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Arch_Titus.jpg
The relief of the imperial triumph (Titus driving a quadriga) Arch of Titus, Rome, Italy15 viewsThe relief of the imperial triumph Arch of Titus, Rome, Italy. The Triumphal Arch of Titus, erected in c. 81 CE by Domitian to commemorate his brother Titus' campaigns in the Jewish War (70-71 CE).

On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D., Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date. Upon his arrival in Rome in 71, Titus was awarded a triumph. As depicted in relief of the imperial triumph on the Arch of Titus in Rome, Titus rode into the city in a quadriga, enthusiastically saluted by the Roman populace and preceded by a lavish parade containing treasures and captives from the war. Josephus describes a procession with large amounts of gold and silver carried along the route, followed by elaborate re-enactments of the war, Jewish prisoners, and finally the treasures taken from the Temple of Jerusalem, including the Menorah and the Pentateuch. He was accompanied by Vespasian and Domitian. Simon Bar Giora was executed in the Forum, after which the procession closed with religious sacrifices at the Temple of Jupiter.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Arch_Titus,_relief_triumph,_Forum_Romanum,_Rome,_Italy.jpg
Date 22 August 2013 for photograph
Author Jebulon
Joe SermariniJul 13, 2019
Herakles_Farnese.jpg
Farnese Hercules14 viewsThe Farnese Hercules is one of the most famous ancient sculptures. It is a colossal copy made after a smaller Lysippos original, and intended to adorn the Baths of Caracalla. The sculpture was discovered and removed from the baths in 1546, entering the famous collection of Alessandro Farnese. It now resides in the museum of Naples.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farnese_Hercules
Joe SermariniJul 13, 2019
Oinoanda.JPG
Turkey, İncealiler - Termessos ad Oenoanda77 viewsOenoanda in the upper valley of the Xanthus River, was a colony of Termessos Major, and was also called Termessos Minor. The ruins of the city lie west of the modern village İncealiler in the Fethiye district of Muğla Province, Turkey, which partly overlies the ancient site. An extensive inscription of Diogenes of Oenoanda has been identified from over 300 scattered fragments, apparently from the stoa, varying in size from a few letters to passages of several sentences covering more than one block. The inscription sets out Epicurus' teachings on physics, epistemology, and ethics. It was originally about 25,000 words long and filled 260 square meters of wall. The stoa was dismantled in the second half of the third century A.D. to make room for a defensive wall; previously the site had been undefended.

By Ansgar Bovet - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18861664
Joe SermariniJun 29, 2019
Side_Commercial_agora_panorama_2.jpg
Turkey, Side, Pamphylia The Commercial Agora33 viewsTurkey, Side, Pamphylia the Commercial Agora

The great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. The well-preserved city walls provide an entrance to the site through the Hellenistic main gate (Megale Pyle) of the ancient city, although this gate from the 2nd century BC is badly damaged. Next comes the colonnaded street, whose marble columns are no longer extant; all that remains are a few broken stubs near the old Roman baths. The street leads to the public bath, restored as a museum displaying statues and sarcophagi from the Roman period. Next is the square agora with the remains of the round Tyche and Fortuna temple (2nd century BC), peripteral with twelve columns, in the middle. In later times it was used as a trading center where pirates sold slaves. The remains of the theater, which was used for gladiator fights and later as a church, and the monumental gate date back to the 2nd century. The early Roman Temple of Dionysus is near the theater. The fountain gracing the entrance is restored. At the left side are the remains of a Byzantine Basilica. A public bath has also been restored. The remaining ruins of Side include three temples, an aqueduct, and a nymphaeum.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Side_Commercial_agora_panorama_2.jpg
Author, Date: Dosserman, 20 February 2015
Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Joe SermariniJun 23, 2019
Side_TH_au.JPG
Turkey, Side, Pamphylia Theater 2nd Century AD Exterior24 viewsTurkey, Side, Pamphylia theater 2nd century AD, exterior. The great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. They cover a large promontory which a wall and a moat separate from the mainland. There are colossal ruins of a theater complex, the largest in Pamphylia, built in the 2nd century A.D. Following design it relies on arches to support the sheer verticals. The Roman style was adopted because Side lacked a convenient hillside that could be hollowed out in the usual Greek fashion more typical of Asia Minor. In Greek fashion, the seating (for 15,000–20,000 people) curves 210° vice the usual 180° for a Roman theater. The stage building was ornately adorned but the decorations and the theater are damaged, in part due to a strong earthquake. The theater was converted into an open-air sanctuary with two chapels during the 5th or 6th century (Byzantine times).

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Side_TH_au.JPG

Author, Date: Dosseman, 21 March 2011

Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Joe SermariniJun 23, 2019
Side_Theatre_panorama.jpg
Turkey, Side, Pamphylia Theater 2nd Century AD panorama24 viewsTurkey, Side, Pamphylia, theater 2nd century AD, panorama

The great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. They cover a large promontory which a wall and a moat separate from the mainland. There are colossal ruins of a theater complex, the largest in Pamphylia, built in the 2nd century A.D. Following design it relies on arches to support the sheer verticals. The Roman style was adopted because Side lacked a convenient hillside that could be hollowed out in the usual Greek fashion more typical of Asia Minor. In Greek fashion, the seating (for 15,000–20,000 people) curves 210° vice the usual 180° for a Roman theater. The stage building was ornately adorned but the decorations and the theater are damaged, in part due to a strong earthquake. The theater was converted into an open-air sanctuary with two chapels during the 5th or 6th century (Byzantine times).

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Side_Theatre_panorama.jpg

Author, Date: Dosseman, 21 March 2011

Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Joe SermariniJun 23, 2019
Sunrise_apollo_side.jpg
Turkey, Side, Pamphylia Temple of Apollo 44 viewsThe ruins of the Temple of Apollo at Side, Antalya, Turkey.

The great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. The well-preserved city walls provide an entrance to the site through the Hellenistic main gate (Megale Pyle) of the ancient city, although this gate from the 2nd century BC is badly damaged. Next comes the colonnaded street, whose marble columns are no longer extant; all that remains are a few broken stubs near the old Roman baths. The street leads to the public bath, restored as a museum displaying statues and sarcophagi from the Roman period. Next is the square agora with the remains of the round Tyche and Fortuna temple (2nd century BC), peripteral with twelve columns, in the middle. In later times it was used as a trading center where pirates sold slaves. The remains of the theater, which was used for gladiator fights and later as a church, and the monumental gate date back to the 2nd century. The early Roman Temple of Dionysus is near the theater. The fountain gracing the entrance is restored. At the left side are the remains of a Byzantine Basilica. A public bath has also been restored. The remaining ruins of Side include three temples, an aqueduct, and a nymphaeum.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sunrise_apollo_side.jpg
Photo by Saffron Blaze, via http://www.mackenzie.co
Date: 21 October 2011
Authorization: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en
Joe SermariniJun 23, 2019
Side_Tyche_temple_on_agora.jpg
Turkey, Side, Pamphylia Temple of Tyche on the commercial agora26 viewsThere are two agoras: a commercial one and one, called "State agora." On the commercial one there is a round temple, well-restored, that was dedicated to Tyche. The agora is over 8000 square meters, surrounded by columns, with shops, exedras and latrines and washing places. On it inconceivable numbers of slaves must have been traded, for during part of its history Side was a major center for pirates who stationed their fleet here. In the center stood a temple for the protective goddess of the city, Tyche. The present construction dates from the 2nd century A.D., it was in use in Byzantine times.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Side_Tyche_temple_on_agora_6140.jpg

Author, Date: Dosserman, 20 February 2015

Joe SermariniJun 23, 2019
Side_Theatre.jpg
Turkey, Side, Pamphylia Theater 2nd Century AD20 viewsThe great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. They cover a large promontory which a wall and a moat separate from the mainland. There are colossal ruins of a theater complex, the largest in Pamphylia, built in the 2nd century A.D. Following design it relies on arches to support the sheer verticals. The Roman style was adopted because Side lacked a convenient hillside that could be hollowed out in the usual Greek fashion more typical of Asia Minor. In Greek fashion, the seating (for 15,000–20,000 people) curves 210° vice the usual 180° for a Roman theater. The stage building was ornately adorned but the decorations and the theater are damaged, in part due to a strong earthquake. The theater was converted into an open-air sanctuary with two chapels during the 5th or 6th century (Byzantine times).

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Side_Theatre_4192.jpg

Author, Date: Dosseman, 21 March 2011

Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Joe SermariniJun 22, 2019
Dacians_bearing_the_draco_on_Trajan__s_Column.jpg
Dacian Draco on Trajan's Column16 viewsThe Dacian Draco was the standard ensign of troops of the ancient Dacian people, which can be seen in the hands of the soldiers of Decebalus in several scenes depicted on Trajan's Column in Rome, Italy. It has the form of a dragon with open wolf-like jaws containing several metal tongues. The hollow dragon's head was mounted on a pole with a fabric tube affixed at the rear. In use, the draco was held up into the wind, or above the head of a horseman, where it filled with air and gave the impression it was alive while making a shrill sound as the wind passed through its strips of material. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dacian_DracoJoe SermariniApr 08, 2019
Dacian_Draco_on_Trajan__s_Column_2.jpg
Dacian Draco on Trajan's Column17 viewsThe Dacian Draco was the standard ensign of troops of the ancient Dacian people, which can be seen in the hands of the soldiers of Decebalus in several scenes depicted on Trajan's Column in Rome, Italy. It has the form of a dragon with open wolf-like jaws containing several metal tongues. The hollow dragon's head was mounted on a pole with a fabric tube affixed at the rear. In use, the draco was held up into the wind, or above the head of a horseman, where it filled with air and gave the impression it was alive while making a shrill sound as the wind passed through its strips of material. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dacian_DracoJoe SermariniApr 08, 2019
Kassope.jpg
Greece, Epirus, Kassope Street in Kassope and view to the south21 viewsGreece, Epirus, Kassope Street in Kassope and view to the south

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kassope_2016-05-09_13.06.21.jpg
9 May 2016 Rjdeadly

Kassope or Cassope was an ancient Greek city in Epirus. Kassope occupies a magnificent and remote site on a high platform overlooking the sea, the Ambracian Gulf and the fertile lands to the south, and with the slopes of the Zalongo mountain to the north. It is considered one of the best remaining examples of a city built on a rectilinear street grid of a Hippodamian plan in Greece. The first settlements on the site are from the Paleolithic. However the city of Kassope was founded in the middle of the 4th century B.C. as the capital of the Kassopaeans, a sub-tribe of the Thesprotians. It belonged to the Aetolian League. Cassope or Cassopia is mentioned in the war carried on by Cassander against Alcetas II of Epirus, in 312 B.C. The city flourished in the 3rd century BC, when large public buildings were built. Kassope also minted its own coins. It was destroyed by Roman forces in 168-167 B.C. Kassope was abandoned in 31 B.C. when the remaining inhabitants resettled to Nikopolis the region’s new capital. The visible remains include the Cyclopean walls, an agora, a theater, the prytaneion.
Joe SermariniFeb 16, 2019
Laodicea.JPG
Turkey, near Denizli, Laodicea on the Lycus24 viewsLaodicea on the Lycus was an ancient city built on the river Lycus (Curuksu), in Lydia, later the Roman Province of Phrygia Pacatiana. It contained one of the Seven churches of Asia mentioned in the Book of Revelation. It is now near the modern city of Denizli. In 2013 the archaeological site was identified as a of World Heritage Site. The existing remains attest to its former greatness. Its many buildings include a stadium, baths, temples, a gymnasium, theaters, and a bouleuterion (Senate House). On the eastern side, the line of the ancient wall may be distinctly traced, with the remains of the Ephesus gate; there are streets traversing the town, flanked by colonnades and numerous pedestals. North of the town, towards the Lycus, are many sarcophagi, with their covers lying near them, partly embedded in the ground, and all having been long since rifled.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Laodicea_(2).JPG

Photo by Rjdeadly, 16 May 2012
Joe SermariniFeb 02, 2019
Cybele_formiae.jpg
Cybele, Marble statue of Cybele from Formia in Lazio, circa 60 BCE15 viewsMarble statue of Cybele from Formia in Lazio, circa 60 BCE. From the collection of the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek. Item number IN 480.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cybele_formiae.jpg
Photo by ChrisO, 26 August 2008
Joe SermariniJan 29, 2019
LimyraTheater.jpg
Turkey, Antalya Province, Limyra - Theater30 viewsLimyra was a small city in Lycia on the southern coast of Asia Minor, on the Limyrus River, about 5 1/2 KM from the mouth of that river. The ruins are about 5 km northeast of the town of Finike (ancient Phoenicus) in Antalya Province, Turkey. It was a prosperous city, and one of the oldest cities in Lycia. It had rich and abundant soil, and gradually became one of the finest trade settlements in Greece. Pericles adopted it as the capital of the Lycian League. The city came under control of the Persian Empire after it was conquered by Cyrus the Great. He later annexed Lydia and its territories after a decisive victory at the Battle of Thymbra and the Siege of Sardis, where he defeated armies twice as large as his. Cyrus then got his greatest general: Harpagus of Media to conquer the much smaller kingdoms in Anatolia, while he went to conquer the Neo-Babylonian Empire. Anatolia would become an important place for the Persian monarchs who succeeded Cyrus. The massive Royal road constructed by Darius went from the Persian capital of Persepolis, to the Anatolian city of Sardis. Limyra would stay under Persian control until it was conquered and sacked by Alexander the Great. It is mentioned by Strabo (XIV, 666), Ptolemy (V, 3, 6) and several Latin authors. Gaius Caesar, adopted son of Augustus, died there (Velleius Paterculus, II, 102). Ruins consist of a theater, tombs, sarcophagi, bas-reliefs, Greek and Lycian inscriptions etc. About 3 km east of the site is the Roman Bridge at Limyra, one of the oldest segmented arch bridges of the world.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:LimyraTheater1.jpg
Photo by Kpisimon, 8 May 1988
Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
Joe SermariniJan 25, 2019
Arwad.jpg
Syria, Arwad / Ruad (Arados, Phoenicia)24 viewsArwad, an island about 800 m long by 500 m wide, about 50 km north of Tripolis, was settled in the early 2nd millennium B.C. by the Phoenicians. Ancient Arados was an important trading city surrounded by a massive wall and an artificial harbor on the east side toward the mainland. Its powerful navy and ships are mentioned in the monuments of Egypt and Assyria. In the Bible, an "Arvad" is noted as the forefather of the "Arvadites," a Canaanite people. Arados ruled some neighboring cities on the mainland, such as Marat (present-day Amrit) and Sumur, the former nearly opposite the island and the latter some kilometers to the south and held hegemony over the northern Phoenician cities from the mouth of the Orontes to the northern limits of Lebanon, something like that of Sidon in the south. Under the Persians, Arwad was allowed to unite in a confederation with Sidon and Tyre, with a common council at Tripolis. When Alexander the Great invaded Syria in 332 B.C., Arados submitted without a struggle under her king Strato, who sent his navy to aid Alexander in the reduction of Tyre. The city received the favor of the Seleucid kings of Syria and enjoyed the right of asylum for political refugees. It is mentioned in a rescript from Rome about 138 B.C. in connection with other cities and rulers of the East, to show favor to the Jews. This was after Rome had begun to interfere in the affairs of Judea and Syria and indicates that Arwad was still of considerable importance at that time.

Photo by NASA.
Joe SermariniJan 16, 2019
Urfa_Castle_02.jpg
Turkey, Sanliurfa Province, Urfa - Roman Columns of Edessa20 viewsThe heritage of Roman Edessa survives today in these columns at the site of Urfa Castle, dominating the skyline of the modern city of Urfa.

Photo by Bernard Gagnon, 24 May 2014.
Joe SermariniJan 15, 2019
20111224_Flavius_Marcianus_Augustus_Column_Fatih_Istanbul_Turkey.jpg
Turkey, Istanbul - the Column of Marcian38 viewsThe column of emperor Marcian, Fatih, Istanbul, Turkey.

The Column of Marcian was dedicated to Marcian, built by the praefectus urbi Tatianus, sometime between 450 and 452. It still stands in modern Istanbul, though the statue of Marcian which originally topped it has been lost. Marcian also had a statue in the Forum of Arcadius, which contained the statues of several of Arcadius' successors.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:20111224_Flavius_Marcianus_Augustus_Column_Fatih_Istanbul_Turkey.jpg
Joe SermariniJan 06, 2019
Rondanini_Medusa_Glyptothek_Munich_252_n1.jpg
Rondanini Medusa18 viewsSo-called “Rondanini Medusa”. Marble, Roman copy after a 5th-century BC Greek original by Phidias, which was set on the shield of Athena Parthenos.

Homer wrote about the Gorgon on four occasions, but only about the head, as if the creature had no body. Up to the 5th century B.C., the head depicted was very ugly, with her tongue sticking out, boar tusks, puffy cheeks, her eyeballs staring straight ahead and the snakes twisting all around her. The direct frontal stare was highly unusual in ancient Greek art. In some cases a beard, (probably representing streaks of blood) was added to her chin, making her appear as a wild. Gorgoneia painted on the shields of warriors on mid-5th century Greek vases, however, are not as ugly, strange or frightening. By that time, the Gorgon had lost her tusks and the snakes were rather stylized. The Hellenistic marble known as the Medusa Rondanini shows how the Gorgon changed over time into a beautiful woman.
Joe SermariniJan 02, 2019
1920px-The_Temple_of_Zeus_Lepsinos_at_Euromus.jpg
Turkey, Kizilcakuyu (Euromus, Caria) The Temple of Zeus Lepsinos103 viewsThe Temple of Zeus Lepsinos at Euromus was built on the site of an earlier Carian temple in the 2nd century AD during the reign of the emperor Hadrian.1 commentsJoe SermariniDec 15, 2018
Kos_Gymnasion_7.jpg
Greece, Kos, Gymnasium of Kos, archaeologic site in Kos city, Kos island 33 viewsGymnasium of Kos, archaeologic site in Kos city, Kos island.Joe SermariniDec 15, 2018
Turkey_ancient_tombs.jpg
Turkey, Dalyan - The rock tombs of Kaunos56 viewsOutside the official Kaunos archeological site, near Dalyan, Turkey there are six rock tombs on the Dalyan river (4th – 2nd century BC). The façades of the rock tombs resemble the fronts of Hellenistic temples with two Ionian pillars, a triangular pediment, an architrave with toothed friezes, and acroterions shaped like palm leaves.1 commentsJoe SermariniDec 14, 2018
14570q00.jpg
PARTHIA/PERSIA, Kingdom of Elymais, Kamnaskires-Orodes, Mid 2nd Century A.D., Bronze Drachm16 viewsGB14570. Bronze drachm, vant Haaff 12.3.1-2A; SGICV 5910 (Kamnaskires-Orodes III); BMC Arabia 28 p. 268, 71 ff. (Orodes II), VF, weight 3.397g, maximum diameter 14.9mm, obverse long bearded diademed bust facing, bunches of hair at sides and on top; to right, pellet inside crescent above anchor with double crossbar; reverse irregular dashesJoe SermariniAug 12, 2018
87419q00.jpg
PARTHIA/PERSIA, Kingdom of Elymais, Prince B, 3rd Century A.D., Bronze Drachm16 viewsGB87419. Bronze drachm, vant Haaff 20.1, 1-1A, (type a); SGICV 5921; BMC Arabia p. 287, 2 ff. (Uncertain Kings), aVF, highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan, weight 3.133g, maximum diameter 14.7mm, die axis 0o, c. 180 - 220 B.C.; obverse forked bearded bust left, diadem with 2 bands, hair tuft on top tied with a ribbon ends flowing, hair tuft at back of head, anchor with pellet in crescent above to right; reverse Athena standing facing, her helmeted head right, spear in right hand, resting left on grounded shieldJoe SermariniAug 12, 2018
87423q00.jpg
PARTHIA/PERSIA, Kingdom of Elymais, Kamnaskires-Orodes, Early - Mid 2nd Century A.D., Bronze Drachm18 viewsGB87423. Bronze drachm, vant Haaff 12.3.1-2A2, e.; SGICV 5910 (Kamnaskires-Orodes III), BMC Arabia p. 268, 74 ff. (Kamnaskires), VF, dark patina with highlighting earthen deposits, weight 3.610g, maximum diameter 16.2mm, die axis 0o, obverse long bearded cuirassed bust facing, large tufts of upward-oriented hair at sides, wearing diademed tiara; to right, pellet inside crescent above anchor; reverse irregular dashesJoe SermariniAug 12, 2018
87420q00.jpg
PARTHIA/PERSIA, Kingdom of Elymais, Phraates, Early - Mid 2nd Century A.D., Bronze Drachm15 viewsGB87420. Bronze drachm, vant Haaff 14.6.1-3; BMC Arabia p. 272, 1 ff.; SGICV 5899, aVF, dark green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan, small edge cracks, weight 3.550g, maximum diameter 15.5mm, die axis 0o, Early - Mid 2nd Century A.D.; obverse ΦPA, bearded bust left wearing tiara with pellet in crescent; pellet inside crescent above anchor with one crossbar right; reverse BACIΛEVC ΠPAATHC (blundered), Artemis standing right, not radiate, drawing arrow from quiver with right, bow in leftJoe SermariniAug 12, 2018
87421q00.jpg
PARTHIA/PERSIA, Kingdom of Elymais, Orodes III, 2nd Century A.D., Bronze Drachm22 viewsGB87421. Bronze drachm, vant Haaff 16.4.2-1A, b.; SGICV 5906 ff.; BMC Arabia p. 276, 44, VF, dark blue-green patina with highlighting buff earthen deposits, edge cracks, weight 3.259g, maximum diameter 15.2mm, die axis 0o, 2nd Century A.D.; obverse long bearded bust left wearing tiara ornamented with anchor; to right, pellet inside crescent above anchor with one crossbar; reverse parallel dashesJoe SermariniAug 12, 2018
Lion_of_Amphipolis.jpg
Greece, Amphipolis, Lion of Amphipolis - Via Egnatia, west side of the Strymonas river71 viewsAmphipolis is best known for being a magnificent ancient Greek polis (city), and later a Roman city, whose impressive remains can still be seen. It is famous in history for events such as the battle between the Spartans and Athenians in 422 B.C., and also as the place where Alexander the Great prepared for campaigns leading to his invasion of Asia. Alexander's three finest admirals, Nearchus, Androsthenes and Laomedon, resided in this city and it is also the place where, after Alexander's death, his wife Roxane and their small son Alexander IV were exiled and later murdered. Excavations in and around the city have revealed important buildings, ancient walls and tombs. The finds are displayed at the archaeological museum of Amphipolis. At the nearby vast Kasta burial mound, an important ancient Macedonian tomb has recently been revealed. The unique and beautiful "Lion of Amphipolis" monument nearby is a popular destination for visitors.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/70/Loewe_von_Amphipolis.jpg
Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International
Date 16 June 2018
Author Neptuul
Joe SermariniAug 08, 2018
RomaForoRomanoTempioAntoninoFaustina.JPG
Italy, Rome, Temple of Antoninus and Faustina, with the church of San Lorenzo in Miranda, view from Palatine Hill, May 2005.64 viewsTemple of Antoninus and Faustina, with the church of San Lorenzo in Miranda, view from Palatine Hill, May 2005. The Temple of Antoninus and Faustina is an ancient Roman temple in Rome, adapted as a Roman Catholic church, Chiesa di San Lorenzo in Miranda. It is in the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra, opposite the Regia. The temple was begun by Antoninus Pius in 141 and was initially dedicated to his deceased and deified wife, Faustina the Elder. When Antoninus Pius was deified after his death in 161 AD, the temple was re-dedicated jointly to Antoninus and Faustina at the instigation of his successor, Marcus Aurelius. The ten monolithic Corinthian columns of its pronaos are 17 metres high. The rich bas-reliefs of the frieze under the cornice, of garlanded griffons and candelabri, were often copied from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_of_Antoninus_and_Faustina Photograph released to the public domain.
1 commentsJoe SermariniAug 07, 2018
Column_of_Marcus_Aurelius_The_Miracle_of_the_Rain.jpg
Italy, Rome, The Colum of Marcus Aurelius with Detail Memorializing the "Miracle in the Rain"51 viewsThe Column of Marcus Aurelius in Piazza Colonna. The five horizontal slits (visible in the middle photo) allow light into the internal stairway. The photo on the right shows detail memorializing the "Miracle in the Rain."

On June 11, 173, during the Marcomannic Wars (166–180), the Roman army in Moravia was outnumbered and surrounded by the Quadi, suffering from the extreme heat, out of water, and on the verge of defeat. Dio writes, "many clouds gathered and a mighty rain, not without divine interposition, burst upon them...when the rain poured down, at first all turned their faces upwards and received the water in their mouths; then some held out their shields and some their helmets to catch it, and they not only took deep draughts themselves but also gave their horses to drink...while those on the one side were being drenched and drinking, the others [the Quadi] were being consumed by fire [lightning] and dying." The Romans were soon victorious. Marcus was saluted imperator for the seventh time and the "miracle of the rain" was memorialized on Marcus Aurelius' column. In 174, Marcus Aurelius officially conferred the title Fulminata (Thundering) to the Legio XII Fulminata.

Photos by Adrian Pingstone released to the public domain.
Joe SermariniJun 14, 2018
82705q00.jpg
Roman Imperators, Julius Caesar, denarius, Alföldi Caesar, type III, 115 (this coin, not in plates)54 viewsSH82705. Silver denarius, Alföldi Caesar, type III, 115 (this coin); BMCRR Rome 4147 (also I); Crawford 480/3; RSC I 34; Sydenham 1056; Sear Imperators 100; RBW 1678 (H) , gVF, toned, banker’s mark on obverse, areas of flat strike, attractive deep old cabinet toning, with hints of iridescence around the devices, Rome mint, weight 3.607g, maximum diameter 21.8mm, die axis 30o, moneyer M. Mettius, Jan - Feb 44 B.C.; obverse CAESAR·IMP, wreathed head of Caesar right, cymbium (boat shaped cup used as a wine ladle) and lituus (augural wand) behind; reverse M METTIVS, Venus standing left, Victory in her extended right hand, long transverse scepter in left hand, resting left elbow on shield which rests on globe, I (control letter) in lower left field; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 23 (9 Jan 2016), lot 376; ex Andrew McCabe Collection; ex CNG e-auction 237 (21 July 2010), lot 344; ex Professor L Fontana Collection; rare.2 commentsJoe SermariniJun 04, 2018
Amrit.jpg
Syria, The Ma'abed - Temple at Marathos (Amrit)35 viewsOne of the most important excavations at Marathos (Amrit) was the Phoenician temple, commonly referred to the "ma'abed," dedicated to the god Melqart of Tyre and Eshmun. The colonnaded temple, excavated between 1955 and 1957, consists of a large court cut out of rock measuring 47 × 49 metres (154 × 161 ft) and over 3 metres (9.8 ft) deep, surrounded by a covered portico. In the center of the court a well-preserved cube-shaped cella stands. The open-air courtyard was filled with the waters of a local, traditionally sacred spring, a unique feature of this site. The temple—which was dated to the late 4th century BC, a period following the Persian expansion into Syria—shows major Achaemenid influence in its layout and decoration. According to Dutch archaeologist, Peter Akkermans, the temple is the "best-preserved monumental structure from the Phoenician homeland."

Source:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amrit#/media/File:Amrit01.jpg
Photo by Jerzy Strzelecki
Joe SermariniMay 25, 2018
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Athlit Bronze War Galley Ram57 viewsThe Athlit ram, found in 1980 off the coast of Israel near at Athlit Bay (just south of Haifa), is the one of a few surviving ancient war galley rams. Carbon 14 dating of timber remnants date it to between 530 BC and 270 BC. It was once fit on the prow of an ancient oared warship. This would be driven into the hull of an enemy ship in order to puncture it and thus sink, or at least disable, the ship. It is made of a single casting of bronze weighing 465kg and measures about 2.10m long. The ram is thus one of the largest bronze objects to survive from the ancient world and is currently on display in the National Maritime Museum, Haifa, Israel. Captured rams were once used to ornament Octavian's battle monument at Actium, Greece. Only the sockets that held them remain. The valuable bronze was melted long ago.

Sources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_ram
http://www.learningsites.com/Athlit/AthlitRam_home.php

For other recovered galley rams see:
https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2013/04/rare-bronze-rams-found-at-site-of-final.html
https://www.historytoday.com/ann-natanson/roman-naval-power-raising-ram
1 commentsJoe SermariniMay 11, 2018
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Greek, Sicily, Syracuse, Agathokles, 317 - 289 B.C., Electrum 50 Litrai36 viewsSH86808. Electrum 50 litrai, Jenkins Group B (O4/R3); SNG ANS 621 (same obv. die); BMC Sicily p. 184, 263 (same); de Luynes 1267 (same); HGC 2 1294, VF, attractive style, centered on a tight flan, lightly toned, light marks, die crack on reverse, Syracuse mint, weight 3.587g, maximum diameter 15.3mm, die axis 270o, c. 306 - 305 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left, amphora behind; reverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN (clockwise from upper right), ornamented tripod lebes, high ring handles; ex Classical Numismatic Group, e-auction 412, lot 38; ex John A. Seeger Collection; ex Classical Numismatic Group, auction 76 (12 Sep 2007), lot 30131 commentsJoe SermariniMay 11, 2018
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Roman Imperators, Mark Antony and Octavia, 39 B.C., Ephesos, Ionia, Silver Cistophoric Tetradrachm20 viewsSH86609. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, RPC I 2202, Sydenham 1198, Crawford 263, RSC Octavia and M. Antony 3, Sear CRI 263, BMCRR East 135, SRCV I 1513, Choice gVF, toned, well centered, some die wear and rust, scratches, Ephesos mint, weight 11.723g, maximum diameter 27.1mm, die axis 0o, summer - autumn 39 B.C.; obverse M ANTONIVS IMP COS DESIG ITER ET TERT (Consul Elect for the 2nd and 3rd time), conjoined head of Antony and bust of Octavia right, Antony nearer and wreathed in ivy, Octavia draped; reverse Dionysus standing half left on cista mystica, in his right hand, thyrsus in his left hand, flanked by two interlaced snakes with heads erect, III VIR (triumvir) downward on left, R P C (Reipublicae Constituendae) upward on rightJoe SermariniMay 11, 2018
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Greek, Western Anatolia, c. 620 - 600 B.C., Plain Globular Type Electrum Hekte39 viewsSH85577. Electrum hekte, Phokaic standard 1/6 stater; unpublished, EF, flan cracks, uncertain western Anatolia mint, weight 2.721g, maximum diameter 8.96mm, c. 620 - 600 B.C.; obverse plain globular surface; reverse one small incuse square punch; extremely rare

Unpublished! The majority of the earliest electrum issues were struck on the lighter Milesian weight standard, with hectes weighing approximately 2.35 grams. This example, however is on the heavier Phocaic standard that was used at mints such as Cyzicus, Mysia and Phocaea, Ionia.
Joe SermariniMay 11, 2018
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Greek, Phoenicia, Tyre, 111 - 110 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver, Year 1850 viewsSL86641. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 237, 85; Cohen DCA 919-18 (C); Baramki AUB -, NGC Ch AU*, strike 5/5, surface 5/5 (4280576-003), Tyre mint, weight 14.20g, maximum diameter 28.0mm, die axis 0o, 109 - 108 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, date HI (year 18) over club and palm frond left, ZB right, Phoenician letter beth between legs1 commentsJoe SermariniMay 11, 2018
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ROMAN IMPERATORS, Octavian, Triumvir and Imperator, Silver Denarius, SRCV I 1558, RSC I 123, RIC I 267, Sear CRI 422, BMCRR 4348127 viewsSH16777. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1558, RSC I 123, RIC I 267, Sear CRI 422, BMCRR 4348, EF, lustrous, weight 3.781g, maximum diameter 20.9mm, die axis 180o, Italian (Rome?) mint, obverse bare head of Octavian right; reverse IMP CAESAR on architrave of the Actian arch, depicted as a single span surmounted by a large statue of Octavian in a facing triumphal quadriga; mirror luster, slight rainbow toning, struck flat on the top edge of the reverse, banker's marks
3 commentsJoe SermariniMar 08, 2018
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Ara Pacis36 viewsThe Ara Pacis Augustae (Latin, "Altar of Augustan Peace"; commonly shortened to Ara Pacis) is an altar in Rome dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. The monument was commissioned by the Roman Senate on July 4, 13 B.C. to honor the return of Augustus to Rome after three years in Hispania and Gaul, and consecrated on January 30, 9 B.C. Originally located on the northern outskirts of Rome, a Roman mile from the boundary of the pomerium on the west side of the Via Flaminia, it stood in the northeastern corner of the Campus Martius, the former flood plain of the Tiber River and gradually became buried under 4 metres (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location, now the Museum of the Ara Pacis, in 1938.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ara_Pacis
Joe SermariniFeb 18, 2018
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Carnyx players on the Gundestrup Cauldron69 viewsDetail of antlered figures with animal-headed horns depicted on the cauldron found at Gundestrup, Himmerland, Jutland, Denmark. The Gundestrup cauldron is housed at the National Museum of Denmark.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Figures_with_horns_on_the_Gundestrup_Cauldron.jpg
Joe SermariniFeb 08, 2018
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Maria of Alania Byzantine empress by marriages to emperors Michael VII Doukas and Nikephoros III Botaneiates (aka Maria-Martha of Georgia of Bagrationi royal dynasy)42 viewsMaria of Alania (born Martha, Georgian, 1053-1118) was Byzantine empress by marriages to emperors Michael VII Doukas and Nikephoros III Botaneiates. At the time of her marriage, Georgian Maria was one of only two non-Byzantine princesses to marry a Byzantine heir and the only one to give birth to an heir.

Anna Komnene, in her medieval biographical text Alexiad, describes the beautiful Georgian princess Maria of Alania: "...after Michael Ducas' deposition, when he had advised the latter's successor, Nicephorus Botaniates, to take her in marriage, because she came from another country and had not a crowd of kinsfolk to give the Emperor trouble, and he had told Botaniates a great deal about her family and personal beauty, and often praised her to him. And certainly she was as slender of stature as a cypress, her skin was white as snow, and though her face was not a perfect round, yet her complexion was exactly like a spring flower or a rose. And what mortal could describe the radiance of her eyes? Her eyebrows were well-marked and red-gold, while her eyes were blue. Full many a painter's hand has successfully imitated the colors of the various flowers the seasons bring, but this queen's beauty, the radiance of her grace and the charm and sweetness of her manners surpassed all description and all art. Never did Apelles or Pheidias or any of the sculptors produce a statue so beautiful. The Gorgon's head was said to turn those who looked upon it into stone, but anyone who saw the Queen walking or met her unexpectedly, would have gaped and remained rooted to the spot, speechless, as if apparently robbed of his mind and wits. There was such harmony of limbs and features, such perfect relation of the whole to the parts and of the parts to the whole, as was never before seen in a mortal body, she was a living statue, a joy to all true lovers of the beautiful. In a word, she was an incarnation of Love come down to this terrestrial globe."

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_of_Alania
Joe SermariniFeb 06, 2018
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ROMAN, Pertinax, 31 December 192 - 28 March 193 A.D.44 viewsSH08958. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 24, Cohen 58, VF, weight 25.04 g, maximum diameter 32.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 31 Dec 192 - 28 Mar 193 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES P HELV PERTINAX AVG, laureate head right; reverse VOTA DECEN TR P COS II S C, Pertinax, veiled, standing left, sacrificing out of patera over tripod; ex John Aiello; ex Edgar L. Owen; ex NFA Feb 27 - 28, 1979, lot 745; very rare (R2)Joe SermariniJan 30, 2018
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ROMAN, Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.57 viewsSH16768. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1592, RIC I 541, BMCRE I 664, superb EF, weight 3.850 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Asia Minor mint, 27 - 20 B.C.; obverse laureate head right, dot border; reverse AVGVSTVS, capricorn left, holding globe, cornucopia above, rudder below; extraordinary high relief impossible to capture in a photograph, lustrous and nearly as struck; rare1 commentsJoe SermariniJan 30, 2018
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ROMAN, Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius29 viewsSH33181. Gold aureus, SRCV II 4553 (same dies), Cayon 1765 (same), RIC III AP356d, Cohen II 98, BMCRE IV AP398, Choice EF, weight 6.923 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, diademed, draped and veiled bust left; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing left, torch in right hand, scepter in left hand; very light hairline scratches; ex Numismatik Lanz auction 135, lot 745 (misattributed); ex Goldberg Auction44, lot 3704 (ICG AU 50); hints of red toning, bold and beautiful, struck with elegant dies!; scarceJoe SermariniJan 30, 2018
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Roman, Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C.63 viewsSH45450. Silver denarius, Crawford 480/13, Sydenham 1074, Sear CRI 107d, RSC I Julius Caesar 39, BMCRR I Rome 4173, SRCV I 1414, Vagi 56, Choice gVF, magnificent portrait, weight 3.660 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, moneyer P Sepullius Macer, Feb - Mar 44 B.C.; obverse CAESAR DICT PERPETVO, veiled and wreathed head of Caesar right; reverse P SEPVLLIVS MACER, Venus standing left, Victory in extended right, long scepter in left hand, shield at feet right3 commentsJoe SermariniJan 30, 2018
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ROMAN, Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.52 viewsSH24852. Gold aureus, RIC III 233e, Calico 1530 (same obv die), Cohen II 314, aEF, weight 7.0221 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 153 - 154 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XVII, laureate head left; reverse COS IIII, Antoninus Pius, togate, standing left, globe in extended right, scroll in left; superb obverse portrait, recognizable portrait on reverse, minor blemish on the second I on the reverse, ex Harlan Berk; scarce1 commentsJoe SermariniJan 30, 2018
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Roman, Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.36 viewsRA73476. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 473 (R2), Webb Carausius 523, Hunter IV 130, Cohen VII 185, SRCV IV -, Linchmere-, Burton Latimer -, Bicester -, VF, fantastic portrait with unusual style, green patina, scratches, tight flan, reverse slightly uneven and off center, spots of corrosion, weight 2.517 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 180o, unmarked mint, c. mid 292 - mid 293; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F I AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, late reign tetrarchic portrait type, long necked variety; reverse ORIENS AVG (the rising sun of the Emperor), Sol standing slightly left, nude but for cloak over shoulders, raising right hand commanding sunrise, globe in left hand, S - P flanking across field, exergue blank; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; very rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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Roman, Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.37 viewsRA76279. Silvered antoninianus, Pink VI-1, p. 63; RIC V-2 376 (S) var. (cuirass); Cohen VI 283 var. (same); Hunter IV 131 var. (same, and obv legend); SRCV III 11984 (same), Choice aEF, some mint luster, most silvering remains, fantastic heroic bust, light corrosion, weight 3.341 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 4 emission, 278 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG (the valor of Emperor Probus), radiate bust left from behind, spear left in right hand, back bare but for balteus over right shoulder and rectangular Aegis shield with square corner in on left shoulder; reverse HERCVLI PACIF (to Hercules the pacifier), Hercules standing left, raising branch in extended right, club and Nemean Lion skin in left, VXXT in exergue; very rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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Roman, Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.35 viewsRL76392. Billon centenionalis, apparently unpublished, cf. RIC VII Siscia 116 - 117 (for obv. type) and 138 - 139 (for rev. type, issues of the Licinii), EF, excellent portrait, both sides slightly off-center, left side of reverse legend weak, some porosity, a few light marks, weight 2.773 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, as caesar, 320 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust left; reverse VIRTVS EXERCIT (courage of the army), vexillum inscribed VOT / XX in two lines, two seated barbarian captives back-to-back flanking base, Christogram (Chi-Rho monogram) left, ESIS star in exergue; ex Scott Collection; extremely rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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Roman, Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D.34 viewsSH77277. Silver denarius, RIC IV 92b, BMCRE V 80, RSC III 122c corr. (Antioch), Hunter III 32 var. (draped, no cuirass), SRCV II 7365, Choice EF, nearly as struck, light tone on luster, superb portrait, well centered, small edge cracks, weight 3.140 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, obverse IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS TEMPORVM (time of security), Securitas standing facing, head left, scepter in right hand, left leg crossed in front of right, leaning with left forearm on columnJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.31 viewsSH73156. Orichalcum sestertius, BMCRE IV 1669, RIC III 767a, Strack III 974, Cohen II 320, Hill UCR 709, SRCV II 4168, VF, nice green patina, nice portrait, light scratches, tight flan, weight 22.051 g, maximum diameter 31.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 146 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG - PIVS P P TR P, laureate head right; reverse Antoninus in slow quadriga left, eagle-tipped scepter in left, reins in right, COS IIII / S C in two lines in exergue1 commentsJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.18 viewsRB76153. Orichalcum sestertius, Göbl MIR 38dd, RIC V 248, Cohen V 1293, Hunter IV 33, SRCV III 10495, Nice gVF, excellent portrait, green patina, tight flan cutting off much legend, weight 10.962 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 253 - 255 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVGG (valor of the two emperors), Virtus standing left, wearing crested helmet and military garb, right resting hand on grounded shield, inverted spear vertical behind in left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across fieldJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Sicily, Syracuse, Timoleon, 344 - 336 B.C.21 viewsGI83514. Bronze hemidrachm, Calciati II p. 168, 72 st3/7; SNG ANS 477 ff.; SNG Cop 727; HGC 2 1440 (S), VF, green patina, edges earthen encrusted, reverse double struck, weight 15.872 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 90o, Syracuse mint, c. 342 - 338 B.C.; obverse ZEYΣ EΛEYΘEPTOΣ, laureate head of Zeus Eleutherios right; reverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, thunderbolt, eagle on right standing right with wings closedJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Phokaia, Ionia, c. 372 - 327 B.C.24 viewsSH86298. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 97 (b/-); SNGvA 2123; BMC Ionia p. 208, 36; Boston MFA 1924 (identified as Pan); SNG Kayhan -, Rosen -, VF, attractive style, well centered and struck, mild die wear, bumps and scratches, weight 2.521 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, c. 364 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos left, wreathed in ivy with berries, hair rolled, small seal (symbol of Phokaia) left below; reverse quadripartite incuse square; scarceJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Knidos, Caria, c. 210 - 185 B.C.18 viewsGS86557. Silver didrachm, SNG Cop 318, Imhoof-Blumer Karische 32, Waddington 2312, SNG Keckman -, SNGvA -, SNG Kayhan -, SNG Mün -, SNG Tüb -, SNG Mugla -, BMC Caria -, aEF, toned, tight flan typical for the type, encrustations, light corrosion, edge cracks, weight 5.531 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Knidos (near Tekir, Turkey) mint, magistrate Agephon..., c. 210 - 185 B.C.; obverse head of Helios facing slightly right; reverse forepart of roaring lion right, club to left, KNI∆ION above, AΓEΦΩN (magistrate) below; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Mesembria, Thrace, c. 275 - 225 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great35 viewsSH85286. Silver tetradrachm, Karayotov p. 84 and pl. VII, 41 (O7/R18); Price 992; Müller Alexander 436, gVF, attractive style, light marks and scratches, weight 17.000 g, maximum diameter 31.6 mm, die axis 180o, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, c. 275 - 225 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion-scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, Zeus seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Corinthian helmet right over ΠA monogram in inner left field under arm; ex FORVM (2013)1 commentsJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus I Soter, 281 - 261 B.C.20 viewsGY85675. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 379.6a, Newell ESM 166, HGC 9 128g, Choice VF, well centered and struck, high relief portrait, attractive toning, bumps and marks, closed edge crack, weight 16.667 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 0o, Seleucia on the Tigris mint, c. 263 - 261 B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse Apollo seated left on omphalos, examining arrow with right, resting left hand on grounded bow, monogram (primary control symbol) outer left, ∆/ΩP monogram (secondary control symbol) outer right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ANT-IOXOY downward on leftJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, PHOENICIA, Arados, Phoenicia, 200 - 190 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great19 viewsGS85703. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3390 ff., Mektepini 614 ff.; Duyrat 1270 ff., Cohen Dated 771, gVF, attractive style, reverse double struck, earthen encrustations, weight 17.039 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 0o, Arados mint, c. 200 - 190 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion-scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, Zeus seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, palm tree with two bunches of dates in left field under arm, AP monogram under throne, uncertain Greek additive date (60 - 69?) belowJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Phokaia, Ionia, c. 372 - 327 B.C.27 viewsSH86298. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 97 (b/-); SNGvA 2123; BMC Ionia p. 208, 36; Boston MFA 1924 (identified as Pan); SNG Kayhan -, Rosen -, VF, attractive style, well centered and struck, mild die wear, bumps and scratches, weight 2.521 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, c. 364 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos left, wreathed in ivy with berries, hair rolled, small seal (symbol of Phokaia) left below; reverse quadripartite incuse square; scarceJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Kos, Carian Islands, c. 345 - 340 B.C.23 viewsGS86516. Silver didrachm, Pixodarus p. 234, 13 (A2/P7); SNG Cop 619; Weber 6629; HGC 6 1305 (R1); BMC Caria p. 195, 18 ff. var. (magistrate); SNG Keckman 287 var. (same), gVF, attractive style, bold strike, toned, tight flan cutting off ethnic, corrosion, edge cracks, Kos mint, weight 6.369g, maximum diameter 20.2mm, die axis 0o, Ma[...], magistrate, c. 345 - 340 B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse veiled female (Halkiopi?) head left, MA (magistrate) behind, KΩION below; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Sicily, Syracuse, Second Democracy, 466 - 405 B.C.18 viewsSH85694. Silver tetradrachm, Boehringer Series XXII, 672 (V338/R459); SNG ANS 222 (same dies); BMC Sicily, p. 162, 123 (same); Jameson 778 (same); Pozzi 586 (same); HGC 2 1320, VF, fine classical style, obverse die wear, bumps and scratches, somewhat ragged tight flan, weight 16.769 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 90o, Syracuse mint, c. 430 - 420 B.C.; obverse slow quadriga driven right by male charioteer holding kentron and reins, Nike above flying right crowning horses; reverse ΣYPAKOΣION, head of Arethusa right, earring, necklace, hair bound with taenia and wound four times around; four dolphins swimming aroundJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Athens, Greece, Pi-Style III Tetradrachm, 353 - c. 340 B.C.49 viewsSH86206. Silver tetradrachm, Kroll Pi-Style p. 244, fig. 8; Flament p. 126, 3; SNG Cop 63; SNG Munchen 96; SNG Delepierre 1479; Svoronos Athens pl. 20: 2, Choice VF, well centered on a tight flan typical of the type, toned, bumps and marks, weight 17.153 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 270o, Athens mint, 353 - c. 340 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right with eye seen in true profile, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and pi-style floral scroll, pellet in ear; reverse owl standing right, head facing, pellet over eyes, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square1 commentsJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Ephesos, Ionia, c. 500 - 420 B.C.21 viewsGS86219. Silver drachm, SNG Kayhan 140, SNGvA 7819, SNG Cop 210, SNG Tübingen 2758, Traité II, p. 1090, 1867 & pl. CLII, 12; BMC Ionia -, SNG München -, Choice gVF, toned, well centered on a tight flan, weight 3.343 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesos mint, c. 500 - 420 B.C.; obverse EΦ-EΣI-O-N, bee seen from above; reverse quadripartite incuse square, divided by thin raised bands, incuse quarters rough; rare issue with full ethnicJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Mytilene, Lesbos, c. 377 - 326 B.C.19 viewsSH86299. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 100A; SNG Cop 317; SNGvA 1715; BMC Lesbos p. 165, 87; Boston MFA 1720; HGC 6 1026 (S), VF, attractive style, light scratches, weight 2.557 g, maximum diameter 10.6 mm, die axis 0o, Mytilene mint, c. 377 - 326 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse head of Artemis right, hair in sphendone, small coiled snake lower left, all within linear frame and incuse square; scarceJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Emerita, Hispania Lusitania14 viewsSH84707. Silver denarius, RIC I 9b, RSC I 398, BMCRE I 291, BMCRR Spain 128, BnF I 1039, Hunter I 124, SRCV I 1627 var. (head right), gVF, full circle centering on a broad flan, mint luster, weak strike areas, die wear, small edge cracks, weight 3.775 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 90o, Emerita Augusta (Merida, Spain) mint, P. Carisius, c. 25 - 23 B.C.; obverse IMP CAESAR AVGVST, bare head left; reverse P CARISIVS LEG PRO PR (P. Carisius Legatus [Augusti] pro Praetore), bird's-eye view of town with walls around, EMERITA inscribed above gateway in front with three battlements over two arched entrances; from the Marcelo Leal CollectionJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, PHOENICIA, Arados, Phoenicia, Unknown King "N", c. 348 - 338 B.C.20 viewsSH85437. Silver stater, BMC Phoenicia p. 10, 58; Betlyon 26, note 104, pl. 7, 4; Rouvier III p. 131, 5; HGC 10 33 (R1); Sunrise 114; SNG Cop -, VF, well centered on a tight flan, struck with high relief dies, test cut on obverse, weight 10.346 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 270o, Arados mint, c. 348 - 338 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Ba'al Arwad right, with profile eye; reverse galley right, figure of Pataikos right on prow, row of shields on bulwark, Phoenician letters mem aleph nun (Melech Arad N - King of Arados N) from right to left above, three waves below; rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Otho, 15 January 69 - 17 April 69 A.D.13 viewsRS85563. Silver denarius, Muona Otho 10b; Butcher-Ponting-Muona 6; ANSCD 1958.217.1; BnF III 1; RIC I 1 (R3, 7 spec. known, all minted with the same die-pair), Nice VF, the best portrait and most attractive of the seven known specimens, light rose toning, a few light marks and spots of porosity, weight 3.272 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 9 Mar - 17 Apr 69 A.D.; obverse IMP OTHO CAESAR AVG TRP, bare head right; reverse CERES AVG, Ceres standing left, grain-ears raised in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; rarest Otho denarius type; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Glenn Woods (NYINC, 2002)Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.20 viewsSH86120. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 178, BMCRE I 131, Cohen I 37, Mac Dowall WCN 120, BnF I -, VF, well centered, nice portrait, near black patina, scratches on obverse lower right field, some porosity and tiny pitting, weight 26.031 g, maximum diameter 34.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 64 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate bust right, wearing aegis; reverse AVGVSTI above, S - C divided by POR OST below, bird's-eye view Ostia harbor: pharos lighthouse with Neptune statue on top at far side center; crescent-shaped pier with building and figure sacrificing at far end, crescent-shaped row of breakwaters or slips on right with figure seated on rock at far end, 7 ships within port; river god Tiber reclining left holding rudder and dolphin below; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 195 (7 Mar 2011), lot 405Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Kelenderis, Cilicia, c. 410 - 375 B.C.18 viewsGS86211. Silver stater, Casabonne type 4; BMC Cilicia p. 55, 25 & pl. X, 3; cf. SNG BnF 75 (KEΛEN); Celenderis Hoard-; SNG Levante -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, aEF, attractive style, centered on a tight flan, die wear and minor die cracks, marks, weight 10.800 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 30o, Celenderis mint, c. 410 - 375 B.C.; obverse young man riding sideways on horse galloping right, preparing to dismount(?), nude, whip in right hand, bridle in left hand; reverse goat crouching left on dotted exergue line, head turned looking back right, KEΛ[E?] above; very rare late issue with rider right and goat leftJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Sicily, Syracuse, Hieron, c. 478 - 466 B.C.23 viewsSH86308. Silver tetradrachm, Boehringer Series X, 229 (V102/R155); HGC 2, 1306; Bement 451; Jameson 744; McClean 2611 (all from the same dies)., gVF, well centered, toned, obverse struck with a worn die, some marks and scratches, weight 17.105 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 270o, Syracuse mint, c. 478 - 475 B.C.; obverse slow quadriga driven right by male charioteer holding goad, Nike above flying right crowning horses; reverse ΣYP-AKO-ΣI-ON (beginning 3:30, 1st Σ reversed), head of Arethusa right, hair turned up behind under diadem of beads, wearing bead necklace, surrounded by four dolphins swimming clockwise; ex Numismatica Ars Classica auction 59 (4 Apr 2011), lot 1571Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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PARTHIA/PERSIA, Parthian Empire, Mithradates II, c. 121 - 91 B.C.40 viewsSH86429. Silver tetradrachm, Sellwood 24.4, BMC 3, Boston MFA 2216, Sunrise 284, Shore 67 var., EF, fantastic high relief bust, well centered on a tight flan, slightest die wear, slightest porosity, weight 15.696 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 0o, Seleukeia on the Tigris mint, c. 119 - 109 B.C.; obverse diademed bust of Mithradates to left, long beard, wearing torc and elaborate robes; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ MEΓAΛOY APΣ-AKOY EΠIΦANOYΣ / TY (square clockwise, ending in exergue)), Arsakes I seated right on omphalos, bow in right hand, palm branch right; ex Pars (2008), ex Antiqua Inc. (2000)1 commentsJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV, c. 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander26 viewsSH86161. Silver tetradrachm, Price 113, Müller Alexander 224, Troxell issue H3, SNG Cop 682, SNG Munchen 275, SNG Alpha Bank 503, SNG Delepierre 986, Choice EF, attractive archaic style, bold well centered strike, high relief, light toning, weight 17.283 g, maximum diameter 26.8 mm, die axis 90o, Macedonia, Amphipolis mint, c. 322 - 320 A.D.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, throne without back, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Macedonian helmet (control symbol) left; Classical Numismatic Group auction 105 (10 May 2017), lot 78; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 46 (11 Sep 2016), lot 105 (realized €1,900 plus fees)Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Sicily, Syracuse, Second Democracy, 466 - 405 B.C.27 viewsSH86210. Silver tetradrachm, Boehringer Series XVIIa, 586 (V291/R396); SNG ANS 189 (same dies); McClean 2670 (same); Pozzi 582 (same); HGC 2 1313, gVF, fine style, lightly toned, well centered, tight flan as always for the type, light bumps and marks, light porosity, slight die shift on reverse, pre-strike casting sprue remnant, weight 16.999 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 135o, Syracuse mint, c. 440 - 430 B.C.; obverse Charioteer driving quadriga right, Nike flying right above crowning horses, ketos right in exergue; reverse ΣYPAKOΣON, head of Arethusa right, hair bound with wide taenia, four dolphins swimming around; ex CNG auction 102 (18 May 2016), lot 143; ex Allan Smith M.D. Collection; ex CNG auction 81 (20 May 2009), lot 162; rare; $3000.00Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Sicily, Syracuse, Deinomenid Tyranny, Time of Hieron, c. 478 - 467 B.C.32 viewsSH86274. Silver tetradrachm, Boehringer 338 (V166/R236); Randazzo 507 - 509 (same dies); SNG ANS -, gVF, fantastic style, toned, centered on a tight flan, small areas struck a little flat, marks, pre-strike flan casting sprues remaining (as usual for the type), weight 16.971 g, maximum diameter 29.0 mm, die axis 0o, Syracuse mint, c. 478 - 467 B.C.; obverse slow quadriga driven right by male charioteer, kentron in right hand, reigns in left hand, Nike above flying right crowning horses; reverse ΣVRA-KOS-I-ON (Latin R upside down, N reversed), Artemis-Arethusa right, archaic eye, hair slightly waved in front turned up in a krobylos under a diadem of beads, wearing earring and necklace, surrounded by four dolphins swimming clockwise; ex Roma Numismatics, auction 6 (29 Sep 2013), lot 441; ex Comery CollectionJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.25 viewsSH56812. Gold stater, Price 2633; Müller Alexander 30, aEF, rev die wear, fine style, Lydia, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, weight 8.597g, maximum diameter 17.0mm, die axis 180o, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, wearing necklace and pendant earring; reverse AΛEΞAN∆[POY], Nike standing half left, wreath in extended right, stylus in left, race torch left below wing, monogram off flan below right wing; a few small die breaks, lustrous fields, superb bust of AthenaJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great, Gold stater22 viewsSH09059. Gold stater, Thompson 164, EF, weight 8.50 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesus mint, posthumous, 305 - 297 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great right wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena seated left, resting elbow on shield and holding Victory, bee and E-Φ in left field; struck with beautiful dies, mint luster!Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Lysimachos Type, Gold stater22 viewsSH12093. Gold stater, SNG Cop 1089 var. (monogram), Choice EF, weight 8.232 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, Byzantium (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 100 - 85 B.C; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great (with the features of Mithradates VI), wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena enthroned left, holding Nike and resting left arm on shield, transverse spear against her side, BY on throne, AP monogram under right arm, trident and two dolphins in exergue; fantastic style with superb portrait of Mithradates as Alexander the Great!Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue, Gold stater30 viewsSH28064. Gold stater, Price 2084, Müller Alexander -, gVF, weight 8.578 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, 325 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet, thunderbolt below; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left holding wreath and ship's mast, H∆ monogram in lower right field; nicely centered; rare varietyJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Gold aureus18 viewsSH33105. Gold aureus, RIC II, part 1, 508; Calicó 884; BMCRE II -; BnF III -; Hunter I -; Cohen I -, VF, weight 7.392 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 87 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR·P VI, laureate head right; reverse IMP·XIIII COS XIII·CENS P·P·P·, Minerva standing left, helmeted and draped, thunderbolt in right hand, spear vertical behind in left hand, grounded shield at feet behind; ex Numismatik Lanz auction 144 lot 457; very rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Gold stater28 viewsSH50029. Gold stater, Price 1358, Müller Alexander 394, IGC EF45, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 328 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, hair in ringlets; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, foreparts of conjoined horses in left field, monogram below left wing; certified (slabbed) by ICGJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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PUNIC, Carthage, Zeugitana, c. 310 - 290 B.C., Electrum shekel15 viewsSH21941. Electrum shekel, Jenkins and Lewis 247 - 250, SNG Cop 137, SGCV II 6462, Choice gVF, a gem, weight 7.575 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Carthage mint, obverse head of Tanit left, wreathed in grain, wearing necklace and triple-drop earring, dot border; reverse horse standing right on double exergual line, pellet lower right, border of dots; excellent strike with dies of finest style; scarceJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Gold stater24 viewsSH33180. Gold stater, Price 2114b, Müller Alexander 577, Choice EF, weight 8.575 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, c. 311 - 305 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, hair in ringlets; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, KH monogram left, labrys lower rightJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.18 viewsSH48868. Gold stater, Price 177, Müller Alexander 196, gVF, weight 8.595 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, c. 330 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, kantharos left, ΛO monogram lower left; nice style, high relief, good strike, and mint lusterJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., Gold stater25 viewsSH54774. Gold stater, Price P203, Müller Alexander P116, aEF, weight 8.564 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 90o, Babylon mint, c. 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet ornamented with Griffin; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, facing head of Helios below left, [KY] below right; Struck under Archon, Dokimos, or Seleukos I, circa 323-318/7 BC.Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Phokaia, Ionia, c. 625 - 522 B.C., Electrum hekte23 viewsSH86204. Electrum hekte, Triton XVI, lot 464; Bodenstedt - (cf. Em. 1), aEF, well centered and struck, small edge cracks, weight 2.575 g, maximum diameter 10.3 mm, die axis 0o, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, c. 625/0 - 522 B.C.; obverse forepart of seal right, dolphin swimming downward behind, annulet or ring below; reverse irregular incuse square punch; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 40, lot 270; extremely rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.19 viewsSH30322. Gold solidus, RIC VIII Antioch 31, Choice EF, weight 4.540 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 340 - 350 A.D.; obverse FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIAE DD NN AVGG (victories of our two lord emperors), VOTIS XV MVLTIS XX within wreath, jewel at top, tied at the bottom, SMAN∆ in exergue; very rare (R3)Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Gold stater25 viewsSH33207. Gold stater, Price 2533, Müller Alexander 293, VF, weight 8.496 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 334 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, hair in ringlets; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, griffin head leftJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great, Gold stater24 viewsSH48867. Gold stater, Müller 162; SNG Cop 1086 ff. var. (monogram), EF, weight 8.544 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Byzantion (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, posthumous, c. 250 - 150 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great right wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena seated left, Victory in extended right, resting left elbow on shield, monogram inner left, BY on throne, trident in exergue ornamented with two small dolphins; extraordinary mint luster, high relief, nice style, fantastic coin!Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantius I, May 305 - 25 July 306 A.D., Gold aureus22 viewsSH08930. Gold aureus, RIC VI Antiochia 8; Calico 4833a; Depeyrot p. 139, 9/4; Cohen VII 145, aVF/VF, weight 5.29 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 293 - 295 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; reverse HERCVLI CONS CAES (Hercules protector of Caesar), Hercules standing facing, head left, leaning on club and holding apples, lion skin over shoulder, SMAΞ* in exergue; very rare (RIC rarity R4, Calico rarity R1), conservative Sear grading, traces of mounting at 12 o'clockJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Gold aureus16 viewsSH37595. Gold aureus, SRCV I 2418; RIC II part 1, Vesp. 365; Cohen I 120; BnF III 65, VF, nice high relief portrait, a few marks, weight 7.068 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT, laureate head right; reverse NEP RED, Neptune standing left, foot on globe, acrostolium in right hand, scepter in left handJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., Gold stater23 viewsSH50028. Gold stater, Thompson Philip 13; SNG ANS 318, NGC Choice Uncirculated, weight 8.58 g, Teos (near Sigacik, Turkey) mint, c. 323 - 316 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse charioteer driving biga right, holding kentron in right hand, reins in left, star and filleted branch below horses, ΦIΛIΠΠOY and spear head in exergue; certified (slabbed) by NGC Ch AU, Strike 4/5, Surface 3/5Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Gold aureus17 viewsSH54548. Gold aureus, Calico 405, RIC I 48, Cohen I 66, VF, hairline scratches, weight 7.420 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 64 - 65 A.D.; obverse NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse CONCORDIA AVGVSTVS (harmony of the Emperor), Concordia seated left, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left handJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C., Gold stater21 viewsSL57441. Gold stater, Le Rider 170 ff., SNG ANS 144 ff., ICG - AU55, Amphipolis mint, c. 340 - 328 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse charioteer in biga right, trident head below horses, ΦIΛIΠΠOY exergue; ICG certified (slabbed) about uncirculated; sharp, attractive fine style, bold high-reliefJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Ionia, c. 650 - 600 B.C., Striated Type, Electrum hekte, 1/3 stater21 viewsSH28071. Electrum hekte, 1/3 stater, Milesian standard; Weidauer 6, Traité I 12, SNGvA 1769, SNG Kayhan 680, Karwiese Artemision I.6, SNG Fitzwilliam -, Rosen -, Zhuyuetang -, VF, weight 2.373 g, maximum diameter 8.6 mm, Ionia, uncertain mint, c. 650 - 600 B.C.; obverse flattened striated surface; reverse two rough approximately square incuse punches; rare and importantJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Gold stater23 viewsSH59889. Gold stater, Price 164, Müller Alexander 2, SNG Cop 625, gVF, weight 8.593 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, possibly a lifetime issue, c. 325 - 320 B.C; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, fulmen (thunderbolt) in left field; ex CNG, auction 90, lot 441; high-relief and fine styleJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Gold aureus15 viewsSH63911. Gold aureus, RIC I 198; Lyon 68; Calicó 174a 174; BMC 498; Paris 1457. Cohen 39 (50 Fr.)., VF, ex jewelry, edge filed to make round for jewelry, weight 7.159 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon) mint, 8 - 7 B.C.; obverse AVGVSTVS DIVI F, laureate head right; reverse C CAES AVGVST, Caius Caesar galloping on horseback right, wearing bulla around neck, sword in right, shield in left, aquila between two signa in background to left; very rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C., Gold stater21 viewsSH70337. Gold stater, Le Rider 341 (D152/R260), SNG ANS 154, Choice gVF, attractive style, perfect centering, light marks, weight 8.513 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 270o, Amphipolis mint, c. 340 - 328 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse charioteer in biga right, trident head below horses, ΦIΛIΠΠOY exergueJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great, Gold stater26 viewsSH30334. Gold stater, apparently unpublished, Müller -, EF, weight 8.652 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great right wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena seated left, Victory in extended right, resting left elbow on shield, XA monogram left; sharp details with some luster, obverse slightly double-struck, ex Numismatica Ars Classica/NAC AG LondonJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Gold aureus14 viewsSH37558. Gold aureus, Giard Lyon, group 1, 143; RIC I 25 (R2); BMCRE I 30; SRCV I 1760; Calico 305d (S.1); Cohen 15; SRCV I 1760, Choice VF, weight 7.677 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 45o, Lugdunum (Lyon) mint, early 'plain' fine style, c. 15 - 18 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Pax (or Livia as Pax) seated right on chair with plain legs set on base, long scepter vertical behind in her right hand, branch in left hand, no footstool; a beautiful coin; rare (R2)Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Gold aureus14 viewsSH46937. Gold aureus, SRCV II 4027, RIC III 256b, Cohen II 996, BMCRE IV 863, gVF, a few light marks, weight 7.259 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 155 - 156 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P IMP II, laureate head right; reverse TR POT XIX COS IIII, Antoninus, togate, standing left extending globe in right. Excellent recognizable figure of Antoninus on the reverse!Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Gold aureus17 viewsSH51590. Gold aureus, RIC II 91, Cohen II 1092, Choice VF, weight 7.161 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 119 - 122 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse P M TR P COS III, Genius standing half-left, patera in right, ears of grain in left; attractive bust, ex Edgar L. OwenJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C., Gold stater24 viewsSH57285. Gold stater, Le Rider 339 (D62/R259), SNG ANS 144 ff., Choice aEF, weight 8.554 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, c. 340 - 328 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse charioteer in biga right, trident head below horses, ΦIΛIΠΠOY exergue; ex Harlan Berk, attractive style, perfect centeringJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Gold aureus15 viewsSH37562. Gold aureus, RIC I 164a, BMCRE I 443, Cohen I 132, SRCV I -, gF, weight 7.668 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 135o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 15 - 13 B.C.; obverse AVGVSTVS DIVI F, bare head right; reverse IMP X, two soldiers, each holding parazonium, offering branches to Augustus seated left on stool set on platform; light punch on reverse, ex jewelry; rare (R2)Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN IMPERATORS, Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C., Gold aureus16 viewsSH37593. Gold aureus, Crawford 466/1, Sydenham 1017, BMCRR 4050, Cohen 2, Julia 2, SRCV I 1395; Sear CRI 56; Calicó 37, gVF, weight 8.106 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, early 46 B.C.; obverse C•CAESAR COS TER, veiled head of Vesta right; reverse A•HIRTIVS•PR, emblems of the pontificate and augurship - jug between lituus to left, and axe to right; small scuff on obv, ex jewelry, ex CNG auction 166, lot 148Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C., Gold stater18 viewsSH68354. Gold stater, Le Rider p. 146 & pl. 58. 157 (D42/R112), SNG ANS 172 ff., SNG Cop 529, SNG Alpha Bank -, EF, perfect centering, weight 8.602 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Pella mint, posthumous, 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY (in exergue), charioteer driving biga right, kentron in right, reins in left, kantharos below; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 215, lot 758Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Gold stater22 viewsSH77066. Gold stater, Price 172, Müller 105, Choice aEF, mint luster, superb style, high relief, good strike, weight 8.580 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 270o, Macedonia, Amphipolis mint, c. 327 - 325 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left hand, trident-head downward (control symbol) in left field, struck during the lifetime of Alexander the Great.Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Metapontion, Lucania, Italy, 334 - 330 B.C., Gold 1/3 stater19 viewsSH86428. Gold 1/3 stater, SNG Lockett 406; SNG ANS 395; HN Italy 1578; Noe-Johnston 3, G1 and pl. 18; SNG Lloyd -; SNG Cop -; Jameson -; Gulbenkian -; Pozzi -; Weber -, aVF+, fine style, marks, reverse double struck, weight 2.574 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 180o, Metapontion mint, c. 334 - 332 B.C.; obverse head of Demeter right, wearing stephane and pendant earring; reverse METAΠON, barley stalk, bird right on leaf to right; ex Forum (2007), ex Christie's Auction (1993) ; very rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Gold aureus13 viewsSH21931. Gold aureus, RIC III 229 var., Cohen II 520 var., Choice gVF, weight 7.276 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 152 - 153 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XVI, laureate bust right, very slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse LIBERALITAS VII COS IIII, Lictor standing facing, head left, wearing cap and chlamys, fasces (rods bundled with an axe) in right, tessera in left; nice style, full circle centering on both obverse and reverse; very rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D., Mule with Constantius II Reverse, Gold solidus24 viewsSH24842. Gold solidus, Depeyrot p. 215, 6/5 (2 spec);obverse RIC VIII 74 / reverse Constantius II RIC VIII 71, Choice EF, full circle centering, weight 4.238 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 340 - 350 A.D.; obverse CONSTANS AVGVSTVS, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, all within wreath; reverse VICTORIAE DD NN AVGG (victories of our two lord emperors), two victories facing one another, holding wreath inscribed VOT XX MVLT XXX, TES in exergue, all in wreath; ex Harlan Berk; very rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Gold aureus18 viewsSH30618. Gold aureus, Giard Lyon, group 5, 151; RIC I 29 (R); BMCRE I 47; Calico 305c (S.3); Cohen 15; SRCV I 1760, gVF, attractive red tone, weight 7.709 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 135o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 36 - 37 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right, laurel wreath ties fall in small undulations (waves); reverse PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Pax (or Livia as Pax) seated right on chair with decorated legs, a single line below, long scepter vertical behind in her right hand, branch in left hand, feet on footstool; Ex-Bosco Reale Hoard, Pompeii 1898; rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Vitellius, 2 January - 20 December 69 A.D., Gold aureus13 viewsSH65988. Gold aureus, RIC I 94, BMCRE I 23, BnF III 54, Calicó 565, Cohen I 54 var. (branch in right hand), F, weight 7.029 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Apr - 20 Dec 69 A.D.; obverse A VITELLIVS GERM IMP AVG TR P, laureate head right; reverse L VITELLIVS COS III CENSOR, Lucius Vitellius (emperor's father) togate, seated left on curule chair, extending right, in left eagle-tipped scepter, feet on stool; very rare (RIC R2)Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Ptolemy I, Satrap of Egypt, 323 - 305 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great, Gold stater23 viewsSH68257. Gold stater, Svoronos 11, Price 3975, Müller Alexander 6, SNG Cop 643, EF, weight 8.554 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Egypt, Memphis mint, reign of Philip III, c. 323 - 316 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, hair in ringlets; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, thunderbolt left, small ∆I at feet on left; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 215, lot 775Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Gold aureus14 viewsSH24853. Gold aureus, BMCRE III p. 250, 84 note; RIC II 46 var. (bust right), Cohen 1368 var. (same), Choice VF, weight 7.124 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 118 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust left; reverse P M TR P COS II, Salus seated left, feeding snake coiled around altar, SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor) in exergue; ex Freeman and Sear; very rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Nero and Agrippina Junior, 55 A.D., Gold aureus14 viewsSH33183. Gold aureus, SRCV I 2042, BnF II 10, RIC I 6, BMCRE I 7, Cohen I 3, VF, scratches and dings, ex jewelry with mounting marks, weight 7.733 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, c. Jan - Nov 55 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD DIVI F CAES AVG GERM IMP TR P COS, conjoined bare headed busts of Nero and Agrippina Junior (draped) right; reverse AGRIPP AVG DIVI CLAVD NERONIS CAES MATER, seated statues of Divus Augustus and Claudius on car drawn to left by four elephants, EX S C in field; ex G. Marchesi collection (Bologna, c. 1990); rare (R3)Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Gold aureus19 viewsSH33184. Gold aureus, SRCV I 1831, RIC I 15, Cohen 34, BMCRE I 16, BnF II 30, VF, weight 7.644 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 225o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 41 - 42 A.D.; obverse TI CLAVD CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P, head right wearing oak wreath; reverse EX S C OB CIVES SERVATOS within Corona Civica, an oak wreath awarded "for saving the lives of citizens"; impressive portrait and attractive reddish tone, similar to that of the Boscoreale Hoard found near Pompeii, small spot of rim filing at 2:00, a few small scratches and dings; rare (R2)Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.42 viewsSH34690. Gold aureus, Calico 1309 var. (obv legend break), RIC II 70 var. (same plus portrait and spear vice scepter); BMC 117 - 118 var. (same); SRCV II -, VF, some circulation marks, weight 7.129 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 119 - 122 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HA-DRIANVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right from behind; reverse P M TR P COS III, Minerva standing facing, helmeted head left, long scepter in left hand, right hand pointing to Spanish olive tree on left, rabbit right at the base of the tree; ex Munzhandlung Basel, 6 March 1936 (Dr. H St. S & Prince Waldeck); very rare2 commentsJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Gold aureus24 viewsSH58612. Gold aureus, RIC IV 237; Calico 2517 (same dies); BMCRE V p. 361, 23 & pl. 53, 13 (same obv die); S 6229, aVF, weight 7.240 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 210 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XVIII COS III P P, Victory advancing right, head left, leading captive with right, trophy over shoulder in left; full circle centering on both obverse and reverse, ex Forum (2008), ex Harlan Berk, very conservative Sear grade; rare1 commentsJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Gold stater23 viewsSH32292. Gold stater, Price 898 var. (monogram; cf. Price 927 tetradrachm), EF, weight 8.443 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, c. 250 - 225 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse AΛEΞAN∆P[OY], Nike standing half left, wreath in extended right, stylus in left, KAΛ monogram to left; high relief, bold, mint luster and a rare variety, small scratch on reverseJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Gold aureus16 viewsSH37551. Gold aureus, SRCV I 1831, RIC I 15, Cohen I 34, BMCRE I 16, BnF II 30, Choice VF, weight 7.673 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 280o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 41 - 42 A.D.; obverse TI CLAVD CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P, head right wearing oak wreath; reverse EX S C OB CIVES SERVATOS within Corona Civica, an oak wreath awarded "for saving the lives of citizens"; fine style; rare (R2)Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Gold aureus14 viewsSH51587. Gold aureus, Calico 1333/1334b (same rev die), RIC II 77c, BMCRE III 133, Hill 232, cf. Cohen 1104, aEF, ex jewelry, weight 7.279 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, Rome mint, 119 - 122 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse P M TR P COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, shield at her side, Victory in right and vertical spear in left, shield bow and quiver behindJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Gold aureus13 viewsSH08970. Gold aureus, BMCRE VI p. 196, 812; RIC IV 251 var.; Calico 3133 (R2); Cohen IV 507 var.; SRCV II 7838, Choice EF, weight 5.61 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 231 A.D.; obverse IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG, laureate bust right with drapery on left shoulder; reverse PROVIDENTIA AVG (the foresight of the Emperor), Providentia (or Annona) standing left, holding stalks of grain over modius and anchor; Sear graded as "attractive EF and rare"; very rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Gold aureus15 viewsSH21696. Gold aureus, RIC I 27 (R2), BMCRE I 26, SRCV I 1833, VF, fantastic fine style, some light scratches and marks,, weight 7.620 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 90o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 44 A.D.; obverse TI CLAVD CAESAR AVG P M TR P IIII, laureate head right; reverse PACI AVGVSTAE, Pax-Nemesis, winged, advancing right, with left pointing winged caduceus down at snake, right holding out fold of drapery below chin; ex Pegasi; very rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C., Gold tetradrachm17 viewsSH24848. Gold tetradrachm, Svoronos 604; BMC Ptolemies p. 40, 4 - 5; SNG Cop 133; SGCV II 7790, superb aEF, weight 13.813 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 265 - 260 B.C.; obverse A∆EΛΦΩN, jugate busts of Ptolemy II Philadelphos, diademed and draped, and Arsinoe II, diademed and veiled, shield behind; reverse ΘEΩN, jugate busts of Ptolemy I Soter, diademed and wearing aegis, and Berenike I, diademed and veiledJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Gold aureus13 viewsSH30323. Gold aureus, RIC III 281c, Calico 1680, Cohen II 1032, BMCRE IV 912 var. (laureate head right), Choice aEF, weight 7.197 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 157 - 158 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P IMP II, laureate and draped bust left; reverse COS IIII, Victory walking left, extending wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand; superb high-relief bust, well centered, great style; rareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
30330p00.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Gold aureus17 viewsSH30330. Gold aureus, Calico 1026, RIC II 319, BMCRE III 569, Cohen II -, Choice EF, minor scratches, weight 7.355 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 116 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse FORT RED P M TR P COS VI P P S P Q R, Fortuna seated left on chair without back, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; well centered and struck on a full broad flan, nice styleJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius, Gold aureus20 viewsSH33181. Gold aureus, SRCV II 4553 (same dies), Cayon 1765 (same), RIC III AP356d, Cohen II 98, BMCRE IV AP398, Choice EF, Rome mint, weight 6.923g, maximum diameter 19.8mm, die axis 180o, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, diademed, draped and veiled bust left; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing left, torch in right hand, scepter in left hand; very light hairline scratches; ex Numismatik Lanz auction 135, lot 745 (misattributed); ex Goldberg Auction44, lot 3704 (ICG AU 50); hints of red toning, bold and beautiful, struck with elegant dies!; scarceJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Arsinoe II, Wife of Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C., Gold oktodrachm40 viewsSH24847. Gold oktodrachm, Svoronos 475; BMC Ptolemies p. 43, 10 and pl. VIII, 4; SGCV II 7768, gVF, weight 27.702 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, c. 253 - 246 B.C.; obverse diademed and veiled head or Arsinoe II right, K behind; reverse APΣINOHΣ ΦIΛA∆EΛΦOY, double cornucopia bound with fillet1 commentsJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Aurelian, August or September 270 - October or November 275 A.D., Gold aureus37 viewsSH24849. Gold aureus, MER-RIC 1584, Göbl MIR 127q, pl. 74 (O96/R298); BnF XII 424, pl. 13 (same dies); Estiot 1999-I 58 (same dies); RIC V 15, aEF, edge bump at 10 o'clock, weight 4.459 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 180o, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, issue 3, mid 272 – end 272; obverse IMP CL DOM AVRELIANVS P F AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right, wearing aegis across chest with small Medusa head in center; reverse VIRTVS AVG (the valor of the Emperor), Virtus, helmeted, cloaked, holding spear in right and trophy across left shoulder, walking right, captive before; ex Harlan Berk1 commentsJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.15 viewsSH24852. Gold aureus, RIC III 233e, Calico 1530 (same obv die), Cohen II 314, aEF, weight 7.0221 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 153 - 154 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XVII, laureate head left; reverse COS IIII, Antoninus Pius, togate, standing left, globe in extended right, scroll in left; superb obverse portrait, recognizable portrait on reverse, minor blemish on the second I on the reverse, ex Harlan Berk; scarceJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Gold aureus15 viewsSH30319. Gold aureus, Calico 1025a, RIC II 320, Cohen II 152, BMCRE III 576 var. (globe under bust), Choice aEF, weight 7.224 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 116 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC, laureate bust right, bare chest, wearing aegis visible front and back; reverse FORT RED P M TR P COS VI P P S P Q R, Fortuna seated left on chair without back, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; elegant bust type, nice style, excellent strike; very scarce;Joe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Gold aureus18 viewsSH30320. Gold aureus, Calico 655, BMCRE II 399, RIC II 297 corrected, Choice aEF, rev slightly flat, weight 7.277 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon) mint, 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III, laureate head right; reverse PACI AVGVSTI, Nemesis advancing right, winged, drawing drapery from top of gown with right, caduceus in left, snake at feet right; nice centering on a full flan; scarceJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Phokaia, Ionia, c. 521 - 478 B.C., Electrum hekte27 viewsSH86213. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt em. 32, 7 (d/γ); Weber III 5736 (= Bodenstedt 7); Boston MFA 1906, SNG Kayhan -; SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Ionia -, Rosen -, EF, superb archaic style, well struck, tight flan, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, weight 2.529g, maximum diameter 10.1mm, die axis 0o, c. 521 - 478 B.C.; obverse archaic style head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet, almond shaped eye, slight smile, long hair in rows of dots, dotted necklace, seal upward behind; reverse quadripartite incuse squareJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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GREEK, Mytilene, Lesbos, c. 521 - 478 B.C.34 viewsSH86292. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 13, SNGvA 1685, SNG Cop 301, Boston MFA 1679; BMC Lesbos p. 157, 20; HGC 6 938 (S), Choice EF, Mytilene mint, weight 2.547g, maximum diameter 10.3mm, die axis 0o, c. 521 - 478 B.C.; obverse roaring lion's head right; reverse incuse calf's head left1 commentsJoe SermariniJan 29, 2018
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Greek, Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 550 - 450 B.C., Electrum stater24 viewsSH86217. Electrum stater, Von Fritze I (Nomisma VII) 104 & pl. 3, 23; Boston MFA 1433; SNG BnF 245; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; BMC Mysia -, VF, tight flan, edge cracks, Kyzikos mint, weight 16.091g, maximum diameter 19.9mm, die axis 0o, c. 550 - 450 B.C.; obverse winged dog seated left, head turned back right, curved archaic wing, wearing collar, tunny fish below to left; reverse quadripartite incuse square; extremely rareJoe SermariniJan 28, 2018
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Tiberius Fourree Denarius35 viewsROMAN EMPIRE, Tiberius Fourree Denarius
PONTIF MAXIM - Livia, as Pax, holding branch and sceptre, seated right; plain legs to chair with double line below.
Lugdunum (Lyon) mint (18-35AD); 2.80g / 19mm / 360
Group 4, c. 18 - 35 A.D.
Obverse: Tiberius is depicted as an older man. One of the ribbons of Tiberius' laurel wreath falls over his neck.
Reverse: No base under the throne (just the single exergual line), Pax usually holds scepter (or rarely a reversed spear), her feet rest on a low footstool.
Aureus: Giard Lyon, Group 4, 149; RIC I 29 (R); BMCRE I 46; Calico 305b (S.1); Cohen 15; SRCV I 1760 - Rare
Denarius: Giard Lyon, Group 4, 150; RIC I 30 (C); BMCRE I 48; RSC II 16a; SRCV I 1763 - Common (approximately half of all Tiberius denarii are this type)
Joe SermariniJan 28, 2018
800px-StatuenMozia.jpg
Motya Charioteer marble sculpture32 viewsThe remarkable and exquisite Motya Charioteer marble sculpture found in 1979 is world famous and is on display at the local Giuseppe Whitaker museum.

Motya was an ancient and powerful city on an island off the west coast of Sicily, between Drepanum (modern Trapani) and Lilybaeum (modern Marsala). The island was renamed San Pantaleo in the 11th century by Basilian monks. It lies in the Stagnone Lagoon, and is within the comune of Marsala. The island is nearly 850 metres (2,790 ft) long and 750 metres (2,460 ft) wide, and about 1 kilometer (0.62 mi) (six stadia) from the mainland of Sicily. It was joined to the mainland in ancient times by an artificial causeway (paved road), by which chariots with large wheels could reach the town.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:StatuenMozia.jpg
Photo by: AEK
Released under the GNU Free Documentation License.
Joe SermariniJan 28, 2018
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Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.50 viewsStatue of a Hermes.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe SermariniAug 14, 2017
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Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.36 viewsStatue of a Hermes.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe SermariniAug 14, 2017
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Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.30 viewsStatue of Herakles.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe SermariniAug 14, 2017
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Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.34 viewsStatue of Athena.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe SermariniAug 14, 2017
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Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya. 33 viewsTyche
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe SermariniAug 14, 2017
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Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.35 viewsStatue of Serapis.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe SermariniAug 14, 2017
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Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya. 31 viewsHeroic statue of Hadrian.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe SermariniAug 14, 2017
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Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.34 viewsHeroic statue of Hadrian.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe SermariniAug 14, 2017
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Turkey, Ankara, The Temple of the Divine Augustus and Rome34 viewsThe Temple of the Divine Augustus and Rome in the centre of Ankara, which now stands besides a mosque. I was unable to get any closer due this being Ramazan, the area was cordoned off in preparation for iftar.

Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe SermariniAug 14, 2017
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Roman Empire, Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.80 viewsBillon centenionalis, unpublished obverse variant; cf. Bastien Lyon XIII, 155-6 and 159-61; RIC VII Lyons 202 - 204, gF, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, weight 3.451g, maximum diameter 18.8mm, die axis 0o, as caesar, 322 - 323 A.D.; obverse IVL CRISPVS NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust left, spear pointed forward in right, shield in left; reverse BEAT TRAN-Q-LITAS, globe on altar inscribed VOT/IS / XX in three lines, three stars above, PLG in exergue; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection

Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear. David Sear notes, "a previously unpublished variant of the series listed by Bastien (Le Monnayage de l'Atelier de Lyon) on pages 163 and 164, numbers 155-6 and 159-61 (cf. RIC vii, p. 134, 202-4)...good F, rare and interesting as an unpublished obverse variant."
1 commentsJoe SermariniJul 23, 2017
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Roman Empire, Clodius Albinus, AE as, RIC 61a var.61 viewsThe coin is known by one other example, sold by Sotheby's. This obverse legend with ALBIN undivided on the obverse is from one die out of the 9 known dies for the type. The coin is published in Curtis Clay's Oxford thesis.
Joe SermariniJul 23, 2017
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Apollo kitharoidos, Vatican Museum, a 2nd-century AD colossal marble statue by an unknown Roman sculptor.84 viewsAn Apollo Citharoedus is a statue or other image of Apollo with a Kithara (lyre). Among the best-known examples is this Apollo Citharoedus of the Vatican Museums, a 2nd-century AD colossal marble statue by an unknown Roman sculptor. Apollo is shown crowned with laurel and wearing the long, flowing robe of the Ionic bard. The statue was found in 1774, with seven statues of the Muses, in the ruins of Gaius Cassius Longinus' villa near Tivoli, Italy. The sculptures are preserved in the Hall of the Muses, in the Museo Pio-Clementino of the Vatican Museums. Joe SermariniMay 22, 2017
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Morocco, Lixus62 viewsLixus is the site of an ancient Roman city located in Morocco just north of the modern seaport of Larache on the bank of the Loukkos River. The location was one of the main cities of the Roman province of Mauretania Tingitana .

Ancient Lixus is located on Tchemmich Hill on the right bank of the Loukkos River (other names: Oued Loukous; Locus River), just to the north of the modern seaport of Larache. The site lies within the urban perimeter of Larache, and about three kilometers inland from the mouth of the river and the Atlantic ocean. From its 80 meters above the plain the site dominates the marshes through which the river flows. To the north, Lixus is surrounded by hills which themselves are bordered to the north and east by a forest of cork oaks.

Among the ruins there are Roman baths, temples, 4th century walls, a mosaic floor, a Christian church and the intricate and confusing remains of the Capitol Hill.

Lixus was first settled by the Phoenicians in the 7th century BC and was later annexed by Carthage. Lixus was part of a chain of Phoenician/Carthaginian settlements along the Atlantic coast of modern Morocco; other major settlements further to the south are Chellah (called Sala Colonia by the Romans) and Mogador. When Carthage fell to Ancient Rome, Lixus, Chellah and Mogador became imperial outposts of the Roman province Mauretania Tingitana.

The ancient sources agree to make of Lixus a counter Phoenician, which is confirmed by the archaeological discovery of material dating from 8th century BC. It gradually grew in importance, later coming under Carthaginian domination. After the destruction of Carthage, Lixus fell to Roman control and was made an imperial colony, reaching its zenith during the reign of the emperor Claudius I (AD 41-54).

Some ancient Greek writers located at Lixus the mythological garden of the Hesperides, the keepers of the golden apples. The name of the city was often mentioned by writers from Hanno the Navigator to the Geographer of Ravenna, and confirmed by the legend on its coins and by an inscription. The ancients believed Lixus to be the site of the Garden of the Hesperides and of a sanctuary of Hercules, where Hercules gathered gold apples, more ancient than the one at Cadiz, Spain. However, there are no grounds for the claim that Lixus was founded at the end of the second millennium BC.

Lixus flourished during the Roman Empire, mainly when Claudius established a Roman Colonia with full rights for the citizens. Lixus was one of the few Roman cities in Berber Africa that enjoyed an amphitheater: the amphitheater at Lixus. In the third century Lixus become nearly fully Christian and there are even now the ruins of a paleochristian church overlooking the archeological area. The Arab invasions destroyed the Roman city. Some berber life was maintained there nevertheless until one century after the Islamic conquest of North Africa by the presence of a mosque and a house with patio with the covered walls of painted stuccos.

The site was excavated continuously from 1948 to 1969. In the 1960s, Lixus was restored and consolidated. In 1989, following an international conference which brought together many scientists, specialists, historians and archaeologists of the Mediterranean around the history and archaeology of Lixus, the site was partly enclosed. Work was undertaken to study the Roman mosaics of the site, which constitute a very rich unit. In addition to the vestiges interesting to discover the such mosaics whose one of sixty meters representing Poseidon. Lixus was on a surface of approximately 75 hectares (190 acres). The excavated zones constitute approximately 20% of the total surface of the site.

This site was added to the UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List on July 1, 1995 in the Cultural category.
Joe SermariniDec 14, 2016
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Italy, Sicily, View of Solanto from the ruins of Soluntum (aka Solus, Solous, and Kefra)64 viewsView of Solanto from the ruins of Soluntum (aka Solus, Solous, and Kefra), Sicily

Solus (or Soluntum, near modern Solanto) was an ancient city on the north coast of Sicily, one of the three chief Phoenician settlements on the island, about 16 kilometers (10 miles) east of Panormus (modern Palermo). It lay 183 meters (600 ft) above sea level, on the southeast side of Monte Catalfano 373 meters (1,225 ft), in a naturally strong situation, and commanding a fine view. The date of its founding is unknown. Solus was one of the few colonies that the Phoenicians retained when they withdrew to the northwest corner of the island before the advance of the Greek colonies in Sicily. Together with Panormus and Motya, it allied with the Carthaginians. In 396 B.C. Dionysius took the city but it probably soon broke away again to Carthage and was usually part of their dominions on the island. In 307 B.C. it was given to the soldiers and mercenaries of Agathocles, who had made peace with the Carthage when abandoned by their leader in Africa. During the First Punic War it was still subject to Carthage, and it was not until after the fall of Panormus that Soluntum also opened its gates to the Romans. It continued to under Roman dominion as a municipal town, but apparently one of no great importance, as its name is only slightly and occasionally mentioned by Cicero. But it is still noticed both by Pliny and Ptolemy, as well as at a later period by the Itineraries. Its destruction probably dates from the time of the Saracens.

Excavations have brought to light considerable remains of the ancient town, belonging entirely to the Roman period, and a good deal still remains unexplored. The traces of two ancient roads, paved with large blocks of stone, which led up to the city, may still be followed, and the whole summit of Monte Catalfano is covered with fragments of ancient walls and foundations of buildings. Among these may be traced the remains of two temples, of which some capitals and portions of friezes, have been discovered. An archaic oriental Artemis sitting between a lion and a panther, found here, is in the museum at Palermo, with other antiquities from this site. An inscription, erected by the citizens in honor of Fulvia Plautilla, the wife of Caracalla, was found there in 1857. With the exception of the winding road by which the town was approached on the south, the streets, despite the unevenness of the ground, which in places is so steep that steps have to be introduced, are laid out regularly, running from east to west and from north to south, and intersecting at right angles. They are as a rule paved with slabs of stone. The houses were constructed of rough walling, which was afterwards plastered over; the natural rock is often used for the lower part of the walls. One of the largest of them, with a peristyle, was in 1911, though wrongly, called the gymnasium. Near the top of the town are some cisterns cut in the rock, and at the summit is a larger house than usual, with mosaic pavements and paintings on its walls. Several sepulchres also have been found.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soluntum

Photo by Allie Caulfield from Germany.
Joe SermariniJul 20, 2016
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Spain, Segobriga - Ampitheater49 viewsSegobriga is a former Roman city near Saelices, in the province of Cuenca in Spain. It is possibly one of the most important archaeological sites of the Spanish Meseta. The name Segóbriga derives from two words: "Sego" meaning victory and "briga" meaning city fortress. The translation would be "City of the Victory" or "Victorious City." The site includes an amphitheatre, theater, the city walls and gates, two thermal buildings or Roman baths, and the Forum. There is also a necropolis, and the circus (Roman race track) is being excavated - its outline can be seen from the top of the hill.

The Amphitheater, 75m long and of an irregular elliptic shape, is the biggest monument of Segóbriga and had capacity for 5,500

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seg%C3%B3briga_Circo_04_JMM.jpg
Joe SermariniJun 22, 2016
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Spain, Segobriga - Theater40 viewsSegóbriga is a former Roman city near Saelices, in the province of Cuenca in Spain. It is possibly one of the most important archaeological sites of the Spanish Meseta. The name Segóbriga derives from two words: "Sego" meaning victory and "briga" meaning city fortress. The translation would be "City of the Victory" or "Victorious City." The site includes an amphitheatre, theater, the city walls and gates, two thermal buildings or Roman baths, and the Forum. There is also a necropolis, and the circus (Roman race track) is being excavated - its outline can be seen from the top of the hill.

Construction of the theater began under the emperor Tiberius and was completed during the Flavian dynasty, circa AD 79. The orchestra had three tiers of seats for VIP's and is preserved together with seats for spectators divided into sections according to their social classes. The upper cavea was built on the city wall on a vault over a street

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Theater_Segobriga.jpg
Photographer: Art Davis
25 September 2011
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Joe SermariniJun 22, 2016
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Spain, Segobriga - Roman baths48 viewsSegóbriga is a former Roman city near Saelices, in the province of Cuenca in Spain. It is possibly one of the most important archaeological sites of the Spanish Meseta. The name Segóbriga derives from two words: "Sego" meaning victory and "briga" meaning city fortress. The translation would be "City of the Victory" or "Victorious City." The site includes an amphitheatre, theater, the city walls and gates, two thermal buildings or Roman baths, and the Forum. There is also a necropolis, and the circus (Roman race track) is being excavated - its outline can be seen from the top of the hill.

Roman Baths: The monumental baths were not only for hygienic reasons but also for social and business purposes.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seg%C3%B3briga_Termas_JMM.jpg
Joe SermariniJun 22, 2016
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Roman Empire, Otho, Denarius CERES AVG 109 viewsSH79667. Silver denarius, Muona Otho 10b; Butcher-Ponting-Muona 6; ANSCD 1958.217.1; BnF III 1; RIC I 1 (7 spec. known, all minted with the same die-pair), Nice VF, the best portrait and most attractive of the seven known specimens, light rose toning, a few light marks and spots of porosity, Rome mint, weight 3.272g, maximum diameter 17.5mm, die axis 180o, 9 Mar - 17 Apr 69 A.D.; obverse IMP OTHO CAESAR AVG TRP, bare head right; reverse CERES AVG, Ceres standing left, grain-ears raised in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Jyrki Muona Collection

This is the rarest Otho denarius type and one of the rarest 1st century Roman denarii. Only two museums, Paris and ANS, hold examples. A further specimen was found in archeological context in Denmark in 1990s. Besides these, four additional specimens are known. This coin has the best portrait and is clearly the most attractive of the seven known. Jyrki Muona obtained it in 2002 at the NYINC from Glenn Woods.

Otho minted three separate issues. The first and second issues followed Galba's standard of 90% silver. Otho's third issue was debased to 80% silver. All coins of the third issue share the reverse legend PONT MAX, perhaps to make it easy to distinguish the debased coins. One might think our rare coin is simply a reverse legend error for Otho's third issue, PONT MAX Ceres type. However, as Butcher et al. have shown, this is not the case. If CERES AVG was a simple reverse legend error, the flan would be 80% silver. This CERES AVG type was struck on second issue 90% silver flans, probably during planning for the third issue, and perhaps only for testing. The type was apparently not distributed, and was withdrawn, and melted when it was decided to debase the coinage and use the PONT MAX legend. It appears a small number were released, most likely by mistake.
4 commentsJoe SermariniJun 11, 2016
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Turkey, Yakapinar (Mopsos) - Mosaics depicting Noah's Ark in the Misis Mosaic Museum126 viewsMosaics depicting Noah's Ark from ancient Mopsos in the Misis Mosaic Museum.1 commentsJoe SermariniMay 28, 2016
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Turkey, Misis, Roman bridge over the Pyramus39 viewsRoman bridge in Misis-Mopsuestia over the Pyramus. Constantius II built this magnificent bridge over the Pyramus (Malalas, Chronographia, XIII; P.G., XCVII, 488) afterwards it was restored by Justinian (Procopius, De Edificiis, V. 5) and it has been restored again recently. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mopsuestia Joe SermariniMay 28, 2016
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Germany, Berlin, The propylon of the Sanctuary of Athena Nikephoros from the Pergamon Acropolis, Pergamon Museum Berlin123 viewsThe monumental gateway, which stood at the northeast corner of the sanctuary, was built by Eumenes II in the early 2nd century BC. The two-storey building, had a porch of four Doric columns (tetrastyle) on the ground floor, above which was a dedicatory inscription by Eumenes to Athena Nikephoros. The upper storey was a balcony with four Ionic columns and fronted by a military frieze depicting armour and weapons. The Sanctuary of Athena Nikephoros, on the southwest corner of the walled citadel on the Acropolis, was one of Pergamon's oldest religious centres, used for the worship of Athena and Nike. The cult of Athena at Pergamon had associations with the city's mythical founder Telephos, the son of Herakles and Auge, who was a priestess of Athena. The Attalid rulers of Pergamon claimed to be descendants of Telephos, and thus of Herakles and Auge.Joe SermariniApr 13, 2016
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Turkey, Elaioussa Sebaste, Islands off Cilicia, Theater68 viewsElaiussa, meaning olive, was founded in the 2nd century B.C. on a tiny island attached to the the southern coast of Anatolia (in modern-day Turkey) by a narrow isthmus in Mediterranean Sea. During the reign of Augustus, the Cappadocian king Archelaus founded a new city on the isthmus. Archelaus called it Sebaste, which is the Greek equivalent word of the Latin "Augusta." The city entered a golden age when Vespasian purged Cilicia of pirates in 74 A.D. Towards the end of the 3rd century A.D. however its importance began to wane, due in large part to incursions by the Sassanian King Shapur I in 260 and later by the Isaurians. When its neighbor Corycus began to flourish in the 6th century A.D., Elaiussa Sebaste slowly disappeared from history.

The theater, dating to the 2nd century A.D., is small with only 23 rows of seats, whose steps and decorations unfortunately succumbed to centuries of plunder. Next to the theater is the agora, built in all great probability during the imperial period. At the entrance of the agora, which is surrounded by a semi-destroyed defense wall once rose two monumental fountains in the shape of lions. Inside the agora stands a large church, its floor is covered by sand to protect the mosaic pavement. Elaiussa's only temple stands outside the city on a hill overlooking the sea; only two of the Corinthian columns of this temple, which had 12 on the long and 6 on the short side originally, are standing today. A large bath complex among the lemon groves between the temple and the agora was built with a Roman technique little used in Anatolia. The necropolis is the richest and most impressive of cities of ancient Cilicia. The "Avenue of Graves," located on a hill to the north of the city, preserves close to a hundred graves of various shapes and sizes scattered among the lemon trees. The ancient aqueducts that carried water to the ruins from the Lamos ("Lemon") river also adorn the city’s two entrances. The aqueduct to the west of the city in particular is in relatively good condition. Centuries ago the aqueduct actually ran all the way to Corycus.
Joe SermariniOct 23, 2015
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Turkey, Kursunlutepe - ancient Skepsis, Troas 71 viewsView of the village of Kurşuntepe from the highest point of the site of ancient Skepsis.

Skepsis or Scepsis, an ancient settlement in the Troad, is today the village of Kursunlutepe, near the town of Bayramic in Turkey. The famous library of Aristotle was kept at Skepsis before being moved to Pergamum and then Alexandria. It was also home to Metrodorus of Scepsis and Demetrius of Scepsis. Several times in its history, the citizens of Skepsis were forced to move elsewhere. In 306 B.C., Antigonus evacuated Skepsis and other cities in the area and forced the residents to move to Alexandria Troas. Tradition holds that Saint Cornelius the Centurion, the first Gentile convert to Christianity, became the first bishop of Skepsis in the early days of Christianity.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skepsis
Joe SermariniOct 22, 2015
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Syria, The Great Colonnade at Apamea118 viewsApamea, on the right bank of the Orontes River, was a treasure city and stud-depot of the Seleucid kings, and was the capital of Apamene. Its site is found about 55 km (34 mi) to the northwest of Hama, Syria, overlooking the Ghab valley.

Previously known as Pharmake, it was fortified and enlarged by Seleucus I Nicator in 300 B.C., who so named it after his Bactrian wife, Apama. The fortress was placed upon a hill; the windings of the Orontes, with the lake and marshes, gave it a peninsular form. Seleucus had his commissariat there, 500 elephants, with 30,000 mares, and 300 stallions. The pretender, Diodotus Tryphon, made Apamea the basis of his operations.

Josephus relates, that Pompey marching south from his winter quarters, probably at or near Antioch, razed the fortress of Apamea in 64 B.C. and the city was annexed to the Roman Republic. In the revolt of Syria under Q. Caecilius Bassus, it held out against Julius Caesar for three years till the arrival of Cassius, 46 B.C.
Located at a strategic crossroads for Eastern commerce, the city flourished to the extent that its population eventually numbered half a million. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. The city boasted one of the largest theaters in the Roman world, and a monumental colonnade.

On the outbreak of the Jewish War, the inhabitants of Apamea spared the Jews who lived in their midst, and would not suffer them to be murdered or led into captivity.
Destroyed by Chosroes I in the 6th century, it was partially rebuilt and known in Arabic as Famia, and destroyed by an earthquake in 1152. In the Crusades it was still a flourishing and important place and was occupied by Tancred.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apamea,_Syria

The ancient city has been damaged as a result of the ongoing civil war in Syria.
Joe SermariniOct 14, 2015
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Trophy of Arms from Trajan's Column97 viewsTrajan’s Column, located in Trajan's Forum, built near the Quirinal Hill, north of the Roman Forum, was dedicated on 12 May 113. The freestanding column is most famous for its spiral bas relief, which artistically describes the epic wars between the Romans and Dacians (101 - 102 and 105 - 106). The relief includes about 2,500 figures and winds 23 times around the shaft for a total length of about 200 meters. The height of the relief increases towards the top of the Column (0.89 m to 1.25 m) with a corresponding increase in the heights of individual figures from c. 60 cm to 80 cm in height. Inside the shaft, a spiral staircase of 185 steps provides access to a viewing platform at the top. Ancient coins indicate preliminary plans to top the column with a statue of a bird, probably an eagle, but after construction, a statue of Trajan was put in place; this statue disappeared in the Middle Ages. On December 4, 1587, the top was crowned by Pope Sixtus V with a bronze figure of St. Peter, which remains to this day.Joe SermariniOct 13, 2015
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Victory Inscribing Shield - From Trajan's Column84 viewsTrajan’s Column, located in Trajan's Forum, built near the Quirinal Hill, north of the Roman Forum, was dedicated on 12 May 113. The freestanding column is most famous for its spiral bas relief, which artistically describes the epic wars between the Romans and Dacians (101 - 102 and 105 - 106). The relief includes about 2,500 figures and winds 23 times around the shaft for a total length of about 200 meters. The height of the relief increases towards the top of the Column (0.89 m to 1.25 m) with a corresponding increase in the heights of individual figures from c. 60 cm to 80 cm in height. Inside the shaft, a spiral staircase of 185 steps provides access to a viewing platform at the top. Ancient coins indicate preliminary plans to top the column with a statue of a bird, probably an eagle, but after construction, a statue of Trajan was put in place; this statue disappeared in the Middle Ages. On December 4, 1587, the top was crowned by Pope Sixtus V with a bronze figure of St. Peter, which remains to this day.Joe SermariniOct 13, 2015
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Iran, Hamadan, the tomb of the biblical Esther and her cousin Mordechai62 viewsThe tomb in the photo, located in Hamadan, is believed by some to hold the remains of the biblical Esther and her cousin Mordechai.

Hamedan, Iran, is believed to be among the oldest cities in the world. Hamadan was established by the Medes and was the capital of the Median empire. It then became one of several capital cities of the Achaemenid Dynasty. Hamadan is mentioned in the biblical book of Ezra as the place where a scroll was found giving the Jews permission from King Darius to rebuild the temple in Jerusalem. (Ezra 6:2). Its ancient name of Ecbatana is used in the Ezra text. Because it was a mile above sea level, it was a good place to preserve leather documents.
Joe SermariniSep 23, 2015
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Israel, Legionary Camp of X Fretensis at Masada122 viewsRemnants of one of several legionary camps of X Fretensis at Masada in Israel, just outside the circumvallation wall which can be seen at the bottom of the image.

Masada Roman Ruins by David Shankbone.

Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Masada_Roman_Ruins_by_David_Shankbone.jpg#/media/File:Masada_Roman_Ruins_by_David_Shankbone.jpg
Joe SermariniAug 14, 2015
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Probus Stlyes Montage363 viewsmaridvnvm posted this on the discussion board July 17, 2006:

One of my specialist areas is Probus and I thought I would share a little montage that I have put together. We must remember that stylistic changes occur within a mint over the time of a single emperor as well as between mints and it is often necessary to become as familiar as we can with these style differences to be able to determine the correct mint placement for some coins.

Here are some Bust Type Cs (Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right (seen from the rear)) for arrange of mints under Probus including some examples from different periods of output from these mints where I have examples to show. I hope it is evident that there are marked differences to be seen between the mints but also within a single mint just for this short period of production. I have taken a random sample of coins and there are different styles notable between dies from the same period but they are all generally evident that they come from a particular mint at a particular period.

The output of Antioch and Tripolis are notably more crude and eccentric than the output of the other mints,

Similar stylistic differences can be seen for the other

Regards,
Martin
3 commentsJoe SermariniJul 24, 2015
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Hercules of the Forum Boarium171 viewsHercules of the Forum Boarium is a gilded 2nd century B.C. slightly over-lifesize bronze statue, which was found in the Forum Boarium in Rome. This statue is probably the one mentioned by Pliny, which originally stood in the Temple of Hercules Victor, by the Tiber. It lacks the lion skin. Perhaps a actual lion skin was once draped on it. The sculpture is now in the Musei Capitolini, Rome.1 commentsJoe SermariniJul 23, 2015
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Hercules of the Theatre of Pompey174 viewsThe Hercules of the Theatre of Pompey, from the 2nd Century A.D., was discovered in 1864. It had been carefully buried under protective tiles, incised FCS (fulgor conditum summanium), indicating that it had been struck by lightning, and had been carefully interred on the spot. The figure supports himself lightly on his grounded vertical club; the skin of the Nemean Lion is draped over his left forearm, he holds the apples of Hesperides in his left hand. The sculpture is now in the round room area of Museo Pio-Clementino.2 commentsJoe SermariniJul 23, 2015
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Seuthes III Bronze Head (Reproduction)124 viewsThe bronze head of Seuthes III was found ritually buried outside his tomb at Kazanlak. The photo is of a reproduction made to look as the head would have looked new. The actual bronze head is in remarkable similar condition with a slightly rougher greener patina and the eyes are plain green bronze.1 commentsJoe SermariniMar 16, 2015
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Italy, Rome, Temple of Vesta in the Forum Romanum.73 viewsTemple of Vesta in the Forum Romanum in Rome. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_of_Vesta. All temples to Vesta were round, and had entrances facing east to symbolize connection between Vesta’s fire and the sun as sources of life. The Temple of Vesta represents the site of ancient cult activity as far back as 7th century BCE. Numa Pompilius is believed to have built this temple along with the original Regia and House of the Vestal Virgins in its original form. Around the Temple stood The Sacred Grove, in which also there was a graveyard for the priests and virgins. It was one of the earliest structures located in the Roman Forum although its present reincarnation is the result of subsequent rebuilding. Instead of a cult statue in the cella there was a hearth which held the sacred flame. The temple was the storehouse for the legal wills and documents of Roman Senators and cult objects such as the Palladium. The Palladium was a statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) believed to have been brought by Aeneas from Troy; the statue was felt to be one of the Pignora Imperii, or pledges of imperium, of Ancient Rome. According to Dionysius of Halicarnassus, the Romans believed that the Sacred fire of Vesta was closely tied to the fortunes of the city and viewed its extinction as a portent of disaster. The sacred flame was put out in 394 by Theodosius I after he won the Battle of the Frigidus, defeating Eugenius and Arbogast. The Temple of Vesta remained reasonably intact until the Renaissance. However, in 1549 the building was completely demolished and its marble reused in churches and papal palaces. The section standing today was reconstructed in the 1930s during the dictatorship of Benito Mussolini.

By Wknight94, 26 April 2008. Source:
Joe SermariniFeb 19, 2015
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Turkey, Perge city overview115 viewsRoman rule of Perge began in 188 BC, and most of the surviving ruins today date from this period. After the collapse of the Roman Empire, Perge remained inhabited until Seljuk times, before being gradually abandoned.

Source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Perge_city_overview.jpg
Joe SermariniJan 19, 2015
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Turkey, Priene, The Temple of Athena at Priene94 viewsThe Temple of Athena at Priene was started by Mausolus but completed by Alexander the Great, who hired the great Greek architect Pytheos to complete the design and construction. It is the largest temple in Priene. Pytheos situated the temple so that it had (and still has) a beautiful view over the valley and river below Alexander the Great invested heavily into rebuilding all of the Greek cities of the Ionic league following the defeat of the Persians. This classic Greek temple was done in the Ionic style and had no frieze around the top. Instead, a dentil design sat above the columns and architrave. The statue of Athena that was originally inside the temple was based on the famous statue by Phidias in the Parthenon of Athens.Joe SermariniDec 20, 2014
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Italy, National Museum Naples, Marble bust of Hannibal from Capua85 viewsA marble bust, reputedly of Hannibal, originally found at the ancient city-state of Capua in Italy (some historians are uncertain of the authenticity of the portrait). From Phaidon Verlag (Wien-Leipzig) - "Römische Geschichte", gekürzte Ausgabe (1932). Author died more than 70 years ago - public domain.Joe SermariniDec 14, 2014
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Rome, Vatican Museum, Base of the Column of Antoninus Pius 117 viewsRome, gardens of the Vatican Museums, the base of the Antonine Column from Campo Marzio: the winged genius door between the gods Antoninus Pius and Faustina Annia deified; left, the genius of the Campus Martius, with the obelisk of Augustus; right, the goddess Roma. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Column_of_Antoninus_PiusJoe SermariniDec 02, 2014
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Italy, Rome, Curia Iulia, Forum Romanum123 viewsCuria Julia (Latin: Curia Iulia, Italian: Curia Iulia) is the third named Curia, or Senate House, in the ancient city of Rome. It was built in 44 BC when Julius Caesar replaced Faustus Cornelius Sulla’s reconstructed Curia Cornelia, which itself had replaced the Curia Hostilia. Caesar did this in order to redesign both spaces within the Comitium and Forum Romanum. The alterations within the Comitium reduced the prominence of the senate and cleared the original space. The work, however, was interrupted by Caesar's assassination at the Theatre of Pompey where the Senate had been meeting temporarily while the work was completed. The project was eventually finished by Caesar’s successor Augustus in 29 BC. The Curia Julia is one of only a handful of Roman structures to survive to the modern day mostly intact, due to its conversion into the basilica of Sant'Adriano al Foro in the 7th century and several later restorations. However the roof, together with the upper elevations of the side walls and rear façade, are modern. These parts date from the remodeling of the deconsecrated church in the 1930s.Joe SermariniSep 12, 2014
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Italy, Rome, Flavian Palace - Domus Flavia (and Circo Massimo)139 viewsThe Flavian Palace, also known as Domus Flavia, is a part of the vast residential complex of the Roman Emperors on the Palatine Hill in Rome. It was completed in 92 AD in the reign of Titus Flavius Domitianus, more commonly known as the Emperor Domitian, and attributed to his master architect, Rabirius. Well known for its grandeur, the Flavian Palace was more commonly used for purposes of state, while the Domus Augustana, an enormous, lavishly ornamented palace south of the Flavian Palace, was the Emperor’s primary residence.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flavian_Palace

by Doug Coldwell
Joe SermariniSep 12, 2014
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Syria, The Roman theater of Gabalah (Jableh, Syria)106 viewsJableh (Arabic: جبلة‎ Ǧabla), also spelt Jebleh, Jabala, Jablah or Gabala, is a coastal city on the Mediterranean in Syria, 25 km north of Baniyas and 25 km south of Latakia, with c. 80,000 inhabitants (2008). In antiquity Jableh was an important Roman city, one of the main remains of this period is an amphitheater, capable of housing c. 7,000 spectators. Near the seashores even older remains were found dating to the Iron Age or Phoenician Era. Less than 1 kilometer of the city center lies the ancient site of Gibala, today known as Tell Tweini. This city was inhabited from the third millennium BCE until the Persian period. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JablehJoe SermariniAug 28, 2014
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England, Colchester, Balkerne Gate280 viewsBalkerne Gate, Colchester. The largest Roman arch in Britain. Colchester and its wall were rebuilt by the Romans after Queen Boudica led a rebellion in AD 60 and detroyed the town. Image source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CamulodunumJoe SermariniAug 13, 2014
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Turkey, Nymphaeum of Perge240 viewsThe monumental fountain or nymphaeum of Perga consists of a wide pool, and behind it a two-storeyed richly worked facade. From its inscription, it is apparent that the structure was dedicated to Artemis Pergaia, Septimius Severus, his wife Julia Domna, and their sons. An inscription belonging to the facade, various facade fragments, and marble statues of Septimius Severus and his wife, all found in excavations of the nymphaeum, are now in the Antalya Museum.1 commentsJoe SermariniJul 21, 2014
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Turkey, Hadrian's Gate in Antalya126 viewsHadrian's Gate in Antalya
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antalya
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Ingo Mehling - 17 May 2012
Joe SermariniJun 07, 2014
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Croatia, Ruins of the amphitheater of Solin175 viewsRuins of the amphitheater of Salona, Dalmatia (Solin, Croatia). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solin,_CroatiaJoe SermariniJun 02, 2014
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Croatia, Salona (Solin) - Baths173 viewsSalona (Solin), Croatia - Baths. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solin,_CroatiaJoe SermariniJun 02, 2014
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Italy, Port facilities of Sybaris131 viewsExcavated remains of the port facilities of Sybaris. These are located on the Casa Bianca site in the easternmost section of the Sybaris archaeological park. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sybaris_port_facilities.jpgJoe SermariniJun 01, 2014
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Tyche of Antioch225 viewsThe Tyche of Antioch was a cult statue of the city goddess (fortune) of Antioch, venerated in a temple called the Tychaion. The statue was made by Eutychides of Sicyon (c. 335 - c. 275), a pupil of the great Lysippus. It was the best-known piece of Seleucid art, remarkable because it was sculpted to be viewed from all directions, unlike many statues from the period. Although the original has been lost, many copies exist, including the one in the photograph right, now at the Vatican. The goddess is seated on a rock (Mount Sipylus), has her right foot on a swimming figure (the river Orontes), wears a mural crown (the city’s walls), and has grain in her right hand (the city's fertility).2 commentsJoe SermariniApr 29, 2014
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Turkey, Cilicia, Olba, Temple of Zeus230 viewsPhoto by Klaus-Peter Simon 1995. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olba_(ancient_city)Joe SermariniApr 29, 2014
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Italy, Rome, The Column of Focas277 viewsThe Column of Phocas at Rome was erected before the Rostra and dedicated to the Emperor on 1 August 608. It was the last addition made to the Forum Romanum. The Corinthian column has a height of 13.6 m (44 ft). Both the column and the marble socle were recycled from earlier use. It still stands in its original location. An English translation of the inscription follows: To the best, most clement and pious ruler, our lord Phocas the perpetual emperor, crowned by God, the forever august triumphator, did Smaragdus, former praepositus sacri palatii and patricius and Exarch of Italy, devoted to His Clemency for the innumerable benefactions of His Piousness and for the peace acquired for Italy and its freedom preserved, this statue of His Majesty, blinking from the splendor of gold here on this tallest column for his eternal glory erect and dedicate, on the first day of the month of August, in the eleventh indiction in the fifth year after the consulate of His Piousness. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Column_of_Phocas. Image released to public domain.Joe SermariniApr 16, 2014
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Israel, The Dome of the Rock on the Temple Mount in the Old City of Jerusalem170 viewsPhoto by Andrew Shiva.Joe SermariniApr 15, 2014
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Libya, The theatre of the Roman city of Sabratha172 viewsPhoto made by the author (duimdog) of the theatre of the Roman city of Sabratha in Libya. For more images of Sabratha See also my Sabratha photoset on Flickr.Source: http://flickr.com/photos/duimdog/127614169/in/set-72057594105577693/

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Joe SermariniApr 13, 2014
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Divus Romulo Mausoleum174 viewsThe ruin of the sepulcher of Divus Romulus (died 209 A.D.), the son of Emperor Maxentius, is situated in a large quadrilateral enclosure forming part of the villa of Maxentius, on the Appian way, about one mile from the gate of S. Sebastian. The building is sometimes erroneously called the stables of the Circus of Caracalla.Joe SermariniMar 11, 2014
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The Temple of Divus Romulus on the Via Sacra Adjoining the Basilica Maxentius129 viewsLeft unfinished at the time of the usurper Maxentius' downfall in AD 312, both structures were completed under Constantine, the temple presumably was dedicated to the founder of the city rather than to Maxentius' son. Joe SermariniMar 11, 2014
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Turkey, Ruins of the main street in Perga, capital of Pamphylia, Asia Minor.152 viewshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pamphylia. 23 February 2006. Joe SermariniFeb 07, 2014
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Bulgaria, Varna - Odessos, Thrace Roman Baths314 viewsOdessus, Thrace, first included into the Roman Praefectura orae maritimae and then in 15 CE annexed to the province of Moesia (later Moesia Inferior), covered 47 hectares in present-day central Varna and had prominent public baths, Thermae, erected in the late 2nd century AD, now the largest Roman remains in Bulgaria (the building was 100 m (328.08 ft) wide, 70 m (229.66 ft) long, and 25 m (82.02 ft) high) and fourth-largest known Roman baths in Europe. Joe SermariniJan 28, 2014
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Barberini Faun (Drunken Satyr) located in the Glyptothek in Munich, Germany223 viewsThe life-size marble statue known as the Barberini Faun or Drunken Satyr is located in the Glyptothek in Munich, Germany. A Faun is the Roman equivalent of a Greek Satyr. In Greek mythology, satyrs were human-like male woodland spirits with several animal features, often a goat-like tail, hooves, ears, or horns. Satyrs attended Dionysus. The position of the right arm over the head was a classical artistic convention indicating sleep. The statue is believed to have once adorned Hadrian's Mausoleum. The historian Procopius recorded that during the siege of Rome in 537 the defenders had hurled down upon the Goths the statues adorning Hadrian's Mausoleum. When discovered, the statue was heavily damaged; the right leg, parts of both hands, and parts of the head were missing. Johann Winckelmann speculated that the place of discovery and the statue's condition suggested that it had been such a projectile.
Joe SermariniJan 24, 2014
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Italy, Sicily, Agrigento, Temple of Concordia218 viewsDue to its good state of preservation, the Temple of Concordia is ranked amongst the most notable edifices of the Greek civilization existing today. It has a peristatis of 6 x 13 columns built over a basement of 39.44 x 16.91 m; each Doric column has twenty grooves and a slight entasis, and is surmounted by an architrave with triglyphs and metopes; also perfectly preserved are the tympani. The cella, preceded by a pronaos, is accessed by a single step; also existing are the pylons with the stairs which allowed to reach the roof and, over the cella's walls and in the blocks of the peristasis entablature, the holes for the wooden beam of the ceiling. The exterior and the interior of the temple were covered by polychrome stucco. The upper frame had gutters with lion-like protomes, while the roof was covered by marble tiles.

When the temple was turned into a church the entrance was moved to the rear, and the rear wall of the cella was destroyed. The spaces between the columns were closed, while 12 arched openings were created in the cella, in order to obtain a structure with one nave and two aisles. The pagan altar was destroyed and sacristies were carved out in the eastern corners. The sepultures visible inside and outside the temple date to the High Middle Age.
2 commentsJoe SermariniJan 24, 2014
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Italy, Sicily, Agrigento, Valley of the Temples117 viewsThe Valle dei Templi (English: Valley of the Temples, Sicilian: Vaddi di li Tempri) is an archaeological site in Agrigento (ancient Greek Akragas), Sicily, southern Italy. It is one of the most outstanding examples of Greater Greece art and architecture, and is one of the main attractions of Sicily as well as a national monument of Italy. The area was included in the UNESCO Heritage Site list in 1997. Much of the excavation and restoration of the temples was due to the efforts of archaeologist Domenico Antonio Lo Faso Pietrasanta (1783–1863), who was the Duke of Serradifalco from 1809 through 1812.

The term "valley" is a misnomer, the site being located on a ridge outside the town of Agrigento.
Joe SermariniJan 24, 2014
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Italy, Sicily, Agrigento - Temple of Juno Lacinia130 viewsThis temple was constructed on a mostly artificial spur. It dates to c. 450 BC, measuring 38.15 x 16.90 m: it is in Doric style, peripteros 6 columns wide by 13 long, preceded by a pronaos and opisthodomos. The basement has four steps.

Current remains (including anastylosis from the 18th Century onwards) consist of the front colonnade with parts of the architrave and of the frieze. Only fragments of the other three sides survive, with few elements of the cella. The building was damaged in the fire of 406 BC and restored in Roman times, with the substitution of clay marble roof tiles with ones and the addition of a steep rise in the area where today can be seen the remains of the altar.

Nearby are arcosolia and other sepultures from Byzantine times, belonging to the late 6th century AD renovation of the Temple of Concordia into a Christian church.
Joe SermariniJan 24, 2014
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Bulgaria, Anchialos (Pomorie) Thracian Tomb307 viewsPomorie's ancient Thracian tombJoe SermariniJan 19, 2014
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Turkey, Erythrai amphitheatre123 viewsErythrai amphitheatre ruins in Turkey, 2009.Joe SermariniDec 20, 2013
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Italy, Palestrina, Ruins of the Sanctuary of Fortuna Primigenia146 viewshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PalestrinaJoe SermariniDec 18, 2013
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Greece, Didyma, The ruins of the Temple of Apollo at Didyma259 viewshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Didyma2 commentsJoe SermariniDec 16, 2013
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Claudius Gothicus Antoninianus: Rome or Antioch? 191 viewsCurtis Clay posted on the discussion board: A. Markl, Mints and Issues of Claudius Gothicus (in German), Num. Zeitschrift 16, 1884, notes that Antioch and Rome share the same officina marks and some of the same rev. types, but the marked coins are easily separated, since Antioch always has obv. leg. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG and officina letter IN EXERGUE, whereas Rome-mint coins with letters in exergue only began in Issue 3 with shortened obv. leg. IMP CLAVDIVS AVG.

Moreover Rome and only Rome usually writes IIIIIP for IMP in obv. leg. (your coin has more IVI for the M, which Markl says also occurs at Antioch).

Finally Antioch coins "are usually on nicely rounded flans and are struck in better billon than the antoniniani of other mints, and are also found more often with an intact silver coating."

Markl, a retired army officer, was a specialist collector of Claudius and the first man to clearly distinguish the different mints of the antoniniani and to put the production of each mint in approximate chronological order.
Joe SermariniOct 29, 2012
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Agrippa, Copper as, RIC I Caligula 58451 viewsAgrippa, Military commander, friend of Augustus, grandfather of Caligula, great-grandfather of Nero

Copper as, RIC I Caligula 58, SRCV I 556, superb EF, weight 10.34 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 38 A.D.; obverse M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing a rostral crown; reverse Neptune standing half left, dolphin in right, trident in left, S - C across fields; bold high relief strike on a large flan with no wear, beautiful green patina, extraordinary portrait, spectacular!

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was a boyhood friend of Augustus and a renowned military commander on land and sea, winning the famous battle of Actium against the forces of Marcus Antonius and Cleopatra. Declared Augustus' successor, Agrippa's brilliant career ended when he predeceased Augustus in 12 B.C. He was married to Augustus' daughter Julia; father of Gaius and Lucius Caesars, Agrippa Postumus, Julia and Agrippina Senior; grandfather of Caligula, and great-grandfather of Nero.

7 commentsJoe SermariniMay 21, 2011
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Diadumenian, mid May - 8 June 218 A.D.96 viewsDiadumenian, mid May - 8 June 218 A.D., SH33336. Silver denarius, SRCV II 7450, RIC IV 117, Choice EF, Rome mint, weight 2.999g, maximum diameter 20.4mm, die axis 0o, as caesar, Jan - May 218 A.D.; obverse M OPEL ANT DIADVMENIAN CAES, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse SPES PVBLICA, Spes advancing left, flower in right, raising skirt with left; lustrous, nice hoard silver gently cleaned, near full circles strike

Spes was the Roman personification of Hope. In art Spes is normally depicted carrying flowers or a cornucopia, but on coins she is almost invariably depicted holding a flower in her extended right hand, while the left is raising a fold of her dress. She was also named "ultima dea" - for Hope is the last resort of men. On this coin, the Caesar, Diadumenian, the designated successor of the emperor, is identified as the future hope of the Roman people.
1 commentsJoe SermariniMay 21, 2011
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GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Epiphanes Dionysus, 144 - 142 or 141 B.C.230 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Epiphanes Dionysus, 144 - 142 or 141 B.C., SH25884. Silver drachm, SNG Cop 294, SNG Spaer 1760 var, Mint State, Antioch mint, weight 4.232g, maximum diameter 17.9mm, die axis 45o, 144 - 143 B.C.; obverse diademed radiate head of Antiochus VI right; reverse BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EPIFANOUS DIONUSOU, Apollo seated left on omphalos, nude, arrow in right, resting left on bow, monogram between legs, QXR (year 169) STA (magistrate) in ex

Antiochus VI was the son of Alexander Balas and Cleopatra Thea and daughter of Ptolemy VI of Egypt. He was nominated in 145 BC by the general Diodotus Tryphon in opposition to Demetrius II. He did not actually rule and served only as the general's pawn. In 142 BC, Diodotus deposed and succeeded him.
5 commentsJoe SermariniMay 21, 2011
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GREEK, Ionia, Herakleia ad Latmon, 155 - 145 B.C.176 viewsHerakleia ad Latmon, Ionia, 155 - 145 B.C., Silver tetradrachm, SNG von Aulock 1977, Pozzi 2453, EF, Herakleia ad Latmon mint, weight 16.351g, maximum diameter 34.6mm, die axis 270o, obverse head of Athena right, wearing necklace and winged and crested Attic helmet decorated with Pegasos and five horses; reverse HRAKLEWN, club within oak-wreath; ethnic, owl and two monograms across fields3 commentsJoe SermariniMay 21, 2011
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Roman, Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161- 17 March 180 A.D.226 views29344. Orichalcum dupondius, SRCV II 4834, RIC III 1240a, Cohen 455, aEF, some light corrosion, Rome mint, weight 11.590g, maximum diameter 25.5mm, die axis 0o, 142 A.D.; obverse AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG PII F COS, bare head right; reverse PIETAS AVG S C, sacrificial implements1 commentsJoe SermariniMay 16, 2010
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D.112 viewsSH33438. Silver denarius, RIC IV 60, RSC III 15b, BMCRE V 62, EF, Rome mint, weight 3.399g, maximum diameter 19.5mm, die axis 0o, 2nd emission, 217 A.D.; obverse IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse FELICITAS TEMPORVM, Felicitas standing left,caduceus in right, cornucopia in left; fabulous short-beard portrait, excellent centering, mint luster2 commentsJoe SermariniMay 16, 2010
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Roman, Diadumenian, mid May - 8 June 218 A.D.230 viewsSH33843. Silver denarius, SRCV II 7449, RIC IV 102, BMC 87, Cohen 3, EF, Rome mint, weight 3.339g, maximum diameter 20.9mm, die axis 0o, as Caesar, 11 Apr 217 - mid May 218 A.D.; obverse M OPEL ANT DIADVMENIAN CAES, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse PRINC IVVENTVTIS, Diadumenian, in military dress, standing left, head right, standard in right, short scepter in left, two grounded standards right; mint luster, superb portrait2 commentsJoe SermariniMay 16, 2010
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Roman, Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D.204 viewsSH32527. Silver denarius, RIC IV 76, Cohen 37, BMCRE V 20, Choice aEF, Rome mint, weight 2.807g, maximum diameter 19.4mm, die axis 180o, 217 A.D.; obverse IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and scepter, small figure of Macrinus before him; excellent short beard portrait with young features, well centered1 commentsJoe SermariniMay 16, 2010
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Elagabalus, denarius, RIC IV 188461 viewsElagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D.
SH33430. Silver denarius, BMCRE V277 - 278 var (obverse legend), RSC III 27 ff var (same), RIC IV 188 var (same), EF, Antioch mint, weight 3.381g, maximum diameter 18.2mm, die axis 0o, obverse ANTONINVS PIVS FELIX AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse FELICITAS TEMP, galley with sail right, containing eight rowers and pilot holding rudder, acrostolium and standard at stern, sail or standard at prow; the finest example of the type FORVM has seen and a rare obverse variety (full spelling for FELIX instead of FEL)
8 commentsJoe SermariniMay 16, 2010
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Roman, Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 Dec 192 A.D.463 viewsSH40551. Bimetallic medallion, Cohen 376 var (300 fr., bust right, central reverse figure hand downward); Gnecchi II p. 57 No. 52 - 53 var (same), aEF, dark brown patina, Rome mint, weight 59.635g, maximum diameter 39.6mm, die axis 0o, 188 A.D.; obverse COMMODVS ANTONINVS PIVS FELIX AVG BRIT, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse P M TR P XIII IMP VIII COS V P P, MON AVG, three monetae standing slightly left, each with a scale in right and cornucopia in left, the center figure is smaller, right hand upward and standing on a short round base; ex Gorney & Mosch, auction 180, lot 404; ex Helios Numismatik auction 3, 155; possibly unique5 commentsJoe SermariniMay 16, 2010
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Roman, Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, wife of Antoninus Pius460 viewsSH33181. Gold aureus, SRCV II 4553 (same dies), Cayon 1765 (same), RIC III 356d, Cohen 98, BMCRE IV 398, Choice EF, Rome mint, weight 6.923g, maximum diameter 19.8mm, die axis 180o, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, diademed, draped and veiled bust left; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing left, torch in right, scepter in left; very light hairline scratches; ex Lanz, Auction 135, lot 745 (misattributed); hints of red toning, bold and beautiful, struck with elegant dies!; scarce

Gold aurei are about the same size as silver denarii but they were not struck with the same dies. The finest work of the mint's top master engravers was reserved for striking gold. The difference between the artistry of the gold and silver is not always so striking, but no denarius equals the beauty of this coin.
8 commentsJoe SermariniMay 16, 2010
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Afghanistan, Balkh2616 viewsThe walls of Balkh, Afganistan1 commentsJoe SermariniMay 02, 2006
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Antioch vs. Rome1178 viewsOne way to distinguish Gordian's Antioch products from Rome is by letter shape, in particular, the letter M; on Antioch coins it is formed with a V in the middle thus IVI, whereas the Rome M is two lambdas thus Λ Λ. Joe SermariniOct 14, 2005
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Q. Cassius Longinus -- AR Denarius640 viewsQ. Cassius Longinus -- AR Denarius. Head of Libertas right; LIBERT left, Q. CASSIVS right / Curule chair within temple of Vesta; urn to left and voting tablet inscribed AC to right. Crawford 428/2; Sydenham 918; Cassia 8. Triton VI, Lot 739.

CNG's historical take on these coins: The reverse of this attractive type alludes to an incident in 113 BC, in which the College of Ponftiffs acquitted two Vestal Virgins, allegedly improperly, on charges of incest, while condemning a third. An ancestor of the moneyer was called in to investigate the affair. The curule chair under the circular temple alludes to the judicial power given to the investigator; the urn to the left and the tablet to the right inscribed A/C (for Absolvo and Condemno) is the ballot used by jurors to vote for guilt or innocence.
1 commentsJoe SermariniDec 03, 2004
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Greece, Athens, Acropolis, Parthenon, East Front of the Parthenon Restored and Dissected792 viewsJoe SermariniAug 01, 2004
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CAMPGATE, Constantine I, Heraclea, RIC 16900 viewsSilvered AE3, RIC 16, EF, 3.90g, 19.9mm, 180o, Heraclea mint, 317 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTA-NTINVS AVG, laureate consular bust left holding mappa and scepter; reverse PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG, campgate with three turrets, MHTB in exergueJoe SermariniJun 09, 2004
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Tigress - Gallienus1302 viewsBronze antoninianus, RIC 230 (sole reign), EF, excellent portrait, 3.16g, 19.9mm, 0 deg, Rome mint, 260-268 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse LIBERO P CONS AVG, Tigress left looking up roaring; B in ex4 commentsJoe SermariniJun 09, 2004
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MARKET, NERO, (Macellum Magnum)2609 viewsOrichalcum dupondius, RIC 400, S 1963 variety, VF, 13.65g, 28.9mm, 180o, Lugdunum mint, 64 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P, laureate head left; reverse MAC AVG S C, front view of the Macellum Magnum (great market), two-story domed section with porticoes approached by steps with a dolphin on each side and containing statue of Neptune holding a long scepter on pedestal, wings of two stories of unequal height.

The Macellum Magnum was a shopping mall located on the Caelian Hill in Rome, dedicated by Nero in 59 A.D. It had flanking wings of slightly different construction and a central dome possibly 120 feet (36 meters) in diameter. Records indicate it was still open in the 4th century. Part of it may be incorporated into the church of S. Stefano Rotundo which stands today. It was the model for many medieval government buildings in Europe, all U.S. state capitols and the U.S. national capitol building.
5 commentsJoe SermariniJun 09, 2004
   
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