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Last additions - JITALS (Afghanistan & Northwest India)
JIT_Tye_246_-.jpg
Tye 246.3/6, Album 1731.213 viewsKhwarezm Shahs: Ala al Din Muhammad ibn Tekesh (567-596 A.H. = 1200-1220 A.D.).

Billon jital, (average silver content 7%), Kurzuwan mint; 2.47 g. (average weight 2.6 g.), 17.30 mm.max., 0◦.

Obv.: Kurzuwan in center, surrounded by as sultan al-aízam Muhammad bin as-sultan.

Rev: Allah / la ilah Allah / Muhammad rasul / al-Nasir.

The Khwarezm Shahs were a Persianate Sunni Muslim dynasty of Turkic mamluk origin. They ruled Greater Iran from approximately 1077 to 1231 A.D., first as vassals of the Seljuqs and Kara-Khitan, and later as independent rulers, up until the Mongol invasions of the 13th century.

By 1217 Ala ad-Din Mohammed had conquered all the lands from the river Jaxartes to the Persian Gulf. He declared himself shah and demanded formal recognition from Caliph an-Nasir in Baghdad. When the caliph rejected his claim, Ala ad-Din Muhammad marched towards Baghdad. However, when crossing the Zagros Mountains, his army was caught in a blizzard and was decimated. In 1218, Genghis Khan attempted to initiate trade relations, but Ala ad-Din Mohammed believed this gesture was only a ploy to invade his land and arrested or executed the Mongolís envoys. In 1219 Genghis retaliated and completely annihilated numerous Khwarezm cities. Ala ad-Din Mohammed fled and died several weeks later.

Tye rarity Common; Album rarity C.
StkpMar 05, 2017
JIT_Tye_386_11-12.jpg
Tye 386.11-12, Deyell 311ff., G&G D45.13 viewsSultans of Delhi, Shams-al-din Iltutmish (1210-1236 A.D. = 607-633 A.H.). Billon jital of Delhi type (tentative average silver content 9%), Delhi mint; 3.46 g. (average weight 3.5 g.), 14.52 mm.max., 3.08 mm. thickness, 180◦.

Obv: Recumbent bull facing left, control mark on jhula/saddle-cloth, numeral five on its rump, Suritana Sri Samasdina, in Nagari/Sarada script, semi-surrounding.

Rev: Horseman bearing lance facing right, Sri Hamirah, in Nagari/Sarada script, above.
Tye rarity rating Abundant.

Shams-al-din Iltutmish was the second ruler of the Mamluk/Slave dynasty and founder of the Delhi Sultanate. The early Ghorid rulers had maintained a coinage system based on the bull-and horseman coins in place at the Delhi mint. In response to the lack of silver, Iltutmish introduced a bimetallic coinage system consisting of the silver tanka and the billon jital.

Those jitals issued by Iltumish at the Delhi mint of the Delhi type (Tye 386) have a silver content ranging from 5.7% to 10.8%, whereas those of the Lahore type (Tye 381) have a silver content ranging from 13% to 16.4%, thus remaining closer to the Chauhan standard of around 18%. Tye speculates that the debasement of the Delhi type caused almost all other mints to abandon the type. The Delhi type contains various control marks on the jhula/saddle-cloth and rump of the bull (there are 25 varieties which essentially coincides with the number of years in Iltumish's reign). Tye speculates that these marks permitted the mint to identify the silver content in the coins.
StkpMar 04, 2017
JIT_Tye_44_2-3.jpg
Tye 44.2-3, Deyell 187ff., G&G __.11 viewsDelhi Rajas/Tomaras of Dhillika (Delhi), Ananga Pala (1130-1145 A.D.). Billon jital (tentative average silver content 18%), Delhi mint; 3.27 g. (average weight 3.3 g.), 16.61 mm.max., 2.24 mm. thickness, 0◦.

Obv: Recumbent bull facing left, trishula on its rump, Cha / Sri Samanta Deva, in Nagari/Sarada script, above.

Rev: Horseman bearing lance facing right, Sri A / nanga Pala Devah Ji, in arc above and to right.

Tye rarity rating Common.
StkpJan 04, 2017
JIT_Tye_381.jpg
Tye 381.1, Deyell 320, G &G D55.11 viewsSultans of Delhi, Shams-al-din Iltutmish (1210-1236 A.D. = 607-633 A.H.). Billon jital of Lahore type (tentative average silver content 16%), Delhi mint; 3.28 g. (average weight 3.6 g.), 14.98 mm.max., 2.49 mm. thickness, 90◦.

Obv: Horseman bearing lance facing right, Sri Hamirah, in Nagari/Sarada script, above.

Rev: Shams al-dunya / wa'l din abu'l muzaffar / iltutmish al-sultan (in Arabic script).

Tye rarity rating Abundant.

Shams-al-din Iltutmish was the second ruler of the Mamluk/Slave dynasty and founder of the Delhi Sultanate. The early Ghorid rulers had maintained a coinage system based on the bull-and horseman coins in place at the Delhi mint. In response to the lack of silver, Iltutmish introduced a bimetallic coinage system consisting of the silver tanka and the billon jital.

Those jitals issued by Iltumish at the Delhi mint of the Delhi type (Tye 386) have a silver content ranging from 5.7% to 10.8%, whereas those of the Lahore type (Tye 381) have a silver content ranging from 13% to 16.4%, thus remaining closer to the Chauhan standard of around 18%. Tye speculates that the debasement of the Delhi type caused almost all other mints to abandon the type. The Delhi type contains various control marks on the jhula/saddle-cloth and rump of the bull (there are 25 varieties which essentially coincides with the number of years in Iltumish's reign). Tye speculates that these marks permitted the mint to identify the silver content in the coins.
StkpJan 02, 2017
JIT_Tye_377_1.jpg
Tye 377.1, Deyell 308+, G&G D59.8 viewsSultans of Delhi, Shams-al-din Iltutmish (1210-1236 A.D. = 607-633 A.H.). Billon jital of the Lahore type (tentative average silver content 16%), Lahore mint; 3.50 g. (average weight 3.6 g.), 14.26 mm.max., 3.21 mm. thickness, 0◦.

Obv: Horseman bearing lance facing right, star in center, Sri Hamirah (in Nagari script).

Rev: Shams / al-dunya wa'l din / iltutmish / al-sultan (in Arabic script).

Tye rarity rating Common.

Shams-al-din Iltutmish was the second ruler of the Mamluk/Slave dynasty and founder of the Delhi Sultanate. The early Ghorid rulers had maintained a coinage system based on the bull-and horseman coins in place at the Delhi mint. In response to the lack of silver, Iltutmish introduced a bimetallic coinage system consisting of the silver tanka and the billon jital.
StkpJan 02, 2017
JIT_Tye_6.jpg
Tye 6.1, Deyell 25+, MacDowall Issue VI, plate XVII, 13.19 viewsShahis (ca. 750-900 A.D.). AR jital (average silver content 69%), Kabul mint; 3.16 g. (average weight 3.3 g.), 18.42 mm.max., 180◦.

Obv: Recumbent bull facing left, trishula on its rump, Sri Spalapati Deva, in Nagari/Sarada script, above.

Rev: Horseman bearing lance facing right, Ka above to left and Ma [?] above to right, both in Nagari/Sarada script.

Tye rarity rating Common.

The history of the Shahi dynasties is almost unknown. The Hindu Shahi dynasty succeeded an earlier Buddhist Shahi dynasty, and was founded in 870 A.D. by Kallar, a Brahmin vazir to the last Buddhist king. The kingdom included portions of Kabulistan (the eastern territories of Greater Khorasan centered around Kabul, now in Afghanistan) and the old province of Gandhara (now in northern Pakistan), with capitals at Kabul and Ohind (in Gandhara). They lost Kabul to the Saminids around 988 A.D. and lost Ohind to Mahmud of Ghazni around 988 A.D. The coins bearing the legend Sri Samanta Deva (= Lord Feudatory Chief) were issued further east and later (albeit, with overlap) than those bearing the legend Sri Spalapati Deva (= Lord Commander of the Army).
1 commentsStkpJan 02, 2017
JIT_Tye_5.jpg
Tye 5, Deyell 24, MacDowall Issue VI, plate XVII, 14.9 viewsShahis (ca. 750-900 A.D.). AR jital (average silver content 69%), Kabul mint; 3.16 g. (average weight 3.3 g.), 17.76 mm.max., 270◦.

Obv: Recumbent bull facing left, trishula on its rump, Sri Spalapati Deva, in Nagari/Sarada script, above.

Rev: Horseman bearing lance facing right, A above to left and Ma [?] above to right, both in Nagari/Sarada script.

Tye rarity rating Common.

The history of the Shahi dynasties is almost unknown. The Hindu Shahi dynasty succeeded an earlier Buddhist Shahi dynasty, and was founded in 870 A.D. by Kallar, a Brahmin vazir to the last Buddhist king. The kingdom included portions of Kabulistan (the eastern territories of Greater Khorasan centered around Kabul, now in Afghanistan) and the old province of Gandhara (now in northern Pakistan), with capitals at Kabul and Ohind (in Gandhara). They lost Kabul to the Saminids around 988 A.D. and lost Ohind to Mahmud of Ghazni around 988 A.D. The coins bearing the legend Sri Samanta Deva (= Lord Feudatory Chief) were issued further east and later (albeit, with overlap) than those bearing the legend Sri Spalapati Deva (= Lord Commander of the Army).
StkpJan 02, 2017
JIT_Kurzuwan_Tye_228_var.JPG
Tye 228.1 var. (pellet), Album 1735.151 viewsKhwarezm Shahs: Ala al Din Muhammad ibn Tekesh (567-596 A.H. = 1200-1220 A.D.).

AE jital, Kurzuwan mint, average silver content ca. 8%, average weight 2.7 g., 14.5 mm.

Obv., Kurzuwan, elephant standing facing left, pellet beneath.

Rev: as sultan / al-aízam / Muhammad / bin as-sultan

The Khwarezm Shahs were a Persianate Sunni Muslim dynasty of Turkic mamluk origin. They ruled Greater Iran from approximately 1077 to 1231 A.D., first as vassals of the Seljuqs and Kara-Khitan, and later as independent rulers, up until the Mongol invasions of the 13th century.

By 1217 Ala ad-Din Mohammed had conquered all the lands from the river Jaxartes to the Persian Gulf. He declared himself shah and demanded formal recognition from Caliph an-Nasir in Baghdad. When the caliph rejected his claim, Ala ad-Din Muhammad marched towards Baghdad. However, when crossing the Zagros Mountains, his army was caught in a blizzard and was decimated. In 1218, Genghis Khan attempted to initiate trade relations, but Ala ad-Din Mohammed believed this gesture was only a ploy to invade his land and arrested or executed the Mongolís envoys. In 1219 Genghis retaliated and completely annihilated numerous Khwarezm cities. Ala ad-Din Mohammed fled and died several weeks later.
StkpJan 25, 2014
JIT_Kurzuwan_Tye_228.JPG
Tye 228.1, Album 1735.140 viewsKhwarezm Shahs: Ala al Din Muhammad ibn Tekesh (567-596 A.H. = 1200-1220 A.D.).

AE jital, Kurzuwan mint, average silver content ca. 8%, average weight 2.7 g., 14 mm.

Obv., Kurzuwan, elephant standing facing left.

Rev: as sultan / al-aízam / Muhammad / bin as-sultan

The Khwarezm Shahs were a Persianate Sunni Muslim dynasty of Turkic mamluk origin. They ruled Greater Iran from approximately 1077 to 1231 A.D., first as vassals of the Seljuqs and Kara-Khitan, and later as independent rulers, up until the Mongol invasions of the 13th century.

By 1217 Ala ad-Din Mohammed had conquered all the lands from the river Jaxartes to the Persian Gulf. He declared himself shah and demanded formal recognition from Caliph an-Nasir in Baghdad. When the caliph rejected his claim, Ala ad-Din Muhammad marched towards Baghdad. However, when crossing the Zagros Mountains, his army was caught in a blizzard and was decimated. In 1218, Genghis Khan attempted to initiate trade relations, but Ala ad-Din Mohammed believed this gesture was only a ploy to invade his land and arrested or executed the Mongolís envoys. In 1219 Genghis retaliated and completely annihilated numerous Khwarezm cities. Ala ad-Din Mohammed fled and died several weeks later.
1 commentsStkpJan 25, 2014
JIT_Samanta_Deva_Tye_14_1.JPG
Tye 14.1, Deyell 4571 viewsShahis (ca. 850-1,000 A.D.). AR jital, possibly Ohind mint, average silver content ca. 69%, average weight 3.3 g., 18 mm.

Obv: Recumbent bull facing left, trishula on its rump, Sri Samanta Deva, in Nagari script, above.

Rev: Horseman bearing lance facing right, Bhi above to left and Ma [?] above to right, both in Nagari script.

Tye rarity rating Abundant.

The history of the Shahi dynasties is almost unknown. The Hindu Shahi dynasty succeeded an earlier Buddhist Shahi dynasty, and was founded in 870 A.D. by Kallar, a Brahmin vazir to the last Buddhist king. The kingdom included portions of Kabulistan (the eastern territories of Greater Khorasan centered around Kabul, now in Afghanistan) and the old province of Gandhara (now in northern Pakistan), with capitals at Kabul and Ohind (in Gandhara). They lost Kabul to the Saminids around 988 A.D. and lost Ohind to Mahmud of Ghazni around 988 A.D. The coins bearing the legend Sri Samanta Deva (= Lord Feudatory Chief) were issued further east and later (albeit, with overlap) than those bearing the legend Sri Spalapati Deva (= Lord Commander of the Army).
1 commentsStkpFeb 11, 2012
JIT_Samanta_Deva_Tye_21_2.JPG
Tye 21.2, Deyell 5275 viewsShahis [?] (ca. 900-1,200 A.D.). AR jital, possibly minted unofficially, north of the Shahi realm, 18 mm.

Obv: Recumbent bull facing left, trishula on its rump, Sri Samanta Devah followed by two vertical pellets, in Nagari script, above.

Rev: Horseman bearing lance facing right, Bhi above to left and Ma [?] above to right, both in Nagari script.

Tye rarity rating Scarce.

The history of the Shahi dynasties is almost unknown. The Hindu Shahi dynasty succeeded an earlier Buddhist Shahi dynasty, and was founded in 870 A.D. by Kallar, a Brahmin vazir to the last Buddhist king. The kingdom included portions of Kabulistan (the eastern territories of Greater Khorasan centered around Kabul, now in Afghanistan) and the old province of Gandhara (now in northern Pakistan), with capitals at Kabul and Ohind (in Gandhara). They lost Kabul to the Saminids around 988 A.D. and lost Ohind to Mahmud of Ghazni around 988 A.D. The coins bearing the legend Sri Samanta Deva (= Lord Feudatory Chief) were issued further east and later (albeit, with overlap) than those bearing the legend Sri Spalapati Deva (= Lord Commander of the Army).
2 commentsStkpFeb 11, 2012
 
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