as nova moneta. For thirteen years the value of the denar remained stable, and 100 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. In 1403 debasement occurred, and 130 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. The debasements continued, so that by 1406 the price of an aranyforint was 160 denars, it was 200 in 1421, 225 in 1423 and 320 in 1426.
Stkp
HUN_Zsigmund_Huszar_576_Pohl_117-37.jpg
Huszár 576, Pohl 117-37, Unger 449aa, Réthy II 121, Frynas H.27.424 viewsHungary. Zsigmond/Sigismund of Luxembourg (1387-1437; Holy Roman Emperor 1433-1437).

AR denar, .42 g., 13.39 mm. max., 0°

Obv: mOn • SIG-ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross.

Rev: [+ REGI]S VnGA]RIE ETC, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle), T above.

The type was struck in 1390-1427 (per Pohl, Huszár, Unger and Frynas). This mintmark was probably struck in Temesvár//now Timișoara, Romania (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4; Unger value 8 DM; Frynas rarity rating C.

This emission was struck with a fineness of 0.582 silver and an average weight of 0.51 g. (per Huszár). However, Engel notes that in 1390 Sigismund was able to temporarily restore the stability of the denar by the issuance of this new emission, which was referred to as nova moneta. For thirteen years the value of the denar remained stable, and 100 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. In 1403 debasement occurred, and 130 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. The debasements continued, so that by 1406 the price of an aranyforint was 160 denars, it was 200 in 1421, 225 in 1423 and 320 in 1426.
Stkp
HUN_Zsigmond_Huszar_576_Pohl_117-43.jpg
Huszár 576, Pohl 117-43, Unger 449d, Réthy II 121, Frynas H.27.452 viewsHungary. Sigismund (Zsigmond, in Hun.) of Luxembourg (1387-1437; Holy Roman Emperor 1433-1437).

AR denar, .54 g., 14.03 mm. max., 90°

Obv: mOn • SIG-ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross.

Rev: + REGIS VnGARIE ETC, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle), •• above.
The type was struck in 1390-1427.

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4

This emission was struck with a fineness of 0.582 silver and an average weight of 0.51 g. (per Huszár). However, Engel notes that in 1390 Sigismund was able to temporarily restore the stability of the denar by the issuance of this new emission, which was referred to as nova moneta. For thirteen years the value of the denar remained stable, and 100 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. In 1403 debasement occurred, and 130 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. The debasements continued, so that by 1406 the price of an aranyforint was 160 denars, it was 200 in 1421, 225 in 1423 and 320 in 1426.
1 commentsStkp
HUN_Zsigmund_Huszar_576_Pohl_117-8.jpg
Huszár 576, Pohl 117-8, Unger 449μ, Réthy II 121, Frynas H.27.425 viewsHungary. Zsigmond/Sigismund of Luxembourg (1387-1437; Holy Roman Emperor 1433-1437).

AR denar, .54 g., 13.58 mm. max., 0°

Obv: mOn • SIG-ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross, •S• between cross arms to right.

Rev: + REGIS Vn[GAR]IE • ETC, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle).

The type was struck in 1390-1427 (per Pohl, Huszár, Unger and Frynas). This mintmark was struck in Szomolnok/Schmöllnitz/now Smolnik, Slovakia (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4; Unger value 8 DM; Frynas rarity rating C.

This emission was struck with a fineness of 0.582 silver and an average weight of 0.51 g. (per Huszár). However, Engel notes that in 1390 Sigismund was able to temporarily restore the stability of the denar by the issuance of this new emission, which was referred to as nova moneta. For thirteen years the value of the denar remained stable, and 100 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. In 1403 debasement occurred, and 130 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. The debasements continued, so that by 1406 the price of an aranyforint was 160 denars, it was 200 in 1421, 225 in 1423 and 320 in 1426.
1 commentsStkp
HUN_Zsigmund_Huszar_576_Pohl_117---.jpg
Huszár 576, Pohl 117-_, Unger 449_, Réthy II 121, Frynas H.27.429 viewsZsigmond/Sigismund of Luxembourg (1387-1437; Holy Roman Emperor 1433-1437).

AR denar, .43 g., 14.34 mm. max., 180°

Obv: mOn • SIG-ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross.

Rev: + REGIS VnGARIE • ETC, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle), star above, E to left.

The type was struck in 1390-1427 (per Pohl, Huszár, Unger and Frynas). This mintmark was possibly struck in Nagybánya/now Baia Mare, Romania (cf. Pohl 117-45 with the star above).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4; Unger value 8 DM; Frynas rarity rating C. This coin has an apparently unrecorded mintmark.

This emission was struck with a fineness of 0.582 silver and an average weight of 0.51 g. (per Huszár). However, Engel notes that in 1390 Sigismund was able to temporarily restore the stability of the denar by the issuance of this new emission, which was referred to as nova moneta. For thirteen years the value of the denar remained stable, and 100 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. In 1403 debasement occurred, and 130 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. The debasements continued, so that by 1406 the price of the price of an aranyforint was 160 denars, it was 200 in 1421, 225 in 1423 and 320 in 1426.
1 commentsStkp
HUN_Zsigmond_Huszar_576_Pohl_117-1.JPG
Huszár 576, Pohl 117-1, Unger 449a, Réthy II 121216 viewsHungary. Sigismund (Zsigmond, in Hun.) of Luxembourg (1387-1437; Holy Roman Emperor 1433-1437). AR denar, 14 mm.

Obv: MOn • SIG—ISMVnDI, Patriarchal cross.

Rev: + • REGIS VnGARIE ETC, Four-part shield (Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle).

The type was struck in 1390-1427 (per Pohl, Huszár & Unger).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4. The descriptions and depictions vary amongst the references with respect to the presence or absence of pellets in the reverse legend. This coin comports with the description and depictions in Huszár.

This emission was withdrawn from circulation after 1427. It was struck with a nominal fineness of 0.582 silver and an average weight of 0.51 g. (per Huszár). However, Engel notes that in 1390 Sigismund was able to temporarily restore the stability of the denar by the issuance of this new emission, which was referred to as nova moneta. For thirteen years the value of the denar remained stable, and 100 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. In 1403 debasement occurred, and130 were the equivalent of the aranyforint. The debasements continued, so that by 1406 the price of an aranyforint was 160 denars, it was 200 in 1421, 225 in 1423 and 320 in 1426.

“Owing to inner strife and disordered general conditions, the coins [of this period] were usually minted with extremely low precious metal content; moreover, poor mintages were often struck with negligently engraved dies. As a result of the hurried, superficial minting, it was sometimes doubtful whether a faulty coin had been issued officially, or was a forgery” (Huszár 1963, at 15).

Stkp
I__MINUCIUS_C_F__AUGURINUS.jpg
I. MINUCIUS C.F. AUGURINUS AR DENARIUS16 viewsOBVERSE: Head of Roma right, star behind
REVERSE: TI MINVCI C F on left, RO-MA above, AVGVRINI on right; 2 togate figures, one holding a simpulum, the other a lituus, standing by statue on column, grain ears on either side of the column
Rome, 134 BC
3.86g, 17mm
Cr243/1, Syd 494, Minucia 9
The reverse refers to a bronze monument erected outside of Portia Trigemina (at Rome) to L. Minucius Augurinus for his distribution of corn to the common people at a low price. The column and statue (a modius with corn ears) was erected at public expense some time after. Undoubtedly there are subtle issues to this reference that did not survive the passage of time.
1 commentsLegatus
Alexander_III_stater.jpg
imitation (east Celts) - Alexander III3 viewsAR stater
imitation of Carrhae?
3rd - 2nd century BC
head of young Herakles right, wearing lion's skin
Zeus seated left, leaning on scepter, holding eagle (goose)?; crescent left
AΛEΞANΔPOY
(ΔIP)
?
Price B 40 (Var.) - Imitation Price 3816/3820?
ex Gitbud and Naumann
Johny SYSEL
gK887yBNJ5yf2pbGN9coaH4TJcP6TK.jpg
In the name of ALEXANDER THE GREAT. Silver drachm.6 viewsKINGS OF MECEDON AR DRACHM. time of PHILIP III
4.2 GR & 17,21 MM
KINGS of MACEDON. Philip III Arrhidaios. 323-317 BC. In the name of Alexander III. Kolophon mint. Struck under Menander or Kleitos, circa 322-319 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, fish upwards; spear-head in right field. Price 1762.
Antonivs Protti
Ionia_Miletos_SNG-Cop1713.jpg
Ionia, Miletos3 viewsIonia, Miletos. 225-190 BC. AR Drachm (2.41 gm). Laureate head of Apollo r. / Lion stdg. l., head turned to r., looking back. Star above, IM monogram and IΣ to l., BIΩN (magistrate) below exergual line. nVF.  SNG Cop 982; BMC 116; cf. Deppert-Lippitz 678; Kinns Ch 8, 474: Milesian Silver Coinage in the Second Century BC, in: Ashton/Hurter (Hrsgg.), Studies in Greek Numismatics in Memory of Martin Jessop Price, London 1998 #476.
Miletos was one of the most important Greek cities of Asia Minor.
Christian T
Price-2151.jpg
Ionia, Miletos: Anonymous (295-275 BCE) AR Drachm (Price 2151; Marcellesi 29)10 viewsObv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress
Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding sceptre; AΛEΞANΔPOY to right, MI (civic) monogram in left field
Quant.Geek
Domna_RSC251a.jpg
Julia Domna (wife of Septimius Severus, mother of Caracalla and Geta), 193–217 CE72 viewsAR Denarius, Rome mint, 211 CE, 3.30g. BM 33a (p. 435), RIC-, RSC 251a (C.L. Clay and Vienna). Obv: IVLIA PIA - FELIX AVG; draped bust right. Rx: VOTA PVBLICA; Pietas (Julia?) standing left, dropping incense on lighted altar and holding open box.

Notes: Rare; none in Reka Devnia. A specimen was purchased by the British Museum in 1973; another in the G.R. Arnold Collection sold in the Glendining sale (21 November 1984), lot 113 (a pair of denarii), pl. V (this type illustrated); hammer price for the lot £120.
2 commentsMichael K5
RS000-Roman-AR_denarius,_Julius_Caesar_(ca_44_BC)-046800.JPG
JULIUS CAESAR (d. 44 BC), AR denarius, struck February-March 44 BC, moneyer C. Cossutius Maridianus79 viewsObverse- Wreathed and veiled head of Caesar right, DICT IN PERPETVO behind, CAESAR before.
Reverse- moneyer's name with Venus standing left, holding Victory and resting elbow on shield on globe.

RSC10, 19mm, 3.17g.

NGC VG ("bankers marks", Strike 3/5, Surface 2/5), cert. #4095350-001.
Ex- Imperial Coins & Artifacts, January 2011, through VCoins store (purchased raw).
Comments: This coin might be an "ugly duckling", but it's got a ton of history. When it came time to pursue a Twelve Caesars collection, I knew that nothing but a lifetime portrait issue of Caesar would do for me, though I probably could have had one of those interesting "elephants" or a more attractive "goddess head" design in better condition for less. This time I chose historical significance over eye appeal. This coin would have been struck just before Caesar's assassination on the fateful Ides of March, perhaps in that very month. It wasn't easy finding one within my $500/coin budgetary ceiling at the time, but this one came in under that price... barely.
4 commentslordmarcovan
brutus_EID_MAR_denar.jpg
JUNIA 52 - BRUTUS EID MAR denarius (replica)266 viewsobv: BRVT IMP L PLAET CEST (bare head of Brutus right)
rev: EID MAR (liberty cap and two daggers)
ref: RSC 15, Syd 1301, Cr502/4, Albert1617
3.53gms, 18mm
replica

This coin commemorates the most important single day event in ancient history. With this famous reverse type Brutus commemorates his assassination of Julius Caesar on the notorious Ides of March, 44 BC, and claims that the deed was done to secure liberty for the Roman people (the liberty cap).
Somewhat more than 50 of these remarkable coins exist. The fact that a lot of people would like to own one, along with the additional fact that most of these coins are in museums, has created the justifiable price structure that exists today.
berserker
Kavaros_Tetradrachm.jpg
Kabyle Thrace Tetradrachm -- 230-218 BC14 views16.62 g, 29 mm, 30°
Minted in Kabyle
Silver Tetradrachm; Lightly Toned, Struck from Worn Dies, Minor Porosity
In the Name and Style of Alexander the Great; Celtic Design
Price 882; Draganov 874-875 (Variation); Peykov F2010

Obverse: Head of Herakles Wearing Nemean Skin Headdress Right.
Reverse: BΑΣΙΛΕΛΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY (Of King Alexander), Zeus Aëtophoros Enthroned Left Holding Eagle and Staff. Artemis Phosphoros (Lightbringer) Standing Left, Holding Torches.

Alexander III the Great, the King of Macedonia and conqueror of the Persian Empire is considered one of the greatest military geniuses of all times. He became king upon his father’s death in 336 BCE and went on to conquer most of the known world of his day. He is known as 'the great' both for his military genius and his diplomatic skills in handling the various populaces of the regions he conquered. Kabyle was an ancient Thracian city in modern South Eastern Bulgaria which was conquered by Philip II in 341 BC. Following the Celtic Invasion of Thrace, the royal Odrysian power was replaced by city rule. Kavaros was a Gallic King of Thrace, the only of them to strike coins.
__________________________________
My #1 or #2 favorite. I love the look that results from the worn dies often used on this style and the addition of Artemis. The flan has a slight bend that's apparent on the left side of the reverse, but I think it gives the coin more character rather than taking away from anything. The reverse also has a slight toning that I've heard referred to as "classic coin cabinet toning" or "gunmetal toning" that makes it look great. In hand, the overall presentation of this coin is just amazing in my opinion.
Hydro
1034_Kaunos.jpg
Kaunos - AE1 views390 - 370 BC
head of Apollo facing
sphinx standing left
(upside down) Δ _ Γ
Klein 526; H. Troxell, Winged Carians, Essays Thompson p. 261, 30; K. Konuk, The Early Coinage of Kaunos, Studies Price p. 214, 117
Johny SYSEL
Kaunos.jpg
Kaunos - AR stater23 views450 - 430 BC
Iris? running left holding kerykeion and wreath
Baetyl, granulated patterns resembling birds on either side
Dewing 2359 (same dies); Konuk, "The Early Coinage of Kaunos" in Studies Price 94 (O36/R35); Troxell, "Winged Carians" in Essays Thompson p. 260, 26
ex CNG 2002
ex Forum Ancient Coins
ex Aurea numismatika 2011
ex Gitbud & Naumann 2014
Johny SYSEL
SeleukosIBabylon.jpg
King 01. Seleucos I, 312-281. 91 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Price 3747, Houghton 82(5), gVF, 17.05g, 25.9mm, 45o, Babylon mint, posthumous, 311 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in lion head headdress; reverse BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter, monogram in wreath left, MI under throne; nice-style high-relief obverse, flat center on reverse

Seleucos I was a comrade of Alexander the great and founded the Seleucid Empire in 312B.C.
2 commentsLordBest
IMG_0817.JPG
Kingdom of Macedhon, Alexander III, 336 – 323 Mytilene Tetradrachm.16 viewsAR 34mm., 15.92g. Head of Herakles r., wearing lion's skin headdress. Rev. ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ Zeus seated r., monogram and lyre in r. field, bunch of grapes below throne. Below throne, monogram. Price 1731.
Naville Numismatics live auction 16 2015 lot 31.
Diogenes
111teg3.jpg
Kingdom of Macedon AR Drachm36 viewsKingdom of Macedon Alexander III Posthumous AR Drachm c. 295/4 b.c.
Mint of Miletos
4.8g, 18mm, 1h. VF
O: Head of Herakles wearing lion skin
R: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left. Monogram in left field, double axe below throne.
Ref: M.J Price 2148.
3 commentsAndrew B2
Price_172.jpg
Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III 'the Great' AV Stater22 views8.57g, 18mm, 1h.
Amphipolis, circa 307-300 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet decorated with a serpent on the bowl / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; trident head pointing downwards in left field, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right.
Price 172.
Very Fine.
2 commentsLeo
coin17.jpg
Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III, 336-323 BC28 viewsAlexander III AE Unit. Macedonia mint. ca 336-323 BC. Head of Herakles, in lionskin headdress / ALEXANDROU between club and bow in quiver. K below.

Lifetime issue, Macedonian Mint, Head of (Alexander as) young
Hercules right, wearing lion's scalp, forepaws knotted at
truncation. / ALEXANDPOU Bow, quiver, club and K. Price 301.
Britanikus
alex_lampsacus_k.jpg
Kingdom of Macedon, Coinage in the style of Alexander III5 viewsAR Drachm, 19mm, 4.5g, 4h; Kolophon mint c. 310-301.
Obv.: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Rev.: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; crescent in left field, monogram below throne.
Reference: Price 1827 / 17-53-55
John Anthony
AG.PNG
Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III 'the Great' AR Drachm.24 viewsObv. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin.
Rev. Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; monograms in left field and below throne.
Magnesia ad Maeandrum, circa 319-305 BC. Struck under Antigonos I Monophthalmos.
References: Price 1959 .
17mm and 3.95 grams.
Canaan
325_-_310_BC_ALEXANDER_III__Hemiobol.JPG
Kingdom of Macedonia, Alexander the Great. AE Hemiobol (4 Chalkoi). Struck 325 – 310 BC at an uncertain mint in Macedonia.15 viewsObverse: No legend. Head of Herakles facing right, wearing lion-skin knotted at base of neck.
Reverse: A quiver (arrow case) placed on top of a bow and below it a club, large B A between; mint-mark, below the club, is a laurel branch.
Diameter: 17mm | Weight: 5.1gms | Die Axis: 7
Price: 385 | Sear: 6742

This coin is a subtype of the quiver type (Type 1B), with the inscription now reading B A (for BAΣIΛEOΣ AΛEΞANĐPOY = KING ALEXANDER). Price believed this coin type was minted both during and after Alexander's lifetime.
1 comments*Alex
336_-_323_BC_ALEXANDER_III_Hemiobol.JPG
Kingdom of Macedonia, Alexander the Great. AE Hemiobol (4 Chalkoi). Struck 336 – 323 BC at Macedon.8 viewsObverse: No legend. Head of Alexander the Great as Herakles, wearing lion-skin knotted at base of neck, facing right.
Reverse: AΛEΞANĐPOY. Bow in Gorytos (a case for bow and quiver) above, club and compound ΠΥΡ monogram below.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 5.79gms | Die Axis: 3
Price: 0335

Alexander the Great reigned from 336 to 323 BC but, although Price supposes this coin to be a lifetime issue, Thompson proposes the posthumous date of 321 – 320 BC (Thompson series VI) based on the control mark.

It is difficult to interpret the die orientation in these issues because not only is it unclear what the Ancient Greeks would have considered “up” with respect to the reverse design but modern scholars are ambiguous on the subject as well. I have, however, assumed that the modern conventional orientation is with the name reading horizontally, and therefore have described my example as having a 3 o’clock orientation, the “top” of the reverse being aligned with the back of Herakles’ head on the obverse.
*Alex
336_-_323_BC_ALEXANDER_III_AE_QUARTER-OBOL~0.JPG
Kingdom of Macedonia, Alexander the Great. AE Quarter-Obol (2 Chalkoi). Lifetime issue struck 336 – 323 BC at Amphipolis, Macedonia.7 viewsObverse: No legend. Head of Herakles, wearing lion skin headdress, facing right.
Reverse: AΛEΞANĐPOY. Eagle facing right, it's head turned to left, standing on a thunderbolt; mint-mark, A in right field before the eagle's breast.
Diameter: 15mm | W