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915rma575.jpg
Cr 50/3 Ć As Anonymous [Anchor]9 views209-208 b.c.e. Rome mint
Laureate head of Janus; I (value) above
Prow right; I (value) above, anchor before, ROMA below
32.66 gm 34 mm
This issue is associated with a 60-As gold piece. A nice specimen with a pronounced eye and oar-box on the prow.
1 commentsPMah10/13/19 at 03:39Jay GT4: Nice big Republican
893BFA252.jpg
Cr 28/4 AR Half-Quadrigatus/Drachm7 viewsAnonymous, Rome mint
2.99 gm; 17 mm
c. 225 BCE?
Laureate head of Fontus/Janus
Jupiter in quadriga driven by Victory l., holding sceptre and thunderbolt; in ex. ROMA.
This type is associated with the series staring with the AU stater with Dioscuri/Oath scene. Crawford dates the entire series to just before the introduction of the denarius, with a theory of the dating based on style. I have not reproduced or researched the arguments here.
This coin is much nicer in hand than the photo.
2 commentsPMah10/12/19 at 05:06Carausius: Good example of a scarce denomination.
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Cr 299/1b AR Denarius4 viewsAppius Claudius Pulcher, T. Manlius Mancius (?) & Q. Urbinius (??)
Rome mint, 111-110 BCE
Helmeted head of Roma right; quadrangular device behind
Victory driving triga right, T•MA•AP• CL•Q•VR in ex.
3.94 gm, 17 mm
The text above does not do justice to the complexity of the ligature of the legend. This variety of the type leads off with moneyer "MA", presumed, not without contrary views, to be a Manlius or a Mallius; Crawford settles on Maloleius. I retained the seller's interpretation in the header for consistency.
"AP CL", by this time frame, will be a Claudius.
Crawford also cites but disputes an earlier interpretation that "Q. VR" stood for Quaestor Urbinus, rather than an unknown Urbinus. Puzzling that a Claudius would share honors.
No associated bronze types.
This coin nicely colored.

2 commentsPMah10/10/19 at 19:33Jay GT4: Indeed.
893BFA252.jpg
Cr 28/4 AR Half-Quadrigatus/Drachm7 viewsAnonymous, Rome mint
2.99 gm; 17 mm
c. 225 BCE?
Laureate head of Fontus/Janus
Jupiter in quadriga driven by Victory l., holding sceptre and thunderbolt; in ex. ROMA.
This type is associated with the series staring with the AU stater with Dioscuri/Oath scene. Crawford dates the entire series to just before the introduction of the denarius, with a theory of the dating based on style. I have not reproduced or researched the arguments here.
This coin is much nicer in hand than the photo.
2 commentsPMah10/10/19 at 19:32Jay GT4: I need one of these. Nice coin. congrats
886Rma707.jpg
Cr 299/1b AR Denarius4 viewsAppius Claudius Pulcher, T. Manlius Mancius (?) & Q. Urbinius (??)
Rome mint, 111-110 BCE
Helmeted head of Roma right; quadrangular device behind
Victory driving triga right, T•MA•AP• CL•Q•VR in ex.
3.94 gm, 17 mm
The text above does not do justice to the complexity of the ligature of the legend. This variety of the type leads off with moneyer "MA", presumed, not without contrary views, to be a Manlius or a Mallius; Crawford settles on Maloleius. I retained the seller's interpretation in the header for consistency.
"AP CL", by this time frame, will be a Claudius.
Crawford also cites but disputes an earlier interpretation that "Q. VR" stood for Quaestor Urbinus, rather than an unknown Urbinus. Puzzling that a Claudius would share honors.
No associated bronze types.
This coin nicely colored.

2 commentsPMah10/10/19 at 16:09shanxi: very nice
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Cr 405/2 AR Denarius M. Plaetorius Cestianus6 viewsM. Plaetorius M. f. Cestianus
Rome mint c. 69 BCE
Draped female bust r. (Fortuna?); behind, [control symbol]
M PLAETORI CEST S·C around half-length boy? girl? facing on tablet inscribed SORS.
20mm, 3.49 gm
Plaetoria 10

A fascinating type among this varied issue with four main types of denarii. There are multiple theories as to the unique figure on the reverse, clearly a reference to divination by lots "SORS", but no agreement as to exactly what it signifies. Even on nicely preserved specimens, of which there are not many, the gender of the reverse figure is difficult to say. Crawford cites reason to think it refers to the origin of the moneyer's adoptive gens, expanded greatly by Michael Harlan. To me, given that the moneyership is an electoral stepping-stone, it seems a rather obscure reference; although the "S C" indicates a special issue perhaps unconnected with regular duties. Crawford notes that Cestianus became Praetor c. 64 BCE, so perhaps he was right to trust in luck.
This type is deemed rare and this specimen's condition is not unusual for the type.
1 commentsPMah10/10/19 at 16:08shanxi: nice one
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Cr 352/1b AR Denarius L. Julius Bursio21 viewsRome, 85 BCE
o: Laureate, winged, and draped bust of Apollo Vejovis right; to left, trident above bow
r: Victory driving galloping quadriga right, holding reins and wreath; EX • A • P in ex.
Sydenham 729; Julia 6; Type as RBW 1348
(18.5mm, 4.04 g, 10h)
From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

I have noted some of my other coins whose types bear a variation on the indication of "from the Public Silver", usually interpreted to mean an issue that required a supplementary grant of authority from the Senate outside the normal annual authorization, as all of the coining metal was "public", including the precious metals from time to time appropriated from the temples of the state religion.

Since this coin is ex McCabe, I will quote his notes on the relative rarity of this type directly:
"The British Museum collection has 115 examples of RRC 352/1a or 352/1c with moneyers name L. IVLI BVRSIO, but just 4 examples with EX A. P. Crawford in RRC, p. 605, says that this issue was struck from money left to the Roman people by Ptolemy Alexander I of Egypt, which probably arrived at Rome in 86 BC. Given the rarity of the EX A. P. issue, perhaps the bequest was modest! "
As with the other 3 coins posted in this group, the coin is much better in hand, although the photos of the silver coins are clearer than the bronze.
1 commentsPMah07/29/19 at 05:04Carausius: Pretty coin, and a scarce variety to boot!
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Cr 206/1 AR Denarius S Afra24 views150 BCE Rome mint
o: Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind
r: Victory in biga right, SAFRA below horses, ROMA in exergue
Afrania 1 3.67 gm 19.00 mm
A "controversial" coin, if one is a bit of a pedant. Both Crawford and Sear note that the absence of a period/dot/stop after the "S" must lead to the conclusion that this is not issued by a "Spurius Afranius", but rather someone else. Indeed, Sear, due to his system, repeats the assertion for each of the seven types in this issue, from denarius to uncia, using up roughly a half-page of type, net. However, Sear makes no attempt to identify "S Afra", and Crawford cops out with "Safra" representing an unknown cognomen. I personally find it a bit difficult to hang such an argument on the absence of a dot but disregarding a usually distinct space between S and A. The Afranii were a fairly prolific bunch; one of them may have felt a need to be a bit hip-er than others. Plus, "Safra" does not seem to mean anything in Latin, which would be a bit unusual for a cognomen.
So, which explanation fits best: omission of a dot in a design versus a meaningless cognomen used by an unknown person who is not one of the members of a sound-alike gens that was sometimes of tertiary importance .....?

This coin is in wonderful condition for the type.
2 commentsPMah07/29/19 at 05:01Carausius: Attractive coin.
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Cr 44/5 AR Denarius Anonymous20 viewsc. 211 BCE -- ish
o: Helmeted head of Roma right; behind, X
r: The Dioscuri galloping right, stars above heads; in exergue, ROMA partially incuse on raised tablet
4.10 gm 20.00 mm
This type, which is the earliest or nearly earliest denarius, is a bit difficult to confirm on this coin due to the slight corrosion on the reverse tablet. If the reverse was as nice as the obverse, it would be unambiguous. I am working on the precise sub-type.
1 commentsPMah07/28/19 at 05:20Steve B5: This is RRC 44/5. The sub-variety is seen in plat...
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Cr 206/1 AR Denarius S Afra24 views150 BCE Rome mint
o: Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind
r: Victory in biga right, SAFRA below horses, ROMA in exergue
Afrania 1 3.67 gm 19.00 mm
A "controversial" coin, if one is a bit of a pedant. Both Crawford and Sear note that the absence of a period/dot/stop after the "S" must lead to the conclusion that this is not issued by a "Spurius Afranius", but rather someone else. Indeed, Sear, due to his system, repeats the assertion for each of the seven types in this issue, from denarius to uncia, using up roughly a half-page of type, net. However, Sear makes no attempt to identify "S Afra", and Crawford cops out with "Safra" representing an unknown cognomen. I personally find it a bit difficult to hang such an argument on the absence of a dot but disregarding a usually distinct space between S and A. The Afranii were a fairly prolific bunch; one of them may have felt a need to be a bit hip-er than others. Plus, "Safra" does not seem to mean anything in Latin, which would be a bit unusual for a cognomen.
So, which explanation fits best: omission of a dot in a design versus a meaningless cognomen used by an unknown person who is not one of the members of a sound-alike gens that was sometimes of tertiary importance .....?

This coin is in wonderful condition for the type.
2 commentsPMah07/19/19 at 19:10quadrans: Another nice piece
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Cr 293/1 AR Denarius L. Philippus25 views113 to 111-ish BCE
o: Head of Philip of Macedon right, wearing royal Macedonian helmet; under chin, Φ; behind, ROMA monogram
r: Equestrian statue right, base inscribed L. PHILIPPVS; below horse, flower; in exergue, XVI [mono]
Marcia 12. 3.92 gm 21.00 mm
The obverse oddly depicts Philip V of Macedon, sometime ally and sometime opponent of Rome, and seems to point to an earlier claim by the Marcii Philippi to a connection to the Macedonian dynasty. The reverse likely depicts a statue of another Marcius in the Roman Forum. There are monograms, flowers, and other elements to round out an array of meanings. The bronze issues, a quadrans and uncia, are also a bit busy and a bit scarcer.

This is a really nice coin, with a bit of deposit at 9:00 obverse, but I just can't get enthusiastic about the type.
3 commentsPMah07/19/19 at 19:09quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
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Cr 293/1 AR Denarius L. Philippus25 views113 to 111-ish BCE
o: Head of Philip of Macedon right, wearing royal Macedonian helmet; under chin, Φ; behind, ROMA monogram
r: Equestrian statue right, base inscribed L. PHILIPPVS; below horse, flower; in exergue, XVI [mono]
Marcia 12. 3.92 gm 21.00 mm
The obverse oddly depicts Philip V of Macedon, sometime ally and sometime opponent of Rome, and seems to point to an earlier claim by the Marcii Philippi to a connection to the Macedonian dynasty. The reverse likely depicts a statue of another Marcius in the Roman Forum. There are monograms, flowers, and other elements to round out an array of meanings. The bronze issues, a quadrans and uncia, are also a bit busy and a bit scarcer.

This is a really nice coin, with a bit of deposit at 9:00 obverse, but I just can't get enthusiastic about the type.
3 commentsPMah07/18/19 at 20:22Tracy Aiello: I agree, simply fantastic.
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Cr 293/1 AR Denarius L. Philippus25 views113 to 111-ish BCE
o: Head of Philip of Macedon right, wearing royal Macedonian helmet; under chin, Φ; behind, ROMA monogram
r: Equestrian statue right, base inscribed L. PHILIPPVS; below horse, flower; in exergue, XVI [mono]
Marcia 12. 3.92 gm 21.00 mm
The obverse oddly depicts Philip V of Macedon, sometime ally and sometime opponent of Rome, and seems to point to an earlier claim by the Marcii Philippi to a connection to the Macedonian dynasty. The reverse likely depicts a statue of another Marcius in the Roman Forum. There are monograms, flowers, and other elements to round out an array of meanings. The bronze issues, a quadrans and uncia, are also a bit busy and a bit scarcer.

This is a really nice coin, with a bit of deposit at 9:00 obverse, but I just can't get enthusiastic about the type.
3 commentsPMah07/18/19 at 04:13Jay GT4: This one's fantastic
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Cr 433/2 AR Denarius M. Junius Brutus25 viewsAR Denarius 54 bce Rome 4.09 gm 17.5 mm
o: BRVTVS, downwards behind head of L. Iunius Brutus r, border of dots
r: AHALA, downwards behind head of C. Servilius Ahala r, border of dots
Junia 30; Servilia 17; Sydenham 932

This type has always puzzled me. It clearly depicts the two anti-tyrants in the Junia family tree, L. Junius Brutus and C. Servilius Ahala. (Crawford uses the phrase "tyrannicides", but Brutus did not kill Tarquin and Ahala seems to have sucker-stabbed Maelius in anger.) Young Brutus, or whatever his name was when he was a moneyer, clearly chose to put them on his coins at the time when Pompey's prominence in the state was at its peak; Caesar was in Gaul or Britain, and could not help him. This decision as to coinage, therefore, seems to me extremely unhealthy. Roughly the same number of dies have been identified for both of Brutus's moneyer issues, so it is unlikely that this type is an indiscretion that was quickly withdrawn. So, was Brutus being played or deployed by Pompey against Caesar? Pompey was ostentatiously NOT claiming the dictatorship, so why "warn" him, especially when a "warning" from a 30-ish year old aspiring politician who maybe had held a staff officer's post would not likely impress Pompey, "the teenage butcher"? Worth, I think, exploring a bit.
2 commentsPMah05/28/19 at 13:58Tracy Aiello: Very nice indeed. Love the write-up.
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Cr 433/2 AR Denarius M. Junius Brutus25 viewsAR Denarius 54 bce Rome 4.09 gm 17.5 mm
o: BRVTVS, downwards behind head of L. Iunius Brutus r, border of dots
r: AHALA, downwards behind head of C. Servilius Ahala r, border of dots
Junia 30; Servilia 17; Sydenham 932

This type has always puzzled me. It clearly depicts the two anti-tyrants in the Junia family tree, L. Junius Brutus and C. Servilius Ahala. (Crawford uses the phrase "tyrannicides", but Brutus did not kill Tarquin and Ahala seems to have sucker-stabbed Maelius in anger.) Young Brutus, or whatever his name was when he was a moneyer, clearly chose to put them on his coins at the time when Pompey's prominence in the state was at its peak; Caesar was in Gaul or Britain, and could not help him. This decision as to coinage, therefore, seems to me extremely unhealthy. Roughly the same number of dies have been identified for both of Brutus's moneyer issues, so it is unlikely that this type is an indiscretion that was quickly withdrawn. So, was Brutus being played or deployed by Pompey against Caesar? Pompey was ostentatiously NOT claiming the dictatorship, so why "warn" him, especially when a "warning" from a 30-ish year old aspiring politician who maybe had held a staff officer's post would not likely impress Pompey, "the teenage butcher"? Worth, I think, exploring a bit.
2 commentsPMah05/28/19 at 10:40shanxi: very nice
427G394Rustia.png
Cr 389/1 AR Denarius L. Rustius29 views74 BCE
o: Helmeted head of Minerva or Mars right, SC behind, star (value mark) below chin
r: Ram standing right, L RVSTI in ex
Crawford 389/1. Rustia 1
3.86g. (5h)
2 commentsPMah05/11/19 at 07:55Optimo Principi: Absolutely beautiful example of this, one I would ...
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cr 286/1 AR Denarius M. Sergius Silus24 views116-115 b.c.e. 3.84 gm; 18.00 mm.
o: Helmeted head of Roma right; before, EX. S.C; behind, ROMA and *
r: Horseman left, holding sword and a severed head in left hand; below horse, Q / [M.] SERGI; in exergue, SILVS.
A special issue, by Senate decree, Sergius holding the fiscal office of Quaestor. Another dynamic decapitation, this coin retaining the facial expressions of the recently-deceased barbarian.
The photo is a bit washed-out, but the excellent obverse strike is apparent.
3 commentsPMah01/23/19 at 08:17Marsman: Beautiful
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cr 286/1 AR Denarius M. Sergius Silus24 views116-115 b.c.e. 3.84 gm; 18.00 mm.
o: Helmeted head of Roma right; before, EX. S.C; behind, ROMA and *
r: Horseman left, holding sword and a severed head in left hand; below horse, Q / [M.] SERGI; in exergue, SILVS.
A special issue, by Senate decree, Sergius holding the fiscal office of Quaestor. Another dynamic decapitation, this coin retaining the facial expressions of the recently-deceased barbarian.
The photo is a bit washed-out, but the excellent obverse strike is apparent.
3 commentsPMah01/22/19 at 07:06Canaan: Very Nice!!!
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Cr 304/1 AR Denarius L. Memmius12 views 109-108 b.c.e 3.93 gm; 19.50 mm
o: Young male head right (Apollo?), wearing oak-wreath; before, *
r: Dioscuri standing facing between their horses, each holding spear; in exergue, L. MEMMI.
This reverse breaks with the (boring) tradition of The Galloping Dioscuri reverse and presents a bold, frontal, sculptural presentation, similar to the sculptural group in front of the Quirinale Palace.
1 commentsPMah01/22/19 at 07:05Canaan: Great Details, a real beauty congrats!!!!
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cr 286/1 AR Denarius M. Sergius Silus24 views116-115 b.c.e. 3.84 gm; 18.00 mm.
o: Helmeted head of Roma right; before, EX. S.C; behind, ROMA and *
r: Horseman left, holding sword and a severed head in left hand; below horse, Q / [M.] SERGI; in exergue, SILVS.
A special issue, by Senate decree, Sergius holding the fiscal office of Quaestor. Another dynamic decapitation, this coin retaining the facial expressions of the recently-deceased barbarian.
The photo is a bit washed-out, but the excellent obverse strike is apparent.
3 commentsPMah01/21/19 at 20:59Jay GT4: I've always loved this type
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Cr 44/7 AR Sestertius Anonymous30 viewsO: Helmeted head of Roma right; behind, IIS [= 2 and Semi]
R: The Dioscuri galloping right; below, ROMA in linear frame
0.81 gms; 13.50 mm
Broad flan, toned

A bit light, but achieving a consistent weight in casting flans was one of the challenges with this small coin at a time when the silver weight was still a critical component of acceptance.

Although the quarter-denarius seems like it should have been a very handy coin, saving the need to carry two large As and the Semis, the silver sestertius was minted only sporadically and then was discontinued. Accordingly, they are relatively rare, and I have to say this one is very nice.
2 commentsPMah01/21/19 at 14:23Carausius: Agree with Steve's assessment. Very pleasing ...
amphora_quadrans_hercules_6-8-17.jpg
Cr 56/5 AE Quadrans Anonymous 13 viewsc. 211 BCE (20.4 mm, 6.04 grams)
o: Helmeted head of Hercules right, 3 dots behind
r: ROMA - Prow to right, 3 dots behind
Crawford 56/5.
Overstruck, possibly Hieron II of Sicily with Zeus/Trident
Ex. RBW
1 commentsPMah01/21/19 at 14:20Carausius: Youre likely correct on the undertype, as I see Ze...
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Cr 421/1 AR Denarius M. Nonius Sufenas21 viewscirca 57- 59 b.c.e., 17.5mm., 3.97gms.
o: SVFENAS – S·C Head of Saturn r.; in l. field, harpa and conical stone
r: PR·L·V·P·F Roma seated l. on pile of arms, holding sceptre and sword, crowned by Victory standing behind her; in exergue, SEX·NONI·. Nonia 1.
The reverse inscription expands as : PR[aetor] L[vdos] V[ictoriae] P[rimus] F[ecit]. Interesting back-story crammed into a busy reverse. The moneyer's father (or grandfather) while Praetor, was the First to "Make" the Games of Victory [of Sulla]. The son's willingness to advertise this on his coins was rather aggressive, considering Sulla's reputation was rapidly declining and his father was a mere partisan despite sponsoring one round of games, and he himself no more popular even though he became praetor, somewhat underlined by this being the first and only "Nonia" issue. Presumably he had faith in Pompey, who was the most enduring and successful of the Sullan partisans and seen as the senior in the power-sharing "First Triumvirate". This bet seemingly did not work out well, but the specifics are not available.
3 commentsPMah01/21/19 at 12:06Optimo Principi: Great example of the type!
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Cr 421/1 AR Denarius M. Nonius Sufenas21 viewscirca 57- 59 b.c.e., 17.5mm., 3.97gms.
o: SVFENAS – S·C Head of Saturn r.; in l. field, harpa and conical stone
r: PR·L·V·P·F Roma seated l. on pile of arms, holding sceptre and sword, crowned by Victory standing behind her; in exergue, SEX·NONI·. Nonia 1.
The reverse inscription expands as : PR[aetor] L[vdos] V[ictoriae] P[rimus] F[ecit]. Interesting back-story crammed into a busy reverse. The moneyer's father (or grandfather) while Praetor, was the First to "Make" the Games of Victory [of Sulla]. The son's willingness to advertise this on his coins was rather aggressive, considering Sulla's reputation was rapidly declining and his father was a mere partisan despite sponsoring one round of games, and he himself no more popular even though he became praetor, somewhat underlined by this being the first and only "Nonia" issue. Presumably he had faith in Pompey, who was the most enduring and successful of the Sullan partisans and seen as the senior in the power-sharing "First Triumvirate". This bet seemingly did not work out well, but the specifics are not available.
3 commentsPMah01/21/19 at 09:32shanxi: very nice
619NN404.jpg
Cr 421/1 AR Denarius M. Nonius Sufenas21 viewscirca 57- 59 b.c.e., 17.5mm., 3.97gms.
o: SVFENAS – S·C Head of Saturn r.; in l. field, harpa and conical stone
r: PR·L·V·P·F Roma seated l. on pile of arms, holding sceptre and sword, crowned by Victory standing behind her; in exergue, SEX·NONI·. Nonia 1.
The reverse inscription expands as : PR[aetor] L[vdos] V[ictoriae] P[rimus] F[ecit]. Interesting back-story crammed into a busy reverse. The moneyer's father (or grandfather) while Praetor, was the First to "Make" the Games of Victory [of Sulla]. The son's willingness to advertise this on his coins was rather aggressive, considering Sulla's reputation was rapidly declining and his father was a mere partisan despite sponsoring one round of games, and he himself no more popular even though he became praetor, somewhat underlined by this being the first and only "Nonia" issue. Presumably he had faith in Pompey, who was the most enduring and successful of the Sullan partisans and seen as the senior in the power-sharing "First Triumvirate". This bet seemingly did not work out well, but the specifics are not available.
3 commentsPMah01/21/19 at 05:25Jay GT4: An outstanding coin. Ccongrats
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Cr 44/7 AR Sestertius Anonymous30 viewsO: Helmeted head of Roma right; behind, IIS [= 2 and Semi]
R: The Dioscuri galloping right; below, ROMA in linear frame
0.81 gms; 13.50 mm
Broad flan, toned

A bit light, but achieving a consistent weight in casting flans was one of the challenges with this small coin at a time when the silver weight was still a critical component of acceptance.

Although the quarter-denarius seems like it should have been a very handy coin, saving the need to carry two large As and the Semis, the silver sestertius was minted only sporadically and then was discontinued. Accordingly, they are relatively rare, and I have to say this one is very nice.
2 commentsPMah12/13/18 at 04:22Steve B5: Very representative example with bound hair, fully...
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Cr 467/1 AR Denarius J. Caesar22 viewso: COS.TERT.DICT.ITER. Head of Ceres right
r: AVGVR above, PONT.MAX. below. Simpulum, sprinkler, capis and lituus; M in right field
Minted in Africa, c 46 b.c.
3.37 gms; 19.00 mm
This coin is not a beauty and may have been a pendant at some point. Yet it is one of those intensely historical coins, minted on either side of the Battle of Thapsus, which ended the old Republican resistance to Julius Caesar. This type, with "M" ligate in reverse field right, has been said to indicate "Munus" (gift in the sense of obligation); the other variation has "D", presumably "Donativum" (gift in the sense of "here you go, poorer person"). I personally find the distinction between M and D somewhat odd and perhaps there was a more sophisticated distinction being made. As the marks appear on coins of equal value, it seems a very obscure way of distinguishing among soldiers and mere beneficiaries.
1 commentsPMah12/09/18 at 01:14Jay GT4: Nice one
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Cr 329/1b AR Denarius P. Cornelius Lentulus M.f. 52 viewsRome, 100 BCE
o: Bust of Hercules right, seen from behind, holding club, shield in left field, K below pellet in right field, ROMA below
r: Roma standing facing, holding spear and wearing triple-crested helmet, Genius of the Roman People right crowning her and holding cornucopiae, K below pellet in left field, LENT•MAR•F in ex, all within laurel-wreath
Crawford 329/1b; Cornelia 25a
(3.94g, 20mm, 12h)
A somewhat busy design.
5 commentsPMah10/28/18 at 04:07PMah: Thanks, Viewers. This type highlights odd range o...
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Cr 340/1 AR Denarius L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi27 views90 BCE Rome mint
o: Laureate head of Apollo to right; behind, inverted anchor; below chin, B
r: L PISO FRVGI Jockey riding galloping horse to right, holding palm branch; above, D; Below, star
Crawford 340/1; Calpurnia 11
(17 mm, 3.76 g, 12 h)
2 commentsPMah09/17/18 at 02:18PMah: Thank you, Jay. I am falling behind on my notes.
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Cr 340/1 AR Denarius L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi27 views90 BCE Rome mint
o: Laureate head of Apollo to right; behind, inverted anchor; below chin, B
r: L PISO FRVGI Jockey riding galloping horse to right, holding palm branch; above, D; Below, star
Crawford 340/1; Calpurnia 11
(17 mm, 3.76 g, 12 h)
2 commentsPMah09/15/18 at 00:19Jay GT4: Very nice!
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Cr 25/3 AE Litra Anonymous32 viewsc 241-235 BCE Anonymous bronze Litra
16 mm, 3.07 grams
o: Head of Mars, right, beardless, wearing Corinthian helmet
r: ROMA below Horse head, right, with bridle; behind, sickle
Crawford 25/3
Ex. RBW collection
1 commentsPMah09/11/18 at 02:38Carausius: Lovely little coin in fine style with little actua...
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Cr 389/1 AR Denarius L. Rustius29 views74 BCE
o: Helmeted head of Minerva or Mars right, SC behind, star (value mark) below chin
r: Ram standing right, L RVSTI in ex
Crawford 389/1. Rustia 1
3.86g. (5h)
2 commentsPMah09/10/18 at 14:50okidoki: excellent
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Cr 312/1 AR Denarius C. Sulpicius C.f. Galba21 views Rome, 106 BCE
o: Jugate heads of Dei Penates left, DPP before
r: Two soldiers swearing oath over sow, L above, C SVLPICI. C F in ex.
Crawford 312/1. Sulpicia 1
Serrated, 3.85g. (12h)
Penates were both personal and public gods, and this obverse emphasizes that these are the public form, "Publici", as it would be quite unusual to emphasize the private aspect of household gods. The oath scene on reverse likely refers to the founding myth of the white sow at Alba Longa in the Aeneid. The Sulpicii gens eventually culminated (and terminated) with the emperor Galba.
1 commentsPMah09/09/18 at 05:01NORMAN K: very nice!
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Cr 44/1 AR Victoriatus Anonymous 39 viewsafter 211 BC. AR Victoriatus (17mm, 3.14g, 11h) Rome mint
O: Laureate head of Jupiter r.
R: Victory standing r., crowning trophy
Crawford 44/1
[my opinion: Although Victoriati can be seen as excruciatingly repetitive, with good reason, the obverse of this coin shows considerable artistry in execution.]
3 commentsPMah09/02/18 at 02:17PMah: Update, with thanks to SteveB5, I agree, and re-at...
RomaTrio.jpg
Cr 390/1 AR Denarius L. Lucretius Trio 43 viewsRome, 74 BCE
o: Radiate head of Sol right
r: Crescent moon surrounded by seven stars; TRIO above, L•LVCRETI below
Crawford 390/1; Lucretia 2.
(3.85g, 16mm, 12h)
4 commentsPMah08/31/18 at 12:01okidoki: Congrats very nice never seen the type
coin314~0.jpg
Cr 250/1 AR Denarius M. Aburius M.F. Geminus 21 views132 B.C.E. Rome mint
(19.32 mm, 3.93 g, 7 h)
o: GEM, helmeted head of Roma right; XVI monogram below chin
r: M·ABVRI / ROMA, Sol, holding reins and whip, driving galloping quadriga right
Crawford 250/1; Aburia 6
1 commentsPMah08/31/18 at 06:42quadrans: Nice
image00066Nomos.jpg
Cr 401/1 AR Denarius Mn. Aquillius Mn.f. Mn.n34 viewso: VIRTVS - III VIR Helmeted and draped bust of Virtus to right, with large head
r: MN F MN N / MN AQVIL / SICIL. Mn. Aquilius (Cos. 101) raising fallen Sicily
65 BCE  Denarius Serratus (19 mm, 3.82 g, 6 h), Rome.
Babelon (Aquilia) 2. Crawford 401/1. Sydenham 798. Toned and struck on a broad flan.
This coin is somewhat unintentionally ironic. The moneyer's honored grandfather was accused of fleecing the people of Sicily, when he was governor of the province after the slave revolts. He later managed to antagonize Mithridates VI of Pontus, leading to widespread slaughter of Romans in Asia.
As Wikipedia summarizes the aftermath: "Mithridates defeated Aquillius in 88 near Protostachium. Aquillius was attempting to make his way back to Italy and managed to make it to Lesbos, where he was delivered to Mithridates by the inhabitants of Mytilene. After being taken to the mainland, he was then placed on a donkey and paraded back to Pergamon. On the trip, he was forced to confess his supposed crimes against the peoples of Anatolia. Aquillius's father, the elder Manius Aquillius, was a former Roman governor of Pergamon and was hated for the egregious taxes that he imposed. It was generally thought that Manius Aquillius the younger would follow in the footsteps of his father as a tax profiteer and was hated by some of the local peoples."
Grandpa was thereafter killed by Mithridates by having molten gold poured down his throat.
2 commentsPMah08/30/18 at 17:01quadrans: Great coin , and details,
Roma475.jpg
Cr 329/1b AR Denarius P. Cornelius Lentulus M.f. 52 viewsRome, 100 BCE
o: Bust of Hercules right, seen from behind, holding club, shield in left field, K below pellet in right field, ROMA below
r: Roma standing facing, holding spear and wearing triple-crested helmet, Genius of the Roman People right crowning her and holding cornucopiae, K below pellet in left field, LENT•MAR•F in ex, all within laurel-wreath
Crawford 329/1b; Cornelia 25a
(3.94g, 20mm, 12h)
A somewhat busy design.
5 commentsPMah08/30/18 at 16:59quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
RomaTrio.jpg
Cr 390/1 AR Denarius L. Lucretius Trio 43 viewsRome, 74 BCE
o: Radiate head of Sol right
r: Crescent moon surrounded by seven stars; TRIO above, L•LVCRETI below
Crawford 390/1; Lucretia 2.
(3.85g, 16mm, 12h)
4 commentsPMah08/30/18 at 16:59quadrans: Ohh, nice,
477ArteCombo.png
Cr 236/1 AR Denarius M. Baebius Q. f. Tampilus 19 views137 BCE
o: Helmeted head of Roma left, X below chin, TAMPIL behind
r: Apollo in quadriga right, ROMA below horses, M. BAEBI. Q. F. in exergue
Cr. 236/1. Baebia 12.
(g. 3.93 mm. 19.00)
1 commentsPMah08/30/18 at 16:55quadrans: Another nice piece
476ArteCombo.png
Cr 217/1 AR Denarius C. Terentius Lucanus 19 views147 BCE
o: Helmeted head of Roma right; behind, X and small Victory
r: The Dioscuri galloping right; below horses, C. TER.LVC. In exergue, ROMA.
Cr. 217/1. Terentia 10
(g. 3.59 mm. 18.00).
1 commentsPMah08/30/18 at 16:54quadrans: Nice piece..
480ArteCombo.png
Cr 327/1 AR Denarius M. Servilius C.f. 21 views100 BCE
o: Helmeted head of Roma right; behind, Z
r: Two warriors, a Roman and a barbarian fighting on foot, each with a horse behind him; in exergue, M. SERVEILI. C. F / T
Cr. 327/1. Servilia 13
(g. 3.93 mm. 21.50)
1 commentsPMah08/30/18 at 08:08Canaan: Very nice!!!!
RomaTrio.jpg
Cr 390/1 AR Denarius L. Lucretius Trio 43 viewsRome, 74 BCE
o: Radiate head of Sol right
r: Crescent moon surrounded by seven stars; TRIO above, L•LVCRETI below
Crawford 390/1; Lucretia 2.
(3.85g, 16mm, 12h)
4 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 20:46Canaan: Very nice!!!!
CNGBlasio.jpg
Cr 296/1d AR Denarius Cn. Blasio Cn.f. 34 viewso: Helmeted male head (Mars or Scipio Africanus?) right; [mark of value] above, prow stem behind
r: Jupiter standing facing, holding scepter and thunderbolt, crowned by Juno on left and Minerva on right
Cn. Blasio Cn.f. 112-111 BC. AR Denarius (17mm, 3.86 g, 6h). Rome mint. Helmeted male head (Mars or Scipio Africanus?) right; [mark of value] above, prow stem behind / Jupiter standing facing, holding scepter and thunderbolt, between Juno on left and Minerva on right, crowning Jupiter with wreath; Π between Jupiter and Minerva. Crawford 296/1d; Sydenham 561b; Cornelia 19.
2 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 17:45Canaan: Great coin
502BERT404.jpg
Cr 308/1a AR Denarius M. Herennius 32 views 108-107 BCE. AR Denarius M. Herennius, Rome, (19mm, 3.83g, 11h).
O: Diademed head of Pietas r.; control mark before chin;PIETAS behind.
R: M HERENNI, left; Amphinomus carrying his father aloft r., who looks back
Crawford 308/1a; RBW -; RSC Herennia 1.
[The Herennii seem to have adopted the Sicilian image of the brothers who fled Aetna with their parents, but most sources put the origin of the gens in Campania.]
2 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 17:44Canaan: Very nice!!!!
508CNG324.jpg
Cr 354/1 AR Denarius C. Licinius L.f. Macer 27 views84 BC. (20mm, 3.60 g, 6h). Rome mint.
Diademed bust of Vejovis left, drapery on left shoulder, hurling thunderbolt
Minerva, holding spear, shield, and reins, driving galloping quadriga right, [C] LICINIVS [L F] MACER in ex

Crawford 354/1; Sydenham 732; Licinia 16; RBW 1355
1 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 17:43Canaan: Nice!!!
Roma495.jpg
Cr 412/1 AR Denarius Serratus L. Roscius Fabatus 30 viewsRome, 64 BCE
o: Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat-skin headdress; pileus of the Dioscuri surmounted by star behind, L•ROSCI below
r: Female standing right facing serpent; [control mark in left field], FABATI in ex
Crawford 412/1; Roscia 3
(3.82g, 19mm, 4h) bankers marks
I should add that I am rather fond or appreciative of bankers' marks. They show the extremely practical nature of any ancient transaction. Imagine if even a small portion of our transactions had to undergo human scrutiny at the level of negating the value of the transaction for every participant, plus the prior and succeeding transactions!
1 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 17:41Canaan: A great coin
Roma487.jpg
Cr 386/1 AR Denarius L. Cassius Q. f. Longinus 30 viewsRome, 78 BCE
o: Head of Liber (or Bacchus) right, wearing ivy wreath; thyrsus over shoulder
r: Head of Liber left, wearing vine wreath; L•CASSI•Q•F behind
Crawford 386/1; RSC Cassia 6.
(3.88g, 14mm, 9h)
An unusual type, with heads on both sides there is some dispute as to the identity of the images. If both are manifestations of Bacchus, then this moneyer apparently really liked to have a good time and wanted his future constituents to know it.
2 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 17:40Canaan: Very nice!!!!
Roma475.jpg
Cr 329/1b AR Denarius P. Cornelius Lentulus M.f. 52 viewsRome, 100 BCE
o: Bust of Hercules right, seen from behind, holding club, shield in left field, K below pellet in right field, ROMA below
r: Roma standing facing, holding spear and wearing triple-crested helmet, Genius of the Roman People right crowning her and holding cornucopiae, K below pellet in left field, LENT•MAR•F in ex, all within laurel-wreath
Crawford 329/1b; Cornelia 25a
(3.94g, 20mm, 12h)
A somewhat busy design.
5 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 17:39Canaan: Interesting type, it is a beauty
image00043Nomospomponia.jpg
Cr 334/1 AR Denarius L. Pomponius Molo 23 viewsL. Pomponius Molo, 97 BCE Denarius (20 mm, 3.81 g, 6 h), Rome.
L.POMPON.MOLO Laureate head of Apollo to right.
NVMA POMPIL Numa standing before altar, sacrificing. Babelon (Pomponia) 6. Crawford 334/1. Sydenham 607.
1 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 05:30Enodia: great reverse scene.
500Bert363.jpg
Cr 44/1 AR Victoriatus Anonymous 39 viewsafter 211 BC. AR Victoriatus (17mm, 3.14g, 11h) Rome mint
O: Laureate head of Jupiter r.
R: Victory standing r., crowning trophy
Crawford 44/1
[my opinion: Although Victoriati can be seen as excruciatingly repetitive, with good reason, the obverse of this coin shows considerable artistry in execution.]
3 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 05:29Enodia: a very cool coin!
Roma487.jpg
Cr 386/1 AR Denarius L. Cassius Q. f. Longinus 30 viewsRome, 78 BCE
o: Head of Liber (or Bacchus) right, wearing ivy wreath; thyrsus over shoulder
r: Head of Liber left, wearing vine wreath; L•CASSI•Q•F behind
Crawford 386/1; RSC Cassia 6.
(3.88g, 14mm, 9h)
An unusual type, with heads on both sides there is some dispute as to the identity of the images. If both are manifestations of Bacchus, then this moneyer apparently really liked to have a good time and wanted his future constituents to know it.
2 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 05:23Jay GT4: Really great type
image00066Nomos.jpg
Cr 401/1 AR Denarius Mn. Aquillius Mn.f. Mn.n34 viewso: VIRTVS - III VIR Helmeted and draped bust of Virtus to right, with large head
r: MN F MN N / MN AQVIL / SICIL. Mn. Aquilius (Cos. 101) raising fallen Sicily
65 BCE  Denarius Serratus (19 mm, 3.82 g, 6 h), Rome.
Babelon (Aquilia) 2. Crawford 401/1. Sydenham 798. Toned and struck on a broad flan.
This coin is somewhat unintentionally ironic. The moneyer's honored grandfather was accused of fleecing the people of Sicily, when he was governor of the province after the slave revolts. He later managed to antagonize Mithridates VI of Pontus, leading to widespread slaughter of Romans in Asia.
As Wikipedia summarizes the aftermath: "Mithridates defeated Aquillius in 88 near Protostachium. Aquillius was attempting to make his way back to Italy and managed to make it to Lesbos, where he was delivered to Mithridates by the inhabitants of Mytilene. After being taken to the mainland, he was then placed on a donkey and paraded back to Pergamon. On the trip, he was forced to confess his supposed crimes against the peoples of Anatolia. Aquillius's father, the elder Manius Aquillius, was a former Roman governor of Pergamon and was hated for the egregious taxes that he imposed. It was generally thought that Manius Aquillius the younger would follow in the footsteps of his father as a tax profiteer and was hated by some of the local peoples."
Grandpa was thereafter killed by Mithridates by having molten gold poured down his throat.
2 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 05:22Jay GT4: Love the toning
Roma475.jpg
Cr 329/1b AR Denarius P. Cornelius Lentulus M.f. 52 viewsRome, 100 BCE
o: Bust of Hercules right, seen from behind, holding club, shield in left field, K below pellet in right field, ROMA below
r: Roma standing facing, holding spear and wearing triple-crested helmet, Genius of the Roman People right crowning her and holding cornucopiae, K below pellet in left field, LENT•MAR•F in ex, all within laurel-wreath
Crawford 329/1b; Cornelia 25a
(3.94g, 20mm, 12h)
A somewhat busy design.
5 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 05:21Jay GT4: Great coin
CNGBlasio.jpg
Cr 296/1d AR Denarius Cn. Blasio Cn.f. 34 viewso: Helmeted male head (Mars or Scipio Africanus?) right; [mark of value] above, prow stem behind
r: Jupiter standing facing, holding scepter and thunderbolt, crowned by Juno on left and Minerva on right
Cn. Blasio Cn.f. 112-111 BC. AR Denarius (17mm, 3.86 g, 6h). Rome mint. Helmeted male head (Mars or Scipio Africanus?) right; [mark of value] above, prow stem behind / Jupiter standing facing, holding scepter and thunderbolt, between Juno on left and Minerva on right, crowning Jupiter with wreath; Π between Jupiter and Minerva. Crawford 296/1d; Sydenham 561b; Cornelia 19.
2 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 05:21Jay GT4: Wonderful
504BERT424.jpg
Cr 344/4a AE As L. Titurius L.f. Sabinus 22 viewsRome, 89 BC. (31mm, 11.94g, 9h)
o: Laureate head of Janus
r: Prow right, L TITVRI L F above, [SABINVS] below, I before
Crawford 344/4a; RBW 1304
1 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 05:17Carausius: Attractive coin that I nearly bid on myself!
RomaTrio.jpg
Cr 390/1 AR Denarius L. Lucretius Trio 43 viewsRome, 74 BCE
o: Radiate head of Sol right
r: Crescent moon surrounded by seven stars; TRIO above, L•LVCRETI below
Crawford 390/1; Lucretia 2.
(3.85g, 16mm, 12h)
4 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 05:16Carausius: Very attractive example.
521RomaLot511.jpg
Cr 448/1a AR Denarius L. Hostilius Saserna 25 viewsRome, 48 BCE
o: Female head right, wearing laurel wreath
r: Victory walking right, holding trophy over left shoulder and caduceus in right hand; L•HOSTILIVS downwards before, SASERNA upwards behind. Crawford 448/1a; RSC Hostilia 5.
3.90g, 18mm, 10h.
1 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 05:12Carausius: Lovely coin. I prefer this of your two specimens....
500Bert363.jpg
Cr 44/1 AR Victoriatus Anonymous 39 viewsafter 211 BC. AR Victoriatus (17mm, 3.14g, 11h) Rome mint
O: Laureate head of Jupiter r.
R: Victory standing r., crowning trophy
Crawford 44/1
[my opinion: Although Victoriati can be seen as excruciatingly repetitive, with good reason, the obverse of this coin shows considerable artistry in execution.]
3 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 04:31Steve B5: These anonymous victoriatii are really tough to at...
Roma475.jpg
Cr 329/1b AR Denarius P. Cornelius Lentulus M.f. 52 viewsRome, 100 BCE
o: Bust of Hercules right, seen from behind, holding club, shield in left field, K below pellet in right field, ROMA below
r: Roma standing facing, holding spear and wearing triple-crested helmet, Genius of the Roman People right crowning her and holding cornucopiae, K below pellet in left field, LENT•MAR•F in ex, all within laurel-wreath
Crawford 329/1b; Cornelia 25a
(3.94g, 20mm, 12h)
A somewhat busy design.
5 commentsPMah08/28/18 at 04:20Steve B5: Really nice collection of RR coins. All are good ...
502BERT404.jpg
Cr 308/1a AR Denarius M. Herennius 32 views 108-107 BCE. AR Denarius M. Herennius, Rome, (19mm, 3.83g, 11h).
O: Diademed head of Pietas r.; control mark before chin;PIETAS behind.
R: M HERENNI, left; Amphinomus carrying his father aloft r., who looks back
Crawford 308/1a; RBW -; RSC Herennia 1.
[The Herennii seem to have adopted the Sicilian image of the brothers who fled Aetna with their parents, but most sources put the origin of the gens in Campania.]
2 commentsPMah08/27/18 at 08:13okidoki: excellent and stylistic
     
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