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Domitian_RIC_280.jpg
RIC 0280 Domitian Sestertius29 viewsIMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI
Laureate head right with Aegis

SC
Domitian riding right on horseback with shield, striking with spear at falling German

Rome, 85 AD

25.81g

RIC 280 (C)

Ex-Calgary Coin

A scarcer type
4 commentsJay GT410/19/19 at 22:23Nemonater: Cool!
IMG_5147.jpg
10 Constantius II53 viewsConstantius II. AE2. Lyons. DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl-diademe, draped, cuirassed bust right, A behind head / FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, soldier standing left, one knee drawn up, about to spear fallen horseman wearing a Phrygian helmet and is sitting on ground, arms raised. A in left field. Mintmark SLG

RIC Lyons 100
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)10/19/19 at 17:32maridvnvm: Thirded
IMG_5249.jpg
05 Constantius II34 viewsConstantius II. AE2. Arles. DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, soldier standing left, one knee drawn up, about to spear falling horseman wearing a Phrygian helmet and is sitting on ground, arms raised. A in left field. Mintmark PARL
RIC Arles 103 variant?
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)10/19/19 at 17:32maridvnvm: Nice
IMG_5450.jpg
4 Constans17 viewsConstans, AE of Siscia. AD 337-350. DN CONSTA-NS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP REPARATIO, radiate phoenix standing right on rocky mound. Mintmark delta SIS[SYM4] (like a Y). RIC VIII Siscia 241.2 commentsRandygeki(h2)10/19/19 at 17:31maridvnvm: Nice clear symbol
IMG_5447.jpg
01 Constantius II18 viewsConstantius II
DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG Constantius II pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO soldier spearing Horseman, bearded,, reaching,
ALEΓ in ex. Γ in left field

Alexandria 72
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)10/19/19 at 17:31maridvnvm: I always like these Alexandrians
D295a.jpg
Domitian RIC-29517 viewsÆ Dupondius, 13.50g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: S C in field; Trophy; to l., German captive std. l.; to r., Germania std. r.
RIC 295 (C). BMC 310. BNC 332.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, October 2019. Ex Edgar L. Owen.

A 'Germania Capta' dupondius struck during Domitian's first issue of 85, the first bronze issue that fully celebrated the German victory. The war with the German tribe the Chatti likely took place in either 82 or 83. Domitian acquired the title 'Germanicus' in 83, the year of his German triumph. Why it took so long for these achievements to be commemorated on the bronze coinage is a mystery. Perhaps the bronze mint was not in full operation until 85? The motif of the reverse design closely follows the 'Judaea Capta' types of Vespasian (who in turn copied it from well known republican types). The trunk of the trophy even resembles a palm. The 'Germania Capta' types would be struck for only a few short years between 85-88.

Beautiful dark olive green patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/19/19 at 16:17Tracy Aiello: Lovely.
1492_Trajan_Seleucia~3.jpg
Trajan - Seleucia Pieria2 views101-117 AD
laureate head right
ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙϹ ΝΕΡ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟϹ ΑΡΙϹΤ ϹΕΒ ΓΕΡΜ ΔΑΚ
Baetyl with fillet attached within square shrine with pyramidal roof surmounted by an eagle
ϹΕΛΕΥΚΕωΝ ΠΕΙΕΡΙΑϹ
B
ΖΕΥС / ΚΑСΙΟС
RPC III, 3768; BMC 37; CRS 420/53a
ex Savoca
1 commentsJohny SYSEL10/19/19 at 15:25Mat: A nice coin, I like the reverse
86A_1.jpg
"Q" Quinarius, RRC 86A/14 viewsDenomination: Quinarius
Era: c. 211 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma r. with splayed visor. Hair curl visible on far side of Roma’s neck. Behind, “V”. Border of dots
Reverse: Dioscuri r.; “ROMA” in exergue. “Q” symbol below horses
Mint: S. E. Italy
Weight: 2.11 gm.
Reference: Crawford 86A/1
Provenance: Nomisma E-Live Auction 12, October 2, 2019, Lot 2034

Comments: “Q” symbol quinarius, Not to be confused with the more common Crawford 102/2 Q quinarius varieties. Very scarce, 6 examples in ACSearch at this writing.

Glossy jet black patina(?) Some reverse corrosion, otherwise GVF.
2 commentsSteve B510/19/19 at 15:25Mat: Very nice
1343_P_Sabina_RPC2544.jpg
2544 LYDIA, Saitta Sabina, Dionysos standing3 viewsReference.
RPC III 2544; Wa 5172; Paris 1060; BMC -; SNG Cop. -; SNG v. Aulock 8246

Obv. ϹΑΒΕΙΝΑ ϹΕΒΑϹΤΗ
Draped bust of Sabina, right

Rev. ϹΑΙΤΤΗΝΩΝ
Dionysus standing l., holding cantharus in his r. hand, l. resting on thyrsus; at his feet, panther

4.10 gr
mm
h

Note.
ex Slg. Rolf Jovy, erworben 1968 von Münzen & Medaillen
1 commentsokidoki10/19/19 at 15:25Mat: Very nice bronze
cascalongus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/217 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
7 commentsCarausius10/19/19 at 14:52Steve P: Wow, that coin is deadly! (congrats, my coin-frien...
20191012_133554.jpg
Taras, Calabria3 views325-280 BC
AR Tritemorion (3/4 Obol) (8mm, 0.38g)
O: Bridled head of horse right.
R: Bridled head of horse right; Φ to right.
cf Vlasto 1716; SNG France 2236; McGill II, 211v; HGC I, 926v; Cote 520v; Sear 358v; HN Italy 981
ex LAC

Possibly an unpublished variety with this control mark.


1 commentsEnodia10/19/19 at 14:24Jay GT4: Tiny!
86A_1.jpg
"Q" Quinarius, RRC 86A/14 viewsDenomination: Quinarius
Era: c. 211 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma r. with splayed visor. Hair curl visible on far side of Roma’s neck. Behind, “V”. Border of dots
Reverse: Dioscuri r.; “ROMA” in exergue. “Q” symbol below horses
Mint: S. E. Italy
Weight: 2.11 gm.
Reference: Crawford 86A/1
Provenance: Nomisma E-Live Auction 12, October 2, 2019, Lot 2034

Comments: “Q” symbol quinarius, Not to be confused with the more common Crawford 102/2 Q quinarius varieties. Very scarce, 6 examples in ACSearch at this writing.

Glossy jet black patina(?) Some reverse corrosion, otherwise GVF.
2 commentsSteve B510/19/19 at 14:23Jay GT4: Very cool denomination, congrats!
D295a.jpg
Domitian RIC-29517 viewsÆ Dupondius, 13.50g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: S C in field; Trophy; to l., German captive std. l.; to r., Germania std. r.
RIC 295 (C). BMC 310. BNC 332.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, October 2019. Ex Edgar L. Owen.

A 'Germania Capta' dupondius struck during Domitian's first issue of 85, the first bronze issue that fully celebrated the German victory. The war with the German tribe the Chatti likely took place in either 82 or 83. Domitian acquired the title 'Germanicus' in 83, the year of his German triumph. Why it took so long for these achievements to be commemorated on the bronze coinage is a mystery. Perhaps the bronze mint was not in full operation until 85? The motif of the reverse design closely follows the 'Judaea Capta' types of Vespasian (who in turn copied it from well known republican types). The trunk of the trophy even resembles a palm. The 'Germania Capta' types would be struck for only a few short years between 85-88.

Beautiful dark olive green patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/19/19 at 13:59Jay GT4: Great patina
D295a.jpg
Domitian RIC-29517 viewsÆ Dupondius, 13.50g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: S C in field; Trophy; to l., German captive std. l.; to r., Germania std. r.
RIC 295 (C). BMC 310. BNC 332.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, October 2019. Ex Edgar L. Owen.

A 'Germania Capta' dupondius struck during Domitian's first issue of 85, the first bronze issue that fully celebrated the German victory. The war with the German tribe the Chatti likely took place in either 82 or 83. Domitian acquired the title 'Germanicus' in 83, the year of his German triumph. Why it took so long for these achievements to be commemorated on the bronze coinage is a mystery. Perhaps the bronze mint was not in full operation until 85? The motif of the reverse design closely follows the 'Judaea Capta' types of Vespasian (who in turn copied it from well known republican types). The trunk of the trophy even resembles a palm. The 'Germania Capta' types would be struck for only a few short years between 85-88.

Beautiful dark olive green patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/19/19 at 12:45Vincent: Super coin and write up....first one I've ever...
laris.jpg
Thessaly, Larissa (360 - 325 B.C.)8 viewsÆ Dichalkon
O: Head of Larissa facing slightly left, wearing ampyx; grain ears in hair.
R: Horseman riding right, holding lance;
5.84g
19mm
Rogers 284; BCD Thessaly II 393; HGC 4, 530
2 commentsMat10/18/19 at 22:06Steve P: Cool addition, M-Dawg (congrats)
Carausius_Mantle.jpg
Carausius7 viewsAE-Antoninianus
IMP CARAVSIVS PF AVG; Radiate bust in imperial mantle to right.
PAX AVG; Pax stg. left, holding scepter and branch; F O in fields.
Ex: ML
London
RIC -
3 commentsJulianus of Pannonia10/18/19 at 20:23Paul R3: Wow! They dont get better than that.
V159bestlg.jpg
Vespasian RIC-15935 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.69g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to l. Captive stg. r.; to r., Judaea std. r. on cuirass; both figures surrounded by arms
RIC 159 (C3). BMC 532. BNC 490, pl. XLIV (same dies).
Acquired from Witter Coins, eBay, October 2019. Ex Triton V, 16 January 2002, lot 1913 (From the Robert Schonwalter Collection). Ex Worner List 1, January 1951, no. 394. Formerly in NGC holder #4683650-005, with grade 'F', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

Ambition sighed: she found it vain to trust
The faithless column and the crumbling bust;
Huge moles, whose shadow stretched from shore to shore,
Their ruins perished, and their place no more!
Convinced, she now contracts her vast design,
And all her triumphs shrink into a coin.
A narrow orb each crowded conquest keeps,
Beneath her palm here sad Judea weeps. -
Alexander Pope, To Mr. Addison, Occasioned by his Dialogues on Medals II. 19-26

For Jerusalem is ruined, and Judah is fallen ... Thy men shall fall by the sword and thy mighty in the war. And her gates shall lament and mourn, and she being desolate shall sit upon the ground - Isaiah III.25-26.

In 70 AD Jerusalem was besieged and sacked and the Temple razed by the Roman forces commanded by Titus Caesar. The following year a massive joint Triumph was held in Rome for Vespasian and Titus to celebrate their successful conclusion of the Jewish Rebellion. Coins were also issued to commemorate their victory. These so called 'Judaea Capta' coins first appeared in late 70 just after the fall of Jerusalem in August, both in the precious metals and at first sparingly in bronze. It wasn't until 71, the year of the triumph, that the bronze coinage came into its own with a whole host of 'Judaea Capta' types. Probably the most famous of these depicts the ubiquitous date palm with a standing bound captive to the left and a seated Judaea to the right, both surrounded by arms. The second bronze issue of 71 saw these produced in massive quantities (Colin Kraay knew of 23 reverse dies paired with this obverse). Although the overall allegorical meaning of the reverse is readily apparent, what each individual device specifically symbolises is open to debate. We are on firm ground to assume the date palm represents the land of Judaea as H. Mattingly proposed in BMCRE II (although J. M. Cody speculated the palm possibly represents the Roman victory). The motif of the standing captive is copied from earlier Republican coin issues, reminiscent of the Gaulish and Spanish captives on those Republican types. His dress indicates he is a barbarian from outside the boundaries of Roman civilisation. In the spirit of the 'Vercingetorix' denarius, H. St. J. Hart proposed the captive is actually either Simon Bar Giora or John of Gischala(!), the two defeated Jewish commanders. The seated female figure is the personification of Judaea, the daughter of Zion. This figure is frequently seen on the various designs of the series, often paired with the palm tree. Her attitude of mourning and dejection leaves little doubt she is lamenting the defeat of her people.

Modern viewers see this as a forlorn scene of defeat, however, to the Roman coin designers the images are meant to convey victory over a worthy foe. The Jewish War was an important event for the fledgling Flavian dynasty - in essence it gave them the legitimacy to rule. The ensuing propaganda onslaught after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem is awe inspiring. The slight of hand the Flavian regime pulled off which transformed defeated rebel provincials into a foreign menace is truly amazing. The coins were a major part of the regime's propaganda commemorating Vespasian's defeat of the Jews and saving the empire. Their efforts paid off, for even today this 'Judaea Capta' type is one of the most iconic and recognised reverses in the whole of Roman coinage.

Fantastic surfaces in good metal. A beauty in hand.
7 commentsDavid Atherton10/18/19 at 20:22Paul R3: Yep thats a super coin!
134Hadrian__RIC133a~0.jpg
133 Hadrian Denarius Roma 119-25 AD Providentia standing3 viewsReference.
Strack 76; RIC 133; RSC 1198.

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder, seen from front

Rev. P M TR P COS III. PRO - AVG
Providentia standing facing, head left, extending hand and holding sceptre; globe at feet to left.

3.20 gr
18 mm
6h
1 commentsokidoki10/18/19 at 20:18Paul R3: Very nice coin! Really like the portrait.
A_and_V_Antioch_7th_Wksp_Large.jpg
Vabalathus and Aurelian Antioch 7th Officina18 viewsVabalathus: 270 - 272 AD; Aurelian: 270 - 275 AD
Julius Aurelius Septimius Vabalathus Athenodorus (Wahb Allat), son of Septimius Odaenathus and Septimia Zenobia. Palmyrene Empire.
Obv: VABALATHVS V C R IM D R1; Bust of Vabalathus, laureate, diademed, draped and curiassed, facing right, seen from behind.
Rev: IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG; Bust of Aurelian, radiate and curiassed, facing right, from the front, Z in exergue.
Denomination: billion antoninianus; Mint: Antioch; Officina: 7th; Issue: 1st; Date: Nov. 270 - Mar. 272; Weight: 4.137g; Diameter: 20.3mm; Die axis: 0º; References, for example: RIC V v.1 381 correc; MER - RIC 3110; SRCV III 11718

Notes:

1VABALATHVS V[IR] C[LARISSIMUS] R[EX] IM[PERATOR] D[UX] R[OMANORUM]. See for example, Bland (2011), pp. 135, 141 and Estiot, p. 118, esp. note 462. Although Potter, page 267 and footnote 24 postulates V[IR] C[ONSULARIS] for the mint at Antioch I would certainly side with Bland and Estiot.

Which side of this coin is the obverse and which side is the reverse?
Webb in RIC V, v.1 puts great weight on the titulature of Aurelian and mentions that mint marks on the obverse of coins were not unknown at Antioch. He considers the coin to have been struck as a sign of vassalage instead of having been struck as an insult. Webb states that Aurelian’s bust is on the obverse of the coin (p. 260). Robertson, pp. cxix and 142 also considers Aurelian’s bust to be on the obverse of the coin, but does not state an explicit reason for her position. Mattingly (1936) holds that the mint mark is the determining factor, and therefore believes that Aurelian’s bust is on the reverse of the coin. In SRCV III, p. 442 Sear follows the reasoning of Mattingly and although Vagi agrees that Aurelian’s bust is on the reverse of the coin (p. 403) he does not explicitly state his reason for believing so. Estiot states that the officina mark under the bust of Aurelian clearly indicates that his portrait is on the reverse of the coin (p. 118). Bland (2011) follows suit. When discussing this issue from Antioch he states that the officina mark is always placed on the reverse of coins. He notes that the placement of the officina mark sent a signal that Aurelian was “...being accorded a lower status than Vabalathus, although he was given his correct titles of Imperator and Augustus, and he wore a radiate crown, also traditionally associated with the senior Augustus” (p. 142 - 3). Watson argues that Queen Zenobia’s assertion of Palmyrene independence from Rome took place gradually (pp. 67 - 9). Bland believes that the placement of the officina mark under the bust of Aurelian on this coin was just another step in that assertion of independence.

Photo credits: Forum Ancient Coins

Sources

Bland 2011: Bland, Roger. “The Coinage of Vabalathus and Zenobia from Antioch and Alexandria" in Numismatic Chronicle, 171 (2011): 133 - 186.
Estiot, Sylviane. Monnaies de L’Empire romain XII.1: D’Aurelian à Florien (270 - 276 apres J.-C.). Paris: Bibliothèque nationale de France, 2004.
Mattingly 1936: Mattingly, Harold. “The Palmyrene Princes and the Mints of Antioch and Alexandria.” The Numismatic Chronicle and Journal of the Royal Numismatic Society, fifth Series, vol. 16, no. 62 (1936): pp. 89 - 114.
MER - RIC: Maison de l’Orient et la Méditerranée: Monnaies de l’Empire Romain / Roman Imperial Coinage AD 268-276. Accessed March 7, 2019. http://www.ric.mom.fr/en/home.
Potter, David S. The Roman Empire at Bay: AD 180 - 395. New York: Routledge, 2004
RIC V v.1: Webb, Percy. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. V, Part 1: Valerian to Florian, edited by Harold Mattingly and Edward Sydenham. London: Spink & Son, 1927.
Robertson, Anne. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, Vol. IV Valerian I to Allectus. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1978.
SRCV III: Sear, David. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. III: Maximinus I to Carinus. London: Spink, 2005.
Vagi, David. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire, Volume One: History. Sidney, Ohio: Coin World, 1999.
Watson, Alaric. Aurelian and the Third Century. New York: Routledge, 1999.
1 commentsTracy Aiello10/18/19 at 20:13Paul R3: Wow! You've got one really nice set of coins t...
Macedon_Kassander_Price133_gf.jpg
Kassander. 319-297 BC. AR Tetradrachm of Amphipolis4 viewsMacedon, Kassander. 319-297 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.24 gm) of Amphipolis, 316-294 BC. Head of Herakles r., clad in lion skin headdress. In the name and types of Alexander III. / Zeus Aetophoros enthroned l., holding eagle and sceptre, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to r., dolphin to l., pellet in Π below throne.  gVF   CNG EA 449 #53. HGC 3.1 #991; Muller plate IX #542 (Incerti Macedoniae); Price 133; Troxell Studies, Issue L #7. 1 commentsAnaximander10/18/19 at 10:28Jay GT4: I always enjoy seeing your additions
Macedon_DemPoliorketes_Newell_DP68_gf.jpg
Demetrios I Poliorketes. 306-285 BC. AR Tetradrachm Pella 3 viewsMacedon, Demetrios I Poliorketes. 306-285 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.40 gm) of Pella 294-292 BC. Winged Nike stdg l. on prow of galley, blowing trumpet & holding stylis. / Poseidon Pelagaios advancing l. w/ trident. ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ. Ɪᵔ monogram to l.; dolphin above to r.  EF.  Lustrous. Newell DP 68 (obv. die LVII, plate VI #18); ACNAC Dewing #1196; HGC 3.1 #1012e. cf. SNG Cop 2 #1178 (no star or dolphin); SNG Munich 1042 (no dolphin, same obv. die); Sotheby's 6147 #236. 1 commentsAnaximander10/18/19 at 10:27Jay GT4: Amazing collection
Corinth_Alexander_Tetradrachm_Price_671.jpg
Kings of Macedon, Demetrios I Poliorketes, 306-283 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Corinth 27 viewsHead of Herakles right wearing lion skin headdress.
BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus Aëtophoros seated left dove left in wreath in left field, H beneath throne.

Price 671 (from the same obverse die as Price 670); Troxell Peloponnesian Alexanders pl. XIX, 6; Noe ANSNS 6, 19. Struck ca. 303-290 BC in Corinth by Demetrios I Poliorketes. Very rare.

(25 mm, 17.2 g, 1h).
Steven Battelle; ex-Gorny & Mosch 212, 5-6 March 2013, 1370.

Only two other examples of Price 671 are known, both from a different obverse die to that of this coin.This coin is from the same obverse die as that which struck the BM example of Price 670. On the latter, the die breaks around the eye of Herakles are more advanced, suggesting that Price 671 more correctly precedes the striking of Price 670 in the sequence of Corinthian Alexanders.
2 commentsn.igma10/18/19 at 10:26Anaximander: Impressive coin. Impressive scholarship.
V287sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-28725 viewsÆ As, 9.19g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: AEQVITAS AVGVSTI; S C low in field; Aequitas stg. l., with scales and rod
RIC 287 (C). BMC 600. BNC 576.
Acquired from eBay, October 2019.

After the financial mess Nero had left the empire in and the heavy costs of the recent Civil War and Judaean revolt, restoring the state's finances were a top priority for Vespasian upon his accession. This Aequitas type struck during his great bronze issue of 71 proclaims the honest administration of public finances and that lapsed standards would be restored. Aequitas holding her scales and measuring rod was probably based on a cult image of the deity. She first shows up as an imperial virtue on the coinage under Galba, a virtue that Vespasian was eager to emulate. The type comes in two variants - one with S C in exergue and, as seen here, S C low in field.

Nice dark tan patina and well centred.
2 commentsDavid Atherton10/18/19 at 10:24Jay GT4: Yes very nice
V287sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-28725 viewsÆ As, 9.19g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: AEQVITAS AVGVSTI; S C low in field; Aequitas stg. l., with scales and rod
RIC 287 (C). BMC 600. BNC 576.
Acquired from eBay, October 2019.

After the financial mess Nero had left the empire in and the heavy costs of the recent Civil War and Judaean revolt, restoring the state's finances were a top priority for Vespasian upon his accession. This Aequitas type struck during his great bronze issue of 71 proclaims the honest administration of public finances and that lapsed standards would be restored. Aequitas holding her scales and measuring rod was probably based on a cult image of the deity. She first shows up as an imperial virtue on the coinage under Galba, a virtue that Vespasian was eager to emulate. The type comes in two variants - one with S C in exergue and, as seen here, S C low in field.

Nice dark tan patina and well centred.
2 commentsDavid Atherton10/18/19 at 08:07FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example of the type.
1341_P_Hadrian_RPC878.jpg
878 BOSPORUS, Kingdom of the Bosporus Hadrian 123-24 AD Cotys II4 viewsReference.
RPC III, 878; Anokhin 471; MacDonald 422

Issue Year ΚY (420)

Obv. ΒΑϹΙΛΕⲰϹ ΚΟΤΥΟϹ
Diademed and draped bust of Cotys II, right

Rev. ΚΥ
Laureate head of Hadrian, right

7.71 gr
19 mm
1h
1 commentsokidoki10/17/19 at 02:52v-drome: Amazing!!!
1-20190803_1-Pg5LT9Bj4Kqkoe2DmRK76fLb4H8bY3.jpg
Antoninus Pius. 138-161 AD. AE As3 viewsAntoninus Pius. 138-161 AD. AE As (9.86 gm, 25.5mm). Rome mint. Struck 140-144 AD.
Obverse: ANTONINVS AVG PI VS PP TRP COS III, laureate head right.
Reverse: ANNONA AVG, S-C, Annona standing right, holding grain ears over modius in right hand, cornucopia in left; at feet to right, prow right.
RIC III 675. VF.
1 commentsPaul R310/16/19 at 18:21okidoki: Nice Pius
1-20190803_1-3Nxiz9nYojC87KpJg6Sd4sqLCoQ5Db_(1).jpg
Spain, Bolskan (Osca). Circa 150-100 BC. AE Unit4 viewsSpain, Bolskan (Osca). Circa 150-100 BC. AE Unit (10.35 gm, 24mm).
Obverse: Bearded head right; dolphin behind.
Reverse: "BOLSKAN" in Celt-Iberian in exergue, rider on horse right, holding spear; star behind.
CNH 8; SNG BM Spain 734; SNG Copenhagen 325. VF.
1 commentsPaul R310/16/19 at 18:20okidoki: great looks
Brutus_new.jpg
002 Brutus AR Denarius29 viewsMarcus Junius Brutus (54 BC). AR denarius
(20.36 mm 4.04 g.). Rome.
Obv: Head of Libertas right
Rev: The consul Lucius Junius Brutus walking left between two lictors, carrying axes over their shoulders, and preceded by an accensus; BRVTVS in exergue.
Crawford 433/1. Sydenham 906. RSC Junia 31.
Purchased March 23, 2017 from Munzenkontor Kornbum on MA-Shops
1 commentsorfew10/16/19 at 17:20Jay GT4: Awesome coin
1-20190803_1-5GzYPg79b7RZWBq6s98E3mKXkNM24o.jpg
Julia Mamaea. Augusta, 222-235 AD. AR Denarius2 viewsJulia Mamaea. Augusta, 222-235 AD. AR Denarius (2,81 gm, 19mm). Rome mint. Struck 222 AD.
Obverse: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, bare headed, draped bust right.
Reverse: IVNO CONS-E-RVATRIX, Juno standing slightly left, holding patera and scepter; to left, peacock standing left.
RIC IV 343 (Severus Alexander); BMCRRE 43-5 (Severus Alexander); RSC 35. gVF.
1 commentsPaul R310/16/19 at 14:59Tracy Aiello: Magnificent coin.
1340_P_Hadrian_RPC1017.jpg
1017 BITHYNIA Koinon of Bithynia Hadrian, Octastyle temple and Prow4 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1017; Rec 38; Rec. Gén. 41.

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СΕΒ
Laureate head of Hadrian, right

Rev. KΟΙ-ΝΟΝ ΒΕΙΘΥΝΙΑС
Octastyle temple on podium of two steps; pellet between middle columns; figure in the pediment, below stairs forepart prow.

23.85 gr
34 mm
h
1 commentsokidoki10/15/19 at 21:53Jay GT4: Big coin, nice reverse!
Hadrian_RIC_363.jpg
RIC 3632 viewsDenarius, 134-138
Obv: HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P
Head, bare, r.
Rev: LIBERALITAS AVG - COS III
Liberalitas standing r., emptying cornucopiae.

17mm, 3.32g
1 commentsklausklage10/15/19 at 20:07okidoki: very nice reverse
PhilipII.jpg
Philip II Tetradrachm Lifetime Issue8 viewsPhilip II Tetradrachm Lifetime Issue Amphipolis Mint, 355-349/8.
O: Laureate head of Zeus to right.
R: ΦΙΛΙΠ ΠΟΥ Philip II, wearing kausia and chlamys and raising his right hand in salute, riding to left; horizontal club below belly.
- Le Rider 96-108

The reverse is a representation of the King’s arrival on his accession to the throne, dressed in traditional Macedonian garb.
1 commentsNemonater10/15/19 at 03:07Jay GT4: A real gem of a coin Nemo, congrats
Aurelian-Tetradrachm~0.jpg
Aurelian (270 - 275 A.D.)39 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Potin Tetradrachm
O: A K Λ ΔOM AVΡHΛIANOC CEB, Laureate and cuirassed bust right.
R: Eagle standing right on wreath, head turned left; star above right, L D right. Dated RY 4 (272/3 AD)
11.25g
21mm
Köln 3076; Dattari 5492; Milne 4398 var. (no star); Emmett 3933 var. (same)
5 commentsMat10/15/19 at 00:06NORMAN K: Nice.....great collection!
mamtet.jpg
Julia Mamaea (222 - 235 A.D.)42 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm
O: IOV MAMAIA CЄB MHTЄ CЄ K CTPA, draped bust right, wearing stephane.
R: Bust of Athena right, wearing Athenian helmet; LIA in left field, palm in right field.
Alexandria Mint, Year 11, 230/231 AD
11.18g
21mm
Emmett 3093; Dattari (Savio) 10051; BMC 1729; SNG Copenhagen 654.

Published on Wildwinds!
5 commentsMat10/15/19 at 00:05NORMAN K: A+++
sev33.jpg
Severus Alexander (222 - 235 A.D.)61 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm
O: Α ΚΑΙ ΜΑΡ ΑΥΡ СƐΥ ΑΛƐΞΑΝΔΡΟС ƐΥ laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Severus Alexander, r., seen from rear.
R: Nilus bust r., draped and wearing lotus wreath; to l., cornucopia on shoulder, r.; in front, palm branch L I = 10
Alexandria Mint
23mm
13.7g
Emmett 3122.10 (R3), Milne 3031; Dattari 4331

Rare

Published on Wildwinds!
9 commentsMat10/15/19 at 00:02NORMAN K: great coin!
Minerva_Roma.JPG
Claudius I AE As Minerva, Rome 41 - 50 AD3 viewsClaudius (41 - 54 AD)

AE As, Rome, 41 - 50 AD

Anv: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR IMP Bust left
Rev: S-C Minerva advancing rigth with shield and spear
RIC I 100

Weight: 12,1g.
Diameter: 29mm.
1 commentsJose Polanco10/14/19 at 23:45Jay GT4: A must have!
laris.jpg
Thessaly, Larissa (360 - 325 B.C.)8 viewsÆ Dichalkon
O: Head of Larissa facing slightly left, wearing ampyx; grain ears in hair.
R: Horseman riding right, holding lance;
5.84g
19mm
Rogers 284; BCD Thessaly II 393; HGC 4, 530
2 commentsMat10/14/19 at 23:41Jay GT4: Sweet!
Trajan_RIC_318_var-3.jpg
RIC 318 var.4 viewsDenarius, 114-117
Obv: IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC
Laur. r., dr. and cuirassed
Rev: P M TR P COS VI P P S P Q R – FORT RED
Fortuna seated l., holding rudder and cornucopiae.

19mm, 3.06g
Woytek 526h (35 specimen)
1 commentsklausklage10/14/19 at 19:57quadrans: Nice piece.. , and nice bust,
0162.jpg
L. Cassius Caeicianus, Denar2 viewsL. Cassius Caeicianus, Denar

RRC: 321/1
102 bc
3,74 gr

AV: CAEICIAN, Draped bust of Ceres left wearing barley-wreath
RV: L CASS(I), 2 yoked oxen, •N above

ex Künker, Auktion 318, Lot 887, 11.03.2019
Reported as ex Jesus Vico, Madrid 2009, Nr. 235.
1 commentsNorbert10/14/19 at 02:16Jay GT4: Very nice
Trajan_RIC_184_var.jpg
RIC 184 var.3 viewsDenarius, 103-111
Obv: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P
Laur. r., aegis
Rev: S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI
Genius standing l., holding patera and cornucopiae, with altar on l.

18mm, 3.48g
Woytek 217c (42 specimen)
1 commentsklausklage10/14/19 at 02:15Jay GT4: Beauty
1495_Rome_didrachm.jpg
Rome - AR Didrachm3 views225-217 BC
laureate head of Janus
Jupiter and Victory in quadriga right. Jupiter holding thunderbolt and scepter, Victory holding reins
ROMA
Crawford 34/1, Albert: 90.
ex Dionysos
1 commentsJohny SYSEL10/13/19 at 16:57Jay GT4: Nice one Johny
ZT_4.jpg
Phoenicia, Arados 175-174 B.C14 viewsAE 21.10mm (Thickness 3.14mm), weight 7.47g, die axis = 11h (350 degrees), denomination B.

Obverse: Turreted head of Tyche right, braided ponytail, palm frond behind, border of dots.

Reverse: Tyche standing left, holding wreath (palm branch) and sceptre, in left field taw (T) ayin (‘), in right field Aradian era date 85.
2 commentsArados10/13/19 at 15:56Arados: Thanks Ralph
915rma575.jpg
Cr 50/3 Æ As Anonymous [Anchor]2 views209-208 b.c.e. Rome mint
Laureate head of Janus; I (value) above
Prow right; I (value) above, anchor before, ROMA below
32.66 gm 34 mm
This issue is associated with a 60-As gold piece. A nice specimen with a pronounced eye and oar-box on the prow.
1 commentsPMah10/13/19 at 02:39Jay GT4: Nice big Republican
PhilipAplustre_Tet_b.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom. Philip II, Amphipolis mint31 viewsMacedonian Kingdom. Philip II, 359-336 BC. Silver Tetradrachm, Amphipolis mint. Early posthumous issue, struck under Kassander.
O: Zeus right wearing laurel wreath with berries.
R: Φ I Λ I Π - Π OY (Of Philip) Naked youth on horse prancing right holding long palm branch and reins; aplustre below; Γ under foreleg. Rider pl. 46, 18; SNG ANS 740. Light golden toning.

Plutarch (Alex., 3)
"To Philip, however, who had just taken Potidaea, there came three messages at the same time:
the first that Parmenio had conquered the Illyrians in a great battle, the second that his race-horse had won a victory at the Olympic games, while a third announced the birth of Alexander. These things delighted him, of course, and the seers raised his spirits still higher by declaring that the son whose birth coincided with three victories would be always victorious."

Plutarch (Alex., 4.10)
"...and (Philip) took care to have the victories of his chariots at Olympia engraved upon his coins..."

The reverse-types of Philip’s coins are nearly all agonistic, and refer either to the games celebrated by him at Dium in
honour of the Olympian Zeus (Müller, Mon. d'Alex., pp. II and 344), or, preferably, to the great Olympian games where his
chariots were victorious. We have, indeed, the direct assertion of Plutarch (Alex., c. 4) in favour of the latter
hypothesis, τας εν ‘Ολυμπια νικας των αρματων εγχαραττων τοις νομισμασιν. Philip was also successful at Olympia with the
race-horse (ιππω κελητι νενικηκέναι; Plut., Alex., 3), a victory of which he perpetuated the memory on his tetradrachms. The horseman
with kausia and chlamys is less certainly agonistic, and may (perhaps with a play upon his name) represent the king
himself as a typical Macedonian ιππευς.
Philip’s coins were struck at many mints in various parts of his empire. For the various mint-marks which they bear see
Müller’s Num. d'Alex. le Grand, the local attributions in which are, however, to be accepted with great caution. They
continued to circulate in Europe long after his death, and the Gauls, when they invaded and pillaged Greece, took vast
numbers of them back into their own land, where they long continued to serve as models for the native currency of Gaul and
Britain. (Historia Numorum, Barclay V. Head, 1887)

It is clear that, trying hard to show off, to pass and ultimately to impose his Greek character, Philip was especially
interested in the aesthetic aspect of his coins and also in the propaganda and psychological effects they would have
on the rest of the Greek world, and especially on "those sarcastic, democratic Athenians" and on "the more barbarian" people than himself...

Demosthenes (19, 308)
"And as for Philip,—why, good Heavens, he was a Greek of the Greeks, the finest orator and the most thorough—going
friend of Athens you could find in the whole world. And yet there were some queer, ill-conditioned fellows in Athens who
did not blush to abuse him, and even to call him a barbarian! "
4 commentsNemonater10/12/19 at 20:27orfew: Wow, that is excellent.
1323_Cf__Rostovtsew___Prou_p__159,_7_.jpg
PB Seal – Bulla Hadrian12 viewsReference
Cf. Rostovtsew & Prou p. 159, 7.

Obv.
Laureate and draped bust of Hadrian right, seen from rear
Rev.
Blank

8.48 gr
17x25.5 mm
1 commentsokidoki10/12/19 at 19:47quadrans: Wow, nice piece...
cascalongus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/217 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
7 commentsCarausius10/12/19 at 19:44quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
PhilipAplustre_Tet_b.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom. Philip II, Amphipolis mint31 viewsMacedonian Kingdom. Philip II, 359-336 BC. Silver Tetradrachm, Amphipolis mint. Early posthumous issue, struck under Kassander.
O: Zeus right wearing laurel wreath with berries.
R: Φ I Λ I Π - Π OY (Of Philip) Naked youth on horse prancing right holding long palm branch and reins; aplustre below; Γ under foreleg. Rider pl. 46, 18; SNG ANS 740. Light golden toning.

Plutarch (Alex., 3)
"To Philip, however, who had just taken Potidaea, there came three messages at the same time:
the first that Parmenio had conquered the Illyrians in a great battle, the second that his race-horse had won a victory at the Olympic games, while a third announced the birth of Alexander. These things delighted him, of course, and the seers raised his spirits still higher by declaring that the son whose birth coincided with three victories would be always victorious."

Plutarch (Alex., 4.10)
"...and (Philip) took care to have the victories of his chariots at Olympia engraved upon his coins..."

The reverse-types of Philip’s coins are nearly all agonistic, and refer either to the games celebrated by him at Dium in
honour of the Olympian Zeus (Müller, Mon. d'Alex., pp. II and 344), or, preferably, to the great Olympian games where his
chariots were victorious. We have, indeed, the direct assertion of Plutarch (Alex., c. 4) in favour of the latter
hypothesis, τας εν ‘Ολυμπια νικας των αρματων εγχαραττων τοις νομισμασιν. Philip was also successful at Olympia with the
race-horse (ιππω κελητι νενικηκέναι; Plut., Alex., 3), a victory of which he perpetuated the memory on his tetradrachms. The horseman
with kausia and chlamys is less certainly agonistic, and may (perhaps with a play upon his name) represent the king
himself as a typical Macedonian ιππευς.
Philip’s coins were struck at many mints in various parts of his empire. For the various mint-marks which they bear see
Müller’s Num. d'Alex. le Grand, the local attributions in which are, however, to be accepted with great caution. They
continued to circulate in Europe long after his death, and the Gauls, when they invaded and pillaged Greece, took vast
numbers of them back into their own land, where they long continued to serve as models for the native currency of Gaul and
Britain. (Historia Numorum, Barclay V. Head, 1887)

It is clear that, trying hard to show off, to pass and ultimately to impose his Greek character, Philip was especially
interested in the aesthetic aspect of his coins and also in the propaganda and psychological effects they would have
on the rest of the Greek world, and especially on "those sarcastic, democratic Athenians" and on "the more barbarian" people than himself...

Demosthenes (19, 308)
"And as for Philip,—why, good Heavens, he was a Greek of the Greeks, the finest orator and the most thorough—going
friend of Athens you could find in the whole world. And yet there were some queer, ill-conditioned fellows in Athens who
did not blush to abuse him, and even to call him a barbarian! "
4 commentsNemonater10/12/19 at 19:41quadrans: Nice piece..
Domitian_RIC_280.jpg
RIC 0280 Domitian Sestertius29 viewsIMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI
Laureate head right with Aegis

SC
Domitian riding right on horseback with shield, striking with spear at falling German

Rome, 85 AD

25.81g

RIC 280 (C)

Ex-Calgary Coin

A scarcer type
4 commentsJay GT410/12/19 at 19:36quadrans: Interesting piece..
94C61DEF-0E56-4090-A71F-F677D5575BBC.jpeg
County of Tripoli, Raymond III (1152-87), Æ Pougeoise12 viewsCounty of Tripoli, Raymond III (1152-87), Æ Pougeoise
Crescent and eight-pointed star with pellets between the rays, TRIPLIS (sic!)
Cross with arrows in the angles, no legend. 1.17 g.
Metc. 515, Schlumb. IV, 7 var., MPS p. 170, 10 var., Sabine 204 var.
Ex Münzen und Medaillen AG Basel Lagerliste 507, Feb. 1988, Nr. 358.
Ex Erich Wäckerlin collection
Ex Münzen & Medaillen GmbH
Auction 47 lot 45

Unpublished legend variant TRIPLIS
1 commentsVladislav D10/12/19 at 19:33quadrans: Nice one
A24E788E-D97F-45F6-BE50-ADD5CA75E594.jpeg
County of Tripoli, Raymond III (1152-87), Æ Pougeoise10 viewsCounty of Tripoli, Raymond III (1152-87), Æ Pougeoise

CVA TRIPOLIS crescent and eight pointed star.
Cross pommettée, arrow touching annulet in each angle.
16 mm, 1.40 g
CCS 10 ; Metcalf 513ff ;Wäckerlin 45

Ex Leu Numismatik web auction 8, lot 1803
1 commentsVladislav D10/12/19 at 19:32quadrans: Interesting piece..
C9EC0CD0-C162-4295-A30A-99B9C391D1A1.jpeg
County of Tripoli .Bohemond VII AD 1275 - 1287 . AR.Gros12 viewsCounty of Tripoli .Bohemond VII AD 1275 - 1287 . AR.Gros
4.24 g.
Cross in twelve-foil, +SEPTIMVS: BOEMVNDVS: COMES Rv. Castle in twelve-foil, +CIVITAS: TRIPOLIS: SYRIE
Metc. 497, Schl. IV, 21, MPS p.175, 26. Pressure mark.
Ex Jan Lis, London 1973.
Ex Erich Wäckerlin collection
Ex Münzen & Medaillen GmbH
Auction 47 lot 71
1 commentsVladislav D10/12/19 at 19:32quadrans: Wow, nice piece..
Richard_II_halfpenny.JPG
1377 - 1399, Richard II, AR Halfpenny struck at London, England4 viewsObverse: + RICARD : REX : ANGL. Crowned facing bust of Richard II within circle of pellets. Cross pattée in legend.
Reverse: CIVITAS LONDON. Long cross pattée dividing legend around inner circle of pellets into quarters, trefoil in each quarter of circle.
Type II, intermediate style, lombardic n's in 'LONDON'
Diameter: 13mm | Weight: 0.55gms | Die Axis: 1
SPINK: 1699 | North: 1331b

Richard II was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. Edward III's heir, Edward the Black Prince, was Richard's father but he died in 1376, leaving Richard as heir apparent. When Edward III died the following year, the 10-year-old Richard succeeded to the throne.
During Richard's first years as king the government was in the hands of a series of regency councils which were under the control of Richard's uncles John of Gaunt and Thomas of Woodstock. England then faced various problems, most notably the Hundred Years' War. Another major challenge of the reign was the Peasants' Revolt in 1381, a crisis which the young king played a central part in suppressing.
Richard sought to restrain the power of the aristocracy and this caused so much discontent that, in 1387, a group of aristocrats known as the Lords Appellant took control of the government. But by 1389 Richard had regained control and for the next eight years governed in apparent harmony with his former opponents. However, in 1397, Richard took his revenge on the Appellants, many of whom were executed or exiled. In 1399, after John of Gaunt died, the king disinherited Gaunt's son, Henry of Bolingbroke, who he had previously exiled. Henry invaded England in June 1399 with a small force that quickly grew in numbers. Meeting little resistance, Bolingbroke deposed Richard and had himself crowned as King Henry IV.
Henry had agreed to let Richard live after his abdication but this all changed when Henry discovered that Lord Despenser, the earls of Huntingdon, Kent and Salisbury, and possibly also the Earl of Rutland, who had all been demoted from the ranks they had been given by Richard, were conspiring to murder him and restore Richard to the throne. Although averted, the plot highlighted the danger of allowing Richard to live and he is reported to have been starved to death in captivity in Pontefract Castle on or around 14 February 1400.
Richard's body was then taken south from Pontefract and displayed in the old St Paul's Cathedral, London until the 6th of March after which it was taken for burial in King's Langley Priory, Hertfordshire. Sometime later, by the order of King Henry V, Richard's body was moved from the Priory to Westminster Abbey.
1 comments*Alex10/12/19 at 19:28quadrans: Nice piece..
Carausius_Mantle.jpg
Carausius7 viewsAE-Antoninianus
IMP CARAVSIVS PF AVG; Radiate bust in imperial mantle to right.
PAX AVG; Pax stg. left, holding scepter and branch; F O in fields.
Ex: ML
London
RIC -
3 commentsJulianus of Pannonia10/12/19 at 19:22quadrans: Nice piece..
893BFA252.jpg
Cr 28/4 AR Half-Quadrigatus/Drachm4 viewsAnonymous, Rome mint
2.99 gm; 17 mm
c. 225 BCE?
Laureate head of Fontus/Janus
Jupiter in quadriga driven by Victory l., holding sceptre and thunderbolt; in ex. ROMA.
This type is associated with the series staring with the AU stater with Dioscuri/Oath scene. Crawford dates the entire series to just before the introduction of the denarius, with a theory of the dating based on style. I have not reproduced or researched the arguments here.
This coin is much nicer in hand than the photo.
2 commentsPMah10/12/19 at 04:06Carausius: Good example of a scarce denomination.
Carausius_Mantle.jpg
Carausius7 viewsAE-Antoninianus
IMP CARAVSIVS PF AVG; Radiate bust in imperial mantle to right.
PAX AVG; Pax stg. left, holding scepter and branch; F O in fields.
Ex: ML
London
RIC -
3 commentsJulianus of Pannonia10/12/19 at 04:03Carausius: Beautiful example!
V159bestlg.jpg
Vespasian RIC-15935 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.69g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to l. Captive stg. r.; to r., Judaea std. r. on cuirass; both figures surrounded by arms
RIC 159 (C3). BMC 532. BNC 490, pl. XLIV (same dies).
Acquired from Witter Coins, eBay, October 2019. Ex Triton V, 16 January 2002, lot 1913 (From the Robert Schonwalter Collection). Ex Worner List 1, January 1951, no. 394. Formerly in NGC holder #4683650-005, with grade 'F', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

Ambition sighed: she found it vain to trust
The faithless column and the crumbling bust;
Huge moles, whose shadow stretched from shore to shore,
Their ruins perished, and their place no more!
Convinced, she now contracts her vast design,
And all her triumphs shrink into a coin.
A narrow orb each crowded conquest keeps,
Beneath her palm here sad Judea weeps. -
Alexander Pope, To Mr. Addison, Occasioned by his Dialogues on Medals II. 19-26

For Jerusalem is ruined, and Judah is fallen ... Thy men shall fall by the sword and thy mighty in the war. And her gates shall lament and mourn, and she being desolate shall sit upon the ground - Isaiah III.25-26.

In 70 AD Jerusalem was besieged and sacked and the Temple razed by the Roman forces commanded by Titus Caesar. The following year a massive joint Triumph was held in Rome for Vespasian and Titus to celebrate their successful conclusion of the Jewish Rebellion. Coins were also issued to commemorate their victory. These so called 'Judaea Capta' coins first appeared in late 70 just after the fall of Jerusalem in August, both in the precious metals and at first sparingly in bronze. It wasn't until 71, the year of the triumph, that the bronze coinage came into its own with a whole host of 'Judaea Capta' types. Probably the most famous of these depicts the ubiquitous date palm with a standing bound captive to the left and a seated Judaea to the right, both surrounded by arms. The second bronze issue of 71 saw these produced in massive quantities (Colin Kraay knew of 23 reverse dies paired with this obverse). Although the overall allegorical meaning of the reverse is readily apparent, what each individual device specifically symbolises is open to debate. We are on firm ground to assume the date palm represents the land of Judaea as H. Mattingly proposed in BMCRE II (although J. M. Cody speculated the palm possibly represents the Roman victory). The motif of the standing captive is copied from earlier Republican coin issues, reminiscent of the Gaulish and Spanish captives on those Republican types. His dress indicates he is a barbarian from outside the boundaries of Roman civilisation. In the spirit of the 'Vercingetorix' denarius, H. St. J. Hart proposed the captive is actually either Simon Bar Giora or John of Gischala(!), the two defeated Jewish commanders. The seated female figure is the personification of Judaea, the daughter of Zion. This figure is frequently seen on the various designs of the series, often paired with the palm tree. Her attitude of mourning and dejection leaves little doubt she is lamenting the defeat of her people.

Modern viewers see this as a forlorn scene of defeat, however, to the Roman coin designers the images are meant to convey victory over a worthy foe. The Jewish War was an important event for the fledgling Flavian dynasty - in essence it gave them the legitimacy to rule. The ensuing propaganda onslaught after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem is awe inspiring. The slight of hand the Flavian regime pulled off which transformed defeated rebel provincials into a foreign menace is truly amazing. The coins were a major part of the regime's propaganda commemorating Vespasian's defeat of the Jews and saving the empire. Their efforts paid off, for even today this 'Judaea Capta' type is one of the most iconic and recognised reverses in the whole of Roman coinage.

Fantastic surfaces in good metal. A beauty in hand.
7 commentsDavid Atherton10/12/19 at 04:02Carausius: Congratulations. A solid Judea Capta with an equa...
Macedon_AlexanderIII_SNG-Cop_800_gf.jpg
Alexander III. 336-323 BC. AR Tetradrachm of Arados4 viewsMacedon, Alexander III. 336-323 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.14 gm) of Arados, Attic stdd., 324-320 BC. Head of Herakles clad in lion skin headdress, r. / Zeus Aetophoros enthroned l., holding sceptre and eagle. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, ΣΩ in left field, ΑΡ (civic) monogram under throne. VF. SNG Cop 2 #800; ACNAC Dewing 1065 (same dies, rev. die engraved with only Σ in l. field); Duyrat group IV, series 6 #402 (D77/R156); HGC 3.1 #910n; Muller pg. 297 (plate XIX #1363); Price 3321; Rouvier 51; SNG Alpha Bank 671 corr. (Σꭥ). 1 commentsAnaximander10/12/19 at 03:33Jay GT4: Supurb
V159bestlg.jpg
Vespasian RIC-15935 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.69g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to l. Captive stg. r.; to r., Judaea std. r. on cuirass; both figures surrounded by arms
RIC 159 (C3). BMC 532. BNC 490, pl. XLIV (same dies).
Acquired from Witter Coins, eBay, October 2019. Ex Triton V, 16 January 2002, lot 1913 (From the Robert Schonwalter Collection). Ex Worner List 1, January 1951, no. 394. Formerly in NGC holder #4683650-005, with grade 'F', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

Ambition sighed: she found it vain to trust
The faithless column and the crumbling bust;
Huge moles, whose shadow stretched from shore to shore,
Their ruins perished, and their place no more!
Convinced, she now contracts her vast design,
And all her triumphs shrink into a coin.
A narrow orb each crowded conquest keeps,
Beneath her palm here sad Judea weeps. -
Alexander Pope, To Mr. Addison, Occasioned by his Dialogues on Medals II. 19-26

For Jerusalem is ruined, and Judah is fallen ... Thy men shall fall by the sword and thy mighty in the war. And her gates shall lament and mourn, and she being desolate shall sit upon the ground - Isaiah III.25-26.

In 70 AD Jerusalem was besieged and sacked and the Temple razed by the Roman forces commanded by Titus Caesar. The following year a massive joint Triumph was held in Rome for Vespasian and Titus to celebrate their successful conclusion of the Jewish Rebellion. Coins were also issued to commemorate their victory. These so called 'Judaea Capta' coins first appeared in late 70 just after the fall of Jerusalem in August, both in the precious metals and at first sparingly in bronze. It wasn't until 71, the year of the triumph, that the bronze coinage came into its own with a whole host of 'Judaea Capta' types. Probably the most famous of these depicts the ubiquitous date palm with a standing bound captive to the left and a seated Judaea to the right, both surrounded by arms. The second bronze issue of 71 saw these produced in massive quantities (Colin Kraay knew of 23 reverse dies paired with this obverse). Although the overall allegorical meaning of the reverse is readily apparent, what each individual device specifically symbolises is open to debate. We are on firm ground to assume the date palm represents the land of Judaea as H. Mattingly proposed in BMCRE II (although J. M. Cody speculated the palm possibly represents the Roman victory). The motif of the standing captive is copied from earlier Republican coin issues, reminiscent of the Gaulish and Spanish captives on those Republican types. His dress indicates he is a barbarian from outside the boundaries of Roman civilisation. In the spirit of the 'Vercingetorix' denarius, H. St. J. Hart proposed the captive is actually either Simon Bar Giora or John of Gischala(!), the two defeated Jewish commanders. The seated female figure is the personification of Judaea, the daughter of Zion. This figure is frequently seen on the various designs of the series, often paired with the palm tree. Her attitude of mourning and dejection leaves little doubt she is lamenting the defeat of her people.

Modern viewers see this as a forlorn scene of defeat, however, to the Roman coin designers the images are meant to convey victory over a worthy foe. The Jewish War was an important event for the fledgling Flavian dynasty - in essence it gave them the legitimacy to rule. The ensuing propaganda onslaught after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem is awe inspiring. The slight of hand the Flavian regime pulled off which transformed defeated rebel provincials into a foreign menace is truly amazing. The coins were a major part of the regime's propaganda commemorating Vespasian's defeat of the Jews and saving the empire. Their efforts paid off, for even today this 'Judaea Capta' type is one of the most iconic and recognised reverses in the whole of Roman coinage.

Fantastic surfaces in good metal. A beauty in hand.
7 commentsDavid Atherton10/12/19 at 01:12Molinari: Excellent coin!
V159bestlg.jpg
Vespasian RIC-15935 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.69g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to l. Captive stg. r.; to r., Judaea std. r. on cuirass; both figures surrounded by arms
RIC 159 (C3). BMC 532. BNC 490, pl. XLIV (same dies).
Acquired from Witter Coins, eBay, October 2019. Ex Triton V, 16 January 2002, lot 1913 (From the Robert Schonwalter Collection). Ex Worner List 1, January 1951, no. 394. Formerly in NGC holder #4683650-005, with grade 'F', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

Ambition sighed: she found it vain to trust
The faithless column and the crumbling bust;
Huge moles, whose shadow stretched from shore to shore,
Their ruins perished, and their place no more!
Convinced, she now contracts her vast design,
And all her triumphs shrink into a coin.
A narrow orb each crowded conquest keeps,
Beneath her palm here sad Judea weeps. -
Alexander Pope, To Mr. Addison, Occasioned by his Dialogues on Medals II. 19-26

For Jerusalem is ruined, and Judah is fallen ... Thy men shall fall by the sword and thy mighty in the war. And her gates shall lament and mourn, and she being desolate shall sit upon the ground - Isaiah III.25-26.

In 70 AD Jerusalem was besieged and sacked and the Temple razed by the Roman forces commanded by Titus Caesar. The following year a massive joint Triumph was held in Rome for Vespasian and Titus to celebrate their successful conclusion of the Jewish Rebellion. Coins were also issued to commemorate their victory. These so called 'Judaea Capta' coins first appeared in late 70 just after the fall of Jerusalem in August, both in the precious metals and at first sparingly in bronze. It wasn't until 71, the year of the triumph, that the bronze coinage came into its own with a whole host of 'Judaea Capta' types. Probably the most famous of these depicts the ubiquitous date palm with a standing bound captive to the left and a seated Judaea to the right, both surrounded by arms. The second bronze issue of 71 saw these produced in massive quantities (Colin Kraay knew of 23 reverse dies paired with this obverse). Although the overall allegorical meaning of the reverse is readily apparent, what each individual device specifically symbolises is open to debate. We are on firm ground to assume the date palm represents the land of Judaea as H. Mattingly proposed in BMCRE II (although J. M. Cody speculated the palm possibly represents the Roman victory). The motif of the standing captive is copied from earlier Republican coin issues, reminiscent of the Gaulish and Spanish captives on those Republican types. His dress indicates he is a barbarian from outside the boundaries of Roman civilisation. In the spirit of the 'Vercingetorix' denarius, H. St. J. Hart proposed the captive is actually either Simon Bar Giora or John of Gischala(!), the two defeated Jewish commanders. The seated female figure is the personification of Judaea, the daughter of Zion. This figure is frequently seen on the various designs of the series, often paired with the palm tree. Her attitude of mourning and dejection leaves little doubt she is lamenting the defeat of her people.

Modern viewers see this as a forlorn scene of defeat, however, to the Roman coin designers the images are meant to convey victory over a worthy foe. The Jewish War was an important event for the fledgling Flavian dynasty - in essence it gave them the legitimacy to rule. The ensuing propaganda onslaught after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem is awe inspiring. The slight of hand the Flavian regime pulled off which transformed defeated rebel provincials into a foreign menace is truly amazing. The coins were a major part of the regime's propaganda commemorating Vespasian's defeat of the Jews and saving the empire. Their efforts paid off, for even today this 'Judaea Capta' type is one of the most iconic and recognised reverses in the whole of Roman coinage.

Fantastic surfaces in good metal. A beauty in hand.
7 commentsDavid Atherton10/11/19 at 15:44Akropolis: Splendid!
V159bestlg.jpg
Vespasian RIC-15935 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.69g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to l. Captive stg. r.; to r., Judaea std. r. on cuirass; both figures surrounded by arms
RIC 159 (C3). BMC 532. BNC 490, pl. XLIV (same dies).
Acquired from Witter Coins, eBay, October 2019. Ex Triton V, 16 January 2002, lot 1913 (From the Robert Schonwalter Collection). Ex Worner List 1, January 1951, no. 394. Formerly in NGC holder #4683650-005, with grade 'F', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

Ambition sighed: she found it vain to trust
The faithless column and the crumbling bust;
Huge moles, whose shadow stretched from shore to shore,
Their ruins perished, and their place no more!
Convinced, she now contracts her vast design,
And all her triumphs shrink into a coin.
A narrow orb each crowded conquest keeps,
Beneath her palm here sad Judea weeps. -
Alexander Pope, To Mr. Addison, Occasioned by his Dialogues on Medals II. 19-26

For Jerusalem is ruined, and Judah is fallen ... Thy men shall fall by the sword and thy mighty in the war. And her gates shall lament and mourn, and she being desolate shall sit upon the ground - Isaiah III.25-26.

In 70 AD Jerusalem was besieged and sacked and the Temple razed by the Roman forces commanded by Titus Caesar. The following year a massive joint Triumph was held in Rome for Vespasian and Titus to celebrate their successful conclusion of the Jewish Rebellion. Coins were also issued to commemorate their victory. These so called 'Judaea Capta' coins first appeared in late 70 just after the fall of Jerusalem in August, both in the precious metals and at first sparingly in bronze. It wasn't until 71, the year of the triumph, that the bronze coinage came into its own with a whole host of 'Judaea Capta' types. Probably the most famous of these depicts the ubiquitous date palm with a standing bound captive to the left and a seated Judaea to the right, both surrounded by arms. The second bronze issue of 71 saw these produced in massive quantities (Colin Kraay knew of 23 reverse dies paired with this obverse). Although the overall allegorical meaning of the reverse is readily apparent, what each individual device specifically symbolises is open to debate. We are on firm ground to assume the date palm represents the land of Judaea as H. Mattingly proposed in BMCRE II (although J. M. Cody speculated the palm possibly represents the Roman victory). The motif of the standing captive is copied from earlier Republican coin issues, reminiscent of the Gaulish and Spanish captives on those Republican types. His dress indicates he is a barbarian from outside the boundaries of Roman civilisation. In the spirit of the 'Vercingetorix' denarius, H. St. J. Hart proposed the captive is actually either Simon Bar Giora or John of Gischala(!), the two defeated Jewish commanders. The seated female figure is the personification of Judaea, the daughter of Zion. This figure is frequently seen on the various designs of the series, often paired with the palm tree. Her attitude of mourning and dejection leaves little doubt she is lamenting the defeat of her people.

Modern viewers see this as a forlorn scene of defeat, however, to the Roman coin designers the images are meant to convey victory over a worthy foe. The Jewish War was an important event for the fledgling Flavian dynasty - in essence it gave them the legitimacy to rule. The ensuing propaganda onslaught after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem is awe inspiring. The slight of hand the Flavian regime pulled off which transformed defeated rebel provincials into a foreign menace is truly amazing. The coins were a major part of the regime's propaganda commemorating Vespasian's defeat of the Jews and saving the empire. Their efforts paid off, for even today this 'Judaea Capta' type is one of the most iconic and recognised reverses in the whole of Roman coinage.

Fantastic surfaces in good metal. A beauty in hand.
7 commentsDavid Atherton10/11/19 at 14:16Jay GT4: Amazing coin. Congrats!
V159bestlg.jpg
Vespasian RIC-15935 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.69g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to l. Captive stg. r.; to r., Judaea std. r. on cuirass; both figures surrounded by arms
RIC 159 (C3). BMC 532. BNC 490, pl. XLIV (same dies).
Acquired from Witter Coins, eBay, October 2019. Ex Triton V, 16 January 2002, lot 1913 (From the Robert Schonwalter Collection). Ex Worner List 1, January 1951, no. 394. Formerly in NGC holder #4683650-005, with grade 'F', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

Ambition sighed: she found it vain to trust
The faithless column and the crumbling bust;
Huge moles, whose shadow stretched from shore to shore,
Their ruins perished, and their place no more!
Convinced, she now contracts her vast design,
And all her triumphs shrink into a coin.
A narrow orb each crowded conquest keeps,
Beneath her palm here sad Judea weeps. -
Alexander Pope, To Mr. Addison, Occasioned by his Dialogues on Medals II. 19-26

For Jerusalem is ruined, and Judah is fallen ... Thy men shall fall by the sword and thy mighty in the war. And her gates shall lament and mourn, and she being desolate shall sit upon the ground - Isaiah III.25-26.

In 70 AD Jerusalem was besieged and sacked and the Temple razed by the Roman forces commanded by Titus Caesar. The following year a massive joint Triumph was held in Rome for Vespasian and Titus to celebrate their successful conclusion of the Jewish Rebellion. Coins were also issued to commemorate their victory. These so called 'Judaea Capta' coins first appeared in late 70 just after the fall of Jerusalem in August, both in the precious metals and at first sparingly in bronze. It wasn't until 71, the year of the triumph, that the bronze coinage came into its own with a whole host of 'Judaea Capta' types. Probably the most famous of these depicts the ubiquitous date palm with a standing bound captive to the left and a seated Judaea to the right, both surrounded by arms. The second bronze issue of 71 saw these produced in massive quantities (Colin Kraay knew of 23 reverse dies paired with this obverse). Although the overall allegorical meaning of the reverse is readily apparent, what each individual device specifically symbolises is open to debate. We are on firm ground to assume the date palm represents the land of Judaea as H. Mattingly proposed in BMCRE II (although J. M. Cody speculated the palm possibly represents the Roman victory). The motif of the standing captive is copied from earlier Republican coin issues, reminiscent of the Gaulish and Spanish captives on those Republican types. His dress indicates he is a barbarian from outside the boundaries of Roman civilisation. In the spirit of the 'Vercingetorix' denarius, H. St. J. Hart proposed the captive is actually either Simon Bar Giora or John of Gischala(!), the two defeated Jewish commanders. The seated female figure is the personification of Judaea, the daughter of Zion. This figure is frequently seen on the various designs of the series, often paired with the palm tree. Her attitude of mourning and dejection leaves little doubt she is lamenting the defeat of her people.

Modern viewers see this as a forlorn scene of defeat, however, to the Roman coin designers the images are meant to convey victory over a worthy foe. The Jewish War was an important event for the fledgling Flavian dynasty - in essence it gave them the legitimacy to rule. The ensuing propaganda onslaught after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem is awe inspiring. The slight of hand the Flavian regime pulled off which transformed defeated rebel provincials into a foreign menace is truly amazing. The coins were a major part of the regime's propaganda commemorating Vespasian's defeat of the Jews and saving the empire. Their efforts paid off, for even today this 'Judaea Capta' type is one of the most iconic and recognised reverses in the whole of Roman coinage.

Fantastic surfaces in good metal. A beauty in hand.
7 commentsDavid Atherton10/11/19 at 12:19Nemonater: Wonderful addition!
V159bestlg.jpg
Vespasian RIC-15935 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.69g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to l. Captive stg. r.; to r., Judaea std. r. on cuirass; both figures surrounded by arms
RIC 159 (C3). BMC 532. BNC 490, pl. XLIV (same dies).
Acquired from Witter Coins, eBay, October 2019. Ex Triton V, 16 January 2002, lot 1913 (From the Robert Schonwalter Collection). Ex Worner List 1, January 1951, no. 394. Formerly in NGC holder #4683650-005, with grade 'F', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

Ambition sighed: she found it vain to trust
The faithless column and the crumbling bust;
Huge moles, whose shadow stretched from shore to shore,
Their ruins perished, and their place no more!
Convinced, she now contracts her vast design,
And all her triumphs shrink into a coin.
A narrow orb each crowded conquest keeps,
Beneath her palm here sad Judea weeps. -
Alexander Pope, To Mr. Addison, Occasioned by his Dialogues on Medals II. 19-26

For Jerusalem is ruined, and Judah is fallen ... Thy men shall fall by the sword and thy mighty in the war. And her gates shall lament and mourn, and she being desolate shall sit upon the ground - Isaiah III.25-26.

In 70 AD Jerusalem was besieged and sacked and the Temple razed by the Roman forces commanded by Titus Caesar. The following year a massive joint Triumph was held in Rome for Vespasian and Titus to celebrate their successful conclusion of the Jewish Rebellion. Coins were also issued to commemorate their victory. These so called 'Judaea Capta' coins first appeared in late 70 just after the fall of Jerusalem in August, both in the precious metals and at first sparingly in bronze. It wasn't until 71, the year of the triumph, that the bronze coinage came into its own with a whole host of 'Judaea Capta' types. Probably the most famous of these depicts the ubiquitous date palm with a standing bound captive to the left and a seated Judaea to the right, both surrounded by arms. The second bronze issue of 71 saw these produced in massive quantities (Colin Kraay knew of 23 reverse dies paired with this obverse). Although the overall allegorical meaning of the reverse is readily apparent, what each individual device specifically symbolises is open to debate. We are on firm ground to assume the date palm represents the land of Judaea as H. Mattingly proposed in BMCRE II (although J. M. Cody speculated the palm possibly represents the Roman victory). The motif of the standing captive is copied from earlier Republican coin issues, reminiscent of the Gaulish and Spanish captives on those Republican types. His dress indicates he is a barbarian from outside the boundaries of Roman civilisation. In the spirit of the 'Vercingetorix' denarius, H. St. J. Hart proposed the captive is actually either Simon Bar Giora or John of Gischala(!), the two defeated Jewish commanders. The seated female figure is the personification of Judaea, the daughter of Zion. This figure is frequently seen on the various designs of the series, often paired with the palm tree. Her attitude of mourning and dejection leaves little doubt she is lamenting the defeat of her people.

Modern viewers see this as a forlorn scene of defeat, however, to the Roman coin designers the images are meant to convey victory over a worthy foe. The Jewish War was an important event for the fledgling Flavian dynasty - in essence it gave them the legitimacy to rule. The ensuing propaganda onslaught after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem is awe inspiring. The slight of hand the Flavian regime pulled off which transformed defeated rebel provincials into a foreign menace is truly amazing. The coins were a major part of the regime's propaganda commemorating Vespasian's defeat of the Jews and saving the empire. Their efforts paid off, for even today this 'Judaea Capta' type is one of the most iconic and recognised reverses in the whole of Roman coinage.

Fantastic surfaces in good metal. A beauty in hand.
7 commentsDavid Atherton10/11/19 at 08:58FlaviusDomitianus: This type is a must have. Nice example.
constans.jpg
Constans (337 - 350 A.D.)14 viewsÆ Centenionalis
O: D N CONSTANS P F AVG, laureate draped bust left holding globe.
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier walking right, spear downwards, leading captive from hut under a tree. Mintmark R star Q.
Rome Mint, officina 4; 348-350 AD
4.08g
23mm
RIC VIII Rome 140; LRBC 601

Pending Wildwinds Publishing
1 commentsMat10/11/19 at 05:04Randygeki(h2): Nice FTR
886Rma707.jpg
Cr 299/1b AR Denarius4 viewsAppius Claudius Pulcher, T. Manlius Mancius (?) & Q. Urbinius (??)
Rome mint, 111-110 BCE
Helmeted head of Roma right; quadrangular device behind
Victory driving triga right, T•MA•AP• CL•Q•VR in ex.
3.94 gm, 17 mm
The text above does not do justice to the complexity of the ligature of the legend. This variety of the type leads off with moneyer "MA", presumed, not without contrary views, to be a Manlius or a Mallius; Crawford settles on Maloleius. I retained the seller's interpretation in the header for consistency.
"AP CL", by this time frame, will be a Claudius.
Crawford also cites but disputes an earlier interpretation that "Q. VR" stood for Quaestor Urbinus, rather than an unknown Urbinus. Puzzling that a Claudius would share honors.
No associated bronze types.
This coin nicely colored.

2 commentsPMah10/10/19 at 18:33Jay GT4: Indeed.
893BFA252.jpg
Cr 28/4 AR Half-Quadrigatus/Drachm4 viewsAnonymous, Rome mint
2.99 gm; 17 mm
c. 225 BCE?
Laureate head of Fontus/Janus
Jupiter in quadriga driven by Victory l., holding sceptre and thunderbolt; in ex. ROMA.
This type is associated with the series staring with the AU stater with Dioscuri/Oath scene. Crawford dates the entire series to just before the introduction of the denarius, with a theory of the dating based on style. I have not reproduced or researched the arguments here.
This coin is much nicer in hand than the photo.
2 commentsPMah10/10/19 at 18:32Jay GT4: I need one of these. Nice coin. congrats
886Rma707.jpg
Cr 299/1b AR Denarius4 viewsAppius Claudius Pulcher, T. Manlius Mancius (?) & Q. Urbinius (??)
Rome mint, 111-110 BCE
Helmeted head of Roma right; quadrangular device behind
Victory driving triga right, T•MA•AP• CL•Q•VR in ex.
3.94 gm, 17 mm
The text above does not do justice to the complexity of the ligature of the legend. This variety of the type leads off with moneyer "MA", presumed, not without contrary views, to be a Manlius or a Mallius; Crawford settles on Maloleius. I retained the seller's interpretation in the header for consistency.
"AP CL", by this time frame, will be a Claudius.
Crawford also cites but disputes an earlier interpretation that "Q. VR" stood for Quaestor Urbinus, rather than an unknown Urbinus. Puzzling that a Claudius would share honors.
No associated bronze types.
This coin nicely colored.

2 commentsPMah10/10/19 at 15:09shanxi: very nice
890NN452.jpg
Cr 405/2 AR Denarius M. Plaetorius Cestianus5 viewsM. Plaetorius M. f. Cestianus
Rome mint c. 69 BCE
Draped female bust r. (Fortuna?); behind, [control symbol]
M PLAETORI CEST S·C around half-length boy? girl? facing on tablet inscribed SORS.
20mm, 3.49 gm
Plaetoria 10

A fascinating type among this varied issue with four main types of denarii. There are multiple theories as to the unique figure on the reverse, clearly a reference to divination by lots "SORS", but no agreement as to exactly what it signifies. Even on nicely preserved specimens, of which there are not many, the gender of the reverse figure is difficult to say. Crawford cites reason to think it refers to the origin of the moneyer's adoptive gens, expanded greatly by Michael Harlan. To me, given that the moneyership is an electoral stepping-stone, it seems a rather obscure reference; although the "S C" indicates a special issue perhaps unconnected with regular duties. Crawford notes that Cestianus became Praetor c. 64 BCE, so perhaps he was right to trust in luck.
This type is deemed rare and this specimen's condition is not unusual for the type.
1 commentsPMah10/10/19 at 15:08shanxi: nice one
cascalongus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/217 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
7 commentsCarausius10/10/19 at 00:49Nemonater: Amazing!
Macedon_PhilipII_SNG-ANS_638_gf.jpg
Philip II, Posthumous (temp Philip III-Kassander) AR Tetradrachm3 viewsMacedon, Philip II, Posthumous (temp Philip III-Kassander) 323-297 BC. AR Tetradrachm (14.23 gm) of Amphipolis c. 323/2-316/5. Laureate head of Zeus, r. / Youth on horseback, r., holding long palm branch. ΦΙΛΙΠ-ΠΟΥ. Λ in circle below, Λ below foreleg. nEF. SNG ANS 8 #638-639 (same obv. die); Le Rider Group III p. 121 (plate 45 11-12); HGC 3.1 -; Troxell Studies Issue 7 #311-312. cf. Nomisma Auction 54 #6; SNG Berry 118. 2 commentsAnaximander10/10/19 at 00:06Robert L3: Outstanding.
Screen_Shot_2019-10-07_at_11_23_40_AM.jpg
RIC 0021 (#2)18 viewsDomitian AR Denarius, 81 CE (Group 3)
3.24g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Curule chair, wreath above
RIC 21 (R2). BMC p. 299 note. RSC 58
Ex: Harry N. Sneh Collection
Ex: David Atherton Collection



Though I already had an example of RIC 21, when this became available I had to have it. First of all it is a rare PONT denarius. This refers to the use of PONT in the obverse legend. The speculation is that PONT was used before Domitian was officially named Pontifex Maximus.

Another reason I wanted the coin is the condition. Just look at that expressive portrait. These early portraits of Domitian have a lot of character. 

Another reason I wanted the coin is that it was once owned by Mr. Harry Sneh. After Mr. Sneh passed away his collection was dispersed to many other collectors through auctions. Mr. Sneh certainly had good taste in coins. He also had many rarities such as this coin.

This coin rates as R2 or very few examples known to the authors of RIC II part 1 (Carradice and Buttrey, 2007). I have 1, there is one in Vienna, one in Copenhagen (RIC), and one at Albert-Ludwigs university (OCRE). I have not been able to find any others.

I would love to add more of these PONT denarii to my collection.
2 commentsorfew10/09/19 at 22:16okidoki: excellent and stylistic
cascalongus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/217 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
7 commentsCarausius10/09/19 at 22:08okidoki: Indeed xxxxx
1337_P_Hadrian_RPC.jpg
0972 Hadrian, Cistophorus BITHYNIA Koinon of Bithynia mint, Male in octastyle temple7 viewsReference.
cf RPC III, 974; cf Metcalf B8

Issue Reverse legend includes COM BIT

Obv. IMP CAES TRA HADRIANO AVG P P
Laureate head right

Rev. COM - BIT (in field), ROM S P AVG (in entablature)
Tetrastyle temple on podium of three steps; within, togate male standing left. holding spear in r. and Victory in left

10.46 gr
26 mm
11h
2 commentsokidoki10/09/19 at 22:06okidoki:
1337_P_Hadrian_RPC.jpg
0972 Hadrian, Cistophorus BITHYNIA Koinon of Bithynia mint, Male in octastyle temple7 viewsReference.
cf RPC III, 974; cf Metcalf B8

Issue Reverse legend includes COM BIT

Obv. IMP CAES TRA HADRIANO AVG P P
Laureate head right

Rev. COM - BIT (in field), ROM S P AVG (in entablature)
Tetrastyle temple on podium of three steps; within, togate male standing left. holding spear in r. and Victory in left

10.46 gr
26 mm
11h
2 commentsokidoki10/09/19 at 18:57Jay GT4: You're cornering the market. Great architectu...
Macedon_PhilipII_SNG-ANS_638_gf.jpg
Philip II, Posthumous (temp Philip III-Kassander) AR Tetradrachm3 viewsMacedon, Philip II, Posthumous (temp Philip III-Kassander) 323-297 BC. AR Tetradrachm (14.23 gm) of Amphipolis c. 323/2-316/5. Laureate head of Zeus, r. / Youth on horseback, r., holding long palm branch. ΦΙΛΙΠ-ΠΟΥ. Λ in circle below, Λ below foreleg. nEF. SNG ANS 8 #638-639 (same obv. die); Le Rider Group III p. 121 (plate 45 11-12); HGC 3.1 -; Troxell Studies Issue 7 #311-312. cf. Nomisma Auction 54 #6; SNG Berry 118. 2 commentsAnaximander10/09/19 at 18:07okidoki: very nice reverse
Domitian_RIC_29_new-removebg-preview.png
RIC 00293 viewsDomitian AR Denarius 81 CE (Group 3) Rome
(20 mm )
Obv: Head laureate right; IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT
Rev: Minerva standing left with victory and spear, shield at feet; COS VII DES VIII P P
RIC 29 (R3)
Purchased from ebay October 3, 2019.



I was very pleased to grab this one when it appeared for sale. I wanted to buy it quickly as I know there are others out there who are seeking out coins like this one. It is a PONT denarius. That is it has PONT in the obverse legend. 

This is also a very rare coin. All PONT denarii are rare. In fact all of them are rated R2 (very few examples known) or R3
(one example known to the authors of RIC II part 1). I know of 3 other examples of this coin. One is owned by a Flavian specialist on Forum Ancient Coins, one is owned by another Forum Ancient Coins member, and the 3rd is the RIC reference coin which is owned by Curtis Clay.

This coin is RIC 29. I also happen to own RIC 28. RIC 28 uses the obverse legend used on more common coins: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M. RIC 28 is another rare coin (R2) and it features a different Minerva than RIC 29. RIC 29 has the Minerva holding Victory and with spear while RIC 28 does not have the Minerva with Victory. There are only 3 coin types for Domitian that include Minerva with Victory and spear (RIC 29, 30, & 99). It so happens that I now have RIC 29 and RIC 99. Of these 3 types RIC 99 is the most common, but it is still designated as rare. I quite like the Minerva with Victory type and wish they would have used it more often. The coin is a bit rough, but i think the portrait has a lot of charm.
1 commentsorfew10/09/19 at 17:10Jay GT4: Another PONT, sweet!
Macedon_PhilipII_SNG-ANS_250_gf.jpg
Philip II. 359-336 BC. AV Stater 5 viewsMacedon, Philip II. 359-336 BC. AV Stater (8.59 gm) of Amphipolis 340/336-328. Laureate head of Apollo r. / Charioteer driving racing biga r., holding goad and reins. ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ in exergue. Ivy leaf in field to r. EF. SNG ANS 250-254; Le Rider 66 (D32/R51); HGC 3.1 #847. cf. Goldberg 80 #3261 (same dies); Roma Num. 7 #386 (same obv. die). 1 commentsAnaximander10/09/19 at 16:48Jay GT4: Sweet
cascalongus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/217 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
7 commentsCarausius10/09/19 at 16:48Jay GT4: Masterpiece!
cascalongus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/217 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
7 commentsCarausius10/09/19 at 15:39*Alex: Excellent. Nice addition to your gallery.
cascalongus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/217 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
7 commentsCarausius10/09/19 at 15:05Tracy Aiello: Magnificent.
PhilipAplustre_Tet_b.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom. Philip II, Amphipolis mint31 viewsMacedonian Kingdom. Philip II, 359-336 BC. Silver Tetradrachm, Amphipolis mint. Early posthumous issue, struck under Kassander.
O: Zeus right wearing laurel wreath with berries.
R: Φ I Λ I Π - Π OY (Of Philip) Naked youth on horse prancing right holding long palm branch and reins; aplustre below; Γ under foreleg. Rider pl. 46, 18; SNG ANS 740. Light golden toning.

Plutarch (Alex., 3)
"To Philip, however, who had just taken Potidaea, there came three messages at the same time:
the first that Parmenio had conquered the Illyrians in a great battle, the second that his race-horse had won a victory at the Olympic games, while a third announced the birth of Alexander. These things delighted him, of course, and the seers raised his spirits still higher by declaring that the son whose birth coincided with three victories would be always victorious."

Plutarch (Alex., 4.10)
"...and (Philip) took care to have the victories of his chariots at Olympia engraved upon his coins..."

The reverse-types of Philip’s coins are nearly all agonistic, and refer either to the games celebrated by him at Dium in
honour of the Olympian Zeus (Müller, Mon. d'Alex., pp. II and 344), or, preferably, to the great Olympian games where his
chariots were victorious. We have, indeed, the direct assertion of Plutarch (Alex., c. 4) in favour of the latter
hypothesis, τας εν ‘Ολυμπια νικας των αρματων εγχαραττων τοις νομισμασιν. Philip was also successful at Olympia with the
race-horse (ιππω κελητι νενικηκέναι; Plut., Alex., 3), a victory of which he perpetuated the memory on his tetradrachms. The horseman
with kausia and chlamys is less certainly agonistic, and may (perhaps with a play upon his name) represent the king
himself as a typical Macedonian ιππευς.
Philip’s coins were struck at many mints in various parts of his empire. For the various mint-marks which they bear see
Müller’s Num. d'Alex. le Grand, the local attributions in which are, however, to be accepted with great caution. They
continued to circulate in Europe long after his death, and the Gauls, when they invaded and pillaged Greece, took vast
numbers of them back into their own land, where they long continued to serve as models for the native currency of Gaul and
Britain. (Historia Numorum, Barclay V. Head, 1887)

It is clear that, trying hard to show off, to pass and ultimately to impose his Greek character, Philip was especially
interested in the aesthetic aspect of his coins and also in the propaganda and psychological effects they would have
on the rest of the Greek world, and especially on "those sarcastic, democratic Athenians" and on "the more barbarian" people than himself...

Demosthenes (19, 308)
"And as for Philip,—why, good Heavens, he was a Greek of the Greeks, the finest orator and the most thorough—going
friend of Athens you could find in the whole world. And yet there were some queer, ill-conditioned fellows in Athens who
did not blush to abuse him, and even to call him a barbarian! "
4 commentsNemonater10/09/19 at 08:29Juan R: Loveable
PhilipAplustre_Tet_b.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom. Philip II, Amphipolis mint31 viewsMacedonian Kingdom. Philip II, 359-336 BC. Silver Tetradrachm, Amphipolis mint. Early posthumous issue, struck under Kassander.
O: Zeus right wearing laurel wreath with berries.
R: Φ I Λ I Π - Π OY (Of Philip) Naked youth on horse prancing right holding long palm branch and reins; aplustre below; Γ under foreleg. Rider pl. 46, 18; SNG ANS 740. Light golden toning.

Plutarch (Alex., 3)
"To Philip, however, who had just taken Potidaea, there came three messages at the same time:
the first that Parmenio had conquered the Illyrians in a great battle, the second that his race-horse had won a victory at the Olympic games, while a third announced the birth of Alexander. These things delighted him, of course, and the seers raised his spirits still higher by declaring that the son whose birth coincided with three victories would be always victorious."

Plutarch (Alex., 4.10)
"...and (Philip) took care to have the victories of his chariots at Olympia engraved upon his coins..."

The reverse-types of Philip’s coins are nearly all agonistic, and refer either to the games celebrated by him at Dium in
honour of the Olympian Zeus (Müller, Mon. d'Alex., pp. II and 344), or, preferably, to the great Olympian games where his
chariots were victorious. We have, indeed, the direct assertion of Plutarch (Alex., c. 4) in favour of the latter
hypothesis, τας εν ‘Ολυμπια νικας των αρματων εγχαραττων τοις νομισμασιν. Philip was also successful at Olympia with the
race-horse (ιππω κελητι νενικηκέναι; Plut., Alex., 3), a victory of which he perpetuated the memory on his tetradrachms. The horseman
with kausia and chlamys is less certainly agonistic, and may (perhaps with a play upon his name) represent the king
himself as a typical Macedonian ιππευς.
Philip’s coins were struck at many mints in various parts of his empire. For the various mint-marks which they bear see
Müller’s Num. d'Alex. le Grand, the local attributions in which are, however, to be accepted with great caution. They
continued to circulate in Europe long after his death, and the Gauls, when they invaded and pillaged Greece, took vast
numbers of them back into their own land, where they long continued to serve as models for the native currency of Gaul and
Britain. (Historia Numorum, Barclay V. Head, 1887)

It is clear that, trying hard to show off, to pass and ultimately to impose his Greek character, Philip was especially
interested in the aesthetic aspect of his coins and also in the propaganda and psychological effects they would have
on the rest of the Greek world, and especially on "those sarcastic, democratic Athenians" and on "the more barbarian" people than himself...

Demosthenes (19, 308)
"And as for Philip,—why, good Heavens, he was a Greek of the Greeks, the finest orator and the most thorough—going
friend of Athens you could find in the whole world. And yet there were some queer, ill-conditioned fellows in Athens who
did not blush to abuse him, and even to call him a barbarian! "
4 commentsNemonater10/09/19 at 03:06Jay GT4: That's a great coin
ceolwulf-i-werbald-1a.jpg
S.927 Ceolwulf I (Werbald)13 viewsPenny of Ceolwulf I, king of Mercia 821-823
Moneyer: Werbald
Mint: East Anglia, possible Ipswich
S. 927
N. 388
O: +CEOVVLF REX m
R: PER BALD mONE

Ceolwulf I, brother of Coenwulf, succeeded to the throne of Mercia, Kent, and East Anglia after his brother's death. He did produce coins in London, Canterbury, and East Anglia. Despite multiple mints, but due to the brevity of his reign, coins of Ceolwulf are very rare.

This moneyer, Werbald, also coined for Ceolwulf's successors Beornwulf and Ludica

Ex- BSJ Auction 38 (lot 1017)
2 commentsNap10/08/19 at 19:47Anaximander: Very nice. Usual design and beautiful strike.
ceolwulf-i-werbald-1a.jpg
S.927 Ceolwulf I (Werbald)13 viewsPenny of Ceolwulf I, king of Mercia 821-823
Moneyer: Werbald
Mint: East Anglia, possible Ipswich
S. 927
N. 388
O: +CEOVVLF REX m
R: PER BALD mONE

Ceolwulf I, brother of Coenwulf, succeeded to the throne of Mercia, Kent, and East Anglia after his brother's death. He did produce coins in London, Canterbury, and East Anglia. Despite multiple mints, but due to the brevity of his reign, coins of Ceolwulf are very rare.

This moneyer, Werbald, also coined for Ceolwulf's successors Beornwulf and Ludica

Ex- BSJ Auction 38 (lot 1017)
2 commentsNap10/08/19 at 15:23Callimachus: Nice coin.
Screen_Shot_2019-10-07_at_11_24_26_AM.jpg
RIC 003419 viewsDomitian AR Denarius, 81 CE (Group 3)
3.23g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, winged thunderbolt
RIC 34 (R3). BMC -. RSC -
Ex: Harry N. Sneh Collection.
Ex: David Atherton Collection




This very rare denarius of Domitian was struck in 81 CE, Domitian's first year as Augustus. Just how rare is this coin? It is marked as R3- one example known to Carradice and Buttrey, the authors of RIC II part 1 (2007). This coin appears to be a double die match for the RIC plate coin. This is hardly surprising. It would have been surprising if this coin had different dies which would have suggested a larger mintage. This coin appears to be the second one known of its type.

It is also not surprising that this coin is a PONT denarius. Many of the rarest issues in 81 CE are PONT denarii. These coins are particularly prized by collectors because of their rarity and because they are interesting. It is surmised that the use of PONT in the obverse legend was used before Domitian officially took the title of PM or Pontifex Maximus. In fact PM is used in many of the obverse legends in the 4 groups of denarii struck for Domitian in 81 CE.

There is another reason that I am thrilled to have this coin-the provenance. This coin was part of the collection of Harry Sneh. Mr. Sneh was a well known collector who had collected many interesting Flavian coins. After his passing, the coins were distributed in auctions. Mr. Sneh had a great eye for coins and I would love to have more from his collection. In fact, when I acquired this coin it came with another PONT denarius that was also once the property of Harry Sneh.

This will take an important place in my coins of Domitian collection.
1 commentsorfew10/08/19 at 11:33Jay GT4: Very nice!
Screen_Shot_2019-10-07_at_11_23_40_AM.jpg
RIC 0021 (#2)18 viewsDomitian AR Denarius, 81 CE (Group 3)
3.24g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Curule chair, wreath above
RIC 21 (R2). BMC p. 299 note. RSC 58
Ex: Harry N. Sneh Collection
Ex: David Atherton Collection



Though I already had an example of RIC 21, when this became available I had to have it. First of all it is a rare PONT denarius. This refers to the use of PONT in the obverse legend. The speculation is that PONT was used before Domitian was officially named Pontifex Maximus.

Another reason I wanted the coin is the condition. Just look at that expressive portrait. These early portraits of Domitian have a lot of character. 

Another reason I wanted the coin is that it was once owned by Mr. Harry Sneh. After Mr. Sneh passed away his collection was dispersed to many other collectors through auctions. Mr. Sneh certainly had good taste in coins. He also had many rarities such as this coin.

This coin rates as R2 or very few examples known to the authors of RIC II part 1 (Carradice and Buttrey, 2007). I have 1, there is one in Vienna, one in Copenhagen (RIC), and one at Albert-Ludwigs university (OCRE). I have not been able to find any others.

I would love to add more of these PONT denarii to my collection.
2 commentsorfew10/08/19 at 11:33Jay GT4: Oh man, what a great coin
1526c.jpg
ric34816 viewsElagabalus
AE Sestertius

Obv: IMP CAES M AVR ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: [FORTVNAE REDVCI], S.C. across, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia.
30 mm, 17.66 gms

RIC 348
2 commentsCharles M10/08/19 at 03:03Charles M: Thank you Curtis. I will move it--you are correct...
779c.jpg
rsc07912 viewsElagabalus
AR Denarius

Obv: IMP ANTONINVS AVG, laureate draped bust right
Rev: LIBERALITAS AVG II, Liberalitas standing front head left, holding abacus & cornucopia set on base.
18 mm, 2.45 gms

RSC 79, RIC 102
2 commentsCharles M10/08/19 at 02:55Charles M: Thank you Curtis. I have it corrected .
1335_P_Hadrian_RPC6266.jpg
3266 CILICIA, Tarsus Hadrian Tridrachm Sandan standing14 viewsReference.
RPC III 3266; Prieur 767; SNG BN 1407-9.

Issue Second group

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΘΕ ΤΡΑ ΠΑΡ ΥΙ ΘΕ ΝΕΡ ΥΙ ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹΕ.
Laureate head of Hadrian, r. with drapery on l. shoulder

Rev. ΤΑΡϹΕΩΝ ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛΕΩϹ.
Sandan, wearing tall headdress and long cloak, standing, r., on horned lion; he wears on his l. side bow-case and sword crossing the bow-case; his r. hand is raised and he holds bipennis and wreath in l.

10.20 gr
25 mm
12h

Note.
Sandan was a Hittite High God, and like all the High Gods, his feet were believed never to touch the earth. Riding on the back of a powerful mythical animal, as Sandan does here with a horned lion, was an often-used means of transportation for these Gods. Sandan's appearance on a 2nd Century AD Cilician coin shows the lasting impact of the Hittite occupation of Cilicia, which occurred 18 centuries before this coin was struck.
1 commentsokidoki10/08/19 at 01:42Jay GT4: Wonderful
RIC_V_1023B_Titus.jpg
RIC 1023B Titus41 viewsObv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP PON TR POT COS VI, Laureate head right, bust draped
Rev: S C, Spes standing left, holding flower
AE/Sestertius (32.30 mm 22.05 g 6h) Struck in Rome 77-78 A.D.
RIC, BMCRE, BNF unpublished
purchased 9/2019 on eBay from ancient17
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus10/07/19 at 23:21David Atherton: Nice rarity!
V221aa.jpg
Vespasian RIC-22132 viewsÆ Sestertius, 19.38g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; S C in exergue; Victory stg. r., l. foot on helmet, inscribing OB / CIV / SERV on shield on palm tree; to r., Judaea std. r.
RIC 221 (C3). BMC 582. BNC 561.
Ex CNG eAuction 453, 2 October 2019, lot 522.

The commonness of most Judaea Capta types underscores how important the Jewish War and subsequent defeat of the Jews was to the fledgling Flavian dynasty. This iconic sestertius from the second bronze issue of 71 was struck in fairly plentiful numbers and copies a similar Victory type coined under Vitellius. It very likely was the first 'Judaea Capta' type struck for Vespasian. Colin Kraay records 21 different reverse dies used for this one type alone. The iconography on the reverse is quite explicit. Victory, nude from the waist up, is inscribing a shield attached to the trunk of a palm tree, the palm being a topographical symbol for the land of Judaea. The personification of Judaea herself sits in dejected mode to the right of the palm. The inscription on the shield, OB CIV SERV - 'for saving the citizens', credits the emperor for keeping the empire safe. The clear allegorical message of the reverse giving the credit to Vespasian for defeating the Jews and saving the empire would have been quite apparent to most people handling this coin. The amount of propaganda squeezed from the rebellion of such a small region is indeed remarkable. Josephus' declaration of the Jewish War as the 'greatest' of all time would have been quite welcomed by the Flavian regime.

Beautiful dark olive green patina good style.

NB: Special thanks to Curtis Clay for the Kraay citation.
2 commentsDavid Atherton10/07/19 at 18:44Jay GT4: Amazing!
RIC_V_1023B_Titus.jpg
RIC 1023B Titus41 viewsObv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP PON TR POT COS VI, Laureate head right, bust draped
Rev: S C, Spes standing left, holding flower
AE/Sestertius (32.30 mm 22.05 g 6h) Struck in Rome 77-78 A.D.
RIC, BMCRE, BNF unpublished
purchased 9/2019 on eBay from ancient17
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus10/07/19 at 18:43Jay GT4: Great find
V221aa.jpg
Vespasian RIC-22132 viewsÆ Sestertius, 19.38g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; S C in exergue; Victory stg. r., l. foot on helmet, inscribing OB / CIV / SERV on shield on palm tree; to r., Judaea std. r.
RIC 221 (C3). BMC 582. BNC 561.
Ex CNG eAuction 453, 2 October 2019, lot 522.

The commonness of most Judaea Capta types underscores how important the Jewish War and subsequent defeat of the Jews was to the fledgling Flavian dynasty. This iconic sestertius from the second bronze issue of 71 was struck in fairly plentiful numbers and copies a similar Victory type coined under Vitellius. It very likely was the first 'Judaea Capta' type struck for Vespasian. Colin Kraay records 21 different reverse dies used for this one type alone. The iconography on the reverse is quite explicit. Victory, nude from the waist up, is inscribing a shield attached to the trunk of a palm tree, the palm being a topographical symbol for the land of Judaea. The personification of Judaea herself sits in dejected mode to the right of the palm. The inscription on the shield, OB CIV SERV - 'for saving the citizens', credits the emperor for keeping the empire safe. The clear allegorical message of the reverse giving the credit to Vespasian for defeating the Jews and saving the empire would have been quite apparent to most people handling this coin. The amount of propaganda squeezed from the rebellion of such a small region is indeed remarkable. Josephus' declaration of the Jewish War as the 'greatest' of all time would have been quite welcomed by the Flavian regime.

Beautiful dark olive green patina good style.

NB: Special thanks to Curtis Clay for the Kraay citation.
2 commentsDavid Atherton10/07/19 at 09:56FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example of the type.
Domitian_RIC_280.jpg
RIC 0280 Domitian Sestertius29 viewsIMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI
Laureate head right with Aegis

SC
Domitian riding right on horseback with shield, striking with spear at falling German

Rome, 85 AD

25.81g

RIC 280 (C)

Ex-Calgary Coin

A scarcer type
4 commentsJay GT410/07/19 at 06:40Randygeki(h2): Nice!
pa636.jpg
Meherdates (50 - 49 A.D.)11 viewsAR Drachm
O: Bust facing with moustache and very short beard, royal wart on brow, tiara with ear flaps and ornamented with a horn on each side, diadem loop and end extending on each side, flanked by two six-pointed stars.
R: Blundered Greek legend forming square around, archer (Arsakes I) seated right on throne, bow in extended right hand, cross below seat, Ekbatana mint monogram below bow.
2.8g
21mm
Ekbatana mint.
Sunrise 417/418 (Meherdates); Sellwood 67.1 (Vonones II); Shore 368 (Vonones II)
1 commentsMat10/07/19 at 06:40Randygeki(h2): Neat addition Mat
RI_171m_img.jpg
171 - Magnentius - AE Centenionalis - RIC Lugdunum 1156 viewsObv:- D N MAGNENTIVS P F AVG, bare-headed, draped & cuirassed bust right; A behind head
Rev:- GLORIA ROMANORVM, emperor galloping right, spearing fallen enemy
Minted in Lugdunum, RSLG in exe. A.D. 350-351
Reference:- RIC VIII Lugdunum 115, Cohen 20.
1 commentsmaridvnvm10/07/19 at 06:40Randygeki(h2): Very nice!
RI_170gf_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - Barbarous imitation of RIC VIII Heraclea 082 6 viewsImitation AE2
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMT OHIIIRATIO, Helmeted soldier left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield at ground to right. Horseman turns to face the soldier, and reaches his left arm up towards him. He is bare headed.
Minted in Heraclea (G | _ // .SHHA).
Reference:- Imitates RIC VIII Heraclea 82 (C2)
1 commentsmaridvnvm10/07/19 at 06:40Randygeki(h2): Cool addition
RI_175ak_img.jpg
175 - Constantius Gallus - AE2 - RIC VIII Cyzicus 094 6 viewsAE2
Obv:– DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Bare, bust draped and cuirassed right
Rev:– FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, Soldier spearing fallen horseman, who is bare helmeted, reaching back towards emperor
Minted in Cyzicus (G | _//SMKG),
Reference:– RIC VIII Cyzicus 94 (C2)
1 commentsmaridvnvm10/07/19 at 06:39Randygeki(h2): Nice!
Domitian_RIC_64.jpg
RIC 00644 viewsDomitian AR Denarius 81 CE (Group 4) Rome
Obv: Laureate head right, IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PM
Rev: Seat draped, above semi-circular frame decorated with corn ears; TR P COS VII DES VIII PP
RIC 64 (R), BMC --, RSC--
Savoca Auctions 6th Blue Auction October 5, 2019
1 commentsorfew10/07/19 at 03:29Jay GT4: Glad you got it. Looks like he's biting his l...
106727q00.jpg
CITY-GATE, Septimius Severus, MOESIA INFERIOR, Nicopolis.193-211 AD 6 viewsMOESIA INFERIOR, Nicopolis. Septimius Severus. 193-211 AD. Æ 26mm (10.18 gm: h 8). Aurelius Gallus, magistrate. AVT L CEPT CEVHP PER, laureate head right / UP AUP GALLOU NIKOPOLEITWN PROC ICTP, city gate, small temple seen through doorway, ornate large colonnaded building above. AMNG I 1331; BMC Thrace pg. 42, 7; SNG Copenhagen -; Price & Trell 45 (fig. 26). Sear GIC 2124. H&J 8.14.46.1 (R7); Varbanov 2733 (R6)
Very rare, dark green patina, near extremely fine.
Ex Gorny & Mosch 186, 8 March 2010, lot 1524
1 commentsAncient Aussie10/07/19 at 03:28Jay GT4: Great reverse and patina!
779c.jpg
rsc07912 viewsElagabalus
AR Denarius

Obv: IMP ANTONINVS AVG, laureate draped bust right
Rev: LIBERALITAS AVG II, Liberalitas standing front head left, holding abacus & cornucopia set on base.
18 mm, 2.45 gms

RSC 79, RIC 102
2 commentsCharles M10/06/19 at 23:44curtislclay: Rev. legend should probably end AVG II?
1526c.jpg
ric34816 viewsElagabalus
AE Sestertius

Obv: IMP CAES M AVR ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: [FORTVNAE REDVCI], S.C. across, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia.
30 mm, 17.66 gms

RIC 348
2 commentsCharles M10/06/19 at 23:27curtislclay: Looks more like a MONETA AVGVSTI S C of Sev. Alexa...
1832__Leu_Numismatik,_Auction_9,_#1.jpg
varb1600 xx10 viewsElagabalus
Philippopolis, Thrace

Obv: AVT K M AVP ANTΩNEINOC, laureate draped and cuirassed bust left, holding shield, spear over right shoulder.
Rev: MHTPOΠOΛEΩC ΦIΛIΠΠOΠOΛEΩC (NE) →ΩKO; in left field, P; in right field, OV. Nude athlete standing front, throwing spear with his right hand and holding discus in his left.
31 mm, 17.27 gms

Varbanov ---; SNG Cop ---; Lanz Auction 117 (2003), lot 999; Leu Numismatik Auction 9, lot 657 (this coin)
1 commentsCharles M10/06/19 at 22:40Jay GT4: Fantastic Charles
Domitian_RIC_99_New.jpg
RIC 00996 viewsDomitian AR Denarius 82 CE First Issue
Rome
(3.13 g)
Obv: Head Laureate right; IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PM
Rev: Minerva stg left with victory and spear, at feet shield; TR POT COS VIII
RIC 99 (R)
Purchased from Ebay August 2, 2019



Minerva reverses on Domitian denarii are not at all rare. in fact these reverses dominate the denarii of Domitian. However, before this occurred there were some interesting appearances of minerva on the early denarii for Domitian as Augustus. The above coin is one of these. Issued in 82 CE, this early denarius features Minerva holding victory. I personally think this version of Minerva is both interesting and attractive. I wish it had been carried on for other issues. I also feel the same about the COS XIIII and CENS P PP reverses from later in Domitian's reign.

While this coin is not really rare, it is a scarce coin. I am very happy to add this one to my collection. I am always keeping an eye out for interesting Minerva reverses on the denarii of Domitian, and I hope to add more of them.

1 commentsorfew10/06/19 at 20:56Jay GT4: Nice rarity
Ceres.JPG
Claudius AE Dupondius Ceres5 viewsClaudius (41 – 54 AD)

AE Dupondius, Rome, 42 – 50 AD

Struck to celebrate the works at Ostia port

Obv: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, bare bust left.
Rev: CERES AVGVSTA S C, Ceres seated on throne left.
RIC I 94

Weight: 9.9g.
Diameter: 26mm.
1 commentsJose Polanco10/06/19 at 20:55Jay GT4: Beautiful patina
Faustina_II_53.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.268, 674 - Faustina II, Diana Lucifera35 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome, ca. AD 161
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair bun without pearls
Rev.: DIANA LVCIF, Diana standing left, holding long lighted torch in both hands.
Ag, 3.41g, 17mm
Ref.: Strack 520b, BMCRE 87, Cohen 85, RIC 674, CRE 174 [S]
2 commentsshanxi10/05/19 at 18:25Jay GT4: Wonderful portrait
1710246.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, C. Vibius C.f. C.n. Pansa Caetronianus, AR Denarius25 viewsC. Vibius C.f. C.n. Pansa Caetronianus. 48 BC. AR Denarius (17mm, 4.03 g). Mask of Pan right / Jupiter Axurus (or Anxurus) seated left, holding patera and scepter. Crawford 449/1a; CRI 20; Sydenham 947; Vibia 18. VF, toned, minor deposits.

From the Karl Sifferman Collection
1 commentsFabiusMaximus10/05/19 at 15:33*Alex: Superb portrait. Great coin.
0048LG.jpeg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L Lucretius Trio, AR Denarius41 viewsL Lucretius Trio Denarius. 74 BC. Laureate head of Neptune right, trident over shoulder, numeral above / L LVCRETI TRIO in two lines, infant Genius riding dolphin right.

This coin may refer to an ancestor, C. Lucretius Gallus, who in 181 BC was created duumvir navalis, and later commanded the fleet against Perseus of Macedon.
1 commentsFabiusMaximus10/05/19 at 14:59*Alex: Beautiful. Gorgeous tone and wonderful reverse.
Domitian_RIC_280.jpg
RIC 0280 Domitian Sestertius29 viewsIMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI
Laureate head right with Aegis

SC
Domitian riding right on horseback with shield, striking with spear at falling German

Rome, 85 AD

25.81g

RIC 280 (C)

Ex-Calgary Coin

A scarcer type
4 commentsJay GT410/05/19 at 02:37David Atherton: Historic type!
RIC_23_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0023 Domitianus55 viewsObv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG PONT, Laureate head right
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P, Curule chair; above, wreath
AR/Denarius (18.58 mm 3.366 g 6h) Struck in 81 A.D. (3rd Group)
RIC 23 (R3), RSC-BMCRE-BNF unlisted
ex Bertolami Fine Arts E-Live Auction 36 lot 544
4 commentsFlaviusDomitianus10/04/19 at 00:12orfew: Nice one Alberto
RIC_60_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0060 Domitianus70 viewsObv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT, Laureate head right
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P, Minerva standing left, with Victory and sceptre; at feet, shield
AR/Denarius (18.38 mm 3.40 g 6h) Struck in Rome 81 A.D. (4th group)
RIC 60 (R2), RSC 565, BMCRE, BNF unlisted
4 commentsFlaviusDomitianus10/03/19 at 23:38orfew: A great portrait
RIC_56_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0056 Domitianus55 viewsObv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT, Laureate head right
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P, Minerva advancing right, with spear and shield
AR/Denarius (17.61 mm 3.398 g 6 h) - Struck in Rome 81 A.D. (4th Group)
RIC 56 (R2), RSC 560a, BMCRE-BNF unlisted
Purchased on eBay from numis-kimel
3 commentsFlaviusDomitianus10/03/19 at 23:36orfew: A lovely example
EL_18.jpg
IONIA, Uncertain4 viewsca. 600-550 BC.
EL Myshemihekte (1/24 Stater); 6 mm, 0.63 grams
Obverse: Archaic head right
Reverse: Quadripartite incuse square
Heavily worn, but very rare.
ex. CNG
cf. CNG 99, lot 245 (image inserted at right to show additional detail)
1 commentscmcdon092310/03/19 at 22:41Jay GT4: Love these tiny EL coins
T137sm.jpg
Titus RIC-13722 viewsÆ Sestertius, 23.56g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona stg. l., with statuette of Aequitas and cornucopiae; to l., modius with corn ears; to r., stern of ship
RIC 137 (C2). BMC 153. BNC 152.
Acquired from Dr. Busso Peus Nachf., September 2019.

Ensuring that the urban plebs were well fed was an important responsibility of the emperor. The reliability of the imperial grain supply from Africa was crucial. This sestertius struck in 80-81 by Titus advertises his commitment, through the auspices of Annona, to fairly provide enough bread for the dole. Annona holding a figure of Aequitas, while standing next to a modius full of corn, and with a docked grain ship in the background was explicitly powerful propaganda. Every pleb had little doubt who to thank for their daily bread. This fairly common sestertius was struck during Titus' great issue of bronze in 80-81. Oddly, the reverse lacks the Senatus Consulto decree seen on most of his imperial bronze.

A fabulous portrait in fine style.
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/03/19 at 17:58okidoki: very nice
T137sm.jpg
Titus RIC-13722 viewsÆ Sestertius, 23.56g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona stg. l., with statuette of Aequitas and cornucopiae; to l., modius with corn ears; to r., stern of ship
RIC 137 (C2). BMC 153. BNC 152.
Acquired from Dr. Busso Peus Nachf., September 2019.

Ensuring that the urban plebs were well fed was an important responsibility of the emperor. The reliability of the imperial grain supply from Africa was crucial. This sestertius struck in 80-81 by Titus advertises his commitment, through the auspices of Annona, to fairly provide enough bread for the dole. Annona holding a figure of Aequitas, while standing next to a modius full of corn, and with a docked grain ship in the background was explicitly powerful propaganda. Every pleb had little doubt who to thank for their daily bread. This fairly common sestertius was struck during Titus' great issue of bronze in 80-81. Oddly, the reverse lacks the Senatus Consulto decree seen on most of his imperial bronze.

A fabulous portrait in fine style.
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/03/19 at 14:59ickster: I agree with Jay - nice portrait. I like these hea...
T137sm.jpg
Titus RIC-13722 viewsÆ Sestertius, 23.56g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona stg. l., with statuette of Aequitas and cornucopiae; to l., modius with corn ears; to r., stern of ship
RIC 137 (C2). BMC 153. BNC 152.
Acquired from Dr. Busso Peus Nachf., September 2019.

Ensuring that the urban plebs were well fed was an important responsibility of the emperor. The reliability of the imperial grain supply from Africa was crucial. This sestertius struck in 80-81 by Titus advertises his commitment, through the auspices of Annona, to fairly provide enough bread for the dole. Annona holding a figure of Aequitas, while standing next to a modius full of corn, and with a docked grain ship in the background was explicitly powerful propaganda. Every pleb had little doubt who to thank for their daily bread. This fairly common sestertius was struck during Titus' great issue of bronze in 80-81. Oddly, the reverse lacks the Senatus Consulto decree seen on most of his imperial bronze.

A fabulous portrait in fine style.
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/03/19 at 13:39Jay GT4: Great portrait
294-1-Blk.jpg
T.DEIDI - Denarius, Crawford 294/120 viewsDenomination: Denarius
Era: c. 113 or 112 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma R; Behind, Roma monogram downward; Below, voided X mark of value; Border of dots

Reverse: Battle between gladiator armed with whip and gladiator armed with stave; in exergue, T.DEIDI; border of dots

Mint: Rome
Weight: 3.87 gm.
Reference: RRC 294/1
Provenance: Aureo & Calico Alba Longa sale, November 7, 2018, Lot 326

The moneyer is believed to be T. Didius who later became consul in 98 BC. Moderate dark toning, well centered and about EF.
3 commentsSteve B510/03/19 at 13:29Carausius: Wonderful example and a perfectly centered reverse...
363-1d.jpg
L.CENSOR - Denarius, Crawford 363/1d6 viewsDenomination: Denarius
Era: c. 82 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: Laureate head of Apollo r. ; border of dots.

Reverse: Marsyas, bald headed, facing l. upward, with r. arm raised and holding wine -skin over l. shoulder; behind, column bearing statue of Victory; before, L·CENSOR downwards.

Mint: Rome
Weight: 3.94 gm.
Reference: Crawford 363/1d
Provenance: Schulman b.v., private purchase, 2-Aug-2017

Comments:
Very common but interesting and unique type. This example is well centered and EF.
1 commentsSteve B510/03/19 at 11:48Carausius: A well struck and centered example!
Brettian_HN1970.jpg
Bruttium, The Bretti, drachm17 viewsDiademed, draped and winged bust of Nike right, bird? behind

BPETTIΩN
River-god Aisaros/Dionysos standing, crowning himself, holding cloak and scepter, monogram and shield to right

216-214 BC Punic war issue

4.81g

Rare with these control marks. Only 2 on acsearch including this one, both from same dies and die flaws.
Struck with worn obverse die.

Arslan dies 81/107’; Scheu S65; HN Italy 1970

Ex-CNG 452 Lot 48; From the John L. Cowan Collection; Ex-Pegasi, 31 May 2012 Auction 24 lot 44.
2 commentsJay GT410/03/19 at 01:10PMah: Very nice.
00374q00.jpg
Maximianus Herculius31 viewsAE-Quinarius
IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG; Laureate and cuirassed bust to right.
VIRTVTI AVGG; Herakles wrestling Antaeus; he lifts Antaeus up into the air by the waist while Antaeus tries to break his grip.
Ex: -
Lugdunum
RIC-; B.47corr; King 22
1 commentsJulianus of Pannonia10/02/19 at 21:55Jay GT4: Fantastic rarity!
202.jpg
Trajan Tetradrachm - Eagle on Thunderbolt (Prieur 1487 this coin)14 viewsAR Tetradrachm
Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, 98-99 AD
14.91g

Obv: Laureate head of Trajan (R), wearing ornate ceremonial aegis.
ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙС ΝΕΡ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟС СΕΒ ΓΕΡΜ

Rev: Eagle standing facing on thunderbolt, head right and wings spread, with wreath in beak.
ΔΗΜΑΡΧ ΕΞ ΥΠΑΤ B

McAlee 427 (this coin); RPC 3512/1 (this coin); Prieur 1487 (Tyre, this coin)
Extremely Rare; only two examples known to Prieur and RPC, including this example.

This coin published in M. Prieur, A Type Corpus of The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and Their Fractions from 57 BC to AD 253 (Lancaster, 2000)
This coin published in R. McAlee, The Coins of Roman Antioch (Lancaster, 2007)
This coin published in A. Burnett, M. Amandry, I. Carradice, Roman Provincial Coinage, vol. II (London and Paris, 1999)

Roma Numismatics Auction XVIII, Lot 760, 29/09/19
ex. Michel Prieur Collection
ex. Edward J. Waddell Ltd., Fixed Price List 48, October 1990, lot 66.
3 commentsOptimo Principi10/02/19 at 14:45okidoki: excellent and stylistic
maximinus_78.jpg
Maximinus I RIC IV, 7884 viewsMaximinus I 235 - 238
AE - Sestertius, 20.72g, 29mm
Rome Jan. 236 - March/Apr. 238
obv. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM
draped, cuirassed bust, laureate head r.
rev. FIDES - MILITVM
Fides standing facing, head l., holding military standard in each hand
between S - C
RIC IV/2, 78; C.13
about VF, nice green patina
2 commentsJochen10/01/19 at 20:38Jay GT4: Nice patina
Brettian_HN1970.jpg
Bruttium, The Bretti, drachm17 viewsDiademed, draped and winged bust of Nike right, bird? behind

BPETTIΩN
River-god Aisaros/Dionysos standing, crowning himself, holding cloak and scepter, monogram and shield to right

216-214 BC Punic war issue

4.81g

Rare with these control marks. Only 2 on acsearch including this one, both from same dies and die flaws.
Struck with worn obverse die.

Arslan dies 81/107’; Scheu S65; HN Italy 1970

Ex-CNG 452 Lot 48; From the John L. Cowan Collection; Ex-Pegasi, 31 May 2012 Auction 24 lot 44.
2 commentsJay GT410/01/19 at 20:04Nemonater: That’s a cool coin!
Augustus_20_side_view.jpg
AUGUSTUS AR Denarius4 viewsOBVERSE: CAESAR AVGVSTVS, head left wearing oak wreath
REVERSE: DIVVS-IVLIVS to left and right of eight rayed comet
with tail upwards
Uncertain Spanish Mint, possibly Caesaraugusta 19-18 BC
3.45g, 21mm
RIC 137b RSC 97
2 commentsLegatus10/01/19 at 19:02Jay GT4: Nice coin!
Augustus_20_side_view.jpg
AUGUSTUS AR Denarius4 viewsOBVERSE: CAESAR AVGVSTVS, head left wearing oak wreath
REVERSE: DIVVS-IVLIVS to left and right of eight rayed comet
with tail upwards
Uncertain Spanish Mint, possibly Caesaraugusta 19-18 BC
3.45g, 21mm
RIC 137b RSC 97
2 commentsLegatus10/01/19 at 17:48Mat: A sweet find, nice portrait
RIC_V_609_Titus.jpg
RIC 0609 Titus12 viewsObv: T CAES VESP IMP PON TR P COS II CENS, Laureate head right
Rev: ROMA / S C, Roma standing left holding Vicotry and spear
AE/Sestertius (33.92 mm 25.25 gr6h) Struck in Rome 73 A.D.
RIC 609 (R2, Vespasian), BMCRE unlisted, BNF 670
ex eBay 9/2019
1 commentsFlaviusDomitianus10/01/19 at 16:31Jay GT4: Outstanding!
octtet.jpg
Otacilia Severa (244 - 249 A.D.)9 viewsSYRIA, Seleucis and Pieria
AR Tetradrachm
O: AP ΩTAKIΛ CЄOYHPAN CЄB, draped bust right, wearing stephane, set on crescent.
R: ΔHMAPX ЄΞOYCIAC YΠATO Γ, ANTIOXIA/S C in two lines in exergue, eagle standing facing, head and tail right, with wings displayed, holding wreath in beak.
11.76g
26mm
McAlee-1091 (Rare); Prieur-385 (10 spec.)

A scarce variety.
1 commentsMat10/01/19 at 02:17Randygeki(h2): Nice!
rjb_gall_11_07.jpg
106825 viewsAntoninianus
Milan
Issue 3
FIDEI EQVITVM
G 1068
1 commentsmauseus09/30/19 at 23:27aegis: Can you give me more info about this coin (die axi...
1330_P_Hadrian_RPC3075.jpg
3075 CAPPADOCIA, Caesaraea. Hadrian Hemidrachm 119-20 AD Nike5 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3075; S 256, Metcalf Conspectus 86b

Issue Year 4

Obv. ΑΥΤΟ ΚΑΙϹ ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹΕΒΑϹΤ
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, right, seen from front

Rev. ΕΤ Δ
Nike advancing r., holding wreath in r. hand, palm in left

1.61 gr
15 mm
12h
1 commentsokidoki09/30/19 at 22:24Jay GT4: The eastern portraits are always interesting
202.jpg
Trajan Tetradrachm - Eagle on Thunderbolt (Prieur 1487 this coin)14 viewsAR Tetradrachm
Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, 98-99 AD
14.91g

Obv: Laureate head of Trajan (R), wearing ornate ceremonial aegis.
ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙС ΝΕΡ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟС СΕΒ ΓΕΡΜ

Rev: Eagle standing facing on thunderbolt, head right and wings spread, with wreath in beak.
ΔΗΜΑΡΧ ΕΞ ΥΠΑΤ B

McAlee 427 (this coin); RPC 3512/1 (this coin); Prieur 1487 (Tyre, this coin)
Extremely Rare; only two examples known to Prieur and RPC, including this example.

This coin published in M. Prieur, A Type Corpus of The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and Their Fractions from 57 BC to AD 253 (Lancaster, 2000)
This coin published in R. McAlee, The Coins of Roman Antioch (Lancaster, 2007)
This coin published in A. Burnett, M. Amandry, I. Carradice, Roman Provincial Coinage, vol. II (London and Paris, 1999)

Roma Numismatics Auction XVIII, Lot 760, 29/09/19
ex. Michel Prieur Collection
ex. Edward J. Waddell Ltd., Fixed Price List 48, October 1990, lot 66.
3 commentsOptimo Principi09/30/19 at 22:14Jay GT4: And a great provenance too!
_Macedon_c.jpg
Macedon3 viewsCoins of the ancient Greek cities and Kings of Macedon, and some celtic imitations thereof. Includes the Hellenistic kings of Macedon and Roman successors. Principal mints: Akanthos, Amphipolis and Pella. 1 commentsAnaximander09/30/19 at 20:21Anaximander: Gallery cover picture, photo edited for artist...
202.jpg
Trajan Tetradrachm - Eagle on Thunderbolt (Prieur 1487 this coin)14 viewsAR Tetradrachm
Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, 98-99 AD
14.91g

Obv: Laureate head of Trajan (R), wearing ornate ceremonial aegis.
ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙС ΝΕΡ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟС СΕΒ ΓΕΡΜ

Rev: Eagle standing facing on thunderbolt, head right and wings spread, with wreath in beak.
ΔΗΜΑΡΧ ΕΞ ΥΠΑΤ B

McAlee 427 (this coin); RPC 3512/1 (this coin); Prieur 1487 (Tyre, this coin)
Extremely Rare; only two examples known to Prieur and RPC, including this example.

This coin published in M. Prieur, A Type Corpus of The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and Their Fractions from 57 BC to AD 253 (Lancaster, 2000)
This coin published in R. McAlee, The Coins of Roman Antioch (Lancaster, 2007)
This coin published in A. Burnett, M. Amandry, I. Carradice, Roman Provincial Coinage, vol. II (London and Paris, 1999)

Roma Numismatics Auction XVIII, Lot 760, 29/09/19
ex. Michel Prieur Collection
ex. Edward J. Waddell Ltd., Fixed Price List 48, October 1990, lot 66.
3 commentsOptimo Principi09/30/19 at 18:32Mat: Amazing portrait & eagle.
postumus_74.jpg
Postumus, RIC V, 7428 viewsPostumus, AD 260-269
Billon-Antoninian, 3.67g, 22.50mm, 180°
Trier, AD 262
obv. IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. MINE - R - FAVTR
Minerva Fautrix, helmeted, advancing l., holding in l. hand spear and shield and
in raised r. hand olive-branch
ref. RIC V/2, 74; C. 195; RSC 195a; Mairat 45-50; AGK 44
VF, attractive
Pedigree:
ex CNG 11/2007
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

The rev. seems to honour the Legio I Minerva. The interesting reverse legend MINER FAVTR stands for Minerva Fautrix, the favouring (partisan) Minerva. Perhaps the message is that Minerva offered Postumus wisdom, military power (note the spear and shield), and peace (note the branch) (FAC)
2 commentsJochen09/30/19 at 14:44Jay GT4: Great portrait
constans_cyzicus72.jpg
Constans, RIC VIII, Cyzicus 7289 viewsConstans AD 337-335, son of Constantine I
AE - Bronze centenionalis, 4.09g, 21.7mm
Cyzicus 2nd officina, AD 348-350
Av. DN CONSTA - NS PF AVG
pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust l., holding globe in r. hand
Rv. FEL TEMP REPA - RATIO
Soldier right leading barbarian from hut under tree
ex. SMKB
RIC VIII, Cyzikus 72
Choice EF, nice patina!; ex J. Aiello coll.
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

I couldn't resist the impressive portrait!
1 commentsJochen09/30/19 at 11:56Jay GT4: Great patina and the portrait is fantastic
BCC_LR66_Constantius_Fel_Temp.jpg
BCC LR667 viewsLate Roman
Constantius II 337-361CE
Obv:DN CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG
Pearl-diademed, draped, and
cuirassed bust right.
Rev:FEL TEMP RE_PARATIO
soldier spearing fallen
horseman who is bearded,
hair in two braids, reaching
backwards. Shield on ground
to right. In left field: Γ
Mintmark: SMKΔ
AE 23mm 4.66gm. Axis:0
Poss. ref: RIC VIII Cyzicus 93V.
(officina and horseman's headwear).
1 commentsv-drome09/30/19 at 05:06Randygeki(h2): Nice
LepidusCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, AR Denarius - Crawford 495/2d42 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Aemilius Lepidus and Octavian, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.70g; 20mm).
Military Mint in Italy.

Obverse: LEPIDVS· PONT· MAX· III· V· R· P· C; bare head of Lepidus facing right.

Reverse: C· CAESAR· IMP· III· VIR· R ·P· C; bare head of Octavian facing right.

References: Crawford 495/2d; HCRI 140a; Sydenham 1323var (rev legend); Aemilia 35var (rev legend); BMCRR (Africa) 29-31var (rev legend); Banti & Simonetti 7 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Leu Numismatik Auction 8 (30 Jun 2019) Lot 949; Bank Leu 7 (9 May 1973) Lot 317; Joseph Martini Collection [Baranowsky (25 Feb 1931) Lot 1273] and [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (24 Feb 1930) Lot 1334]; Rodolfo Ratto Fixed Price List (1927) Lot 629; Dr. Bonazzi Collection a/k/a Riche Collection [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (23 Jan 1924) Lot 1352].

This reverse die differs from most of this denarius issue in that the inscription begins with the initial “C” for Octavian's first name (Caius), while the remainder of the issue begins, simply, "CAESAR." The coins appear to celebrate the formation of the Second Triumvirate, although it is unclear why Lepidus did not also strike coins with Antony’s portrait.

This particular example appeared in a remarkable number of important Roman Republican coin sales between 1924-1931, including sales of the collections of Dr. Bonazzi and Joseph Martini.
4 commentsCarausius09/28/19 at 10:02David Atherton: Incredible coin!
AntonyAugurCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, AR Denarius - Crawford 533/28 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius. 43 BCE.
AR Denarius (4.07g; 18mm).
Military mint in Athens, Summer 38 BCE.

Obverse: M ANTONIVS M F M N AVGVR IMP TER; Antony in the priestly robes of an augur, standing right and holding lituus.

Reverse: III VIR R P C COS DESIG ITER ET TERT; Radiate head of Sol facing right.

References: Crawford 533/2; HCRI 267; Sydenham 1199; BMCRR (East) 141; Antonia 80.

Provenance: Ex Kentfield Coll. [Heritage Auction 3067 (9 Jun 2018) Lot 33340]; Michele Baranowski Auction (25 Feb 1931), Lot 1274.

In 50 BCE, Antony was appointed to the College of Augurs, an important group whose job was divining the will of the gods by interpreting auspices (birds and such) and providing advice based on these divinations. Antony was particularly proud of this appointment and referred to it frequently on his coinage, perhaps as a means of highlighting his traditional republican sensibilities. On this coin, he is depicted in full augur regalia. Sol on the reverse is a reference to The East, which Antony controlled per the renewal of the Second Triumvirate several months earlier. The inscriptions reference his augurship, second imperatorial acclamation, and designated second and third consulships. The coin was likely struck in Athens where Antony and Octavia were living after their marriage.
2 commentsCarausius09/28/19 at 10:01David Atherton: Stunning!
Domitian_88AD.JPG
Domitian 81-96 AD10 viewsSilver Denarius, Rome 88 AD

Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII, Legend with Laureate Bust Right.

Rev: IMP XV COS XIIII CENS P P P, Minerva Advancing Right, Holding Spear and Shield. Extremely Fine & Rare.

RIC 591, (3.58 g, 19.0 mm)
4 commentsVacolony09/28/19 at 09:58David Atherton: Pretty toning.
Vespasian_80-AD.jpg
Vespasian 69-79 AD7 viewsSilver Denarius, Rome Mint & Stuck under Titus 80AD

Obv: Legend with Laureate Bust Right. DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS

Rev: Shield Inscribed SC Supported by Two Capricorns with Globe Below.

RIC 63, (3.36 g, 18.5 mm)
3 commentsVacolony09/28/19 at 09:58David Atherton: Wonderful example!
DSC_0007.JPG
CILICIA. Celenderis. Ca. 425-350 BC. AR stater3 viewsCILICIA. Celenderis. Ca. 425-350 BC. AR stater (20mm, 10.84 gm, 3h). NGC XF 4/5 - 4/5. Persic standard, ca. 425-400 BC. Youthful nude male rider, reins in right hand, kentron in left, dismounting from horse prancing left; A below / KEΛ, goat with long whiskers kneeling left, head right; two long stalks above, one terminating in flower, the other in large ivy leaf, all in incuse circle. SNG France 2, 46.2 commentsMark R109/27/19 at 23:41Tracy Aiello: That is magnificent.
Trajan_RIC_245.jpg
RIC 2452 viewsDenarius, 112-114
Obv: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P
Laur. r., dr. l. s.
Rev: S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI – ARAB ADQ in ex
Arabia standing to front, head turned l., holding branch; at her feet, a camel.

3.12g, 18mm
Woytek 396b (78 specimen)
Ex A. Lynn Collection (Heritage 3015, 12 September 2011)
1 commentsklausklage09/27/19 at 23:38Tracy Aiello: Lovely coin.
DSC_0007.JPG
CILICIA. Celenderis. Ca. 425-350 BC. AR stater3 viewsCILICIA. Celenderis. Ca. 425-350 BC. AR stater (20mm, 10.84 gm, 3h). NGC XF 4/5 - 4/5. Persic standard, ca. 425-400 BC. Youthful nude male rider, reins in right hand, kentron in left, dismounting from horse prancing left; A below / KEΛ, goat with long whiskers kneeling left, head right; two long stalks above, one terminating in flower, the other in large ivy leaf, all in incuse circle. SNG France 2, 46.2 commentsMark R109/27/19 at 19:57Jay GT4: Great one Mark
Trajan_RIC_146_var.jpg
RIC 146 var.5 viewsAureus, 103-111
Obv: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P
Laur. r., aegis.
Rev: COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINC
Octastyle temple, adorned with five statues; within, figure of Jupiter (or Pax) standing.

6.26g, 18mm
Woytek 267r (2 specimen): Temple of Honos?
1 commentsklausklage09/27/19 at 19:57Jay GT4: Fantastic coin with a great Aegis
T70.jpg
Titus RIC 7037 viewsÆ As, 8.70g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
RIC 70 (R2). BMC p. 253 note. BNC -.
Acquired from Münzen & Medaillen, September 2019.

Titus' first issues of bronze as Augustus struck in 79, dated COS VII, are all very rare. They were produced sometime during the last six months of the year after his rise to the purple at the end of June, presumably in very modest numbers based on the meagre specimens that have survived antiquity. This As from that scanty issue features the familiar Pax and column type, likely based on a familiar cult image of the deity. Pax is holding a caduceus, an allusion to the peaceful prosperity credited to the emperor. Missing from both the London and Paris collections.

Worn, but with a beautiful olive green patina and bold legends.
1 commentsDavid Atherton09/27/19 at 18:27FlaviusDomitianus: Nice find. Obverse die could be the same as my exa...
1820_Münzzentrum_Rheinland,_Auction_189_#1.jpg
varb16626 viewsElagabalus
Philippopolis, Thrace

Obv: AVT K M AVPHΛ ANTΩNEINOC CEB, radiate cuirassed bust right, seen from rear.
Rev: KENΔPEICEIA ΠVΘIA EN ΦIΛIΠΠO →ΠOΛI (NE)ΩKO/P Ω, Temple with 13 coulumns seen in perspective to right.
35 mm, 20.87 gms

Varbanov 1662; Münzzentrum Rheinland, Auction 189. Lot 250 (this coin)
1 commentsCharles M09/27/19 at 15:03Callimachus: Nice coin.
1327Hadrian_RIC206.jpg
206 Hadrian Denarius Roma 119-22 AD Clementia standing7 viewsReference.
RIC 206; C. 218. Hill 430; BMC 537; Strack 333

Obv: HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS.
Bare head right

Rev: CLEMENTIA AVG COS III P P.
Clementia standing left with patera and sceptre.

3.19 gr
19 mm
6h
1 commentsokidoki09/27/19 at 01:40Jay GT4: Very nice
edward-martyr-1a.jpg
S.1142 Eadward the Martyr (Æthelstan)8 viewsPenny of Eadward "the Martyr", king of England 975-978
Moneyer: Æthelstan
Mint: Canterbury
S. 1142
O: EADPEA REX ANGLOR
R: ÆÐESTAN M-O CÆNT

The unfortunate Eadward, with the sobriquet "the Martyr", obviously wasn't destined for long life. Just three years into his reign, the hapless Eadward was killed, probably by his step mother Ælfthryth, mother of his half-brother Æthelred (II).

This particular coin appears to have been from an altered die of Eadgar, with the last three letters of the presumably still serviceable die altered.

Ex- Davissons, Spink
1 commentsNap09/26/19 at 15:14Callimachus: Always nice to see a coin of this king.
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688226 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569. BNC 121.
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (BNC 121, obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
17 commentsDavid Atherton09/26/19 at 03:43David Atherton: Sandro, not to my knowledge.
RIC_44_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0044 Domitianus31 viewsObv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMIT AVG PONT, Laureate head right
Rev : TR P COS VII DES VIII P P, Altar, garlanded and lighted
AR/Denarius (18.72 mm 3.255 g 6h) Struck in Rome 81 A D (4th Group)
RIC 44 (R2), RSC-BMCRE-BNF unlisted
ex Savoca 24th Blue Auction Lot 1246
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus09/26/19 at 00:33Akropolis: A "keeper"!!!!!!!
V64.jpg
Vespasian RIC 6442 viewsÆ As, 9.15g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M TR P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., with aegis
Rev: T ET DOMITIAN CAESARES PRIN IVVENT; S C in field; Titus and Domitian riding r., with hands raised
RIC 64 (R2). BMC 750. BNC 469.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, September 2019.

An extremely rare early dynastic As struck during Vespasian's first As issue at Rome. H. Mattingly in the BMCRE mistakenly attributes it to Tarraco, but does express doubt in a footnote. Only one reverse die is known and apparently it was used to produce both dupondii and Asses. This specimen is undoubtedly an As due to the copper composition and the low weight. It is a double die match with the lone specimen in the BM and both examples in the BN. This reverse with Titus and Domitian on horseback (oddly, Cohen has them holding spears) copies a similar type struck on the denarius and boldly announces Vespasian's intention to found a dynasty.

Interestingly, this early style portrait features an aegis, an added level of prestige.
2 commentsDavid Atherton09/26/19 at 00:18Nemonater: Awesome pickup!
V64.jpg
Vespasian RIC 6442 viewsÆ As, 9.15g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M TR P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., with aegis
Rev: T ET DOMITIAN CAESARES PRIN IVVENT; S C in field; Titus and Domitian riding r., with hands raised
RIC 64 (R2). BMC 750. BNC 469.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, September 2019.

An extremely rare early dynastic As struck during Vespasian's first As issue at Rome. H. Mattingly in the BMCRE mistakenly attributes it to Tarraco, but does express doubt in a footnote. Only one reverse die is known and apparently it was used to produce both dupondii and Asses. This specimen is undoubtedly an As due to the copper composition and the low weight. It is a double die match with the lone specimen in the BM and both examples in the BN. This reverse with Titus and Domitian on horseback (oddly, Cohen has them holding spears) copies a similar type struck on the denarius and boldly announces Vespasian's intention to found a dynasty.

Interestingly, this early style portrait features an aegis, an added level of prestige.
2 commentsDavid Atherton09/25/19 at 23:12Jay GT4: Great issue
image00446.jpg
Persia, Achaemenid Empire. Darios I to Xerxes I. (Circa 505-480 BC) 5 viewsAR Siglos

14 mm, 5.38 g

Lydo-Milesian standard. Sardes mint.

Obverse: Persian king or hero, wearing kidaris and kandys, quiver over shoulder, in kneeling-running stance right, drawing bow

Reverse: Incuse punch

Carradice Type II (pl. XI, 12); Meadows, Administration 320; BMC Arabia pl. XXVII, 23; Sunrise 21.

From the Baldwin Maull Collection, purchased 1950s-early 1960s.

The Persians eventual adoption of coinage was related to their conquests of Lydia and then to their conflicts with the Greek city states in the sixth through fourth centuries BC. During these wars, the Persians employed Greek mercenaries, who were accustomed to receiving payment in coinage.

The Persians issued silver sigloi and gold darics (20:1 value) with only a few basic designs. The type of siglos above (Type II), with the full-length king drawing a bow, is attributed to the period 510-480 BC and the third Persian King after Cyrus the Great, Darius I the Great, who is thought to be the human figure represented on the coin.

In general it seems that the circulation patterns of darics and sigloi were fundamentally different – so far there is no single known hoard in which the two types of coins have occurred together. Darics circulated widely and were likely used for the payment of governmental, military (1 per month for the average soldier) and diplomatic expenses. Moreover, once they entered circulation, they would have been readily accepted as bullion anywhere. As the Greeks themselves hardly struck any gold, the daric was almost free of competition on the coin market in its time.

In contrast, hoards of sigloi have been found almost exclusively in the westernmost Persian territories — the central, coastal regions of modern Turkey. From the beginning, sigloi were primarily used for local needs. In international trade the small, relatively unattractive siglos hardly had a chance against the superior Greek competitors, and even the Greek mercenaries serving in Persian service increasingly refused to accept it.

The Persian’s primary mint was certainly Sardes (the mint of the former Lydian kings as well), the seat of the Achaemenid administration for the whole of Asia Minor. As the leading administrative center, Sardes must also have been the collection point for the annual tribute payments from the provinces of Asia Minor, thus ensuring a sufficient supply of precious metals for mint production there.
1 commentsNathan P09/25/19 at 22:20Tracy Aiello: Great coin. Nice write-up.
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688226 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569. BNC 121.
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (BNC 121, obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
17 commentsDavid Atherton09/25/19 at 18:47Sandro M: Any updates about the number of known examples? Ot...
RIC_44_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0044 Domitianus31 viewsObv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMIT AVG PONT, Laureate head right
Rev : TR P COS VII DES VIII P P, Altar, garlanded and lighted
AR/Denarius (18.72 mm 3.255 g 6h) Struck in Rome 81 A D (4th Group)
RIC 44 (R2), RSC-BMCRE-BNF unlisted
ex Savoca 24th Blue Auction Lot 1246
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus09/25/19 at 15:53Jay GT4: Beautiful find Alberto, congrats
0233_REPROM_RRC423_1.jpg
0233 - Denarius Servilia 57 BC8 viewsObv/ Head of Flora with flower crown; behind, lituus; around, FLORAL PRIMVS.
Rev/ Soldiers facing each other, holding swords and shields; in ex., C SERVEIL; C F on field.

Ag, 18.8 mm, 3.85 g
Moneyer: C. Servilius C.f.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 423/1 [dies o/r: 99/110]
ex-DNW, auction Feb 2019, lot 683
1 commentsdafnis09/24/19 at 01:26Jay GT4: Wonderful coin
0232_Vesp_RIC_II_2_16.jpg
0232 - Denarius Vespasian 70 AC10 viewsObv/ Laureate bust of V. r., around IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG.
Rev/ Confronted heads of Titus to r., and Domitian to l.; around, CAESAR AVG F COS CAESAR AVG F PR.

Ag, 18.9 mm, 3.34 g
Mint: Roma
RIC II.2/16 [R] – BMCRE II/3
ex-CNG, auction e438, lot 491
1 commentsdafnis09/24/19 at 01:25Jay GT4: Nice!
00561q00.jpg
Probus75 viewsAE-Antoninianus
VIRTVS PROBI AVG; Radiate, helmeted and cuirassed half length bust to right, raising right hand and holding victory on globe in left.
MARS VICTOR; Helmeted Mars with spear walking right, holding trophy over shoulder.
Ex: II
Lugdunum
RIC - ; B222 pl. XXVII; 3ex.
6 commentsJulianus of Pannonia09/23/19 at 20:25Jochen: I'm jealous
valtet.jpg
Valerian I (253 - 260 A.D.)12 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm
O: A K Π ΛI OVAΛEPIANOC EV EVC, Laureate and cuirassed bust right
R: Tyche seated left, holding rudder and cornucopia; L Δ (Year 4, 256/7 A.D.) to upper left.
10.54g
24mm
Köln 2867; Dattari (Savio) 5174; K&G 88.28; Emmett 3721.4.
3 commentsMat09/22/19 at 02:30Randygeki(h2): Nice one Mat
D383a.jpg
Domitian RIC-38337 viewsÆ As, 9.49g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: MONETA AVGVST; S C in field; Moneta stg. l., with scales and cornucopiae
RIC 383 (C3). BMC -. BNC 374.
Acquired from Musa Numismatic, September 2019.

In 82 Domitian reformed the coinage by increasing the weight of the gold and fineness of the silver. Production of the bronze coinage was suspended while the mint was reorganised and resumed in 84 with new reverse types and a higher artistic standard. Appropriately, one of the first types struck on the bronze after the coinage reform was Moneta, 'mint goddess of the emperor'. H. Mattingly believes Moneta in this context can be seen as symbolising Domitian's control of the mint and as paymaster to the empire. A fitting reverse design for an emperor who cared so much for his coinage. Mirroring the silver, many of the bronze coins struck in the first year or so after the coinage reform have portraits with an aegis, an extra detail likely due to Domitian's attentive care. Under Domitian Moneta became a regular feature of the coinage and was struck year after year on the As issues. This example from 85 is one of the most common types struck for the As that year. Oddly enough, it is missing from the BM.

One gets the impression that Domitian was quite proud of his coinage reforms and Moneta was a symbolic reverse celebrating that achievement.

A nice example in hand, much better than the photo suggests.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/21/19 at 16:39Rob P: Very cool best of type ive seen
D383a.jpg
Domitian RIC-38337 viewsÆ As, 9.49g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: MONETA AVGVST; S C in field; Moneta stg. l., with scales and cornucopiae
RIC 383 (C3). BMC -. BNC 374.
Acquired from Musa Numismatic, September 2019.

In 82 Domitian reformed the coinage by increasing the weight of the gold and fineness of the silver. Production of the bronze coinage was suspended while the mint was reorganised and resumed in 84 with new reverse types and a higher artistic standard. Appropriately, one of the first types struck on the bronze after the coinage reform was Moneta, 'mint goddess of the emperor'. H. Mattingly believes Moneta in this context can be seen as symbolising Domitian's control of the mint and as paymaster to the empire. A fitting reverse design for an emperor who cared so much for his coinage. Mirroring the silver, many of the bronze coins struck in the first year or so after the coinage reform have portraits with an aegis, an extra detail likely due to Domitian's attentive care. Under Domitian Moneta became a regular feature of the coinage and was struck year after year on the As issues. This example from 85 is one of the most common types struck for the As that year. Oddly enough, it is missing from the BM.

One gets the impression that Domitian was quite proud of his coinage reforms and Moneta was a symbolic reverse celebrating that achievement.

A nice example in hand, much better than the photo suggests.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/21/19 at 09:52FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example
valtet.jpg
Valerian I (253 - 260 A.D.)12 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm
O: A K Π ΛI OVAΛEPIANOC EV EVC, Laureate and cuirassed bust right
R: Tyche seated left, holding rudder and cornucopia; L Δ (Year 4, 256/7 A.D.) to upper left.
10.54g
24mm
Köln 2867; Dattari (Savio) 5174; K&G 88.28; Emmett 3721.4.
3 commentsMat09/21/19 at 02:15David Atherton: Great looking coin!
valtet.jpg
Valerian I (253 - 260 A.D.)12 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm
O: A K Π ΛI OVAΛEPIANOC EV EVC, Laureate and cuirassed bust right
R: Tyche seated left, holding rudder and cornucopia; L Δ (Year 4, 256/7 A.D.) to upper left.
10.54g
24mm
Köln 2867; Dattari (Savio) 5174; K&G 88.28; Emmett 3721.4.
3 commentsMat09/21/19 at 00:26Jay GT4: Very nice!
D383a.jpg
Domitian RIC-38337 viewsÆ As, 9.49g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: MONETA AVGVST; S C in field; Moneta stg. l., with scales and cornucopiae
RIC 383 (C3). BMC -. BNC 374.
Acquired from Musa Numismatic, September 2019.

In 82 Domitian reformed the coinage by increasing the weight of the gold and fineness of the silver. Production of the bronze coinage was suspended while the mint was reorganised and resumed in 84 with new reverse types and a higher artistic standard. Appropriately, one of the first types struck on the bronze after the coinage reform was Moneta, 'mint goddess of the emperor'. H. Mattingly believes Moneta in this context can be seen as symbolising Domitian's control of the mint and as paymaster to the empire. A fitting reverse design for an emperor who cared so much for his coinage. Mirroring the silver, many of the bronze coins struck in the first year or so after the coinage reform have portraits with an aegis, an extra detail likely due to Domitian's attentive care. Under Domitian Moneta became a regular feature of the coinage and was struck year after year on the As issues. This example from 85 is one of the most common types struck for the As that year. Oddly enough, it is missing from the BM.

One gets the impression that Domitian was quite proud of his coinage reforms and Moneta was a symbolic reverse celebrating that achievement.

A nice example in hand, much better than the photo suggests.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/20/19 at 22:59Jay GT4: Sweet!
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Vespian Tetradrachm 3 viewsAlexandrian Tetradrachm year 2 of Vespasian (thanks to the fourm I know the year! Thank you) Rev: Nike facking left holding wreath and palm. 24 mm 11.39gm as worn a bit. 2 commentsRob P09/20/19 at 00:08Rob P: Thanks Jay GT4!
1205_-_1216_John_AR_Penny_Dublin.JPG
1199-1216, John, AR Penny, Struck 1207 – 1211 at Dublin, Ireland7 viewsObverse: IOHANNES REX around triangle enclosing a crowned and draped facing bust of King John holding, in his right hand, a sceptre tipped with a cross pommée which extends through the side of the triangle into the legend. Quatrefoil to right of bust.
Reverse: ROBERD ON DIVE around triangle containing sun over crescent moon and a star in each angle. Cross pattée at apex of each point of the triangle and above legend on each of the three sides. Moneyer: Roberd, cognate to the modern English name of Robin.
Third issue “REX” coinage, struck to the same weight and fineness as the English standard.
This was the only coinage struck by King John in his own name.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 1.2gms | Die Axis: 4
SPINK: 6228

John was King of England from 1199 until his death in 1216. The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the first Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom.
John, the youngest of the five sons of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, was not expected to inherit significant lands which resulted in him being given the nickname John Lackland. However, after the failed rebellion of his elder brothers between 1173 and 1174, John became Henry's favourite child. He was appointed Lord of Ireland in 1177 and given lands in England and on the continent. John's elder brothers William, Henry and Geoffrey died young and when Richard I became king in 1189, John was the potential heir to the throne. John unsuccessfully attempted a rebellion against Richard's administration whilst his brother was participating in the Third Crusade but despite this, after Richard died in 1199, John was proclaimed King of England.
King John contracted dysentery at Lynn in 1216 but, just before his death, he managed to dictate a brief will. This will still survives and as part of it John requested: "I will that my body be buried in the church of St. Mary and St. Wulfstan of Worcester".
Some of King John's favourite hunting grounds were in Worcester, at Kinver and Feckenham, and he had a special affection for Saint Wulfstan, one of the two great Anglo-Saxon saints whose shrines and tombs were also at Worcester. Both Saint Wulfstan and Saint Oswald can be seen in miniature beside the head of the effigy of King John on his tomb.
Medieval effigies usually show the subject in the prime of life, however the effigy on King John's tomb is unique in that not only is it a life-like image of him, it is also the oldest royal effigy in England.
King John's tomb has been opened twice, once in 1529 and again in 1797. At the first opening it was said that John's head was covered with a monk's cowl, however it is now thought that this was probably his coronation cap. When the tomb was opened for the second time the antiquarians responsible discovered that a robe of crimson damask had originally covered the king's body but, by 1797, most of the embroidery had deteriorated. They also found the remains of a sword which lay down the left side of the body along with parts of its scabbard.
3 comments*Alex09/19/19 at 21:10Anaximander: Nice! That's one I didn't know even exist...
V635.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 63532 viewsÆ As, 10.08g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in exergue; Titus stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
RIC 635 (R). BMC -. BNC 688.
Acquired from Marc Breitsprecher, September 2019.

In 71 AD Vespasian and Titus held a double triumph celebrating their victory in the recently concluded Judaean War. The spectacular triumph was held a few days after Titus' arrival from the East in June and could be viewed as his effective homecoming party. Mary Beard has shrewdly observed that the triumph served as 'the Flavian coronation, the official launch party and press night of the Flavian dynasty.' It was the first time after Vespasian's rise to the purple that the whole family could be seen together by the Roman populace. Vespasian and Titus were identically dressed riding in matching quadrigas while Domitian trotted alongside on a splendid mount. By showcasing his eldest son on an equal footing in the procession, it left little doubt who would succeed after his death. Coins were struck in all metals to commemorate the event. Here is a rare As with a reverse depicting Titus Caesar in a triumphal quadriga, a clear commemoration of the joint triumph. Oddly, this type is more commonly seen in silver from Antioch. The piece serves as a superb memento of the 'Greatest Show on Earth' triumph put on by the Flavian regime in the late First century.

Not in the BM. RIC cites only a specimen in the Paris collection (BNC 688), a double die match with this coin as pointed out by C. Clay.

Worn, but the major devices are still quite visible.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/19/19 at 15:04David Atherton: Yes, I believe you are correct - a double die matc...
V635.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 63532 viewsÆ As, 10.08g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in exergue; Titus stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
RIC 635 (R). BMC -. BNC 688.
Acquired from Marc Breitsprecher, September 2019.

In 71 AD Vespasian and Titus held a double triumph celebrating their victory in the recently concluded Judaean War. The spectacular triumph was held a few days after Titus' arrival from the East in June and could be viewed as his effective homecoming party. Mary Beard has shrewdly observed that the triumph served as 'the Flavian coronation, the official launch party and press night of the Flavian dynasty.' It was the first time after Vespasian's rise to the purple that the whole family could be seen together by the Roman populace. Vespasian and Titus were identically dressed riding in matching quadrigas while Domitian trotted alongside on a splendid mount. By showcasing his eldest son on an equal footing in the procession, it left little doubt who would succeed after his death. Coins were struck in all metals to commemorate the event. Here is a rare As with a reverse depicting Titus Caesar in a triumphal quadriga, a clear commemoration of the joint triumph. Oddly, this type is more commonly seen in silver from Antioch. The piece serves as a superb memento of the 'Greatest Show on Earth' triumph put on by the Flavian regime in the late First century.

Not in the BM. RIC cites only a specimen in the Paris collection (BNC 688), a double die match with this coin as pointed out by C. Clay.

Worn, but the major devices are still quite visible.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/19/19 at 14:37curtislclay: A die match with Paris 688 on both sides, I would ...
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Vespian Tetradrachm 3 viewsAlexandrian Tetradrachm year 2 of Vespasian (thanks to the fourm I know the year! Thank you) Rev: Nike facking left holding wreath and palm. 24 mm 11.39gm as worn a bit. 2 commentsRob P09/19/19 at 12:30Jay GT4: Great historical type!
V635.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 63532 viewsÆ As, 10.08g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in exergue; Titus stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
RIC 635 (R). BMC -. BNC 688.
Acquired from Marc Breitsprecher, September 2019.

In 71 AD Vespasian and Titus held a double triumph celebrating their victory in the recently concluded Judaean War. The spectacular triumph was held a few days after Titus' arrival from the East in June and could be viewed as his effective homecoming party. Mary Beard has shrewdly observed that the triumph served as 'the Flavian coronation, the official launch party and press night of the Flavian dynasty.' It was the first time after Vespasian's rise to the purple that the whole family could be seen together by the Roman populace. Vespasian and Titus were identically dressed riding in matching quadrigas while Domitian trotted alongside on a splendid mount. By showcasing his eldest son on an equal footing in the procession, it left little doubt who would succeed after his death. Coins were struck in all metals to commemorate the event. Here is a rare As with a reverse depicting Titus Caesar in a triumphal quadriga, a clear commemoration of the joint triumph. Oddly, this type is more commonly seen in silver from Antioch. The piece serves as a superb memento of the 'Greatest Show on Earth' triumph put on by the Flavian regime in the late First century.

Not in the BM. RIC cites only a specimen in the Paris collection (BNC 688), a double die match with this coin as pointed out by C. Clay.

Worn, but the major devices are still quite visible.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/19/19 at 12:28Jay GT4: Awesome find!
HENRY_II_Tealby_AR_Penny.JPG
1154 - 1189, HENRY II, AR 'Tealby' Penny, Struck 1158 - 1163 at Canterbury (?), England31 viewsObverse: (HE)NRI • R(EX• A -). Crowned facing bust of Henry II, his head facing slightly to the left, holding sceptre tipped with a cross potent in his right hand. Crown has three vertical uprights each topped by a fleur-de-lis.
Reverse: + (ROGI)ER : ON : (C)A(NT) surrounding short cross potent within beaded circle, small cross potents in each quarter. Moneyer: Rogier, cognate to the modern English name of Roger. Mintmark: Cross potent.
Uncommonly clear Class A bust
Diameter: 20mm | Weight: 1.3gms | Die Axis:1
Flan chipped and cracked
SPINK: 1337

For the first few years of Henry II's reign the coins of King Stephen continued to be produced, but in 1158, in order to restore public confidence in the currency, a new 'cross and crosslet' coinage was introduced in England which was of sufficient importance for the contemporary chroniclers to record that 'a new money was made, which was the sole currency of the kingdom.' While this coinage was acceptable in terms of weight and silver quality, it is notorious for its ugly appearance, bad craftsmanship and careless execution. In fact the 'Tealby' coinage is among the worst struck of any issue of English regal coinage, so much so that collectors consider it something of a bonus if they are able to make out the name of the moneyer, or the mint, from the letters showing.
The cross and crosslet type coinage of King Henry II is more often called 'Tealby' because of the enormous hoard of these coins which was found in late 1807 at Bayons Manor farm near Tealby in Lincolnshire. This hoard, which originally amounted to over 5,700 pieces, was first reported in the Stamford Mercury of the 6th November 1807, but unfortunately the majority of the coins, more than 5,000 of them, were sent to be melted at the Tower of London and only some 600 pieces were saved for national and important private collections.
A total of 30 mints were employed in the initial 'Tealby' recoinage, however once the recoinage was completed only 12 mints were permitted to remain active and this marks the beginning of the gradual decline in the number of mints which were used to strike English coins.
The 'Tealby' issue continued until 1180 when a new style coin of much better workmanship, the short-cross penny, was introduced.
2 comments*Alex09/18/19 at 11:10*Alex: .. but not pretty.
1189_-_1199_Richard_I_AR_Denier.JPG
1189 - 1199, RICHARD I (the lionheart), AR Denier minted at Melle, Poitou, France42 viewsObverse: +RICARDVS REX. Cross pattée within braided inner circle, all within braided outer circle.
Reverse: PIC / TAVIE / NSIS in three lines within braided circle.
Diameter: 20mm | Weight: 1.0gms | Die Axis: 2
SPINK: 8008 | Elias: 8

Poitou was an Anglo-Gallic province in what is now west-central France and its capital city was Poitiers, the mint at this time was however located at Melle. Melle was an active centre of minting during the early Middle Ages due to the important silver mines located under and around the city. This is the only coin issue struck during the reign of Richard I to bear his own name and titles as King of England.

Richard I was King of England from 1189 until his death on 6th April 1199. He also ruled several territories outwith England, and was styled as Duke of Normandy, Aquitaine and Gascony, Lord of Cyprus, Count of Poitiers, Anjou, Maine, and Nantes, as well as being overlord of Brittany at various times during the same period. He was the third of five sons of King Henry II of England and Duchess Eleanor of Aquitaine. He was known as Richard the Lionheart (Richard Cœur de Lion) because of his reputation as a great military leader and warrior when, at the age of 16 and commanding his own army, he had put down rebellions against his father in Poitou.
Richard was a commander during the Third Crusade, and led the campaign after the departure of Philip II of France. However, although he scored several notable victories against the Muslims led by Saladin, he failed to retake Jerusalem from them.
Although Richard was born in England and spent his childhood there before becoming king, he lived most of his adult life in the Duchy of Aquitaine. Following his accession, his life was mostly spent on Crusade, in captivity, or actively defending his lands in France. Rather than regarding England as a responsibility requiring his presence as ruler, he appears to have used it merely as a source of revenue to support his armies. Nevertheless, he was seen as a pious hero by his subjects and he remains one of the few kings of England who is remembered by his epithet rather than by his regnal number, and even today he is still an iconic figure in both England and France.
3 comments*Alex09/18/19 at 11:08*Alex:
Sicily_Syracuse_SNG-ANS5_1028_gf.jpg
Syracuse, Hieronymos7 viewsSicily, Syracuse, Hieronymos. 215-214 BC. AR 10 Litrai (8.46 gm). Diademed head Hieronymos l., ꓘ to r. / Winged thunderbolt, magistrate name ΚΙ below, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΙΕΡΩΝΟΥΜΟΥ. EF. SNG ANS 5 #1028-1030 (same obv. die); ACNAC: Davis 63, Dewing 962 (same obv. die); HGC 2 #1567. Holloway (Portrait A) 1969 #41; SNG Lloyd 1565. cf. SNG Cop 1 #872-875 (monogram). 1 commentsAnaximander09/18/19 at 01:57Jay GT4: They just keep coming! Wow!
Akanthos.jpg
GREEK, Akanthos, AR Tetrobol, 420-380 B.C.163 viewsAverse: Forepart of bul
Reverse: Quadripartite incuse square
3 commentsOptimus09/17/19 at 16:47Anaximander: Best of type!
Domitian_RIC_267.jpg
RIC 267 Domitian25 viewsCAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII
Laureate head right

PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS
Goat standing left in laurel wreath

Rome, 80-81 AD after the deification of Vespasian.

3.37g

RIC 267 (C)

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya

This is a nice example of the legend ending with a pronounced dot.
4 commentsJay GT409/17/19 at 16:11FlaviusDomitianus: Very nice example.
Domitian_RIC_267.jpg
RIC 267 Domitian25 viewsCAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII
Laureate head right

PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS
Goat standing left in laurel wreath

Rome, 80-81 AD after the deification of Vespasian.

3.37g

RIC 267 (C)

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya

This is a nice example of the legend ending with a pronounced dot.
4 commentsJay GT409/17/19 at 14:54Christian Scarlioli: Very nice, I always like seeing this issue.
1519334_m.jpg
7 viewsCALABRIA
TARENT
AR-Drachme, 302/280 v. Chr.; 3,22 g. Athenakopf r. mit attischem Helm, steinschleudernde Scylla als Helmzier//Eule r., r. Olivenzweig. Ravel, Vlasto 1047 ff.; Rutter, Historia Numorum 975. Sehr schön Exemplar der Sammlung Kochs. Ex: Dr. Eugen Nitsch, Auktion Adolph Hess Nachf. 236, Frankfurt am Main Monday, April 3, 1939, Nr. 69.
1 commentspaul188809/17/19 at 02:19Jay GT4: Nice!
Domitian_RIC_267.jpg
RIC 267 Domitian25 viewsCAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII
Laureate head right

PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS
Goat standing left in laurel wreath

Rome, 80-81 AD after the deification of Vespasian.

3.37g

RIC 267 (C)

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya

This is a nice example of the legend ending with a pronounced dot.
4 commentsJay GT409/17/19 at 01:54Nemonater: Nice!
Domitian_RIC_267.jpg
RIC 267 Domitian25 viewsCAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII
Laureate head right

PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS
Goat standing left in laurel wreath

Rome, 80-81 AD after the deification of Vespasian.

3.37g

RIC 267 (C)

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya

This is a nice example of the legend ending with a pronounced dot.
4 commentsJay GT409/16/19 at 22:50David Atherton: Good example!
0155.jpg
Denarius, M. Aurelius Scaurus, L. Licinius Crassus, Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus1 viewsDenarius, M. Aurelius Scaurus, L. Licinius Crassus, Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus

RRC: 282/1
118 bc
3,89 gr

AV: Head of Roma right, helmeted. "ROMA" "M.AURELI"
RV: Gaulish warrior in biga rightHead of Roma right, helmeted "SCAUR","L LIC CN DOM"

ex Artemide Aste, eLive auction 5b, Lot 208, 11.11.2018
1 commentsNorbert09/16/19 at 21:28Jay GT4: Incredible coin. Congrats!
ZomboDroid_16092019092503.jpg
Kings of Macedon. Kolophon. Antigonos I Monophthalmos 320-301 BC. As Strategos of Asia, 320-306/5 BC, or king, 306/5-301 BC. In the name and types of Alexander III. Struck circa 310-301 BC Drachm AR 16mm., 3,89g5 viewsObv.Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Rev. Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, uncertain mark above crescent in left field, monogram of KAP below throne.
Price 1827 
1 commentsCanaan09/16/19 at 19:19Jay GT4: Nice little drachm
Sicily_Syracuse_SNG-ANS5_884_gf.jpg
Syracuse, Hieron II4 viewsSicily, Syracuse, Hieron II. 274-216 BC. AR 16 Litra (13.44 gm) struck c. 240-216 BC. Veiled and diademed head of Queen Philistis l., torch behind. / Fast quadriga driven r. by Nike, ΒΑΣΙΛΑΙΣΣΑΣ above, E (magistrate) below horses, ΦΙΛΙΣΤΙΔΟΣ in ex. EF. Pegasi 123 #42. SNG ANS 5 #884 (same dies) #886-887 (same obv. die); Burnett SNR 62, pl. 3 #47 (same dies); Cahn Basel #533; Caltabiano et al Siracusa #37 (D11/R-); Gulbenkian 355; HGC 2 #1553 (same obv. die) /1554; SNG Cop 1 #823. cf. Triton X #102, Nomos 15 #32. 1 commentsAnaximander09/16/19 at 18:50Jay GT4: Oh man! That is gorgeous. The Victory in the qua...
1205_-_1216_John_AR_Penny_Dublin.JPG
1199-1216, John, AR Penny, Struck 1207 – 1211 at Dublin, Ireland7 viewsObverse: IOHANNES REX around triangle enclosing a crowned and draped facing bust of King John holding, in his right hand, a sceptre tipped with a cross pommée which extends through the side of the triangle into the legend. Quatrefoil to right of bust.
Reverse: ROBERD ON DIVE around triangle containing sun over crescent moon and a star in each angle. Cross pattée at apex of each point of the triangle and above legend on each of the three sides. Moneyer: Roberd, cognate to the modern English name of Robin.
Third issue “REX” coinage, struck to the same weight and fineness as the English standard.
This was the only coinage struck by King John in his own name.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 1.2gms | Die Axis: 4
SPINK: 6228

John was King of England from 1199 until his death in 1216. The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the first Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom.
John, the youngest of the five sons of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, was not expected to inherit significant lands which resulted in him being given the nickname John Lackland. However, after the failed rebellion of his elder brothers between 1173 and 1174, John became Henry's favourite child. He was appointed Lord of Ireland in 1177 and given lands in England and on the continent. John's elder brothers William, Henry and Geoffrey died young and when Richard I became king in 1189, John was the potential heir to the throne. John unsuccessfully attempted a rebellion against Richard's administration whilst his brother was participating in the Third Crusade but despite this, after Richard died in 1199, John was proclaimed King of England.
King John contracted dysentery at Lynn in 1216 but, just before his death, he managed to dictate a brief will. This will still survives and as part of it John requested: "I will that my body be buried in the church of St. Mary and St. Wulfstan of Worcester".
Some of King John's favourite hunting grounds were in Worcester, at Kinver and Feckenham, and he had a special affection for Saint Wulfstan, one of the two great Anglo-Saxon saints whose shrines and tombs were also at Worcester. Both Saint Wulfstan and Saint Oswald can be seen in miniature beside the head of the effigy of King John on his tomb.
Medieval effigies usually show the subject in the prime of life, however the effigy on King John's tomb is unique in that not only is it a life-like image of him, it is also the oldest royal effigy in England.
King John's tomb has been opened twice, once in 1529 and again in 1797. At the first opening it was said that John's head was covered with a monk's cowl, however it is now thought that this was probably his coronation cap. When the tomb was opened for the second time the antiquarians responsible discovered that a robe of crimson damask had originally covered the king's body but, by 1797, most of the embroidery had deteriorated. They also found the remains of a sword which lay down the left side of the body along with parts of its scabbard.
3 comments*Alex09/16/19 at 13:29quadrans: Wow, nice piece..
Edward_I_AR_Penny_Berwick.JPG
1272 - 1307, EDWARD I, AR Penny, Struck 1296 - 1306 at Berwick-on-Tweed, England7 viewsObverse: + EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB. Crowned bust of Edward I facing within circle of pellets. Cross pattée in legend.
Reverse: VILLA BEREVVICI. Long cross dividing legend into quarters, trefoil in each quarter of inner circle.
Undated Penny, Class 10 Berwick Type II (Local dies). Issues from this mint are quite rare.
Diameter: 21.5mm | Weight: 1.0gms | Die Axis: 2
SPINK: 1415

Edward I began a major recoinage in 1279 which consisted not only of pennies and new round half-pennies and farthings, but also introduced a new denomination, a fourpenny piece called the "Groat".

In September 1290, upon the death of Margaret, Maid of Norway, there arose a number of claimants to the throne of Scotland. The Guardians of Scotland, who were the de facto heads of state until a king was chosen, asked Edward I of England to conduct the court proceedings in the dispute because the late King Alexander III had been married to Edward's sister, Margaret of England.
John Balliol, a descendant of King David I, was chosen and he was inaugurated at Scone, on St. Andrew's Day, 30 November 1292. But Edward I treated both Baliol and Scotland with contempt and demanded military support for his war against France. The Scottish response was to form an alliance with the French, invade England, and launch an attack on Carlisle.
After the failure of the Scottish attack on Carlisle, Edward I marched north and, on 28th March 1296, he crossed the river Tweed which borders the two countries, with his troops. On the following day he marched on the town of Berwick, which was Scotland's most important trading port and second only to London in economic importance in medieval Britain at that time.
Contemporary accounts of the number slain range anywhere from 4,000 to 20,000. ”When the town had been taken in this way and its citizens had submitted, Edward spared no one, whatever the age or sex, and for two days streams of blood flowed from the bodies of the slain, for in his tyrannous rage he ordered 7,500 souls of both sexes to be massacred...So that mills could be turned by the flow of their blood.” - Account of the Massacre of Berwick, from Bower’s Scotichronicon.
Berwick's garrison was commanded by William the Hardy, Lord of Douglas, whose life and those of his garrison were spared after he surrendered and the English took the castle.
Berwick was recaptured by the Scots in 1318 but the town changed hands between the two countries several times during the following years until it was finally captured for the English by Richard, Duke of Gloucester, the future Richard III of England, in 1482. The Scots however, did not accept this conquest for at least two centuries after this date as is evidenced by innumerable charters.
2 comments*Alex09/16/19 at 13:29quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
LepidusCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, AR Denarius - Crawford 495/2d42 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Aemilius Lepidus and Octavian, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.70g; 20mm).
Military Mint in Italy.

Obverse: LEPIDVS· PONT· MAX· III· V· R· P· C; bare head of Lepidus facing right.

Reverse: C· CAESAR· IMP· III· VIR· R ·P· C; bare head of Octavian facing right.

References: Crawford 495/2d; HCRI 140a; Sydenham 1323var (rev legend); Aemilia 35var (rev legend); BMCRR (Africa) 29-31var (rev legend); Banti & Simonetti 7 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Leu Numismatik Auction 8 (30 Jun 2019) Lot 949; Bank Leu 7 (9 May 1973) Lot 317; Joseph Martini Collection [Baranowsky (25 Feb 1931) Lot 1273] and [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (24 Feb 1930) Lot 1334]; Rodolfo Ratto Fixed Price List (1927) Lot 629; Dr. Bonazzi Collection a/k/a Riche Collection [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (23 Jan 1924) Lot 1352].

This reverse die differs from most of this denarius issue in that the inscription begins with the initial “C” for Octavian's first name (Caius), while the remainder of the issue begins, simply, "CAESAR." The coins appear to celebrate the formation of the Second Triumvirate, although it is unclear why Lepidus did not also strike coins with Antony’s portrait.

This particular example appeared in a remarkable number of important Roman Republican coin sales between 1924-1931, including sales of the collections of Dr. Bonazzi and Joseph Martini.
4 commentsCarausius09/16/19 at 07:42antoninus1: Very nice Lepidus and an impressive provenance.
AntonyAugurCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, AR Denarius - Crawford 533/28 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius. 43 BCE.
AR Denarius (4.07g; 18mm).
Military mint in Athens, Summer 38 BCE.

Obverse: M ANTONIVS M F M N AVGVR IMP TER; Antony in the priestly robes of an augur, standing right and holding lituus.

Reverse: III VIR R P C COS DESIG ITER ET TERT; Radiate head of Sol facing right.

References: Crawford 533/2; HCRI 267; Sydenham 1199; BMCRR (East) 141; Antonia 80.

Provenance: Ex Kentfield Coll. [Heritage Auction 3067 (9 Jun 2018) Lot 33340]; Michele Baranowski Auction (25 Feb 1931), Lot 1274.

In 50 BCE, Antony was appointed to the College of Augurs, an important group whose job was divining the will of the gods by interpreting auspices (birds and such) and providing advice based on these divinations. Antony was particularly proud of this appointment and referred to it frequently on his coinage, perhaps as a means of highlighting his traditional republican sensibilities. On this coin, he is depicted in full augur regalia. Sol on the reverse is a reference to The East, which Antony controlled per the renewal of the Second Triumvirate several months earlier. The inscriptions reference his augurship, second imperatorial acclamation, and designated second and third consulships. The coin was likely struck in Athens where Antony and Octavia were living after their marriage.
2 commentsCarausius09/16/19 at 02:05Jay GT4: Wonderful!
711365.jpg
Ptolemy V. Tetradrachm. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. 204-180 BC.4 viewsAlexandria mint. (25mm., 13,03g.)

Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis around neck / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOY, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, no control marks.

Svoronos 1231; SNG Copenhagen 244-5.
1 commentsRuslan K09/16/19 at 01:12Jay GT4: Nice coin!
1205_-_1216_John_AR_Penny_Dublin.JPG
1199-1216, John, AR Penny, Struck 1207 – 1211 at Dublin, Ireland7 viewsObverse: IOHANNES REX around triangle enclosing a crowned and draped facing bust of King John holding, in his right hand, a sceptre tipped with a cross pommée which extends through the side of the triangle into the legend. Quatrefoil to right of bust.
Reverse: ROBERD ON DIVE around triangle containing sun over crescent moon and a star in each angle. Cross pattée at apex of each point of the triangle and above legend on each of the three sides. Moneyer: Roberd, cognate to the modern English name of Robin.
Third issue “REX” coinage, struck to the same weight and fineness as the English standard.
This was the only coinage struck by King John in his own name.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 1.2gms | Die Axis: 4
SPINK: 6228

John was King of England from 1199 until his death in 1216. The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the first Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom.
John, the youngest of the five sons of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, was not expected to inherit significant lands which resulted in him being given the nickname John Lackland. However, after the failed rebellion of his elder brothers between 1173 and 1174, John became Henry's favourite child. He was appointed Lord of Ireland in 1177 and given lands in England and on the continent. John's elder brothers William, Henry and Geoffrey died young and when Richard I became king in 1189, John was the potential heir to the throne. John unsuccessfully attempted a rebellion against Richard's administration whilst his brother was participating in the Third Crusade but despite this, after Richard died in 1199, John was proclaimed King of England.
King John contracted dysentery at Lynn in 1216 but, just before his death, he managed to dictate a brief will. This will still survives and as part of it John requested: "I will that my body be buried in the church of St. Mary and St. Wulfstan of Worcester".
Some of King John's favourite hunting grounds were in Worcester, at Kinver and Feckenham, and he had a special affection for Saint Wulfstan, one of the two great Anglo-Saxon saints whose shrines and tombs were also at Worcester. Both Saint Wulfstan and Saint Oswald can be seen in miniature beside the head of the effigy of King John on his tomb.
Medieval effigies usually show the subject in the prime of life, however the effigy on King John's tomb is unique in that not only is it a life-like image of him, it is also the oldest royal effigy in England.
King John's tomb has been opened twice, once in 1529 and again in 1797. At the first opening it was said that John's head was covered with a monk's cowl, however it is now thought that this was probably his coronation cap. When the tomb was opened for the second time the antiquarians responsible discovered that a robe of crimson damask had originally covered the king's body but, by 1797, most of the embroidery had deteriorated. They also found the remains of a sword which lay down the left side of the body along with parts of its scabbard.
3 comments*Alex09/14/19 at 13:49Stkp: Very nice
T248.jpg
Titus RIC-24849 viewsÆ As, 10.39g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
RIC 248 (C). BMC 217. BNC 222.
Acquired from eBay, September 2019.

A fairly common As struck in Titus' large second issue of bronze in 80-81. Because Titus did not take up the consulship in 81, the issue cannot be dated more precisely. The Victory on prow is a carry-over type from the coinage of Vespasian, who in turn borrowed it from the coinage of Augustus. It is a fairly popular generic design symbolising the emperor's military successes. The prow lends it a nautical theme, perhaps alluding to a successful ongoing Flavian naval policy.

Very attractively toned with a pleasing portrait.
2 commentsDavid Atherton09/14/19 at 12:25Jay GT4: Attractive portrait with pleasing tone
terinabis.jpg
Terina Stater11 viewsItalie Bruttium, Terina, 400-356 av. J.C. AR Stater 7.38g.
D:/TEPINAIΩN Tête de nymphe à droite
R:/Nike assise sur un cippe à gauche, un oiseau posé sur la main droite
ref. Holloway & Jenkins 84, HN Italy 2629
2 commentsBrennos09/14/19 at 12:14Anaximander: Beautiful. Well centered, nicely struck, and lovel...
syrac4bis.jpg
Syracuse Tetradrachm8 viewsSicile, Syracuse, 466-406 av. J.C. AR Tétradrachme 17.11g.
D:/Bige au pas à d., conduit par un aurige tenant les rênes et le kentron ; le bige est couronné par Niké volant à droite. A l'exergue un Ketos.
R:/ΣVRΑΚΟ-ΣΙ-Ο-Ν , Tête d'Aréthuse à d., les cheveux relevés et retenus par un large bandeau, entourée de quatre dauphins.
ref. Boehringer 536 (V 274 / R 374), HGC Sicily 1316
1 commentsBrennos09/14/19 at 12:12Anaximander: Impressive, even better than Joe Sermarini's b...
syrac5_B_676.jpg
Syracuse Tetradrachm7 viewsSicile, Syracuse, 435-420 av. J.C. AR Tétradrachme 17.22g.
D:/Bige au pas à d., conduit par un aurige tenant les rênes et le kentron ; les chevaux sont couronnés par Niké volant à droite.
R:/ΣVRΑ-ΚΟ-Σ(Ι)-ΟΝ , Tête d'Aréthuse à d., le chignon ligaturé horizontal derrière la tête, entourée de quatre dauphins.
ref. Boehringer 676.1 this coin (V338/R463), HGC Sicily 1320
Ex Merzbacher Auktion 2 nov. 1909 lot 2563
1 commentsBrennos09/14/19 at 12:06Anaximander: Unusual type, and fantastic portrait (Tres Tres Be...
8973_8974.jpg
Probus, Antoninianus, SALVS AVG, XXIV14 viewsAE Antoninianus
Probus
Augustus: 276 - 282AD
Issued: 280AD
21.5mm 3.30gr 6h
O: IMP PROBVS PF AVG; Helmeted, radiate and cuirassed bust left, holding spear over shoulder in right hand and shield with dots in design in left hand.
R: SALVS AVG; Salus, standing right, feeding snake in right hand from patera in left.
Exergue: XXIV, below line.
Siscia Mint
RIC V-2 Siscia 748, XXIV; Alfoldi 65 #48.
Aorta: B15, O79, R141, T19, M6.
master-numismatics/Marisa Andresevic 153393291318
3/3/19 7/5/19
2 commentsNicholas Z09/14/19 at 10:41Nicholas Z: My bad, Barnaba! Thank you for the correction!
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Probus, Antoninianus, VIRTVS PROBI AVG, XXIVI19 viewsAE Antoninianus
Probus
Augustus: 276 - 282AD
Issued: 278AD
22.0 x 20.0mm 2.97gr 6h
O: IMP CM AVR PROBVS P-F AVG; Radiate, cuirassed bust left, carrying shield and spear over right shoulder.
R: VIRTVS P-ROBI AVG; Mars advancing right, holding long spear and trophy.
Exergue: XXIVI, below line.
Siscia Mint
RIC V-2 Siscia 810, XXIVI; Sear 12071; Alfoldi 96, #215.
Aorta: B65, 038, R195, T41, M6.
fvrivs.rvfvs/Jeremy Mancevice 273832257126
6/19/19 7/6/19
2 commentsNicholas Z09/14/19 at 10:39Nicholas Z: Thanks Barnaba!
T248.jpg
Titus RIC-24849 viewsÆ As, 10.39g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
RIC 248 (C). BMC 217. BNC 222.
Acquired from eBay, September 2019.

A fairly common As struck in Titus' large second issue of bronze in 80-81. Because Titus did not take up the consulship in 81, the issue cannot be dated more precisely. The Victory on prow is a carry-over type from the coinage of Vespasian, who in turn borrowed it from the coinage of Augustus. It is a fairly popular generic design symbolising the emperor's military successes. The prow lends it a nautical theme, perhaps alluding to a successful ongoing Flavian naval policy.

Very attractively toned with a pleasing portrait.
2 commentsDavid Atherton09/14/19 at 08:57FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example.
terinabis.jpg
Terina Stater11 viewsItalie Bruttium, Terina, 400-356 av. J.C. AR Stater 7.38g.
D:/TEPINAIΩN Tête de nymphe à droite
R:/Nike assise sur un cippe à gauche, un oiseau posé sur la main droite
ref. Holloway & Jenkins 84, HN Italy 2629
2 commentsBrennos09/13/19 at 21:38Grant H: A Masterpiece AAA+++
henry-vii-1.jpg
S.2200 Henry VII42 viewsGroat of Henry VII (1485-1509)
Mint: London
Mintmark: cross-crosslet
Class IVa
S. 2200
O: hЄnRIC’ DI’ GRΛ’ RЄX AGL’ Z FR'
R: POSVI DЄV’ Λ DIVTOR Є’ mЄV/CIVI TAS LOn DOn

Henry Tudor's first issue of groats is really not much different from that of Richard III and all the kings before him going back to Edward III. The design would change radically during Henry's reign. This particular issue shows a little more detail in the face and hair, paralleling the developments in art the early 16th century

This particular coin is believed to have been produced around 1504-1505, the estimate for the cross-crosslet mint mark activity.

Ex- CNG
4 commentsNap09/13/19 at 13:41*Alex: Superb portrait. Great coin.
mary-1a.jpg
S.2492 Mary I31 viewsGroat of Mary I (1553-1558)
First issue (1553-1554)
Mintmark: Pomegranate
O: MARIA D G ANG FRA Z HIB REGI
R: VERITAS TEMPORIS FILIA

Mary, daughter of Henry VIII by his first wife Catherine of Aragon, is a controversial figure in English history because of her religious persecutions against Protestants. She gets the moniker "Bloody Mary" because under her watch several hundred Protestants were burned at the stake. Mary's husband, Philip II of Spain, was also unpopular in England. Mary died childless and her sister Elizabeth undid pretty much all of her political and religious changes.

Coins of Mary take two flavors- in just her name prior to her marriage to Philip, and after 1554 with Philip's name. This coin belongs to the earlier issue. These coins frequently demonstrate large scratches across the queen's face, done intentionally as Mary was not liked in her time. This particular example is remarkable free of surface marks.

Ex- Heritage auction 3073 (lot 31062), Spink 11039 (lot 345), F Brady, Seaby, R Carlyon-Britton, WC Boyd
2 commentsNap09/13/19 at 13:40*Alex: Exceptional.
edward-v-groat-1.jpg
S.2155 Edward V32 viewsGroat of Edward V, king of England 1483
Mint: London
Mintmark: boar's head 1 over sun and rose 1/sun and rose 1
S.2155

This issue was probably struck under Richard III but before Edward's death in the tower. The coin's obverse depicts the boar's head mint-mark, which replaced the halved sun-and-rose, which was in use probably from the end of Edward IV's reign until Richard. The sun and rose groats in the name of Edward cannot conclusively be attributed to either Edward IV or Edward V. On the other hand, coins with the boar's head are presumably from Richard's time, since the boar's head was Richard's symbol.

This leads to a confusing coinage of 1483, where major events occurred during a period of 3 months. Edward IV died on April 9. His eldest son Edward was styled Edward V, though never had a coronation. The 12 year-old Edward unfortunately became a political pawn, and his uncle Richard, unsatisfied with his role as Lord Protector, managed to have Edward and his brother Richard of Shrewsbury declared illegitamate and marginalized. Uncle Richard became King Richard III on June 26. Edward and his brother were prisoners in the tower, and it is likely that they were murdered that year, though nobody really knows when they died. Bones purporting to be the two princes were found in the 17th century, but have never been analyzed by modern DNA testing.

So we are left with a coin in the name of Edward, but depicting Richard III's badge. The Edward could be Edward IV, and there are plenty of situations of coinage continuing in the name of the recently deceased king (coins of Richard I in the name of Henry II, coins of Edward I in the name of Henry III, and Edward VI in the name of Henry VIII). It could also be Edward V, since Richard was trying, at least initially, to appear to be ruling in Edward V's name as Lord Protector. It can possibly be considered that ths coin was struck by Richard in Edward V's name before the demise of the young king, perhaps during Richard's protectorate. Or it could be a posthumous issue as it seems to be contemporaneous with other coins in the name of Richard himself.

My take is that the Edward written on the coin is most likely to be Edward V, making this one of the very few coins that come from that reign.

Ex- DNW 3 Jul 2019 (lot 802), M Lessen, Spink, SNC Jan/Feb 1926 (lot 49003)
2 commentsNap09/13/19 at 13:38*Alex: Outstanding.
edward-ii-1.jpg
S.1455 Edward II10 viewsPenny of Edward II, king of England 1307-1327
Mint: London
Class 11a
O:+EDWA R ANGL DNS HYB
R: CIVITAS LONDON

Ex- eBay
1 commentsNap09/13/19 at 13:33*Alex: Great portraits like that are difficult to find.
1326_P_Hadrian_RPC1396.jpg
1396 Hadrian, Cistophorus PHRYGIA, Hierapolis Apollo Lairbenos13 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1396; Metcalf --

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P
Bust draped right

Reverse inscription COS III
Reverse design Apollo Lairbenos riding r., holding double axe over l. shoulder.

10.14 gr
30 mm
7h
1 commentsokidoki09/12/19 at 21:02Mat: An awesome coin
BeFunky-collage_(22).jpg
Sicily Syracuse AR Tetradrachm circa 480-475 BC 17.40 g 25 mm 11h Boehringer 119{O54/R 76}5 viewsCharioteer driving slow quadriga right holding kentron and reins./Nike flying right crowning the horses,head of Arethusa facing right,four dolphins around.
very rare Boehringer list one coin from this die pair,and is in his Massenpragung group.
1 commentsGrant H09/12/19 at 18:45Anaximander: Nice! SNG ANS 5 #31. Hard to find these with all-o...
Constantine_the_Great_the_hand_of_God_reaches_down_.jpg
Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D. , Manus Dei, the hand of God.8 viewsBillon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 39; LRBC I 1374; SRCV V 17488; Voetter 34; Cohen VII 760; Hunter V p. 283, 4 ff. var. (officina), EF, glossy black patina, red earthen deposits, 1.821g, 15.0mm, 330o, 10th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, posthumous, Sep 337 - 347 A.D.; obverse DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled bust right; reverse Constantine in quadriga right, veiled, the hand of God reaches down to take him to heaven; star above, SMANI in exergue.

FORVM Ancient Coins. /The Sam Mansourati Collection.

Soon after the Feast of Easter 337, Constantine fell seriously ill. He left Constantinople for the hot baths near his mother's city of Helenopolis. There, in a church his mother built in honor of Lucian the Apostle, he prayed, and there he realized that he was dying. He attempted to return to Constantinople, making it only as far as a suburb of Nicomedia. He summoned the bishops, and told them of his hope to be baptized in the River Jordan, where Christ was written to have been baptized. He requested the baptism right away, promising to live a more Christian life should he live through his illness. The bishops, Eusebius records, "performed the sacred ceremonies according to custom." It has been thought that Constantine put off baptism as long as he did so as to be absolved from as much of his sin as possible. Constantine died soon after at a suburban villa called Achyron, on 22 May 337.
2 commentsSam09/12/19 at 16:15okidoki: wonderful obverse and toning
Vlasto_320~0.jpg
GREEK, Italy, CALABRIA, Taras. AR Nomos. Circa 415-405 BC.21 views22mm, 7.88 g, 9h
Nude rider seated right on horse, which he crowns; kerykeion to right, ΛA in exergue / Phalanthos, nude, extending his hand, riding dolphin right.
Fischer-Bossert Group 21, 297 (V134/R229); Vlasto 320–1 (same dies); HN Italy 851; SNG Copenhagen 803 (same dies); SNG Lloyd 150 (same dies); SNG Lockett 351 (same dies); Hirsch 190 (same dies); Dewing 137 (same dies).
Even light gray tone, with iridescence around the devices, a few marks under tone on obverse, light scuffs under tone and die flaw on reverse. Near EF. Very rare.

From the Matthew Curtis Collection. Ex William N. Rudman Collection (Triton V, 15 January 2002), lot 1040.
2 commentsLeo09/12/19 at 16:10okidoki: excellent and stylistic
Vlasto_320~0.jpg
GREEK, Italy, CALABRIA, Taras. AR Nomos. Circa 415-405 BC.21 views22mm, 7.88 g, 9h
Nude rider seated right on horse, which he crowns; kerykeion to right, ΛA in exergue / Phalanthos, nude, extending his hand, riding dolphin right.
Fischer-Bossert Group 21, 297 (V134/R229); Vlasto 320–1 (same dies); HN Italy 851; SNG Copenhagen 803 (same dies); SNG Lloyd 150 (same dies); SNG Lockett 351 (same dies); Hirsch 190 (same dies); Dewing 137 (same dies).
Even light gray tone, with iridescence around the devices, a few marks under tone on obverse, light scuffs under tone and die flaw on reverse. Near EF. Very rare.

From the Matthew Curtis Collection. Ex William N. Rudman Collection (Triton V, 15 January 2002), lot 1040.
2 commentsLeo09/12/19 at 10:50Grant H: love the horse
V243.jpg
Vespasian RIC-24333 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.77g
Rome mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVSTI; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 243 (C3). BMC 555. BNC 516.
Acquired from Wallinmynt, September 2019.

The standing Pax is one of the most common types encountered on Vespasian's sestertii struck during the great bronze issue of 71, mirroring the prominent role Pax played on his early denarii. Colin Kraay counted a staggering 31 obverse dies paired with this sestertius reverse type alone. Here Pax is represented holding a cornucopiae (on the denarius she holds a caduceus) symbolising the emperor's gift of peace and prosperity to the empire.

A strong veristic portrait in good metal.
1 commentsDavid Atherton09/12/19 at 09:21FlaviusDomitianus: Good portrait indeed.
Screenshot_2017-11-20_15_07_51.png
Roman Imperial, Postumus (Gallic Emperor), AR Antoninianus.3 viewsLyons 260-269 A.D 4.54g - 22.8mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG - Radiate, draped bust right.

Rev: PAX AVG - Pax running left, holding olive branch and sceptre.

RIC V-II 78.
1 commentsChristian Scarlioli09/11/19 at 19:24Anaximander: Lovely coin; great portrait and excellent legends.
Constantine_the_Great_the_hand_of_God_reaches_down_.jpg
Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D. , Manus Dei, the hand of God.8 viewsBillon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 39; LRBC I 1374; SRCV V 17488; Voetter 34; Cohen VII 760; Hunter V p. 283, 4 ff. var. (officina), EF, glossy black patina, red earthen deposits, 1.821g, 15.0mm, 330o, 10th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, posthumous, Sep 337 - 347 A.D.; obverse DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled bust right; reverse Constantine in quadriga right, veiled, the hand of God reaches down to take him to heaven; star above, SMANI in exergue.

FORVM Ancient Coins. /The Sam Mansourati Collection.

Soon after the Feast of Easter 337, Constantine fell seriously ill. He left Constantinople for the hot baths near his mother's city of Helenopolis. There, in a church his mother built in honor of Lucian the Apostle, he prayed, and there he realized that he was dying. He attempted to return to Constantinople, making it only as far as a suburb of Nicomedia. He summoned the bishops, and told them of his hope to be baptized in the River Jordan, where Christ was written to have been baptized. He requested the baptism right away, promising to live a more Christian life should he live through his illness. The bishops, Eusebius records, "performed the sacred ceremonies according to custom." It has been thought that Constantine put off baptism as long as he did so as to be absolved from as much of his sin as possible. Constantine died soon after at a suburban villa called Achyron, on 22 May 337.
2 commentsSam09/11/19 at 14:56Simon: Love it.
Sicily_Syracuse_SNG-ANS5_499_gf.jpg
Syracuse, Third Democracy & Timoleon3 viewsSicily, Syracuse, Third Democracy & Timoleon. 341-317 BC. AR Stater (8.55 gm). Pegasus flying l. / Head of Athena r., wearing Corinthian helmet ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ r. EF. SNG ANS 5 #499 (same dies); Cahn AMB 498; Calciati Pegasi II pg. 607 #1; HGC 2 #1400; SNG Cop 1 #711; SNG Delpierre 689-693; SNG Lloyd 1442. cf. Nomos 17 #54 (same obv. die) PR CHF 2,840. 1 commentsAnaximander09/11/19 at 14:55Ruslan K: Fantastic stater! Very nice!
imgonline-com-ua-2to1-GxChneZ0eoXNQPCf.jpg
MYSIA, Kyzikos. AR Hemiobol. 450-400 BC.6 views(8,5mm, 0.4g). Forepart of boar left; behind, tunny upward / Head of roaring lion left; star to upper left; all within incuse square. Von Fritze II 14; SNG France 387. 2 commentsRuslan K09/11/19 at 14:20Ruslan K:
imgonline-com-ua-2to1-tbphBRKwoyGTX.jpg
MYSIA, Kyzikos. AR Obol. 450-400 BC. 7 views(12,5 mm, 0.8 g,). MYSIA, Kyzikos. Forepart of boar left, E (retrograde) on shoulder; tunny to right / Head of lion left within incuse square. Von Fritze II, 11; SNG BN 378.2 commentsRuslan K09/11/19 at 14:18Ruslan K: Thank you! Lovely small coins!
imgonline-com-ua-2to1-tbphBRKwoyGTX.jpg
MYSIA, Kyzikos. AR Obol. 450-400 BC. 7 views(12,5 mm, 0.8 g,). MYSIA, Kyzikos. Forepart of boar left, E (retrograde) on shoulder; tunny to right / Head of lion left within incuse square. Von Fritze II, 11; SNG BN 378.2 commentsRuslan K09/11/19 at 14:14Anaximander: I love your fractions from Kyzikos.
imgonline-com-ua-2to1-GxChneZ0eoXNQPCf.jpg
MYSIA, Kyzikos. AR Hemiobol. 450-400 BC.6 views(8,5mm, 0.4g). Forepart of boar left; behind, tunny upward / Head of roaring lion left; star to upper left; all within incuse square. Von Fritze II 14; SNG France 387. 2 commentsRuslan K09/11/19 at 14:12Anaximander: Unusual with the star on the reverse. Nice.
Hekatomnos.jpg
Satraps OF Caria. Hekatomnos (Circa 392/1-377/6 BC)7 viewsAR Tetradrachm

25 mm, 14.90 g

Obverse: Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding labrys over his right shoulder and long scepter in his left.

Reverse: EKATOMNΩ, Lion at bay to right.

Hecatomnus 16. Karl 3. SNG von Aulock 2354.

Hecatomnos was the son of Hyssaldomus, the local ruler of Mylasa, a town in Caria (a region on the SW coast of Turkey). In 392 or 391, the Persian king Artaxerxes II appointed Hecatomnos as satrap of that part of the Achaemenid Empire and later awarded him the overlordship of the city of Miletus, the largest Greek settlement in Asia Minor. Hecatomnos seems to have been fascinated by Greek culture, and on one occasion sent his youngest son Pixodarus to Athens. Hecatomnos died in 377/376 and was succeeded by his son Maussolus (builder of the Mausoleum of Maussollos). His house was to rule Caria for another half century.

In many ways, not least in their coinage, the Hekatomnids were the forerunners of Hellenistic kings. They were unique in that period in issuing a regular and prolific dynastic coinage, which remained practically unchanged until the arrival of Alexander the Great. Other satraps struck coins, but none was hereditary and there was no continuity of coinage from one family member to another as was the case with the Hekatomnids.

The tetradrachm series above was a type that remained in use virtually unchanged throughout the coinage of the Hekatomnids. On the obverse is the figure of Zeus Labraundos, bearded and laureate, standing to the right, wearing a himation, and holding a spear pointing downward in one hand and a labrys (double-axe) in the other. This was a potent image, sacred to all Carians by virtue of the importance of the sanctuary of Labraunda (literally, “place of the sacred labrys”). This image of Zeus, with a very Greek looking appearance, remained virtually unchanged throughout the different issues that were minted over a period of about half a century – perhaps suggesting that the coin design was modelled after the actual statue of Zeus at Labraunda.

The reverse of the tetradrachm depicts a lion standing to the left, roaring, its back legs straight and front legs bent, almost parallel to the ground line. Comparable lion postures are found on some contemporary Cypriot issues and on the 5th century BC diobol coinage of Miletos (most likely the Hekatomnids’ inspiration).
2 commentsNathan P09/11/19 at 12:34Anaximander: Such a rarity. Lovely toning.
Hekatomnos.jpg
Satraps OF Caria. Hekatomnos (Circa 392/1-377/6 BC)7 viewsAR Tetradrachm

25 mm, 14.90 g

Obverse: Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding labrys over his right shoulder and long scepter in his left.

Reverse: EKATOMNΩ, Lion at bay to right.

Hecatomnus 16. Karl 3. SNG von Aulock 2354.

Hecatomnos was the son of Hyssaldomus, the local ruler of Mylasa, a town in Caria (a region on the SW coast of Turkey). In 392 or 391, the Persian king Artaxerxes II appointed Hecatomnos as satrap of that part of the Achaemenid Empire and later awarded him the overlordship of the city of Miletus, the largest Greek settlement in Asia Minor. Hecatomnos seems to have been fascinated by Greek culture, and on one occasion sent his youngest son Pixodarus to Athens. Hecatomnos died in 377/376 and was succeeded by his son Maussolus (builder of the Mausoleum of Maussollos). His house was to rule Caria for another half century.

In many ways, not least in their coinage, the Hekatomnids were the forerunners of Hellenistic kings. They were unique in that period in issuing a regular and prolific dynastic coinage, which remained practically unchanged until the arrival of Alexander the Great. Other satraps struck coins, but none was hereditary and there was no continuity of coinage from one family member to another as was the case with the Hekatomnids.

The tetradrachm series above was a type that remained in use virtually unchanged throughout the coinage of the Hekatomnids. On the obverse is the figure of Zeus Labraundos, bearded and laureate, standing to the right, wearing a himation, and holding a spear pointing downward in one hand and a labrys (double-axe) in the other. This was a potent image, sacred to all Carians by virtue of the importance of the sanctuary of Labraunda (literally, “place of the sacred labrys”). This image of Zeus, with a very Greek looking appearance, remained virtually unchanged throughout the different issues that were minted over a period of about half a century – perhaps suggesting that the coin design was modelled after the actual statue of Zeus at Labraunda.

The reverse of the tetradrachm depicts a lion standing to the left, roaring, its back legs straight and front legs bent, almost parallel to the ground line. Comparable lion postures are found on some contemporary Cypriot issues and on the 5th century BC diobol coinage of Miletos (most likely the Hekatomnids’ inspiration).
2 commentsNathan P09/11/19 at 06:35shanxi: nice
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ATTICA. Athens. Ca. 2nd-1st centuries BC. AR tetradrachm10 viewsATTICA. Athens. Ca. 2nd-1st centuries BC. AR tetradrachm (34mm, 16.94 gm, 12h). NGC XF 4/5 - 3/5, brushed, die shift. New Style coinage, ca. 148/7 BC, Ammo(nius) and Dio-, magistrates. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with a vine scroll, Pegasus above solid upturned cheek flap / A-ΘE / AM/MΩ / ΔIO, owl standing facing on overturned amphora; kerchnos in left field, A below, all within wreath. Thompson 101a. 3 commentsMark R109/11/19 at 03:55Jay GT4: Very nice!
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ATTICA. Athens. Ca. 2nd-1st centuries BC. AR tetradrachm10 viewsATTICA. Athens. Ca. 2nd-1st centuries BC. AR tetradrachm (34mm, 16.94 gm, 12h). NGC XF 4/5 - 3/5, brushed, die shift. New Style coinage, ca. 148/7 BC, Ammo(nius) and Dio-, magistrates. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with a vine scroll, Pegasus above solid upturned cheek flap / A-ΘE / AM/MΩ / ΔIO, owl standing facing on overturned amphora; kerchnos in left field, A below, all within wreath. Thompson 101a. 3 commentsMark R109/10/19 at 19:58Mat: Amazing owl
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ATTICA. Athens. Ca. 2nd-1st centuries BC. AR tetradrachm10 viewsATTICA. Athens. Ca. 2nd-1st centuries BC. AR tetradrachm (34mm, 16.94 gm, 12h). NGC XF 4/5 - 3/5, brushed, die shift. New Style coinage, ca. 148/7 BC, Ammo(nius) and Dio-, magistrates. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with a vine scroll, Pegasus above solid upturned cheek flap / A-ΘE / AM/MΩ / ΔIO, owl standing facing on overturned amphora; kerchnos in left field, A below, all within wreath. Thompson 101a. 3 commentsMark R109/10/19 at 16:30Tracy Aiello: Gorgeous.
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Constans AE Centenionalis9 viewsOBV: D N CONSTANS P F AVG
REV: FEL TEMP REPARTIO
Trier Mint mark
346 AD
21mm
4,28g
RIC 224

Purchased from RomaNumismatics
1 commentsAdam P209/10/19 at 04:54Randygeki(h2): Nice!
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C. Publicus Malleolus, (96 B.C.)8 viewsAR Denarius
O: Helmeted head of Mars right; mallet (malleolus) above, mark of value below chin.
R: Warrior, holding spear and shield, with right foot on cuirass, standing left before trophy; prow to right; C•M(AL) to right.
Rome Mint
3.67g
19mm
Crawford 335/3b; Sydenham 615; Poblicia 6a; Type as RBW 1203.
2 commentsMat09/10/19 at 04:47Randygeki(h2): Not bad!
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lampsakos001a3 viewsElagabalus
Lampsakos, Mysia

Obv: AV K M AVPH ANTΩNЄINOC, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear.
Rev: ΛΑΝΨΑΚΗΝΩΝ. Homonoia standing facing, head left, holding cornucopia and patera; at feet to left, lighted altar.
20 mm, 5.02 gms

SNG France 1286 (as Caracalla).
1 commentsCharles M09/10/19 at 01:45rennrad12020: I love the psi!
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C. SULPICIUS C.f. GALBA AR Serrate Denarius2 viewsOBVERSE: Conjoined laureate heads of the Dei Penates left
REVERSE: Two soldiers swearing oath over a sow; F above; C SVLPICI C F in ex
Struck at Rome, 106 BC
3.8g, 19mm
Cr312/1; Syd 572; Sulpicia 1
1 commentsLegatus09/09/19 at 21:19Jay GT4: Wonderful obverse. Congrats!
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Syracuse, Dionysios I. 3 viewsSicily, Syracuse, Dionysios I. 405-395 BC. AR Litra (0.77 gm). Head of Arethusa l., hair in sphendone, dolphin to r. ΣꓦΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ before. / Octopus. A hidden legend (ΣΥΡΑΚΟΥ) is allegedly formed by the octopus tentacles. VF. Bt. FUN show, 2017. SNG ANS 5 #293-294; HGC 2 #1381; SNG Ashmolean 2018; SNG Cop 1 #675; SNG Fitzwilliam 1259; SNG Lloyd 1400-1402; SNG Munchen 1096 (all with same dies). 1 commentsAnaximander09/09/19 at 21:17Jay GT4: Very nice!
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BCC RI2527 viewsRoman Imperial
Geta Caesar 198-211 CE
AR Denarius
Obv:P SEPT GETA CAES PONT
Bare-headed, draped bust right
Rev: PRINC IVVENTVTIS
Geta standing left, holding branch
and spear, trophy to right
19mm. 3.27gm. Axis:0
possible reference: RIC 18 Rome Mint
2 commentsv-drome09/09/19 at 18:48v-drome: Thank you, Jay. It remains as found, 45 years ago...
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BCC RI2527 viewsRoman Imperial
Geta Caesar 198-211 CE
AR Denarius
Obv:P SEPT GETA CAES PONT
Bare-headed, draped bust right
Rev: PRINC IVVENTVTIS
Geta standing left, holding branch
and spear, trophy to right
19mm. 3.27gm. Axis:0
possible reference: RIC 18 Rome Mint
2 commentsv-drome09/09/19 at 18:34Jay GT4: I would never clean this!
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L. Cornelius Lentulus & C. Claudius Marcellus, Denarius 2 viewsL. Cornelius Lentulus & C. Claudius Marcellus, Denarius

RRC: 445/2
49 bc
3,82 gr

AV: Head of Apollo right; L LENT C MARC before, COS behind.
RV: Jupiter standing facing, holding thunderbolt and eagle; on right, altar decorated with garland; on left, star and Q.

ex Gemini, Auct XIV, Lot 425, 18.04.2018
reported as: "Ex Philip T. Ashton Collection. Ex SC Collection".
1 commentsNorbert09/08/19 at 18:56Jay GT4: Fantastic
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Q. Sicinius & C. Coponius, Denarius 3 viewsQ. Sicinius & C. Coponius, Denarius

RRC: 444/1a
49 bc
3,97 gr

AV: Head of Apollo right, star below; Q.SICINIVS before, III.VIR behind.
RV: Club of Hercules surmounted by lion skin with scalp to right; arrow on left, bow on right; C COPONIVS PR S C around.

ex Gemini, Auct XIV, Lot 424, 18.04.2018
reported as: "Ex Philip T. Ashton Collection".
1 commentsNorbert09/08/19 at 18:55Jay GT4: Great coin
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1272 - 1307, EDWARD I, AR Penny, Struck 1296 - 1306 at Berwick-on-Tweed, England7 viewsObverse: + EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB. Crowned bust of Edward I facing within circle of pellets. Cross pattée in legend.
Reverse: VILLA BEREVVICI. Long cross dividing legend into quarters, trefoil in each quarter of inner circle.
Undated Penny, Class 10 Berwick Type II (Local dies). Issues from this mint are quite rare.
Diameter: 21.5mm | Weight: 1.0gms | Die Axis: 2
SPINK: 1415

Edward I began a major recoinage in 1279 which consisted not only of pennies and new round half-pennies and farthings, but also introduced a new denomination, a fourpenny piece called the "Groat".

In September 1290, upon the death of Margaret, Maid of Norway, there arose a number of claimants to the throne of Scotland. The Guardians of Scotland, who were the de facto heads of state until a king was chosen, asked Edward I of England to conduct the court proceedings in the dispute because the late King Alexander III had been married to Edward's sister, Margaret of England.
John Balliol, a descendant of King David I, was chosen and he was inaugurated at Scone, on St. Andrew's Day, 30 November 1292. But Edward I treated both Baliol and Scotland with contempt and demanded military support for his war against France. The Scottish response was to form an alliance with the French, invade England, and launch an attack on Carlisle.
After the failure of the Scottish attack on Carlisle, Edward I marched north and, on 28th March 1296, he crossed the river Tweed which borders the two countries, with his troops. On the following day he marched on the town of Berwick, which was Scotland's most important trading port and second only to London in economic importance in medieval Britain at that time.
Contemporary accounts of the number slain range anywhere from 4,000 to 20,000. ”When the town had been taken in this way and its citizens had submitted, Edward spared no one, whatever the age or sex, and for two days streams of blood flowed from the bodies of the slain, for in his tyrannous rage he ordered 7,500 souls of both sexes to be massacred...So that mills could be turned by the flow of their blood.” - Account of the Massacre of Berwick, from Bower’s Scotichronicon.
Berwick's garrison was commanded by William the Hardy, Lord of Douglas, whose life and those of his garrison were spared after he surrendered and the English took the castle.
Berwick was recaptured by the Scots in 1318 but the town changed hands between the two countries several times during the following years until it was finally captured for the English by Richard, Duke of Gloucester, the future Richard III of England, in 1482. The Scots however, did not accept this conquest for at least two centuries after this date as is evidenced by innumerable charters.
2 comments*Alex09/08/19 at 16:24Jay GT4: Nice one Alex
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C. Publicus Malleolus, (96 B.C.)8 viewsAR Denarius
O: Helmeted head of Mars right; mallet (malleolus) above, mark of value below chin.
R: Warrior, holding spear and shield, with right foot on cuirass, standing left before trophy; prow to right; C•M(AL) to right.
Rome Mint
3.67g
19mm
Crawford 335/3b; Sydenham 615; Poblicia 6a; Type as RBW 1203.
2 commentsMat09/07/19 at 23:34Jay GT4: Great reverse design
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Phoenicia, Arados 130-129 B.C5 viewsAE 21.25mm (Thickness 2.61mm), weight 6.13g, die axis = 12h (0 degrees), denomination B.

Obverse: Turreted head of Tyche right, S shaped ponytail, palm branch behind.

Reverse: Poseidon seated left on prow of galley holding wreath in right hand and trident in left, Athena figurehead (Ἀθηνᾶ Πρόμαχος), Phoenician letters qoph (Q) and beth (B) above, Aradain era date 130 with heth (H) below.
1 commentsArados09/07/19 at 13:04Jay GT4: Love the patina
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01 Domitian as Caesar RIC 66923 viewsÆ As, 11.05g
Rome mint, 73-74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIAN COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
RIC 669 (C). BMC -. BNC 699.
Acquired from Musa Numismatics, August 2019.

The propaganda value of Pax for the Flavian dynasty after the Civil War, the revolt of Civilis, and the Jewish War cannot be underestimated. In her various guises she is one of the most popular types on Vespasian's coinage and shows up quite frequently during the reign on the coins struck for both himself and his sons. This As struck for Domitian as Caesar shows Pax leaning on a column, which likely copies a well known cult image of the goddess.

Tellingly, less than a decade later, Pax would not feature so prominently on Domitian's own coinage as Emperor.

Fine style early portrait.
1 commentsDavid Atherton09/07/19 at 12:43Jay GT4: Lovely portrait
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Nabataean Kingdom, Nabataean, King Rabbel and Queen Gamilat, AR Drachm. Scarce.2 viewsPetra Year 21 = 90-91 A.D. 3.40g - 12.9mm, Axis 12h.

Obv: Laureate and draped bust of King Rabbel right.

Rev: Laureate, veiled, and draped bust of Queen Gamilat right; date in legend behind head.

Barkay, Coinage 16; Meshorer, Nabataea 153.
1 commentsChristian Scarlioli09/07/19 at 12:26Canaan: I love this type definitly on my wish list Congra...
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Syracuse, Second Democracy & Dionysios I. 11 viewsSicily, Syracuse, Second Democracy & Dionysios I. 400-390 BC. AR Dekadrachm (42.64 gm). Fast quadriga driven l., crowned by Nike flying r. above; ex: panoply of armor, spear behind. / Head of Arethusa l., hair wreathed; four dolphins around, scallop shell behind. [ΣꓦΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ]. Unsigned die in the style of Euainetos. Die rust on obverse. nVF/gVF. SNG ANS 5 #370 (same dies); Dewing 907-908 (same dies); Gallatin series F: O.VIII-R.F.I #1-2 (same dies); HGC 2 #1299. cf Triton VII #91. 1 commentsAnaximander09/07/19 at 12:17Jay GT4: Masterpiece
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S.1393 Edward I12 viewsPenny of Edward I, king of England 1272-1307
Mint: London
Class 3g
O:+EDW R ANGL DNS HYB
R: CIVITAS LONDON

Ex- eBay
1 commentsNap09/07/19 at 11:19Anaximander: Nice! A strong example, with outstanding legends.
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Philip III Arrhidaios. KINGS of MACEDON. Tetradrachm. 323-317 BC.11 viewsBabylon mint. (17.00g, 27mm.) Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding sceptre; BAΣIΛEΩΣ below, ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ to right, M in left field, ΛY below throne. Price P181. 2 commentsRuslan K09/07/19 at 11:15Ruslan K: Thank you!
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Syracuse, Second Democracy9 viewsSicily, Syracuse, Second Democracy. 466-405 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.21 gm) struck 450-440 BC. Charioteer driving slow quadriga r., holding kentron, Nike overhead. ex: ketos (sea serpent) r. / Hd. of Arethusa r., hair in krobylos bound by taenia, wearing earrings and necklace; four dolphins around. Σꓦ-ꓣΑΚΟΣ-Ι-Ο-Ͷ (Ν retrograde). EF. 19 known. SNG Lockett 941 (same dies); SNG Lloyd 1326 (same rev. die); Bement 475 (same dies); Boehringer series XVIb #564 (V285/R379); HGC 2 #1311; SNG Munchen 1023 (same dies). SNG ANS -; SNG Cop -; cf. NAC 82 #56; Baldwin 75 #2158.
You can see a near identical type here, in the Best of Type gallery, from the collection of Joe Sermarini.
2 commentsAnaximander09/07/19 at 05:32Christian Scarlioli: Super detail, love it.
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Philip III Arrhidaios. KINGS of MACEDON. Tetradrachm. 323-317 BC.11 viewsBabylon mint. (17.00g, 27mm.) Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding sceptre; BAΣIΛEΩΣ below, ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ to right, M in left field, ΛY below throne. Price P181. 2 commentsRuslan K09/06/19 at 21:42Jay GT4: Very nice!
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Probus, Antoninianus, SOLI INVICTO, CXXIM4 viewsAE Antoninianus
Probus
Augustus: 276 - 282AD
Issued:
22.0 x 20.5mm 3.95gr 0h
O: IMP CM AVR PROBVS PF AVG; Radiate bust left, wearing imperial mantle, holding scepter with eagle atop in right hand.
R: SO-LI INVICTO; Sol in spread quadriga, advancing, holding whip and globe in left hand, raising right hand.
Exergue: CXXIM, below line.
Cyzicus Mint
RIC V-2 Cyzicus 911; Aorta: B48, O38, R155, T133, M2.
Savoca London/Philipp Eckhert 5th Blue Auction, Lot 990
8/11/19 9/6/19
1 commentsNicholas Z09/06/19 at 21:42Jay GT4: Great reverse on this one
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S.1875 Henry VI27 viewsGroat of Henry VI, king of England, first reign 1422-1461
Mint: Calais
Mintmark: pinecone and mascle
S.1875

Ex- Silbury Coins
2 commentsNap09/06/19 at 21:06Anaximander: Well done. Centered, well struck up, portrait and ...
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Syracuse, Second Democracy9 viewsSicily, Syracuse, Second Democracy. 466-405 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.21 gm) struck 450-440 BC. Charioteer driving slow quadriga r., holding kentron, Nike overhead. ex: ketos (sea serpent) r. / Hd. of Arethusa r., hair in krobylos bound by taenia, wearing earrings and necklace; four dolphins around. Σꓦ-ꓣΑΚΟΣ-Ι-Ο-Ͷ (Ν retrograde). EF. 19 known. SNG Lockett 941 (same dies); SNG Lloyd 1326 (same rev. die); Bement 475 (same dies); Boehringer series XVIb #564 (V285/R379); HGC 2 #1311; SNG Munchen 1023 (same dies). SNG ANS -; SNG Cop -; cf. NAC 82 #56; Baldwin 75 #2158.
You can see a near identical type here, in the Best of Type gallery, from the collection of Joe Sermarini.
2 commentsAnaximander09/06/19 at 16:52Tracy Aiello: Gorgeous especially the reverse.
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PUPIENUS30 viewsAR antoninianus. 238 AD. 4,42grs. Radiate draped and cuirassed bust right. IMP CAES PVPIEN MAXIMVS AVG. / Clasped right hands. CARITAS MVTVA AVGG.
RIC 10 b. RSC 3. s 8520.
1 commentsbenito09/06/19 at 15:09Callimachus: Nice coin.
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S.1765 Henry V13 viewsGroat of Henry V, king of England, 1413-1422
Mint: London
Mintmark: cross pattee
S.1765
Class C

Ex- P.Hutchings, I.White
1 commentsNap09/06/19 at 15:08Callimachus: Nice example of a rare coin.
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Syracuse, Deinomenid Tyranny, Hieron I. 6 viewsSicily, Syracuse, Deinomenid Tyranny, Hieron I. 478-466 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.26 gm) struck c. 478-475 BC. Charioteer driving quadriga r., Nike overhead. / Head of Arethusa r., hair in krobylos bound by taenia of pearls, wearing pearl necklace. Four dolphins around. ΣꓦꓣΑΚΟΣΙΟ-Ν. gVF. Boehringer VIIIb #146 (V65/R100); Randazzo 356; SNG Cop 1 #625; HGC 2 #1307 (same obv. die); Same dies: ACNAC Davis #49; Jameson 1908; Cosimo 209. cf. CNG 94 #106.1 commentsAnaximander09/05/19 at 18:51Jay GT4: Outstanding!
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Syracuse Fourth Democracy (289 - 287 B.C.)22 viewsNumismatic evidence suggests that republican government existed for a few years between the death of Agathokles and Hicetas' assumption of power; this is sometimes referred to as the Fourth Democracy (289 - 287 B.C.). GB88303. Bronze AE 22, Calciati II p. , 148 Ds 59/1, cf. SNG Cop 782 (uncertain control), HGC 2 148 (R2) var. (∆ vice thunderbolt), SNG ANS -, gVF, superb style, well centered on a tight flan cutting off the obverse legend, brown patina, some hard green encrustation, Syracuse, Sicily mint, weight 8.524g, maximum diameter 21.7mm, die axis 270o, 289 - 288 B.C.; obverse DIOΣ EΛEYΘEPOY, laureate head of Zeus Eleutherios left, thunderbolt behind; reverse thunderbolt with four wings, ΣYPAK/OΣIΩN in two lines, above and below; ex CNG e-auction 233 (26 May 2010), lot 110; ex Harlan J. Berk.4 commentsMark R109/05/19 at 17:43Anaximander: Great portrait and interesting description!
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GREEK, SICILY. Syracuse. Deinomenid Tyranny. 485-466 BC. AR Tetradrachm56 viewsSICILY. Syracuse. Deinomenid Tyranny. 485-466 BC. AR Tetradrachm (24mm - 17.08 g). Struck under Hieron I, circa 478-475 BC
Hoover 1307
2 commentsKarsten K09/05/19 at 17:32Anaximander: Magnificent! That's an SNG Cop. vol. 1 #625, i...
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6070 EGYPT, Alexandria Sabina Hemidrachm 134-35 AD Dikaiosyne standing15 viewsReference.
RPC III, 6070; Köln 1268; Emmett 1337.19; Dattari-2067; K&G-33.9

Issue L ƐΝΝƐΑΚ·Δ

Obv. ϹΑΒΙΝΑ ϹƐΒΑϹΤΗ
Bust of Sabina (hair on top of head), r., and crowned with poppy head

Rev. L ƐΝΝƐΑΚ·Δ
Dikaiosyne standing facing, head l., holding scales and cornucopia

12.26 gr
30 mm
12h
4 commentsokidoki09/05/19 at 12:56Jay GT4: A beauty!
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Domitian RIC-70925 viewsÆ As, 10.61g
Rome mint, 90-91 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XV CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VIRTVTI AVGVSTI; S C in field; Virtus stg. r., foot on helmet, with spear and parazonium
RIC 709 (C2). BMC 452. BNC 482.
Acquired from Prafectus Coins, August 2019.

The Virtus type was struck repeatedly on Domitian's middle bronze from 84 onwards. I. Carradice in his 1983 monograph on Domitian's coinage says the following concerning the type - 'Virtus is a military type, symbolic of the courage of Domitian and the mutual devotion between the army and emperor.' Virtus first appears on the coinage in the flurry of Germania Capta types that were struck soon after Domitian's German triumph. She is depicted in traditional Amazon attire.

A superb example in fine style.
1 commentsDavid Atherton09/05/19 at 12:51Jay GT4: Wonderful reverse and strong portrait
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Vitellius / L. Vitellius Denarius88 viewsVitellius (69 AD). AR Denarius, 18 mm, 2.51 g. Rome mint. Struck late April to December 20, 69.
O: A VITELLIVS GERM IMP AVG TR P, laureate head right.
R: L VITELLIVS COS III CENSOR, L. Vitellius seated left on curule chair, holding branch and eagle-tipped sceptre.
RIC I, 97 (R); Cohen 55 (40 Francs).

Lucius Vitellius the elder, the father of the emperor of the same name, had an impressive career under Tiberius, Caligula and Claudius. He achieved the highest honors attainable by a private man at Rome under the Empire: consul for the third time and censor. He held these offices during the reign of Claudius, being a close friend of the emperor and the most influential Roman senator.

Vitellius died unexpectedly from a paralytic stroke in 51 and received a statue on the speaker's platform on the Roman Forum, with the inscription 'Of unwavering loyalty to the emperor'.

The year 36 saw an incident which deserves mentioning. In Judaea, a Samaritan, claiming to be Moses reincarnate, gathered an armed following. The prefect of Judaea, Pontius Pilate, intervened immediately, dispersed the crowd, and had the ringleaders executed. The Samaritans considered his violence excessive and appealed to the Syrian governor. Vitellius heard their complaints, sent Pilate back to Italy and appointed Marcellus. Pilate's co-ruler in Judaea, the high priest Joseph Caiaphas, was replaced by his brother-in-law Jonathan.
2 commentsNemonater09/05/19 at 03:06Jay GT4: Cool!
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Augustus RPC 414230 viewsSELEUCIS and PIERIA, Antioch. Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. AR Tetradrachm
(27mm, 14.56 g, 12h). In the name and types of the Seleucid king Philip I Philadelphus. Dated year 26 of the Caesarean Era (24/23 BC).
Obv: Diademed head of Philip I right within fillet border
Rev: Zeus Nicephorus seated left; monogram to inner left and below throne, ςK (date) and thunderbolt in exergue; all within wreath.
Prieur 19; McAlee 19 (this coin illustrated); RPC I 4142; SC 2491.16; HGC 9, 1360p. Toned, some porosity and surface striations. Fine. Rare, seven known to Prieur, and two in CoinArchives.
From the Michel Prieur Collection, purchased privately from Richard McAlee.
CNG E-Auction 451 Lot 272 September 4, 2019
2 commentsorfew09/05/19 at 02:38David Atherton: Wonderful!
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Roman Imperial, Vespasian as Augustus, AR Denarius.7 viewsRome 70 A.D. 3.24g - 19.8mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG - Laureate head right.

Rev: COS ITER TR POT - Mars, naked save for cloak, walking right, holding spear and aquila.

RIC II 23; RSC 87.
Scarce.
1 commentsscarli09/05/19 at 02:07Jay GT4: Great early portrait
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Roman Imperial, Galerius Maximian as Caesar, AE Follis.3 viewsLyons 304 A.D. 8.53g - 27mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: MAXIMIANVS NOB C - Laureate, cuirassed bust right.

GENIO POPVLI ROMANI - Genius standing left sacrificing from patera over flaming altar and holding cornucopiae, B to right. Mintmark PLG.

RIC VI 164, B.
1 commentsChristian Scarlioli09/05/19 at 02:01Jay GT4: Great patina
Screenshot_2017-04-21_15_55_37.png
Roman Imperial, Galerius Maximian as Caesar, AE Follis.3 viewsCarthage 299-303 A.D. 11.39g / 29.4mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES - Laureate head right.

Rev: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART - Carthago standing front, looking left, holding fruit in both hands. Mintmark Δ.

RIC VI 32b.
1 commentsChristian Scarlioli09/05/19 at 02:01Jay GT4: Wow, outstanding! I like these big LRB's
Screenshot_2017-05-10_13_57_34.png
Roman Imperial, Constantius I Chlorus as Caesar, AE Follis.3 viewsCarthage 298-299 A.D. 10.64g - 27.7mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES - Laureate head right.

Rev: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART - Carthago standing facing, head left, in long robe, holding fruits in both hands. Mintmark Γ.

RIC VI 32a.
1 commentsChristian Scarlioli09/05/19 at 01:59Jay GT4: Great coin!
anazarbos_pseudoautonom_SNGlevante1378.jpg
Cilicia, Anazarbos, pseudo-autonomous, SNG Levante 1784 viewsCilicia, Anazarbos, pseudo-autonomous, time of Trajan (AD 98-117)
AE 19 (Hemiassarion), 4.78g, 19.29g, 0°
struck AD 107/8 (CY 126)
obv. [K]AICAREWN - PR ANA
Bust of Tyche (as City Goddess), draped, veiled and wearing mural crown, r.
rev. ETOVC [s]KR (126)
bust of Athena, cuirassed, wearing crested helmet, r.
ref. RPC III, 3367; Ziegler Anazarbos 96; SNG Levante 1278
F+, nice olive green patina

1 commentsJochen09/04/19 at 21:26Jay GT4: I really like the Athena
Screenshot_2018-07-13_17_26_02.png
Roman Imperial, Trajan as Augustus, AE As. From a 100 year old collection.2 viewsRome 99 A.D. 10.49g - 27.2mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: IMP CAES NERVA TRAIAN AVG GERM P M - Laureate head right.

Rev: T R POT COS II / SPQR/ S-C - Victory walking left, holding palm-branch and shield inscribed SPQR.

RIC II 395.
1 commentsChristian Scarlioli09/04/19 at 21:25Jay GT4: Nice Victory
lot_272_cng_aug.jpg
Augustus RPC 414230 viewsSELEUCIS and PIERIA, Antioch. Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. AR Tetradrachm
(27mm, 14.56 g, 12h). In the name and types of the Seleucid king Philip I Philadelphus. Dated year 26 of the Caesarean Era (24/23 BC).
Obv: Diademed head of Philip I right within fillet border
Rev: Zeus Nicephorus seated left; monogram to inner left and below throne, ςK (date) and thunderbolt in exergue; all within wreath.
Prieur 19; McAlee 19 (this coin illustrated); RPC I 4142; SC 2491.16; HGC 9, 1360p. Toned, some porosity and surface striations. Fine. Rare, seven known to Prieur, and two in CoinArchives.
From the Michel Prieur Collection, purchased privately from Richard McAlee.
CNG E-Auction 451 Lot 272 September 4, 2019
2 commentsorfew09/04/19 at 21:05Jay GT4: Great coin and provenance
BCC_CM36_Caracalla_Founder.jpg
BCC CM3618 viewsRoman Provincial
Caesarea Maritima
Caracalla 211-217CE
Obv: IM C M AV ANTONINVS
Laureate, draped bust right.
Rev: CO I FL AV FC CAESAR
Founder plowing to right with
bull and cow yoked.
AE 22mm 10.81gm. Axis:210
Kadman #71 (Same die?)
Surface find, 1971
J. Berlin Caesarea Collection
1 commentsv-drome09/04/19 at 13:17Maritima: Nice coin
138_large_5fa83f3c59ed37da41c7f44a378a0def.jpg
Moesia Inferior. Nicopolis. Elagabalus. Inferior. Nicopolis. Elagabalus.9 viewsMoesia Inferior. Nicopolis. Elagabalus. 11.6gm, AMNG 1982,HrHJ (2018) 8.26.46.15. Cult statue (Serapis) within temple seen in perspective, shield in pediment, trees in background.2 commentsAncient Aussie09/04/19 at 11:18*Alex: Great reverse.
Tranquillina.jpg
MACEDON THESSALONICA Tranquillina2 viewsMACEDON THESSALONICA
Tranquillina
Bronze. AD 238-244.
26 mm. 12,11 g.
Obv: CABINIA TPANKYΛΛΙΝΑ ΑΥΓ.
Diademed and draped bust right.
Rev: ΘΕCCΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ NEΩKOPΩN.
Tetrastyle temple seen in perspective to left ΠΥΘΙΑ below.
Cf. Varbanov 4657.
Rare
1 commentsAncient Aussie09/04/19 at 11:16*Alex: Nice temple.
284957_l.jpg
Divus Romulus.5 viewsDIVUS ROMULUS (Died 309). Follis. Ostia.
Obv: IMP MAXENTIVS DIVO ROMVLON V FILIO.
Bare head right.
Rev: AETERNA MEMORIA / MOSTT.
Domed hexastyle temple; on roof, eagle standing right, head left.
Weight: 6.0 g. Diameter: 25 mm.
RIC 33.
1 commentsAncient Aussie09/04/19 at 11:13*Alex: Very nice example of the type.
346.jpg
Augustus, Posthumous12 viewsAugustus, Posthumous as struck under the reign of Tiberius
DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER, Radiate head of Augustus left
PROVIDENT, Altar, S C in field
11.02 gr
Ref : Cohen #228, RCV #1789, RIC I # 81
2 commentsAncient Aussie09/04/19 at 11:11*Alex: I agree, very nice coin.
Augustus_temple_(800x387).jpg
Antoninus Pius 7 viewsAntoninus Pius Sestertius temple of Augustus and Livia
Catalog: Temple of Divus Augustus
weight 28,6gr. | bronze Ø 32mm.
obv. Laureate head right ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TR P XXII
rev. Octastyle temple of Divus Augustus, containing cult-statues of Augustus
and Livia TEMPLVM DIVI AVG REST COS IIII S C

The Temple of Divus Augustus was a major temple originally built to commemorate the deified first Roman emperor, Augustus. It was built between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia, on the site of the house that Augustus had inhabited before he entered public life in the mid-1st century BC. The temple′s construction took place during the 1st century AD, having been vowed by the Roman Senate shortly after the death of the emperor in AD 14. It is known from Roman coinage that the temple was originally built to an Ionic hexastyle design. However, its size, physical proportions and exact site are unknown. During the reign of Domitian the Temple of Divus Augustus was destroyed by fire but was rebuilt and rededicated in 89/90 with a shrine to his favourite deity, Minerva. The temple was redesigned as a memorial to four deified emperors, including Vespasian and Titus. It was restored again in the mid 150s by Antonius Pius, and that was the reason for this coinage. The last known reference to the temple was on 27 May 218 | at some point thereafter it was completely destroyed and its stones were presumably quarried for later buildings. Its remains are not visible and the area in which it lay has never been excavated.

Cohen 805 | RIC 1004 | BMC 2063 | Sear 4235 R
vf
1 commentsAncient Aussie09/04/19 at 11:09*Alex: Excellent coin. Interesting commentary too.
Temple_Janus_1681.jpg
Louis XIV 16816 viewsCatalog: Feuardent 12708
Material: Brass, Weight: 7.3gm.
Diameter: 27.00 mm
LOUIS XIV - Alsace Propaganda jeton struck in 1681 to celebrate the surrender of Strasbourg. On reverse: the temple of Janus, closed, to mean it is now peace time. Legends LOUIS LE GRAND ROY DE FRANCE IEN AY LA CLEF (='j'en ai la clé', i.e. I keep its key) Uneven color on reverse.
1 commentsAncient Aussie09/04/19 at 11:05*Alex: Interesting and nice. I have a few of his jetons a...
syrac.jpg
Syracuse Tetradrachm46 viewsSicile, Syracuse, 399-387 BC AR Tetradrachme 16.82g.
D:/quadrige au galop a g., Nike volant à dr. couronne l'aurige, à l’exergue dauphin nageant à g.
R:/ΣYRAKOΣIΩN Tête d'Aréthuse à g., un large bandeau dans les cheveux, quatre dauphins au pourtour
Tudeer 92 O33/R64
1 commentsBrennos09/04/19 at 10:03Anaximander: Stunning!
SYRAC1.JPG
Syracuse Tetradrachm44 viewsSicile, Syracuse, 510-500 BC AR Tétradrachme 17.43g.
D:/SVRA Quadrige au pas à droite.
R:/Carré creux partagé en quatre carrés. Au centre dans un cercle creux, tête d'Aréthuse à gauche, les cheveux en pointillé retombant sur la nuque.
Boehringer 28 (V20/R14)
ex Chandon de Briailles collection sale Emile Bourgey 1959 lot 156
1 commentsBrennos09/04/19 at 10:01Anaximander: A rarity! So archaic and beautifully struck up.
Sicily_Himera_BostonMFA254_gf.jpg
Himera11 viewsSicily, Himera. 440-430/425 BC. AR Tetradrachm (16.93 gm). Slow biga driven l. by charioteer crowned by Nike flying r. Ex: IMEPAION (retrograde) and cock walking l. / Nymph Himera holding patera over altar to l.; satyr to r. stdg below fountain w/ lions-head spout; ear of grain above.  gVF.   Boston MFA 254 (same dies); de Luynes 976 (same dies); Rizzo pl. XXI, 12 (same dies); Arnold-Biucchi, Monetazione, Group III, 15 (Q4/H12); Gutmann & Schwabacher 10; SNG Ashmolean 1765 (same dies). cf. HGC 2 #434 (crane in ex); Jenkins Sicily 30; CNG 100 #1268 & Triton XI #37 (same dies). Very rare. 4 commentsAnaximander09/04/19 at 06:29Brennos: Very great coin !!
M__VOLTEIUS_M_F_a.png
M. VOLTEIUS M.F. ROMAN REPUBLIC; GENS VOLTEIA AR Denarius4 viewsOBVERSE: Laureate head of Jupiter right
REVERSE: Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus with closed doors; thunderbolt on pediment; below, M. VOLTEI. M. F.
Rome 78BC
3.60g, 18mm
Crawford 385/1; Sydenham 774; Volteia 1
1 commentsLegatus09/04/19 at 03:28Jay GT4: Great looking historical coin
Sicily_Naxos_SNG-ANS4_513_gf.jpg
Naxos5 viewsSicily, Naxos. 530-510 BC. AR Litra (0.73 gm). Archaic head of Dionysus, hair beaded, l. / Bunch of grapes, ͶΟΙΧΑͶ (ΝΑΧΙΟΝ in retrograde). VF. SNG ANS 4 #513; HGC 2 #967; Cahn Naxos p. 106, plate I #21 (V14/R20); Campana CNAI Naxos #2; Jameson 671; Pozzi 504-505; SNG Lockett 839; Rizzo pl. XXVIII, 5; SNG Cop -; SNG Lloyd 1149; SNG Lockett 839.1 commentsAnaximander09/03/19 at 21:41Molinari: Nice and old, just how I like them!
SNG-ANS_TOC.pdf
SNG American Numismatic Society. Table of Contents.110 viewsSylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Part 1 to 9 | The Collection of the American Numismatic Society | Table of Contents (and ONLY the Table of Contents).
11,991 coins, 388 plates.
Collection highlight: The backbone of this collection is that of Edward T. Newell, and is rich in Southern Italian and Sicilian coinage. Part 9 has extensive Baktrian coinage.
1 commentsAnaximander09/03/19 at 14:34Anaximander: This is only a table of contents, not the ANS...
Screenshot_2018-08-25_16_17_10.png
Kings of Macedonia, Macedonia, Alexander III, AR Drachm.50 viewsLampsacus 310-301 B.C. 4.16g - 18.6mm, Axis 3h.

Obv: Head of Herakles wearing lionskin headdress.

Rev: AΛEΞANΔΡOY - Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, amphora in left field, ME ligate monogram beneath chair.

Price 1417; Mueller 600; SNG Cop 979.
1 commentsChristian Scarlioli09/02/19 at 18:17Jay GT4: Nice portrait
Screenshot_2018-05-15_15_29_05.png
Anglo-Saxon, Continental Sceattas, AR Sceat. UK Metal Detecting find from Kirkburn in Yorkshire.52 viewsFrisia 710-750 A.D. 0.79g - 11.5mm, Axis 3h.

Obv: 'Porcupine' with four legs below, pellet triangle below.

Rev: Beaded standard, with annulet at center and concentric beaded square; T-shaped ornaments in margin.

Spink 790D; Abramson 96.10; SCBI 63 (BM), –; North 45.
1 commentsChristian Scarlioli09/02/19 at 18:14Anaximander: Good one! Nice strike.
Cuadrante_balanza.JPG
Claudius Quadrans Scale118 viewsClaudius (41 – 54 AD)

AE quadrans, Rome, 41 AD

Obv. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG, Hand holding scale over P N R
Rev. PON M TR P IMP COS DES IT around S C.
RIC I 85

Weigth: 2.7g
Diameter: 16mm.
2 commentsJose Polanco09/02/19 at 17:55Jose Polanco: Thanks @okidoki
Cuadrante_balanza.JPG
Claudius Quadrans Scale118 viewsClaudius (41 – 54 AD)

AE quadrans, Rome, 41 AD

Obv. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG, Hand holding scale over P N R
Rev. PON M TR P IMP COS DES IT around S C.
RIC I 85

Weigth: 2.7g
Diameter: 16mm.
2 commentsJose Polanco09/02/19 at 16:23okidoki: Congrats very nice
0308D386-9B01-46AC-A229-73DD89DFFDE5.jpeg
Tarsos80 views1 commentsMolinari09/01/19 at 17:58okidoki: very nice i love it
1728.jpg
varb1777_23 viewsElagabalus
Philippopolis, Thrace

Obv: AVT K M AVP ANTΩNEINOC, laureate head right
Rev: ΦIΛIΠΠOΠOΛEITΩN (NE)ΩKO →PΩN, Dionysos standing left, holding bunch of grapes and thyrsos.
20 mm, 4.63 gms

Varbanov 1777
1 commentsCharles M09/01/19 at 15:52Anaximander: That's a really nice run of Elagablus bronze f...
Sicily_Selinus_HGC2_1237_gf.jpg
Selinos6 viewsSelinos. c. 450-440 BC. Cast AE Onkia (3.71 gm), tooth-shaped. Kantharos (two handled cup), pellet as value mark above. / Selinon (wild celery) leaf. gF. Anepigraphic. Triskles 18 & Vauctions 322 #28. HGC 2 #1237; Calciati CNS I pg. 237 #10. 1 commentsAnaximander09/01/19 at 12:35okidoki: Interesting coin
Sicily_Leontini_SNG-ANS4_257_gf.jpg
Leontini6 viewsSicily, Leontini. 455-430 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.07 gm). Laureate head of Apollo l. with hair rolled up and bound with wreath. / Head of lion l. w/ open jaw, three barley ears around, laurel leaf behind. LEO-NTI-NON. EF. SNG ANS 4 #257 (same dies), #256 (same obv. die); Boehringer Münzgeschichte pl. 12 #55 (same dies); Rizzo pl. XXIIII #4 (same dies); SNG Lloyd 1063; SNG München 559 (same dies); HGC 2 #671. cf. NAC 106 #180 & 114 #53 (same dies).
1 commentsAnaximander08/30/19 at 16:08okidoki: Congrats very nice
Sicily_Messana_SNG-ANS4_318_gf.jpg
Messana7 viewsSicily, Messana. Tyranny of Anaxilas. 480-462/1 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.07 gm). Biga of mules r. with seated charioteer; laurel leaf in ex. / Hare bounding r. MESSENION (SS not retrograde). gVF. Pegasi V #63. SNG ANS 4 #318 (same rev. die); Caltabiano 1993 Series IIb #77 (D41/R40); ACNAC Dewing #640 (same dies); Randazzo 105-106 (same dies); HGC 2 #779. cf. SNG Cop 1 #389-390 (SS not retrograde); Same dies: CNG EA 301 #3; CBG.fr M43 #385760; Roma Num. E2 #33. 1 commentsAnaximander08/30/19 at 15:19Tracy Aiello: Great reverse. Look at those ears!
RPC1672.jpg
RPC-1672-Domitian39 viewsAR Didrachm, 6.47g
Rome mint (for Cappadocia), 93-94 AD
Obv: AYT KAI ΔOMITIANOC CЄBACTOC ΓЄPM; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev: ЄTO ΙΓ; Mt Argaeus; on summit, radiate figure standing l., globe in r. hand, sceptre in l. hand
RPC 1672 (17 spec.).
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, August 2019.

During Domitian's reign, the mint at Rome struck silver drachms and didrachms for circulation in Cappadocia, all of which can be dated to 93-94 AD. They can be distinguished as Rome mint issues by style and their 6 o'clock die axis. This didrachm features the ethnic reverse type of Mt. Argaeus surmounted by a figure. The engravers at Rome presumably had never seen the mountain in person and likely based the design on a standardised model, possibly a cult image. The figure's identity atop the mountain is uncertain - perhaps it is either Helios or the personification of the mountain itself. The portrait style is similar to Domitian's contemporaneous denarii.

In good style and well centred.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/29/19 at 21:44Jay GT4: Sweet portrait!
Vitelio.JPG
Vitelius As Fides Exercituum88 viewsVitelius (69 AD)

Æ As, Tarraco (Tarragona), January to June 69 AD.

Obv. A VITELLIVS IMP GERMAN, Laureated bust left.
Rev. FIDES EXERCITVVM S C. Clasped hands.
RIC I 42

Weight: 9.2g
Diameter: 27mm.
1 commentsJose Polanco08/29/19 at 20:48FlaviusDomitianus: Nice find.
Sicily_Messana_SNG-ANS4_367-378_gf.jpg
Messana6 viewsSicily, Messana. 412-408 BC. AR Tetradrachm (16.8 gm). Biga of mules driven l. by nymph Messana, Nike overhead with wreath & taenia. Ex: two dolphins meeting. / Hare bounding l., grain ear below, dove above. Ex: ΜΕΣΣΑΝΙΩΝ. VF. Pegasi 127 #53. ex-William N. Rudman Coll., Triton V #1193 (this coin). SNG ANS 4 #367/378. Same dies: SNG Cop 1 #405; Caltabiano series XV 623 (D223/R249); Nantueil 303; Triton XX #62. Same obv. die: HGC 3 #801; ACNAC Davis 40; Kraay-Hirmer pl. 19 #61; Pozzi 492; Rizzo pl. XXVII, 7; SNG Fitzwilliam 1081; SNG Lockett 831. SNG Munchen 660; NAC 33 #78 & 52 #45. cf. Boeringer SNR 57 p. 136f. 1 commentsAnaximander08/29/19 at 19:02quadrans: Another nice piece
Sicily_Messana_SNG-ANS4_314_gf.jpg
Messana6 viewsSicily, Messana. 480-462/1 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.14 gm). Biga of mules r. with seated charioteer; laurel leaf in ex. / Hare bounding r., pellet below. ΜΕSSΕ-N-ΙΩN (both sigmas and nus retrograde). VF. Pegasi V #63. SNG ANS 4 #314; Caltabiano 1993 Series IIb 52 similar to (D28/R22 or R38); Dewing 641 (same obv. die)/636. HGC 3 #779 (same obv. die). SNG Fitzwilliam 1067. Cf SNG Cop 1 #390 (no pellet); Bement 405 (SS not retrograde); Randazzo 105-106 (same). 1 commentsAnaximander08/29/19 at 19:01quadrans: Nice piece..
RPC1672.jpg
RPC-1672-Domitian39 viewsAR Didrachm, 6.47g
Rome mint (for Cappadocia), 93-94 AD
Obv: AYT KAI ΔOMITIANOC CЄBACTOC ΓЄPM; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev: ЄTO ΙΓ; Mt Argaeus; on summit, radiate figure standing l., globe in r. hand, sceptre in l. hand
RPC 1672 (17 spec.).
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, August 2019.

During Domitian's reign, the mint at Rome struck silver drachms and didrachms for circulation in Cappadocia, all of which can be dated to 93-94 AD. They can be distinguished as Rome mint issues by style and their 6 o'clock die axis. This didrachm features the ethnic reverse type of Mt. Argaeus surmounted by a figure. The engravers at Rome presumably had never seen the mountain in person and likely based the design on a standardised model, possibly a cult image. The figure's identity atop the mountain is uncertain - perhaps it is either Helios or the personification of the mountain itself. The portrait style is similar to Domitian's contemporaneous denarii.

In good style and well centred.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/29/19 at 19:01quadrans: Great, Interesting coin ...
RPC1672.jpg
RPC-1672-Domitian39 viewsAR Didrachm, 6.47g
Rome mint (for Cappadocia), 93-94 AD
Obv: AYT KAI ΔOMITIANOC CЄBACTOC ΓЄPM; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev: ЄTO ΙΓ; Mt Argaeus; on summit, radiate figure standing l., globe in r. hand, sceptre in l. hand
RPC 1672 (17 spec.).
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, August 2019.

During Domitian's reign, the mint at Rome struck silver drachms and didrachms for circulation in Cappadocia, all of which can be dated to 93-94 AD. They can be distinguished as Rome mint issues by style and their 6 o'clock die axis. This didrachm features the ethnic reverse type of Mt. Argaeus surmounted by a figure. The engravers at Rome presumably had never seen the mountain in person and likely based the design on a standardised model, possibly a cult image. The figure's identity atop the mountain is uncertain - perhaps it is either Helios or the personification of the mountain itself. The portrait style is similar to Domitian's contemporaneous denarii.

In good style and well centred.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/29/19 at 13:30Mat: A great coin
1315_P_Sabina_RPC6070.jpg
6070 EGYPT, Alexandria Sabina Hemidrachm 134-35 AD Dikaiosyne standing15 viewsReference.
RPC III, 6070; Köln 1268; Emmett 1337.19; Dattari-2067; K&G-33.9

Issue L ƐΝΝƐΑΚ·Δ

Obv. ϹΑΒΙΝΑ ϹƐΒΑϹΤΗ
Bust of Sabina (hair on top of head), r., and crowned with poppy head

Rev. L ƐΝΝƐΑΚ·Δ
Dikaiosyne standing facing, head l., holding scales and cornucopia

12.26 gr
30 mm
12h
4 commentsokidoki08/29/19 at 12:18Steve P: Nice! ... wow, that's a fantastic addition (co...
BeFunky_Collage~7.jpg
GREEK, Sicily, Gela, AR Tetradrachm circa 465--450 BC17.22 g 11h Jenkins 220 {O58/R118} The Randazzo Hoard no.41 this coin46 viewsCharioteer in quadriga moving slowly left,column behind marking the turning point of the race,in exergue sea monster {pistrix}
Rev forepart of man-headed bull with Nike flying right to crown him.off flan.
The Numismatic Chronicle 1894 page 212 contributions to Sicilian Numismatics by Arthur.J.Evans.These coins of Syracusan show the pistrix in the exergue of there reverse types,the introduction of which on the Syracusan dies Dr.Head has reasonably connected with Hierons great sea victory off Cumae of 474.I am inclined to go still further than Dr. Head,and to suggest that the symbol of sea power survived on the issues of the Syracusan democracy for another two decades or more.One of the novelties supplied by the present find is the appearance of the same sea-monster in the exergual position on a coin of Gela.It may ,therefore,be reasonably brought into connection with the same historical occasion,and may be regarded as a complimentary allusion to the great citizen of Gela who now ruled at Syracuse.It is possible that a Geloan contingent participated in the naval victory over the Etruscans,the victorious occasion of the present piece is ,indeed,accentuated and brought into direct relation with Gela itself by the obverse design,on which almost alone among the coins of this city,a flying Nike is seen crowning the head of the River-God.
1 commentsGrant H08/29/19 at 11:38*Alex: Nice coin and interesting commentary.
RPC1672.jpg
RPC-1672-Domitian39 viewsAR Didrachm, 6.47g
Rome mint (for Cappadocia), 93-94 AD
Obv: AYT KAI ΔOMITIANOC CЄBACTOC ΓЄPM; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev: ЄTO ΙΓ; Mt Argaeus; on summit, radiate figure standing l., globe in r. hand, sceptre in l. hand
RPC 1672 (17 spec.).
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, August 2019.

During Domitian's reign, the mint at Rome struck silver drachms and didrachms for circulation in Cappadocia, all of which can be dated to 93-94 AD. They can be distinguished as Rome mint issues by style and their 6 o'clock die axis. This didrachm features the ethnic reverse type of Mt. Argaeus surmounted by a figure. The engravers at Rome presumably had never seen the mountain in person and likely based the design on a standardised model, possibly a cult image. The figure's identity atop the mountain is uncertain - perhaps it is either Helios or the personification of the mountain itself. The portrait style is similar to Domitian's contemporaneous denarii.

In good style and well centred.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/29/19 at 09:54FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition, congrats!
Screenshot_2019-08-27_13_06_05.png
Roman Republic, Gens: Fonteia, Mn Fonteius Cf, AR Denarius.3 viewsRome 85 B.C. 2.96g - 18.4mm, Axis 4h.

Obv: [M•FONTEI] / CF - Laureate head of Apollo Vejovis right, thunderbolt below, [M•FONTEI] behind, CF below chin.

Rev: Cupid on goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, thyrsus in ex.

Fonteia 10; Syd 724a; Cr353/1c.
1 commentsChristian Scarlioli08/28/19 at 17:55shanxi: nice
Sicily_Leontini_SNG-ANS4_225_gf.jpg
Leontini7 viewsSicily, Leontini. 455-430 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.13 gm). Laureate head of Apollo r. with hair rolled up and bound with wreath. / Head of lion r. w/ open jaw, four barley ears around. LE-O-NT-INO-N. EF. Pegasi XV #35. Same dies: SNG ANS 4 #225; Rizzo pl. XXIII #4; Triton XIII #37. Same obv. dies: Boehringer #37; SNG Fitzwilliam 1053; SNG Lloyd 1054; SNG Lockett 797. Same rev. die: Gulbenkian 217. cf. HGC 2 #667; Basel 349; ACNAC Dewing 624-628; Gillet 444; SNG Cop 1 346-348.1 commentsAnaximander08/28/19 at 17:54shanxi: beautiful
catoquinariuscombined.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, M. Porcius Cato, AR Quinarius - Crawford 343/2b12 viewsRome, The Republic.
M. Porcius Cato, 89 BCE.
AR Quinarius (2.08g; 14mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: M.CATO; Liber head facing right wearing ivy wreath; rudder (control mark) below.

Reverse: VICTRIX; Victory seated left, holding patera in outstretched hand and palm over left shoulder.

References: Crawford 343/2b; Sydenham 597c; BMCRR (Italy) 677-93var (symbol); Porcia 7.

Provenance: Ex Elsen 141 (15 Jun 2019) Lot 152; Elsen List 60 (Oct 1983), Lot 37.

The precise identity of the moneyer is uncertain. Crawford believes the obverse head of Liber alludes to the Porcian Laws which broadened the rights of Roman citizens with respect to punishments and appeals. This issue of quinarii was huge, with Crawford estimating 400 obverse and 444 reverse dies. The obverse appears in two varieties: one with control marks below the head, and one without. The control marks include Greek and Latin letters, numbers and symbols.
4 commentsCarausius08/28/19 at 04:19PMah: Very nice example.
plae.jpg
M. Plaetorius M.f. Cestianus (57 B.C.)11 viewsAR Denarius
O: Winged and draped bust of Vacuna right, wearing crested and laureate helmet; bow and quiver over shoulder, cornucopia below chin.
R: Eagle standing right on thunderbolt, head left, wings spread.
Rome Mint
3.63g
20mm
Crawford 409/1; Sydenham 809; Plaetoria 4
1 commentsMat08/27/19 at 20:43Randygeki(h2): Neat addition. Nice for the price
catoquinariuscombined.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, M. Porcius Cato, AR Quinarius - Crawford 343/2b12 viewsRome, The Republic.
M. Porcius Cato, 89 BCE.
AR Quinarius (2.08g; 14mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: M.CATO; Liber head facing right wearing ivy wreath; rudder (control mark) below.

Reverse: VICTRIX; Victory seated left, holding patera in outstretched hand and palm over left shoulder.

References: Crawford 343/2b; Sydenham 597c; BMCRR (Italy) 677-93var (symbol); Porcia 7.

Provenance: Ex Elsen 141 (15 Jun 2019) Lot 152; Elsen List 60 (Oct 1983), Lot 37.

The precise identity of the moneyer is uncertain. Crawford believes the obverse head of Liber alludes to the Porcian Laws which broadened the rights of Roman citizens with respect to punishments and appeals. This issue of quinarii was huge, with Crawford estimating 400 obverse and 444 reverse dies. The obverse appears in two varieties: one with control marks below the head, and one without. The control marks include Greek and Latin letters, numbers and symbols.
4 commentsCarausius08/27/19 at 19:34quadrans: Wow, nice piece...
13newtray.jpg
12 Caesars Tray17 viewsUpdated 12 Caesars Tray4 commentsMat08/27/19 at 19:29quadrans: Wow, nice ...
catoquinariuscombined.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, M. Porcius Cato, AR Quinarius - Crawford 343/2b12 viewsRome, The Republic.
M. Porcius Cato, 89 BCE.
AR Quinarius (2.08g; 14mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: M.CATO; Liber head facing right wearing ivy wreath; rudder (control mark) below.

Reverse: VICTRIX; Victory seated left, holding patera in outstretched hand and palm over left shoulder.

References: Crawford 343/2b; Sydenham 597c; BMCRR (Italy) 677-93var (symbol); Porcia 7.

Provenance: Ex Elsen 141 (15 Jun 2019) Lot 152; Elsen List 60 (Oct 1983), Lot 37.

The precise identity of the moneyer is uncertain. Crawford believes the obverse head of Liber alludes to the Porcian Laws which broadened the rights of Roman citizens with respect to punishments and appeals. This issue of quinarii was huge, with Crawford estimating 400 obverse and 444 reverse dies. The obverse appears in two varieties: one with control marks below the head, and one without. The control marks include Greek and Latin letters, numbers and symbols.
4 commentsCarausius08/27/19 at 15:26Steve P: Cool addition, coin-bro (congrats)
13newtray.jpg
12 Caesars Tray17 viewsUpdated 12 Caesars Tray4 commentsMat08/27/19 at 13:39shanxi: nice collection
Sicily_Katane_SNG-ANS3_1245_gf.jpg
Katane5 viewsSicily, Katane. 450-445 BC. AR Tetradrachm (16.96 gm). Slow quadriga r. / Laureate head of Apollo r. KATANAI-ON.  gVF.  Pegasi A17 #36. SNG ANS 3 #1245 (same dies) #1244 (obv. die) & #1246 (rev. die); Basel 324 (same obv. die); Gulbenkian 177 (same obv. die); HGC 2 #566; Kraay & Hirmer 35 (same obv. die); Mirone 34 (same obv. die); Rizzo pl. X, 3 (same obv. die); SNG Cop 1 #176; SNG Lloyd 892 (same obv. die). 1 commentsAnaximander08/27/19 at 13:38shanxi: another beauty
Screenshot_2018-09-10_10_12_51.png
Roman Imperial, Probus as Augustus, AE Antoninianus - 3rd Officina, 8th Emission.3 viewsLugdunum 281 A.D. 3.88g - 22.5mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: IMP C PROBVS P F AVG - Radiate, cuirassed bust right.

Rev: PIETAS AVG - Pietas standing left by altar, holding patera and box of perfumes. Mintmark III.

RIC V-II, 96.
1 commentsChristian Scarlioli08/27/19 at 11:02Anaximander: Great portrait, and its lettering is impeccable.
13newtray.jpg
12 Caesars Tray17 viewsUpdated 12 Caesars Tray4 commentsMat08/27/19 at 00:55Tracy Aiello: Nice.
141Hadrian__RIC164.jpg
164 Hadrian Denarius Roma 125-28 AD Virtus35 viewsReference.
Strack 182var. (No globe); RIC 164d var no shield c.339 BMC 372 notes no shield.

Obv: HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS.
Laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder.

Rev: COS III.
Virtus seated left on cuirass, right foot on helmet, holding parazonium and spear.

3.34 gr
21 mm.
2 commentsokidoki08/26/19 at 21:47Jay GT4: Really nice!
1313Hadrian_RIC164cf.jpg
164 Var. Hadrian Denarius Roma 125-28 AD Virtus7 viewscf RIC 164 only with Globe, and foot on globe

Reference.
RIC --; Strack 182 ( specimens with globe in Sofia, Vienna, Leningrad, and Rome )
Variant with globe is mentioned by BMC 372 note, referring to Reka Devnia p. 30: two such specimens in the Sofia part of the hoard.

Obv. HADRIANVS-AVGVSTVS
Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder

Rev. COS III
Virtus seated Left on cuirass and shield, parazonium in right hand, vertical spear in left, foot on globe
Globe in exergue

2.91 gr
19 mm
6h
1 commentsokidoki08/26/19 at 21:47Jay GT4: Nice!
Sicily_Himera_BostonMFA254_gf.jpg
Himera11 viewsSicily, Himera. 440-430/425 BC. AR Tetradrachm (16.93 gm). Slow biga driven l. by charioteer crowned by Nike flying r. Ex: IMEPAION (retrograde) and cock walking l. / Nymph Himera holding patera over altar to l.; satyr to r. stdg below fountain w/ lions-head spout; ear of grain above.  gVF.   Boston MFA 254 (same dies); de Luynes 976 (same dies); Rizzo pl. XXI, 12 (same dies); Arnold-Biucchi, Monetazione, Group III, 15 (Q4/H12); Gutmann & Schwabacher 10; SNG Ashmolean 1765 (same dies). cf. HGC 2 #434 (crane in ex); Jenkins Sicily 30; CNG 100 #1268 & Triton XI #37 (same dies). Very rare. 4 commentsAnaximander08/26/19 at 20:06Jay GT4: Simply amazing
13newtray.jpg
12 Caesars Tray17 viewsUpdated 12 Caesars Tray4 commentsMat08/26/19 at 20:05Jay GT4: Sweet!
1315_P_Sabina_RPC6070.jpg
6070 EGYPT, Alexandria Sabina Hemidrachm 134-35 AD Dikaiosyne standing15 viewsReference.
RPC III, 6070; Köln 1268; Emmett 1337.19; Dattari-2067; K&G-33.9

Issue L ƐΝΝƐΑΚ·Δ

Obv. ϹΑΒΙΝΑ ϹƐΒΑϹΤΗ
Bust of Sabina (hair on top of head), r., and crowned with poppy head

Rev. L ƐΝΝƐΑΚ·Δ
Dikaiosyne standing facing, head l., holding scales and cornucopia

12.26 gr
30 mm
12h
4 commentsokidoki08/26/19 at 19:23quadrans: Wow, nice piece...
Sicily_Himera_BostonMFA254_gf.jpg
Himera11 viewsSicily, Himera. 440-430/425 BC. AR Tetradrachm (16.93 gm). Slow biga driven l. by charioteer crowned by Nike flying r. Ex: IMEPAION (retrograde) and cock walking l. / Nymph Himera holding patera over altar to l.; satyr to r. stdg below fountain w/ lions-head spout; ear of grain above.  gVF.   Boston MFA 254 (same dies); de Luynes 976 (same dies); Rizzo pl. XXI, 12 (same dies); Arnold-Biucchi, Monetazione, Group III, 15 (Q4/H12); Gutmann & Schwabacher 10; SNG Ashmolean 1765 (same dies). cf. HGC 2 #434 (crane in ex); Jenkins Sicily 30; CNG 100 #1268 & Triton XI #37 (same dies). Very rare. 4 commentsAnaximander08/26/19 at 19:23quadrans: Great coin , and details,
1315_P_Sabina_RPC6070.jpg
6070 EGYPT, Alexandria Sabina Hemidrachm 134-35 AD Dikaiosyne standing15 viewsReference.
RPC III, 6070; Köln 1268; Emmett 1337.19; Dattari-2067; K&G-33.9

Issue L ƐΝΝƐΑΚ·Δ

Obv. ϹΑΒΙΝΑ ϹƐΒΑϹΤΗ
Bust of Sabina (hair on top of head), r., and crowned with poppy head

Rev. L ƐΝΝƐΑΚ·Δ
Dikaiosyne standing facing, head l., holding scales and cornucopia

12.26 gr
30 mm
12h
4 commentsokidoki08/26/19 at 12:05shanxi: great coin
Sicily_Himera_BostonMFA254_gf.jpg
Himera11 viewsSicily, Himera. 440-430/425 BC. AR Tetradrachm (16.93 gm). Slow biga driven l. by charioteer crowned by Nike flying r. Ex: IMEPAION (retrograde) and cock walking l. / Nymph Himera holding patera over altar to l.; satyr to r. stdg below fountain w/ lions-head spout; ear of grain above.  gVF.   Boston MFA 254 (same dies); de Luynes 976 (same dies); Rizzo pl. XXI, 12 (same dies); Arnold-Biucchi, Monetazione, Group III, 15 (Q4/H12); Gutmann & Schwabacher 10; SNG Ashmolean 1765 (same dies). cf. HGC 2 #434 (crane in ex); Jenkins Sicily 30; CNG 100 #1268 & Triton XI #37 (same dies). Very rare. 4 commentsAnaximander08/26/19 at 12:05shanxi: wonderful coin
36-37_Tiberius1.jpg
Tiberius, 14-37 AD8 viewsSilver Denarius, Lugdunum Mint (Modern Day Lyon, France)

Obv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTV[S], Laureate Bust Right.
Rev: PONTIF MAXIM, Female figure seated right on chair with ornamented legs, holding inverted spear and branch; single exergual line below.
RIC 30, (3.70 g, 19.0 mm)
3 commentsVacolony08/26/19 at 11:16okidoki: excellent and stylistic
catoquinariuscombined.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, M. Porcius Cato, AR Quinarius - Crawford 343/2b12 viewsRome, The Republic.
M. Porcius Cato, 89 BCE.
AR Quinarius (2.08g; 14mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: M.CATO; Liber head facing right wearing ivy wreath; rudder (control mark) below.

Reverse: VICTRIX; Victory seated left, holding patera in outstretched hand and palm over left shoulder.

References: Crawford 343/2b; Sydenham 597c; BMCRR (Italy) 677-93var (symbol); Porcia 7.

Provenance: Ex Elsen 141 (15 Jun 2019) Lot 152; Elsen List 60 (Oct 1983), Lot 37.

The precise identity of the moneyer is uncertain. Crawford believes the obverse head of Liber alludes to the Porcian Laws which broadened the rights of Roman citizens with respect to punishments and appeals. This issue of quinarii was huge, with Crawford estimating 400 obverse and 444 reverse dies. The obverse appears in two varieties: one with control marks below the head, and one without. The control marks include Greek and Latin letters, numbers and symbols.
4 commentsCarausius08/26/19 at 10:47okidoki: great looks
Sicily_Himera_SNG-ANS4_155_gf.jpg
Himera. Tyranny of Theron & Thrasydaios8 viewsSicily, Himera. 480-470 BC. AR Didrachm (8.79 gm). Cock standing l. HIMERA to l. / Crab.  nEF.  Westermark & Jenkins Himera #4; SNG ANS 4 #155ff; SNG Cop 1 #302-303; SNG Lloyd 1011-1012; BMC 2 24; ACNAC: Dewing 613-614, Rosen 55; HGC 2 #438. cf. Nomos 1 #20 (same dies).
Theron of Akragas and Gelon of Syracuse defeated Carthage in the Battle of Himera in 480 BC. Theron deposed the local tyrant of Himera and ruled over the city. The pairing of the crowing rooster on the obverse (Himera’s name means ‘day break’) and the crab of Akragas on the reverse aptly captures this political situation. Theron's son, Thrasydaios, succeeded him as tyrant in 472 BC, but Thrasydaios was defeated in battle by Hieron of Syracuse in 470 BC. The Carthaginians had their revenge in 408 BC when Himera was utterly destroyed.
1 commentsAnaximander08/26/19 at 10:47okidoki: excellent and stylistic
Octavian_Antoninus_R695_fac.jpg
Cr. 517/2, Octavian, Mark Antony14 viewsOctavian and Mark Antony
Denarius 41 BC
Obv.: CAESAR·IMP·PONT·III·VIR·R·P·C: Head of Octavian right, bearded; around, inscription. Border of dots.
Rev.: M·ANT·IMP·AVG·III·VIR·R·P·C·M·BARBAT·Q·P: Head of M. Antonius right; around, inscription. Border of dots.
Ag, 3.81g, 18.1mm
Ref.: Crawford 517/2
Ex Christoph Gärtner 44. Auktion Numismatik, Lot 4055 D
4 commentsshanxi08/25/19 at 22:55Jay GT4: Great portraits
Tiberius_14-37AD.jpg
Tiberius, 14-37 AD5 viewsSilver Denarius Contemporary Imitation of the “Tribute Penny”.
Laureate Head / Livia, as Pax, Seated Holding Sceptre and Olive-Branch.
Crude Style
RIC 30, (3.70 g, 18.0 mm)
1 commentsVacolony08/25/19 at 22:54Jay GT4: Love these Indian imitations.
36-37_Tiberius1.jpg
Tiberius, 14-37 AD8 viewsSilver Denarius, Lugdunum Mint (Modern Day Lyon, France)

Obv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTV[S], Laureate Bust Right.
Rev: PONTIF MAXIM, Female figure seated right on chair with ornamented legs, holding inverted spear and branch; single exergual line below.
RIC 30, (3.70 g, 19.0 mm)
3 commentsVacolony08/25/19 at 22:53Jay GT4: Wonderful
image00309.jpg
MYSIA. Pergamon. Circa 166-67 BC. Cistophoric Tetradrachm.63 views(Silver, 27 mm, 12.50 g, 12 h), c. 92-88.
Basket (cista mystica) from which snake coils; around, ivy wreath with fruits.
Rev. Two snakes coiled around a bow case; to left, ?EP? monogram; to right, serpent-entwined staff of Asclepius; between snakes' heads,
EY above monogram of ?PYT. Kleiner, Hoard 33. SNG France 1736-7.
2 commentsRuslan K08/25/19 at 19:49Ruslan K: Thank you!
PtolmyXII_SNG_Cop_381_gf.jpg
Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos. 9 viewsPtolemy XII Neos Dionysos. 80-58 & 55-51 BC. AR Tetradrachm (13.92 gm) of Alexandria, 74/73 BC. Diademed head of Ptolemy I wearing aegis r. / Eagle standing l. on thunderbolt. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ | ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ, LH (RY 8) to l., ΠΑ to r. gVF. Pegasi A22 #270. SNG Cop. 8 #381; Svoronos 1855 (w/ Kleopatra VII) pl. 62 #9; DCA 69; BMC 7 118 #13.1 commentsAnaximander08/25/19 at 19:47shanxi: great example
image00309.jpg
MYSIA. Pergamon. Circa 166-67 BC. Cistophoric Tetradrachm.63 views(Silver, 27 mm, 12.50 g, 12 h), c. 92-88.
Basket (cista mystica) from which snake coils; around, ivy wreath with fruits.
Rev. Two snakes coiled around a bow case; to left, ?EP? monogram; to right, serpent-entwined staff of Asclepius; between snakes' heads,
EY above monogram of ?PYT. Kleiner, Hoard 33. SNG France 1736-7.
2 commentsRuslan K08/25/19 at 19:41Anaximander: Great example of a classic type.
00561q00.jpg
Antiochos VII Tetradrachm. 138-129 BC.15 viewsAntiochia on the Orontes mint. (32 mm, 16.90 g, 1 h), Diademed head of Antiochos VII to right. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟY - EYEPΓETOY Athena standing front, head to left, holding Nike in her right hand and spear and shield with her left; to outer left, monogram above K. SC 2061.1t. 1 commentsRuslan K08/25/19 at 19:39Anaximander: Very nice portrait and a good strike.
Octavian_Antoninus_R695_fac.jpg
Cr. 517/2, Octavian, Mark Antony14 viewsOctavian and Mark Antony
Denarius 41 BC
Obv.: CAESAR·IMP·PONT·III·VIR·R·P·C: Head of Octavian right, bearded; around, inscription. Border of dots.
Rev.: M·ANT·IMP·AVG·III·VIR·R·P·C·M·BARBAT·Q·P: Head of M. Antonius right; around, inscription. Border of dots.
Ag, 3.81g, 18.1mm
Ref.: Crawford 517/2
Ex Christoph Gärtner 44. Auktion Numismatik, Lot 4055 D
4 commentsshanxi08/25/19 at 19:35Anaximander: Way up there in historical value, and good portrai...
Sicily_Gela_SNG-ANS4_7_gf.jpg
Gela11 viewsGela. (CEΛAΣ) c. 490/485-480/475 BC. AR Didrachm (8.57 gm). Horseman galloping right, brandishing spear overhead. / Forepart of river god Gelas as man-headed bull r. (Ε-ΛΑ before.  nEF.  Triton V #1167. Ex William N. Rudman Coll. SNG ANS 4 mule: #7 (same ob. die) / #5 (same rev. die); Jenkins Gela Gp Ib 42 (O13'/R17); SNG Cop 1 #256; SNG Klagenfurt 430; HGC 2 #363.
480-470 BC.  Rule of tyrant Gelon, born in Gela, who won a crushing victory over the Carthaginians and ruled Syracuse for a time.
3 commentsAnaximander08/25/19 at 19:05Tracy Aiello: Simply gorgeous.
Domitian_88AD.JPG
Domitian 81-96 AD10 viewsSilver Denarius, Rome 88 AD

Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII, Legend with Laureate Bust Right.

Rev: IMP XV COS XIIII CENS P P P, Minerva Advancing Right, Holding Spear and Shield. Extremely Fine & Rare.

RIC 591, (3.58 g, 19.0 mm)
4 commentsVacolony08/25/19 at 18:30orfew: A lovely example
36-37_Tiberius1.jpg
Tiberius, 14-37 AD8 viewsSilver Denarius, Lugdunum Mint (Modern Day Lyon, France)

Obv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTV[S], Laureate Bust Right.
Rev: PONTIF MAXIM, Female figure seated right on chair with ornamented legs, holding inverted spear and branch; single exergual line below.
RIC 30, (3.70 g, 19.0 mm)
3 commentsVacolony08/25/19 at 17:09quadrans: Interesting piece..
Vespasian_80-AD.jpg
Vespasian 69-79 AD7 viewsSilver Denarius, Rome Mint & Stuck under Titus 80AD

Obv: Legend with Laureate Bust Right. DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS

Rev: Shield Inscribed SC Supported by Two Capricorns with Globe Below.

RIC 63, (3.36 g, 18.5 mm)
3 commentsVacolony08/25/19 at 17:09quadrans: Wow,
Trajan_98–117.jpg
Trajan, 98-117 AD6 viewsSilver Denarius, Rome Mint 103-111

Obv: Laureate Head Right, IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P

Rev: Aequitas Standing Left, Holding Scales and Cornucopiae. COS V P P SPQR OPTIMO PRINC

RIC 118, (3.35 g, 19.0 mm)
1 commentsVacolony08/25/19 at 17:08quadrans: Nice piece..
115062LG.jpg
Parthian Kingdom. Gotarzes II. Ca. A.D. 40-51. Tetradrachm.13 views(26 mm, 12 h). Seleukeia on the Tigris, S.E. 360 (A.D. 48/9).
Diademed and draped bust of Gotarzes II left /
King seated right, receiving wreath from Nike standing left, holding cornucopiae; above, date (??), month off flan.
Cf. Sellwood 65.20-24; cf. Shore 361.
1 commentsRuslan K08/25/19 at 17:07quadrans: Nice piece..
Domitian_88AD.JPG
Domitian 81-96 AD10 viewsSilver Denarius, Rome 88 AD

Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII, Legend with Laureate Bust Right.

Rev: IMP XV COS XIIII CENS P P P, Minerva Advancing Right, Holding Spear and Shield. Extremely Fine & Rare.

RIC 591, (3.58 g, 19.0 mm)
4 commentsVacolony08/25/19 at 17:06quadrans: Nice one
Vespasian_80-AD.jpg
Vespasian 69-79 AD7 viewsSilver Denarius, Rome Mint & Stuck under Titus 80AD

Obv: Legend with Laureate Bust Right. DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS

Rev: Shield Inscribed SC Supported by Two Capricorns with Globe Below.

RIC 63, (3.36 g, 18.5 mm)
3 commentsVacolony08/25/19 at 13:35Jay GT4: Very nice
Domitian_88AD.JPG
Domitian 81-96 AD10 viewsSilver Denarius, Rome 88 AD

Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII, Legend with Laureate Bust Right.

Rev: IMP XV COS XIIII CENS P P P, Minerva Advancing Right, Holding Spear and Shield. Extremely Fine & Rare.

RIC 591, (3.58 g, 19.0 mm)
4 commentsVacolony08/25/19 at 13:34Jay GT4: Beautiful
Octavian_Antoninus_R695_fac.jpg
Cr. 517/2, Octavian, Mark Antony14 viewsOctavian and Mark Antony
Denarius 41 BC
Obv.: CAESAR·IMP·PONT·III·VIR·R·P·C: Head of Octavian right, bearded; around, inscription. Border of dots.
Rev.: M·ANT·IMP·AVG·III·VIR·R·P·C·M·BARBAT·Q·P: Head of M. Antonius right; around, inscription. Border of dots.
Ag, 3.81g, 18.1mm
Ref.: Crawford 517/2
Ex Christoph Gärtner 44. Auktion Numismatik, Lot 4055 D
4 commentsshanxi08/25/19 at 13:13Mat: A great example
D397sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-39743 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.19g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM XI CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, r., with aegis
Rev: GERMANIA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Trophy; to r., German captive stg. r., hands bound, head l.; to l., Germania std. l.; around arms
RIC 397 (R2). BMC 361. BNC -.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, August 2019.

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The details of the war are unclear, but the overall impression is that the conflict was a minor affair blown out of proportion by an emperor eager for military glory. Consequently, Domitian's Germanic triumph of 83 received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. Germania Capta types were first struck in silver in 84 and in bronze in 85. This iconic Germania Capta sestertius strongly echoes Vespasian's Judaea Capta types - but instead of a palm tree we see a trophy and a bound captive replaces the triumphal emperor. H. Mattingly writes in BMCRE 'the type is closely modelled on the Judaea Capta of Vespasian, but the German element is indicated by the heavy angular cloak worn by the man and by the oblong shields.' Comparing the two triumphs, the Josephian scholar Steve Mason remarked - 'The same people who produced Flavian Triumph I: Judaea were on hand for Flavian Triumph II: Germania, and sequels are rarely as good as the originals.'

The Germania Capta sestertii were produced for only a few short years between 85-88. The present example from the third issue of 85 is a rare variant with an obverse legend struck just after Domitian had become censor for life (CENS PER).
3 commentsDavid Atherton08/25/19 at 12:21Jay GT4: I love these huge 1st century sestertii
Octavian_Antoninus_R695_fac.jpg
Cr. 517/2, Octavian, Mark Antony14 viewsOctavian and Mark Antony
Denarius 41 BC
Obv.: CAESAR·IMP·PONT·III·VIR·R·P·C: Head of Octavian right, bearded; around, inscription. Border of dots.
Rev.: M·ANT·IMP·AVG·III·VIR·R·P·C·M·BARBAT·Q·P: Head of M. Antonius right; around, inscription. Border of dots.
Ag, 3.81g, 18.1mm
Ref.: Crawford 517/2
Ex Christoph Gärtner 44. Auktion Numismatik, Lot 4055 D
4 commentsshanxi08/25/19 at 12:05quadrans: Great piece ...
Sicily_Gela_SNG-ANS4_7_gf.jpg
Gela11 viewsGela. (CEΛAΣ) c. 490/485-480/475 BC. AR Didrachm (8.57 gm). Horseman galloping right, brandishing spear overhead. / Forepart of river god Gelas as man-headed bull r. (Ε-ΛΑ before.  nEF.  Triton V #1167. Ex William N. Rudman Coll. SNG ANS 4 mule: #7 (same ob. die) / #5 (same rev. die); Jenkins Gela Gp Ib 42 (O13'/R17); SNG Cop 1 #256; SNG Klagenfurt 430; HGC 2 #363.
480-470 BC.  Rule of tyrant Gelon, born in Gela, who won a crushing victory over the Carthaginians and ruled Syracuse for a time.
3 commentsAnaximander08/25/19 at 11:15Molinari: Excellent example. I love it!
Sicily_Gela_SNG-ANS4_7_gf.jpg
Gela11 viewsGela. (CEΛAΣ) c. 490/485-480/475 BC. AR Didrachm (8.57 gm). Horseman galloping right, brandishing spear overhead. / Forepart of river god Gelas as man-headed bull r. (Ε-ΛΑ before.  nEF.  Triton V #1167. Ex William N. Rudman Coll. SNG ANS 4 mule: #7 (same ob. die) / #5 (same rev. die); Jenkins Gela Gp Ib 42 (O13'/R17); SNG Cop 1 #256; SNG Klagenfurt 430; HGC 2 #363.
480-470 BC.  Rule of tyrant Gelon, born in Gela, who won a crushing victory over the Carthaginians and ruled Syracuse for a time.
3 commentsAnaximander08/25/19 at 11:14quadrans: Nice piece..
Sicily_Gallery_h.jpg
Sicily20 viewsGreek colonies dotted the island of Sicily from about the mid-8th C. BC onward, sometimes conflicting with the native tribes (Sikels to the east, Sikanians in central Sicily, and Elymians to the west) and several Phoenician colonies. The largest issuance of coinage by the city-states often came amidst conflict among themselves and later arrivals, the Carthaginians and Romans. While Greek coin types and denominations predominated, the local litra and its fractions of onkiai survived down to the Roman conquest in 212 BC, when local striking withered. Major mints include Akragas, Gela, Himera, Kamarina, Katane, Leontini, Messene, Naxos, Segesta, Selinos, Syracuse, and the siculo-punic mints of Entella and Lilybaion.
2 commentsAnaximander08/25/19 at 11:14quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
Sicily_Akragas_SNG-ANS3_1009_gf.jpg
Akragas12 viewsAkragas. 420-410 BC. Hemidrachm (2.07 gm). Eagle standing l. atop hare. / Crab, tunny l. below. ⤹ A-K-P-A around. VF. CICF 2005 Ponterio 134 #1368. SNG ANS 3 #1009; SNG Cop 1 #57-58; SNG Lloyd 826; HGC 2 #104; BMC 2 p. 12, #65.
2 commentsAnaximander08/25/19 at 11:13quadrans: Nice piece..
1311Hadrian_RIC10.jpg
010 Hadrian Denarius Roma 117 AD Fortuna14 viewsReference
Strack 14; RIC 10; C. 749; BMC 20

Obv. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA
Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder, seen from front.

Rev. PARTH F DIVI NER NEP P M TR P COS
Fortuna, veiled, enthroned left, rudder in right hand, cornucopiae in left, FORT RED in exergue.

4.02 gr
19 mm
6h
3 commentsokidoki08/25/19 at 11:12quadrans: Great coin , and details,
Philip_I,_244-249.jpg
Philip-I, 244-249 AD7 viewsSilver Antoninianus, Rome 245 AD
Obv: IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG Radiate, Draped and Cuirassed Bust facing Right.
Rev: ADVENTVS AVGG Philip I on Horseback to left, raising his right hand and holding a scepter in his left.

RIC 26b (3.95 g, 24.0 mm)
1 commentsVacolony08/25/19 at 10:50Anaximander: Impressive! Perfect portrait.
D397sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-39743 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.19g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM XI CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, r., with aegis
Rev: GERMANIA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Trophy; to r., German captive stg. r., hands bound, head l.; to l., Germania std. l.; around arms
RIC 397 (R2). BMC 361. BNC -.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, August 2019.

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The details of the war are unclear, but the overall impression is that the conflict was a minor affair blown out of proportion by an emperor eager for military glory. Consequently, Domitian's Germanic triumph of 83 received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. Germania Capta types were first struck in silver in 84 and in bronze in 85. This iconic Germania Capta sestertius strongly echoes Vespasian's Judaea Capta types - but instead of a palm tree we see a trophy and a bound captive replaces the triumphal emperor. H. Mattingly writes in BMCRE 'the type is closely modelled on the Judaea Capta of Vespasian, but the German element is indicated by the heavy angular cloak worn by the man and by the oblong shields.' Comparing the two triumphs, the Josephian scholar Steve Mason remarked - 'The same people who produced Flavian Triumph I: Judaea were on hand for Flavian Triumph II: Germania, and sequels are rarely as good as the originals.'

The Germania Capta sestertii were produced for only a few short years between 85-88. The present example from the third issue of 85 is a rare variant with an obverse legend struck just after Domitian had become censor for life (CENS PER).
3 commentsDavid Atherton08/25/19 at 10:43Nemonater: Awesome addition!
Nerón.JPG
Nero As Winged Victory37 viewsNero (54 - 68 AD)

AE AS, Lugdunum, 65 AD

Obv. IMP NERO CAESAR AVG GERM, Bust rigth
Rev. S C Winged Victory with shield inscribed with S P Q R
RIC I 351

Weight: 10.9g
Diameter: 28mm.

1 commentsJose Polanco08/25/19 at 10:05okidoki: Nice catch
D397sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-39743 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.19g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM XI CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, r., with aegis
Rev: GERMANIA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Trophy; to r., German captive stg. r., hands bound, head l.; to l., Germania std. l.; around arms
RIC 397 (R2). BMC 361. BNC -.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, August 2019.

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The details of the war are unclear, but the overall impression is that the conflict was a minor affair blown out of proportion by an emperor eager for military glory. Consequently, Domitian's Germanic triumph of 83 received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. Germania Capta types were first struck in silver in 84 and in bronze in 85. This iconic Germania Capta sestertius strongly echoes Vespasian's Judaea Capta types - but instead of a palm tree we see a trophy and a bound captive replaces the triumphal emperor. H. Mattingly writes in BMCRE 'the type is closely modelled on the Judaea Capta of Vespasian, but the German element is indicated by the heavy angular cloak worn by the man and by the oblong shields.' Comparing the two triumphs, the Josephian scholar Steve Mason remarked - 'The same people who produced Flavian Triumph I: Judaea were on hand for Flavian Triumph II: Germania, and sequels are rarely as good as the originals.'

The Germania Capta sestertii were produced for only a few short years between 85-88. The present example from the third issue of 85 is a rare variant with an obverse legend struck just after Domitian had become censor for life (CENS PER).
3 commentsDavid Atherton08/25/19 at 09:34FlaviusDomitianus: Glad you got one of these.
Domitian_ric_68.jpg
RIC 006835 viewsDomitian AR Denarius
(3.13gr 18mm)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG PONT; laureate head right
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; seat, draped, above, a winged thunderbolt placed horizontally.
RIC 68 (R2)
Ebay: August 24, 2019

2 commentsorfew08/25/19 at 02:25David Atherton: Wonderful!
ConstantineCaesar_PKD.JPG
Struck A.D.307. CONSTANTINE I as CAESAR. Large AE Follis of Carthage4 viewsObverse: CONSTANTINVS NOB CAES. Laureate head of Constantine facing right.
Reverse: CONSERVATO-RES KART SVAE. Hexastyle temple within which is Carthage standing facing left holding fruits in both hands. In exergue, PKΔ.
Diameter: 25.15mm | Weight: 6.4gms
RIC VI : 61

This coin is one of the issues which were struck in A.D.307 to commemorate and advertise Constantine's alliance with Maxentius, reflected in types common to both rulers. Carthage was one of Maxentius' power bases.
1 comments*Alex08/24/19 at 22:37Ancient Aussie: Very nice, great patina.
AUGCIST_ARCH.JPG
Struck 19 - 18 B.C. AUGUSTUS. AR Cistophorus (Cistophoric Tetradrachm = 3 denarii) of Pergamum19 viewsObverse: IMP•IX•TR•PO•V. Bare head of Augustus facing right.
Reverse: Triumphal arch surmounted by Augustus in facing triumphal quadriga; IMP IX TR POT V on architrave; S P R SIGNIS RECEPTIS in three lines within arch opening, standards at either side.
Diameter: 24 - 25mm | Weight: 11.7gms | Die Axis: 12
RIC I : 510 | BMC : 703 | RSC : 298
Ex ROMA NUMISMATICS (London) | Ex Künker, 2006
RARE

This coin commemorates Augustus' triumphant agreement with the Parthians in 20 B.C. under which they returned the legionary standards captured from Crassus who was defeated and killed at Carrhae thirty-three years earlier (53 B.C.). Augustus installed these standards in the Temple of Mars Ultor.
The reverse of the coin shows the triumphal arch which was awarded to Augustus on the occasion of his recovery of the standards. This was the second triumphal arch awarded to Augustus and, like the earlier arch which had been constructed in 29 BC to honour his victory over Cleopatra, this second arch, which archaeological evidence suggests may actually have incorporated the first arch, stood in close proximity to the Temple of Divus Julius at the southern entrance to the Roman Forum.
This is the rarest cistophorus struck during the reign of Augustus with the exception of the exceedingly rare issues featuring a sphinx.
2 comments*Alex08/24/19 at 22:32Ancient Aussie: Absolutely fantastic coin.
Maximinus_II_as_FIL-AVG_SMTS.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, MAXIMINUS II as Filius Augustorum. AE Follis (Nummus) of Thessalonika. Struck A.D.308 - 30911 viewsObverse: MAXIMINVS • FIL • AVGG. Laureate head of Maximinus II facing right.
Reverse: GENIO CAESARIS. Genius standing facing left, holding patera in right hand and cornucopiae in left; in left field, star; in right field, delta; in exergue, •SM•TS•.
RIC VI : 32a
RARE

Maximinus Daia was the nephew of Galerius, who made him Caesar in A.D.305. He then changed his name to Galerius Valerius Maximinus and ruled over the East and Egypt from his headquarters at Antioch. When Licinius was made Augustus in A.D.308, Maximinus demanded the title also, especially since it had been usurped by Constantine in the West. Instead, both he and Constantine received the novel rank of Filius Augustorum in late A.D.308 or early 309. Galerius though finally acceded to Maximinus' demands and he was promoted to Augustus in May, A.D.310.
This coin bears the new (and short lived) Filius Augustorum title which only appears on some coins struck for Maximinus in the West. The issues of his capital, Antioch, only stress his position as Caesar until his promotion to Augustus.
1 comments*Alex08/24/19 at 21:46Jay GT4: Nice looking coin. Love the patina
Domitian_ric_68.jpg
RIC 006835 viewsDomitian AR Denarius
(3.13gr 18mm)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG PONT; laureate head right
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; seat, draped, above, a winged thunderbolt placed horizontally.
RIC 68 (R2)
Ebay: August 24, 2019

2 commentsorfew08/24/19 at 21:44Jay GT4: Glad you got it!
32091_0.jpg
Hadrian, Tetradrachm circa 137-138 AD (year 22).5 viewsAlexandria mint. (23mm., 12.89g.) Laureate bust r. Rev. ΠΡΟΝΟΙΑ Pronoia standing facing, head l., holding phoenix and sceptre; in l. field, L/KB. RPC 6252. Dattari-Savio Pl. 68, 7458.1 commentsRuslan K08/24/19 at 18:09shanxi: nice
00472q00.jpg
Carausius17 viewsAE-Antoniniaus
IMP C CARAVSIVS P AVG; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust to right.
ORIENS AVG; Radiate Sol walking left, holding whip and raising hand. S / P in Fields.
Ex: C
Camulodunum
RIC 293
1 commentsJulianus of Pannonia08/24/19 at 16:03Pscipio: Superb!
Sicily_Abakoinon_SNG-ANS3_895_gf.jpg
Abakainon9 viewsAbakainon. 420-410 BC. AR Litra (0.60 gms). Laureate bearded head of Zeus r. ⟲A-B-A-K. / Boar stdg r. ⟲IИIA. gVF. FUN Show 2015. SNG ANS 3 #895; HGC 2 #9; BMC 2 #2; SNG Cop -.1 commentsAnaximander08/24/19 at 14:08shanxi: very nice
PtolmyI_SNGCop29_gf.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter17 viewsPtolemy I Soter. 323-285 BC. AR Tetradrachm (15.71gm) Struck 310-285 BC. Head of Alexander r. wearing elephant skin headdress with horn of Zeus Amon and aegis, Δ behind ear. / Athena Alkidemos walking r., with spear & shield. ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ. ΑΧ monogram, helmet & eagle stdg on thunderbolt to r. gVF. CNG 50 #949. Lorber CPE I #162; SNG Cop 8 #29; Svoronos 162; Jenkins group e.
2 commentsAnaximander08/24/19 at 02:29Nemonater: Great example
Sicily_Akragas_SNG-ANS3_1009_gf.jpg
Akragas12 viewsAkragas. 420-410 BC. Hemidrachm (2.07 gm). Eagle standing l. atop hare. / Crab, tunny l. below. ⤹ A-K-P-A around. VF. CICF 2005 Ponterio 134 #1368. SNG ANS 3 #1009; SNG Cop 1 #57-58; SNG Lloyd 826; HGC 2 #104; BMC 2 p. 12, #65.
2 commentsAnaximander08/23/19 at 22:55Jay GT4: Great crab!
Sicily_Akragas_SNG-ANS3_934_gf.jpg
Akragas11 viewsAkragas. Early issue of 500-495 BC. AR Stater, Didrachm (8.69 gm). Eagle l., wings folded, AKRA above. / Crab. VF. SNG ANS 3 #923-929 (#927 same dies); SNG Cop 1 #24-26; SNG Lloyd 789-790; HGC 2 #93; Jenkins Gela Group IIc; Dewing 551.
1 commentsAnaximander08/23/19 at 22:55Jay GT4: Oh yeah, nice one!
Sicily_Gallery_h.jpg
Sicily20 viewsGreek colonies dotted the island of Sicily from about the mid-8th C. BC onward, sometimes conflicting with the native tribes (Sikels to the east, Sikanians in central Sicily, and Elymians to the west) and several Phoenician colonies. The largest issuance of coinage by the city-states often came amidst conflict among themselves and later arrivals, the Carthaginians and Romans. While Greek coin types and denominations predominated, the local litra and its fractions of onkiai survived down to the Roman conquest in 212 BC, when local striking withered. Major mints include Akragas, Gela, Himera, Kamarina, Katane, Leontini, Messene, Naxos, Segesta, Selinos, Syracuse, and the siculo-punic mints of Entella and Lilybaion.
2 commentsAnaximander08/23/19 at 17:34Anaximander: Cover art for the Sicilian Coin Gallery
Thrace+Skythia.jpg
Thrace & Skythia16 viewsThrace & Skythia, including Dacia, Moesia, & Paeonia.
Thracian mints: Abdera, Apollonia Pontika, Byzantion, Cherronesos, Koson, Maroneia, Mesembria, Neapolis, Potidaia, Sparadakos, Terone, & Thasos.
1 commentsChristian T08/23/19 at 17:32Anaximander: Cover art for the Thrace & Skythia Coin Galler...
Ptolmaic_Egypt_.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom7 viewsHellenistic coinage of the Ptolemies, after Alexander the Great. Principal mints include Alexandria in Egypt, Paphos and Sidon in Cyprus, and Sidon and Tyre in Phoenicia. 1 commentsAnaximander08/23/19 at 17:31Anaximander: Cover art for the Ptolemaic Coin Gallery
Celtic.jpg
Celtic Coinage17 viewsContinental Celts & Tribes of Britannia
Gaul: Northwest Gaul: Aulerci Eburovices, Carnutes, Coriosolites, Redones, Senones, Veneti. Northeast Gaul: Ambiani, Remi, Suessiones (Cricironus), Treveri.
Central Gaul: Aediu, Arverni. Sequani (Turonos & Cantorix). Southern Gaul: Massalia (Marseilles), Tolostates, Volcae-Arecomici. Uncertain: Volcae Tectosages, Leuci, Senones.
Britain: Atrebates & Regni (Verica), Cantii (Amminus), CantuvellauniCorieltauvi (Volisios Dumnocoveros), Cunobelin, Dobunni, Durotriges, Epaticcus, Iceni, Trinovantes, Cantuvellauni & Trinovantes (Addedomaros, Caratacus).
Lower Danube: Geto-Dacians. Middle Danube: Hercuniates. Central Europe: Boii. Danubian Celts are also referred to as being from the Carpathian Region, in which there were various tribes, many unknown.
1 commentsChristian T08/23/19 at 17:29Anaximander: Cover art for the Celtic Coin Gallery
Carthage.jpg
Coinage of Carthage 14 views1 commentsChristian T08/23/19 at 17:29Anaximander: Cover art for the Carthaginian Coin Gallery :!...
Asia_Minor.jpg
Asia Minor16 viewsAncient Greek coinage of Asia Minor: Black Sea Area (Bosporos, Kolchis, Pontos, Paphlagonia, & Bithynia), Western Asia Minor (Mysia, Troas, Aiolis, Lesbos, Ionia, Lydia, & Caria), & Central & Southern Asia Minor (Phrygia, Lycia, Pamphylia, Pisidia, Lycanonia, Cilicia, Galata, Cappadocia).1 commentsChristian T08/23/19 at 17:28Anaximander: Cover art for the ancient Greek Asia Minor Coi...
Baktria.jpg
Baktria16 viewsAlexander the Great's empire split into rival Hellenistic kingdoms ruled by his generals. The most far-flung part was Baktria, his conquests in what is today Afghanistan, western India and Pakistan. Greek settlers ruled over a much larger indigenous population. As centuries went by, this isolated outpost of Greek culture combined elements of both Greek and native traditions, oftentimes reflected in their bilingual coins. The main mints include Aï Khanoum, Bactra, and Pushkalavati.2 commentsChristian T08/23/19 at 17:27Anaximander: Cover art for the Baktrian Coin Gallery
Greece.jpg
Greece29 viewsGreece - Central, Peloponnesos, Crete & The Cyclades.
Thessaly, Akarnania, Boeotia, Euboia, Attica, Corinthia, Sikyonia, Peloponnesos, Argolis, Phokaia, Arkadia, Lokris.
2 commentsChristian T08/23/19 at 17:26Anaximander: Cover art for the Greek Coin Gallery
Calvino_Hadrian_Sestertius.jpg
Cavino Hadrian Sestertius14 viewsObv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head Right.
Rev. S C, Mars Walking Right, Holding Trophy and spear.
Mint: Padua, Italy, 16th century

36mm 28,52g

Klawans Hadrian, 3 p. 78
1 commentskc08/23/19 at 17:17Jay GT4: Stunning!
Octopus_Litra.jpg
Sicily, Syracuse AR Litra 120 viewsΣYPA
Diademed head of Arethusa right.

Octopus.

0.65 g

c. 466-460 BC. Second Democracy

Boehringer 421; SNG ANS 131.

Ex-ANE
9 commentsJay GT408/23/19 at 16:21Anaximander: Brilliant! So archaic: Eye, hair, and a partly re...
1311Hadrian_RIC10.jpg
010 Hadrian Denarius Roma 117 AD Fortuna14 viewsReference
Strack 14; RIC 10; C. 749; BMC 20

Obv. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA
Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder, seen from front.

Rev. PARTH F DIVI NER NEP P M TR P COS
Fortuna, veiled, enthroned left, rudder in right hand, cornucopiae in left, FORT RED in exergue.

4.02 gr
19 mm
6h
3 commentsokidoki08/23/19 at 12:48Anaximander: It's a beaut (sorry, technical term ). Am...
1311Hadrian_RIC10.jpg
010 Hadrian Denarius Roma 117 AD Fortuna14 viewsReference
Strack 14; RIC 10; C. 749; BMC 20

Obv. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA
Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder, seen from front.

Rev. PARTH F DIVI NER NEP P M TR P COS
Fortuna, veiled, enthroned left, rudder in right hand, cornucopiae in left, FORT RED in exergue.

4.02 gr
19 mm
6h
3 commentsokidoki08/23/19 at 08:24Christian Scarlioli: Quality strike, beautiful coin.
Titus_RIC_V951.jpg
Titus as Caesar69 viewsTitus, denarius.
RIC V951 (R), RSC 67.
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD.
2.8 gr.
Obv. T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS, laureate head right.
Rev. COS VI in exergue; Yoke of oxen walking left.
5 commentsMarsman08/22/19 at 19:02okidoki: Interesting reverse
Hadrian_seal2~0.jpg
Roman lead seal Hadrian?132 views
Head of Hadrian? right letters before and behind bust

2.67g

Certainly looks like Hadrian but could possibly be later 3-4th Century AD.
1 commentsJay GT408/22/19 at 17:21okidoki: very nice Jay
Antonia_2.JPG
Claudius AE Dupondius Antonia34 viewsClaudius (41 – 54 AD)

AE Dupondius, Rome, 42 AD

Obv: ANTONIA AVGVSTA draped bust right.
Rev: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P S C Claudius veiled and togate standing left, holding simpulum.
RIC I 104

Weight: 12.3g.
Diameter: 27mm.
1 commentsJose Polanco08/22/19 at 15:34Jay GT4: A must have for 1st century collections
Baktria_AntimachosI_SNG-ANS280.jpg
Baktria, Antimachos I13 viewsAntimachos I. 171-160 BC. AR Drachm (3.77 gm) of Baktra. Draped and diademed bust of Antimachos r., wearing kausia. / Poseidon stg facing, holding trident & palm branch. ΑΝΤΙΜΑΧΟΥ-ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΘΕΟΥ, N monogram to r. VF. SNG ANS 280; Bopearachchi 184 serie 2B, Michiner 74; HGC 109 R1.2 commentsChristian T08/21/19 at 10:09*Alex: I have always liked that type. Nice.
ZomboDroid_20082019192506.jpg
MACEDONIAN KINGDOM. Alexander III the Great (336-323 BC). AR tetradrachm. 11 views1 commentsCanaan08/20/19 at 22:46Jay GT4: Beefy coin!
Libertas_2.JPG
Claudius AE As Libertas22 viewsClaudius (41 - 54 AD)

AE As imitation minted in Hispania (41 - 50 AD)

Anv: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP PP Bust left
Rev: LIBERTAS AVGVSTA S-C, Libertas standing front with pileus
RIC I 97

Weight: 7.9g.
Diiameter: 26mm.
1 commentsJose Polanco08/20/19 at 22:45Jay GT4: A classic must have for 1st century collectors
Lucania_Thourioi_HN-IT1823.jpg
Lucania, Thourioi.19 viewsLucania, Thourioi. 350-300 BC. AR Distater (25mm, 15.09 gm). Head of Athena r., wearing helmet decorated with Skylla throwing stone. / Bull butting r., ΘΟΡΙΩΝ & EYΦA above; in exergue, two fish r. gVF. CNG 102 #64. ex-Tom Cederlind. HN Italy 1823; SNG ANS 977v (ex.); Noe, Thurian J2 (same dies); HGC 1 1257.1 commentsChristian T08/20/19 at 17:11Tracy Aiello: Nice coin. I love representations of Skylla.
Baktria_AntimachosI_SNG-ANS280.jpg
Baktria, Antimachos I13 viewsAntimachos I. 171-160 BC. AR Drachm (3.77 gm) of Baktra. Draped and diademed bust of Antimachos r., wearing kausia. / Poseidon stg facing, holding trident & palm branch. ΑΝΤΙΜΑΧΟΥ-ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΘΕΟΥ, N monogram to r. VF. SNG ANS 280; Bopearachchi 184 serie 2B, Michiner 74; HGC 109 R1.2 commentsChristian T08/20/19 at 17:05Tracy Aiello: Great obverse.
Screenshot_2018-09-06_15_53_38.png
Byzantine Empire, Justin II, AE Half Follis.6 viewsNicomedia Year 4 = 568-569 A.D. 5.42g - 28.5mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: NVIPP AV - Justin on left, Sophia on right, seated facing on double-throne, both nimbate, Justin holding cross on globe, Sophia holding sceptre.

Rev: Large K, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year IIII to right. Mintmark NI.

SB 370.
1 commentsChristian Scarlioli08/20/19 at 16:11okidoki: very nice looks
G_369_Kyzikos.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Kyzikos, Boar, Lion17 viewsKyzikos, Mysia
AR obol, 525 - 475 B.C.
Obv.: forepart of boar left, reversed E on side, tunny fish behind
Rev.: head of roaring lion left within incuse square
Ag, 0.79g, 10.4mm
Ref.: SNG France 377-8, BMC Mysia p. 35, 118, SNG Cop 4 #48 (Mysia)
Ex Numismatik Naumann, Auction 80, Lot 871 (part of)
3 commentsshanxi08/20/19 at 09:00shanxi: Thank you for the reference
3D5D4F8B-3155-4812-8C7B-A956EA34615E.jpeg
Denarius of Commodus/Securitas, AD 188-18910 viewsAR3 17mm
Obverse: Laureate bust right; MCOMMANTPFELAVGBRIT
Reverse: Securitas seated left, with globe in right hand; SECVR ORB P M TR P XIIII
Exergue: COS V PP
Found in the Balkans
RIC III Commodus 179
http://numismatics.org/ocre/id/ric.3.com.179
1 commentsCelticaire08/20/19 at 07:32shanxi: COS V PP (narrow V) in exerque if TR P XIIII (look...
maxtet5.jpg
Maximinus I (235 - 238 A.D.)18 viewsBillon Tetradrachm
O: AVTO MAΞIMINOC EVC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right .
R: Nike walking left, wearing long chiton, carrying wreath and palm; LΓ in left field. Y 3 = AD 236-237.
13.38g
23mm
Dattari 4583; Emmett 3288.3

Ex. Roma Numismatics E-Sale 36, Lot 242, May 5, 2017

Published on Wildwinds!
3 commentsMat08/20/19 at 05:20Randygeki(h2): I like this one. Cool addition
Tiberio_Provident.JPG
Tiberius AE As, Divus Augustus/Provident25 viewsTiberius (14 - 37 AD)

Anv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER, Augustus' radiated bust left.
Rev: PROVIDENT - S C altar.
RIC I 81 (Tiberius)

Weigth: 9,6g.
Diameter: 23mm
1 commentsJose Polanco08/19/19 at 23:11Jay GT4: A classic type
Domitian_RIC_72.jpg
RIC 007237 viewsDomitian, as Augustus (AD 81-96). AR denarius Rome
13 September-31 December AD 81
(18mm, 3.02 gm, 6h).
NGC Choice Fine 4/5 - 4/5.
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M, laureate head of Domitian right
Rev: TR P COS VII-DES VIII P P, pulvinar of Jupiter and Juno, draped, surmounted by thunderbolt.
RIC II 72 (R2), BMC--, RSC--, Cohen--
2019 August 18 Ancient Coin Selections from the Morris Collection,
Part II Monthly Online Auction #271933 Lot # 35169




I really wanted this denarius of Domitian. Why? First, it was struck during Domitian's first year as Augustus. In 81 CE there were 4 issues of precious metal coinage. They are grouped in RIC by the reverse legend. The chronology of these 4 groups is uncertain. Some coins do not have titles that one would expect. For example, why is TR P omitted from some of these coins when it does appear for Group 1 denarii? The second reason I wanted this coin was for the rare obverse legend IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M. There are only 9 denarii types that have this legend. All of the coins with this legend are either R2 (very few examples known to the RIC authors) or R3 (only one example known). This coin is R2 and is a very difficult coin to find in trade. I also very much like the young portrait on this coin.

This coin makes 10 denarii I have from 81 CE. I am always on the lookout for more as I find these early denarii for Domitian fascinating. I like them for the mysteries they contain, the rarity, and the interesting obverse legends. For example, it is within groups 2, 3, and 4 that one finds the elusive PONT denarii. PONT occurs in the obverse legends on these coins and all of them are rated R2 or R3. In other words the PONT denarii are all very rare to extremely rare.

I hope that this coin will not be my last purchase from these first year denarii. Also, while I usually free a coin from its slab as soon as I receive it, this one will stay in the plastic. The reason is that this coin has a provenance. It was part of the Morris collection. I like having this information directly on the slab where it cannot be separated from the coin. I have been very interested lately in collecting coins with provenance. Because of the ever increasing regulations and agreements being applied to ancient coins I feel that provenance is going to become very important to collectors in the next few years.

I will leave you with a tip. If you are looking for a coin like mine with an unusual obverse legend be sure to check the auctions and dealer inventory very carefully. These coins are often misattributed. It is quite possible to find coins like this marked as common because the legends have been misread.
4 commentsorfew08/19/19 at 19:46Jay GT4: Nice one!
Domitian_RIC_72.jpg
RIC 007237 viewsDomitian, as Augustus (AD 81-96). AR denarius Rome
13 September-31 December AD 81
(18mm, 3.02 gm, 6h).
NGC Choice Fine 4/5 - 4/5.
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M, laureate head of Domitian right
Rev: TR P COS VII-DES VIII P P, pulvinar of Jupiter and Juno, draped, surmounted by thunderbolt.
RIC II 72 (R2), BMC--, RSC--, Cohen--
2019 August 18 Ancient Coin Selections from the Morris Collection,
Part II Monthly Online Auction #271933 Lot # 35169




I really wanted this denarius of Domitian. Why? First, it was struck during Domitian's first year as Augustus. In 81 CE there were 4 issues of precious metal coinage. They are grouped in RIC by the reverse legend. The chronology of these 4 groups is uncertain. Some coins do not have titles that one would expect. For example, why is TR P omitted from some of these coins when it does appear for Group 1 denarii? The second reason I wanted this coin was for the rare obverse legend IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M. There are only 9 denarii types that have this legend. All of the coins with this legend are either R2 (very few examples known to the RIC authors) or R3 (only one example known). This coin is R2 and is a very difficult coin to find in trade. I also very much like the young portrait on this coin.

This coin makes 10 denarii I have from 81 CE. I am always on the lookout for more as I find these early denarii for Domitian fascinating. I like them for the mysteries they contain, the rarity, and the interesting obverse legends. For example, it is within groups 2, 3, and 4 that one finds the elusive PONT denarii. PONT occurs in the obverse legends on these coins and all of them are rated R2 or R3. In other words the PONT denarii are all very rare to extremely rare.

I hope that this coin will not be my last purchase from these first year denarii. Also, while I usually free a coin from its slab as soon as I receive it, this one will stay in the plastic. The reason is that this coin has a provenance. It was part of the Morris collection. I like having this information directly on the slab where it cannot be separated from the coin. I have been very interested lately in collecting coins with provenance. Because of the ever increasing regulations and agreements being applied to ancient coins I feel that provenance is going to become very important to collectors in the next few years.

I will leave you with a tip. If you are looking for a coin like mine with an unusual obverse legend be sure to check the auctions and dealer inventory very carefully. These coins are often misattributed. It is quite possible to find coins like this marked as common because the legends have been misread.
4 commentsorfew08/19/19 at 19:43FlaviusDomitianus: Great find, congrats!
Domitian_RIC_72.jpg
RIC 007237 viewsDomitian, as Augustus (AD 81-96). AR denarius Rome
13 September-31 December AD 81
(18mm, 3.02 gm, 6h).
NGC Choice Fine 4/5 - 4/5.
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M, laureate head of Domitian right
Rev: TR P COS VII-DES VIII P P, pulvinar of Jupiter and Juno, draped, surmounted by thunderbolt.
RIC II 72 (R2), BMC--, RSC--, Cohen--
2019 August 18 Ancient Coin Selections from the Morris Collection,
Part II Monthly Online Auction #271933 Lot # 35169




I really wanted this denarius of Domitian. Why? First, it was struck during Domitian's first year as Augustus. In 81 CE there were 4 issues of precious metal coinage. They are grouped in RIC by the reverse legend. The chronology of these 4 groups is uncertain. Some coins do not have titles that one would expect. For example, why is TR P omitted from some of these coins when it does appear for Group 1 denarii? The second reason I wanted this coin was for the rare obverse legend IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M. There are only 9 denarii types that have this legend. All of the coins with this legend are either R2 (very few examples known to the RIC authors) or R3 (only one example known). This coin is R2 and is a very difficult coin to find in trade. I also very much like the young portrait on this coin.

This coin makes 10 denarii I have from 81 CE. I am always on the lookout for more as I find these early denarii for Domitian fascinating. I like them for the mysteries they contain, the rarity, and the interesting obverse legends. For example, it is within groups 2, 3, and 4 that one finds the elusive PONT denarii. PONT occurs in the obverse legends on these coins and all of them are rated R2 or R3. In other words the PONT denarii are all very rare to extremely rare.

I hope that this coin will not be my last purchase from these first year denarii. Also, while I usually free a coin from its slab as soon as I receive it, this one will stay in the plastic. The reason is that this coin has a provenance. It was part of the Morris collection. I like having this information directly on the slab where it cannot be separated from the coin. I have been very interested lately in collecting coins with provenance. Because of the ever increasing regulations and agreements being applied to ancient coins I feel that provenance is going to become very important to collectors in the next few years.

I will leave you with a tip. If you are looking for a coin like mine with an unusual obverse legend be sure to check the auctions and dealer inventory very carefully. These coins are often misattributed. It is quite possible to find coins like this marked as common because the legends have been misread.
4 commentsorfew08/19/19 at 18:30okidoki: Congrats very nice
D385a.jpg
Domitian RIC-38536 viewsÆ As, 10.60g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: SALVTI above, AVGVSTI below; S C in field; Altar
RIC 385 (C2). BMC 358. BNC 379.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, August 2019.

The SALVTI AVGVSTI altar type was first introduced on Domitian's aes coinage in 84 after a brief hiatus of the Senatorial mint's production in 82-83, presumably for re-organisational purposes. The structure on the reverse has been traditionally described as an altar, however, Marvin Tameanko has convincingly argued it is actually a sacellum, or small shrine. He states the steps at the base leading to two doors with handles are overwhelming evidence that the structure was much larger than an altar. As far as the shrine's significance - H. Mattingly in BMCRE II interprets the type as commemorating the Senate's dedication of an altar shrine celebrating Domitian's safe return from the Germanic Wars of 82-83. Alternately, the shrine may have been dedicated as an appeal to Salus for the emperor's continued good health. In any case, no trace of the shrine has survived antiquity.

This As with its aegis, large flan (30mm), and elegant idealised style are all hallmarks of the new direction introduced after the Senatorial mint's overhaul.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/19/19 at 17:14Gary W2: Nice detail on the altar. I also love the broad fl...
Celts_Danube_ImitatingThasos_GöblOTAClassV.jpg
Danubian Celts, Carpathian Region28 viewsCelts, Danubian, Carpathian Region, Uncertain Tribe. 1st c. BC. AR Tetradrachm (14.83 gm). Imitating Thasos Celticized and degraded head of Dionysos right, wearing ivy wreath / Celticized Herakles, standing facing, holding club and lionskin. Legend degraded to mere dots. VF. CNG 51 #19. Göbl OTA Class V; cf Kostial Lanz 983-994.2 commentsChristian T08/19/19 at 16:20cicerokid: Lovely
Baktria.jpg
Baktria16 viewsAlexander the Great's empire split into rival Hellenistic kingdoms ruled by his generals. The most far-flung part was Baktria, his conquests in what is today Afghanistan, western India and Pakistan. Greek settlers ruled over a much larger indigenous population. As centuries went by, this isolated outpost of Greek culture combined elements of both Greek and native traditions, oftentimes reflected in their bilingual coins. The main mints include Aï Khanoum, Bactra, and Pushkalavati.2 commentsChristian T08/19/19 at 16:19cicerokid: Great Baktrian collection
Caria_Kos_SNG-Cop627.jpg
Carian Islands, Kos11 viewsKos 300-190 BC.  AR Tetradrachm (14.55 gm). Head of Herakles r., wearing lionskin headdress / Crab, bow in bow case below. KΩION above, ΛEΩΔAMAΣ (magistrate) below, all within square with dotted border. aEF.  Pegasi Auction VI (2002) #177. SNG Cop. 627; SNG Delepierre 2729; SNG Berry 1116; HGC 6 #1308 (S); Ingvaldsen XIV 284, 52c (same dies); Requier 44a (same reverse die). 1 commentsChristian T08/19/19 at 16:07cicerokid: Exceptional
G_368_Athens.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, Obol13 viewsAttica. Athens
Obol (454-404 BC)
Obv: Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet decorated with olive wreath.
Rev: AΘΕ, Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent behind.
Ag, 0.63g, 9.3mm
Ref.: SNG Copenhagen 53-6, SNG München 49.
Ex Numismatik Naumann, Auction 80, Lot 871 (part of)
1 commentsshanxi08/19/19 at 15:48Mat: A neat addition
Augustus_RIC_222.jpg
Augustus RIC 022444 viewsOctavian as Augustus, 27 BC – 14 AD Denarius
Lugdunum circa 13-14,
18mm., 3.56g.
Obv: Laureate head r.
Rev. Tiberius in triumphal quadriga r., holding laurel branch and eagle-tipped sceptre.
RSC 301. RIC 224.
Ex: Naville Numismatics Live auction 50 Lot 439 June 23, 2019
3 commentsorfew08/19/19 at 15:47Mat:
Domitian_Ric_425.jpg
RIC 042539 viewsDomitian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 86. First Issue
3.38g, 20mm, 5h
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V, laureate head right
Rev: IMP XI COS XII CENS P P P, Minerva advancing right, holding spear and shield.
RIC 425 (R) BMC 88, RSC 194
Roma Numismatics E-Sale 57. Thursday 30th May 2019 Lot 861


Here is a lovely rare coin. the toning is beautiful and the portrait is excellent. Struck before September of 86 CE, most of the coins of this issue are very scarce to rare. I loved the look of this one and I did not have one so naturally I bought it.

Tracking down these rarities is a lot of fun and it forces one to become knowledgeable in terms of the relevant research books and references. It is almost as much fun to read about these coins as it is to possess them. I guess that is one aspect that really attracted me to collecting ancient coins; the opportunity to dive deep into the research concerning these coins.

i love this portrait and am trying to track down more coins from this issue. They are not easy to find, but that is part of the fun.
2 commentsorfew08/19/19 at 15:47Mat: Nice one
Titus_RIC_528_[Vesp].jpg
RIC 052872 viewsTitus as Caesar AR Denarius
Rome mint 73 CE
Obv: TCAES IMP VESP PON TR POT CENS; Laureate Head of Titus right
Rev: FIDES PUBL; Hands clasped over caduceus, 2 poppoies and 2 corn ears
RIC 528 (R)[VESP] BMC 91a RSC 87b
Purchased from Ebay July 18, 2019
5 commentsorfew08/19/19 at 15:46Mat: Love the portrait
Domitian_RIC_435_~1.jpg
Roman Empire, Domitian, AR Denarius55 viewsDOMITIAN, (A.D. 81-96), silver denarius, Rome mint, issued A.D. 86, Second Issue
(3.47 g),
Obv. laureate head of Domitian to right, around IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V, Rev. around IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P, Minerva standing to right, fighting, holding javelin and shield,
RIC 435, RSC 201b BMC 93.
Attractive blue and gold patina, extremely fine.
Ex Dr V.J.A. Flynn Collection. With old dealer's ticket.
Noble Numismatics Auction 120 Lot 3217 April 4, 2019.
6 commentsorfew08/19/19 at 15:46Mat: Superb
RPC2721.jpg
RPC-2721-Domitian46 viewsÆ Drachm, 19.56g
Alexandria mint, 95-96 AD
Obv: AVT KAI C ΘEOY YIOC ∆OMIT CEB ΓEPM; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev: No legend; Emperor in quadriga of elephants r., holding branch of laurel and sceptre; upon elephant's heads Nike r., holding wreath and palm; date LIE in exergue
RPC 2721 (11 spec.).
Ex Forvm Ancient Coins, July 2019.

The Alexandrian mint under Domitian around regnal year 10 or 11 experienced a 'dramatic improvement in style' and the 'adoption of a wide range of new types' (Milne). One of those new types was the flamboyant scene of Domitian in a quadriga drawn by four elephants struck for the drachm. This type is unique to Alexandria and does not show up elsewhere in the Flavian numismatic canon. However, the Arch of Titus once supported a bronze sculpture depicting such a scene and the Arch of Domitian described by Martial had two elephant quadrigae. Pompey the Great was the first Roman to employ an elephant quadriga in his triumph of 61 BC. The elephants were too big to fit through one of the gates leading up to the Capitol and they had to be switched out with a team of horses. The ancient authors thought it 'a piquant warning of the dangers of divine self-aggrandizement.' (M. Beard). Yet, by the Flavian era the elephant quadriga was seen as a powerful symbol of triumphal glory - although, there is no evidence that Domitian ever rode in an elephant quadriga in any of his triumphs. After Hadrian's reign, the elephant quadriga on the coinage was soley the realm of the imperial Divi and not the living emperor.

A beautiful coin in hand with a magnificent reverse!
6 commentsDavid Atherton08/19/19 at 15:45Mat: Fantastic
D367.jpg
Domitian RIC-36760 viewsÆ Dupondius, 11.64g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: ANNONA AVG; S C in exergue; Annona, std r., holding open on lap by two ends bag full of corn-ears; in front of her stands a small figure, l., also holding two ends of bag, and in the background, stern of ship
RIC 367 (C). BMC 347. BNC 364.
Ex eBay, August 2019.

A most curious reverse type was struck for Domitian on his dupondii for a short period between 84-88. Here we see Annona seated holding open a bag(?) of corn-ears and a mysterious small figure standing before her holding the other end of the bag with a ship's stern in the background. Overall, the reverse likely alludes to Domitian's care of the corn supply, hinted at by the stern, here a symbol of the all important African grain ships. The small individual before Annona has variously been described as a 'boy', a 'child', or ambiguously as just a 'figure'. H. Mattingly has the most imaginative explanation in BMCRE II - 'Annona herself, the spirit of the corn-supply, and the ship, the symbol of the overseas corn, are familiar: but who is the small figure who stands before her? He is certainly no child, but only a man reduced to tiny proportions beside the goddess; and the fact that he is bare to the waist may suggest that he is an Italian farmer. If this interpretation is right, the type records a definite policy of Domitian to encourage the growing of corn in Italy.' Mattingly may be correct about the overall meaning, but I think the figure is indeed a child, symbolic of the emperor's care, through Annona's auspices, for his subjects.

Flatly struck on one side, but in fine style.
7 commentsDavid Atherton08/19/19 at 15:45Mat: A nice find
V1426(5A)3.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1426(5A)342 viewsAR Denarius, 3.25g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r.; no mintmark
RIC 1426(5A)3 (R3). BMC -. RPC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, May 2019.

This is an extremely rare denarius from Ephesus struck without a mintmark and the second known example of the Turreted female bust type lacking one. The Ephesian denarius issues struck under Vespasian all have mintmarks, save for the first and one tiny issue dated COS III. Aside from this turreted female type and the accompanying footnote, this issue is not represented in the new RIC II.1. Ted Buttrey wrote in the RIC II Addenda the following concerning the no mintmark issue:

'I’m not terribly happy about this. It’s a convenient way to draw together several pieces which lack the mintmark, placing them after the completion of the ΘΙ and ΘΥ Groups 3-5 and the inception of Group 6 with ΕΡΗ. But why should they have given up on a mintmark in mid-course, when all of Groups 2-9 are marked? The choices are – (i) mintmark on coins worn away; (ii) engraver forgot to add mintmark to the dies; (iii) issue deliberately produced without mintmark. Assuming (iii) for the moment, the new Group takes the place of fnn. 46-47, pp.162-3, and fits here nicely with V’s title for Groups 5-6, and T’s for Group 6, But I have no fixed opinion, and await the appearance of others of this variety.'

IMHO, either ii or iii are the most likely option. There are specimens from this non-mintmark issue (such as the present coin) that have no available space on the flan for a mintmark, thus, one was never intended either deliberately or accidentally. No mintmarks occur on various dies spanning different reverse types for both Vespasian and Titus Caesar, because of this I lean more towards this being intentional.

Struck in high relief with the reverse slightly off centred.

NB: This coin shares a reverse die with my Titus Caesar example of the type.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/19/19 at 15:45Mat: Sweet addition
D385a.jpg
Domitian RIC-38536 viewsÆ As, 10.60g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: SALVTI above, AVGVSTI below; S C in field; Altar
RIC 385 (C2). BMC 358. BNC 379.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, August 2019.

The SALVTI AVGVSTI altar type was first introduced on Domitian's aes coinage in 84 after a brief hiatus of the Senatorial mint's production in 82-83, presumably for re-organisational purposes. The structure on the reverse has been traditionally described as an altar, however, Marvin Tameanko has convincingly argued it is actually a sacellum, or small shrine. He states the steps at the base leading to two doors with handles are overwhelming evidence that the structure was much larger than an altar. As far as the shrine's significance - H. Mattingly in BMCRE II interprets the type as commemorating the Senate's dedication of an altar shrine celebrating Domitian's safe return from the Germanic Wars of 82-83. Alternately, the shrine may have been dedicated as an appeal to Salus for the emperor's continued good health. In any case, no trace of the shrine has survived antiquity.

This As with its aegis, large flan (30mm), and elegant idealised style are all hallmarks of the new direction introduced after the Senatorial mint's overhaul.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/19/19 at 15:44Mat: A wonderful bronze!
Civil_Wars_BonusEvent.jpg
Roman Civil Wars, Revolt of Galba, Governor of Spain19 viewsSilver denarius, Tarraco(?) mint, Apr - Jun 68 A.D.
O: BON EVENT, young female head (Bonus Eventus) right, fillet around forehead.
R: ROM RENASC, Roma standing right in military garb, Victory on globe in right hand, eagle-tipped scepter over left shoulder in left, implying the restoration of the Republic.
- RIC I 9 (R4), RSC II 396, BMCRE I 9, SRCV I 2072.

Galba lived in Tarraco for eight years. This coin was issued by Galba as governor of Spain in revolt against Nero. The obverse is copied from Republican denarii struck in 62 B.C. by the moneyer L. Scribonius Libo.
2 commentsNemonater08/19/19 at 15:44Mat: Not one you see often, very nice, congrats.
Domitian_RIC_72.jpg
RIC 007237 viewsDomitian, as Augustus (AD 81-96). AR denarius Rome
13 September-31 December AD 81
(18mm, 3.02 gm, 6h).
NGC Choice Fine 4/5 - 4/5.
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M, laureate head of Domitian right
Rev: TR P COS VII-DES VIII P P, pulvinar of Jupiter and Juno, draped, surmounted by thunderbolt.
RIC II 72 (R2), BMC--, RSC--, Cohen--
2019 August 18 Ancient Coin Selections from the Morris Collection,
Part II Monthly Online Auction #271933 Lot # 35169




I really wanted this denarius of Domitian. Why? First, it was struck during Domitian's first year as Augustus. In 81 CE there were 4 issues of precious metal coinage. They are grouped in RIC by the reverse legend. The chronology of these 4 groups is uncertain. Some coins do not have titles that one would expect. For example, why is TR P omitted from some of these coins when it does appear for Group 1 denarii? The second reason I wanted this coin was for the rare obverse legend IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M. There are only 9 denarii types that have this legend. All of the coins with this legend are either R2 (very few examples known to the RIC authors) or R3 (only one example known). This coin is R2 and is a very difficult coin to find in trade. I also very much like the young portrait on this coin.

This coin makes 10 denarii I have from 81 CE. I am always on the lookout for more as I find these early denarii for Domitian fascinating. I like them for the mysteries they contain, the rarity, and the interesting obverse legends. For example, it is within groups 2, 3, and 4 that one finds the elusive PONT denarii. PONT occurs in the obverse legends on these coins and all of them are rated R2 or R3. In other words the PONT denarii are all very rare to extremely rare.

I hope that this coin will not be my last purchase from these first year denarii. Also, while I usually free a coin from its slab as soon as I receive it, this one will stay in the plastic. The reason is that this coin has a provenance. It was part of the Morris collection. I like having this information directly on the slab where it cannot be separated from the coin. I have been very interested lately in collecting coins with provenance. Because of the ever increasing regulations and agreements being applied to ancient coins I feel that provenance is going to become very important to collectors in the next few years.

I will leave you with a tip. If you are looking for a coin like mine with an unusual obverse legend be sure to check the auctions and dealer inventory very carefully. These coins are often misattributed. It is quite possible to find coins like this marked as common because the legends have been misread.
4 commentsorfew08/19/19 at 15:43Mat: Love this coin, nice toning & portrait
D385a.jpg
Domitian RIC-38536 viewsÆ As, 10.60g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: SALVTI above, AVGVSTI below; S C in field; Altar
RIC 385 (C2). BMC 358. BNC 379.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, August 2019.

The SALVTI AVGVSTI altar type was first introduced on Domitian's aes coinage in 84 after a brief hiatus of the Senatorial mint's production in 82-83, presumably for re-organisational purposes. The structure on the reverse has been traditionally described as an altar, however, Marvin Tameanko has convincingly argued it is actually a sacellum, or small shrine. He states the steps at the base leading to two doors with handles are overwhelming evidence that the structure was much larger than an altar. As far as the shrine's significance - H. Mattingly in BMCRE II interprets the type as commemorating the Senate's dedication of an altar shrine celebrating Domitian's safe return from the Germanic Wars of 82-83. Alternately, the shrine may have been dedicated as an appeal to Salus for the emperor's continued good health. In any case, no trace of the shrine has survived antiquity.

This As with its aegis, large flan (30mm), and elegant idealised style are all hallmarks of the new direction introduced after the Senatorial mint's overhaul.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/19/19 at 14:09FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example
Campania_Neapolis_SNG-ANS338.jpg
Campania, Neapolis.18 viewsCampania, Neapolis. 320-300 BC. AR Nomos (7.47 gm). Head of nymph Parthenope r., with pendant earring, dolphins around. / Man-headed bull walking, Nike above, crowning. ΟΥΙΛ below. Ex: [NEO]POΛITΩ[N]. VF. Pegasi AXXI #40 SNG ANS 337-339; SNG Cop 413-414; HN Italy 576; HGC 1 452; Sambon 458.1 commentsChristian T08/19/19 at 11:22Molinari: Beautiful.
Campania_Neapolis_SNG-ANS376.jpg
Campania, Neapolis.22 viewsCampania, Neapolis. 450-340 BC. AR Didrachm (7.29 gm). Head of nymph Parthenope r., hair bound with ampyx, wearing single-pendant earring, X behind. / Man-headed bull standing r., head facing, with Nike flying above, crowning bull, Θ below. [NEO]POΛITΩ[N] on raised exergal band. VF. SNG ANS 376; SNG Cop 436; ; Sambon 476; SNG München 223; cf HN Italy 579; CNG EA 288 #22.1 commentsChristian T08/19/19 at 11:21Molinari: A great example.
Bruttium_Laus_SNG-ANS135.jpg
Bruttium, Laus.16 viewsBruttium, Laus. 480-460 BC. AR Stater (8.07 gm). Man-headed bull stdg l., looking back. ΛAΣ (retrograde) above. / Man-headed bull standing r. ΛAΣ (retrograde) above. VF. CICF06 138 #1422. SNG ANS 135 (Lucania); HN Italy 2275; SNG Cop. 1146; SNG Fitzwilliam 445; SNG München 920; Sternberg 9 (V8/R8); Weber 728.1 commentsChristian T08/19/19 at 11:20Molinari: Excellent coin.
D385a.jpg
Domitian RIC-38536 viewsÆ As, 10.60g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: SALVTI above, AVGVSTI below; S C in field; Altar
RIC 385 (C2). BMC 358. BNC 379.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, August 2019.

The SALVTI AVGVSTI altar type was first introduced on Domitian's aes coinage in 84 after a brief hiatus of the Senatorial mint's production in 82-83, presumably for re-organisational purposes. The structure on the reverse has been traditionally described as an altar, however, Marvin Tameanko has convincingly argued it is actually a sacellum, or small shrine. He states the steps at the base leading to two doors with handles are overwhelming evidence that the structure was much larger than an altar. As far as the shrine's significance - H. Mattingly in BMCRE II interprets the type as commemorating the Senate's dedication of an altar shrine celebrating Domitian's safe return from the Germanic Wars of 82-83. Alternately, the shrine may have been dedicated as an appeal to Salus for the emperor's continued good health. In any case, no trace of the shrine has survived antiquity.

This As with its aegis, large flan (30mm), and elegant idealised style are all hallmarks of the new direction introduced after the Senatorial mint's overhaul.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/19/19 at 11:03Jay GT4: Lovely patina
Phoenicia_Arados_SNG-Cop30.jpg
Phoenecia, Arados12 viewsArados. c. 174/3 BC. AR Drachm (4.15 gm), CY 88. Bee, F-MC monogram in fields / Stag stdg r. before date palm, APAΔIΩN to r.  gVF.  Bt. Coral Gables 1999. SNG Berry II 1423; Duyrat 2005 1455-1557; HGC 10 63; SNG Cop 7 30. 1 commentsChristian T08/19/19 at 10:50Arados: Wonderful coin Christian
IMGP4145Osr1forg.jpg
Osroes I. Forgery,22 viewsFORGERY!! AR dr., 4,45gr(!), 20,8mm; after Sellwood 80.1, etc., same dies as with the previous coin, but wrong weight;

bought from a now defunct Dutch seller as genuine.
1 commentsSchatz08/19/19 at 10:18Anaximander: Such a good-looking coin. Would take greater exper...
G_369_Kyzikos.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Kyzikos, Boar, Lion17 viewsKyzikos, Mysia
AR obol, 525 - 475 B.C.
Obv.: forepart of boar left, reversed E on side, tunny fish behind
Rev.: head of roaring lion left within incuse square
Ag, 0.79g, 10.4mm
Ref.: SNG France 377-8, BMC Mysia p. 35, 118, SNG Cop 4 #48 (Mysia)
Ex Numismatik Naumann, Auction 80, Lot 871 (part of)
3 commentsshanxi08/19/19 at 09:12Anaximander: Beautiful strikes and gVF! Ref: SNG Cop 4 #48 (Mys...
Civil_Wars_BonusEvent.jpg
Roman Civil Wars, Revolt of Galba, Governor of Spain19 viewsSilver denarius, Tarraco(?) mint, Apr - Jun 68 A.D.
O: BON EVENT, young female head (Bonus Eventus) right, fillet around forehead.
R: ROM RENASC, Roma standing right in military garb, Victory on globe in right hand, eagle-tipped scepter over left shoulder in left, implying the restoration of the Republic.
- RIC I 9 (R4), RSC II 396, BMCRE I 9, SRCV I 2072.

Galba lived in Tarraco for eight years. This coin was issued by Galba as governor of Spain in revolt against Nero. The obverse is copied from Republican denarii struck in 62 B.C. by the moneyer L. Scribonius Libo.
2 commentsNemonater08/19/19 at 03:16David Atherton: Utterly fantastic!
maxtet5.jpg
Maximinus I (235 - 238 A.D.)18 viewsBillon Tetradrachm
O: AVTO MAΞIMINOC EVC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right .
R: Nike walking left, wearing long chiton, carrying wreath and palm; LΓ in left field. Y 3 = AD 236-237.
13.38g
23mm
Dattari 4583; Emmett 3288.3

Ex. Roma Numismatics E-Sale 36, Lot 242, May 5, 2017

Published on Wildwinds!
3 commentsMat08/18/19 at 23:15Nemonater: Nice, I love these tets!
got.jpg
Gotarzes II (44 - 51 AD)26 viewsAR Drachm
O: Diademed bust left.
R: (OΛCIΛCΩC) OΛCIΛ(EΩN) (Λ)I(3 dots)IΛNO(V) ΔIXΛIOV I(3 dots)VI(3 dots)PΓI.TO(V) (EΠ)IΦΛNOVC (ΦIΛEΛ)ΛHXO(C), / Archer (Arsakes I) seated right on throne, holding bow; monogram below bow.
 Ekbatana mint
20.5mm
3.77g
Sellwood 65.33; Sunrise –; Shore 364
3 commentsMat08/18/19 at 23:15Nemonater: Wow!
maxtet5.jpg
Maximinus I (235 - 238 A.D.)18 viewsBillon Tetradrachm
O: AVTO MAΞIMINOC EVC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right .
R: Nike walking left, wearing long chiton, carrying wreath and palm; LΓ in left field. Y 3 = AD 236-237.
13.38g
23mm
Dattari 4583; Emmett 3288.3

Ex. Roma Numismatics E-Sale 36, Lot 242, May 5, 2017

Published on Wildwinds!
3 commentsMat08/18/19 at 22:30quadrans: Nice piece..
G_369_Kyzikos.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Kyzikos, Boar, Lion17 viewsKyzikos, Mysia
AR obol, 525 - 475 B.C.
Obv.: forepart of boar left, reversed E on side, tunny fish behind
Rev.: head of roaring lion left within incuse square
Ag, 0.79g, 10.4mm
Ref.: SNG France 377-8, BMC Mysia p. 35, 118, SNG Cop 4 #48 (Mysia)
Ex Numismatik Naumann, Auction 80, Lot 871 (part of)
3 commentsshanxi08/18/19 at 18:28Tracy Aiello: Great coin!
Screenshot_2019-08-17_10_32_41.png
Sicily. The Mamertini, Æ Pentonkion.10 viewsMessana After 210 B.C. 12.91g - 26.1mm, Axis 12h.

Obv: Laureate head of Ares left.

Rev: ΜΑΜΕΡΤΙΝΩΝ / Π - Nude horseman, spear in his left hand, leading his horse left; Π in left field.

SNG ANS 430; Calciati 25; BMC 32.
2 commentsChristian Scarlioli08/18/19 at 18:23Christian Scarlioli: Thank you
Nimes.JPG
Augustus and Agrippa, Nimes dupondius35 viewsAugustus (27 BC – 14 AD)

Æ Dupondius. Nemausus (Nimes), 12 BC

Struck to commemorate the defeat of Mark Antony at Actium and the capture of Egypt.

Obv: IMP DIVI F P P. adduced heads of Augustus (right) and Agrippa (left), Augustus laureate, Agrippa wearing rostral crown.
Rev.: COL NEM. crocodile chained to palm tree.
RIC 157

Weight: 12.9g.
Diameter: 26mm.
1 commentsJose P08/18/19 at 12:09Jay GT4: Nice one
Screenshot_2019-06-30_08_01_52.png
Cilician Armenia, Royal Period, King Hetoum I, AR Tram.11 viewsSis 1226-1270 A.D. 2.99g - 21.3mm, Axis 9h.

Obv: +ՎԱԻՈՂՈԻԹ - ԻԻՆUՑՈ I - Queen Zabel and King Hetoum standing facing, holding long cross between them.

Rev: +ՀԷԹՈԻՄ ԹԱԳԱԻՈՐ ՀԱՅ[ՈՑ] - Crowned lion standing right, head facing, left paw raised; long cross behind.

AC 340var (reverse legend).
2 commentsChristian Scarlioli08/18/19 at 11:21Christian Scarlioli: Thank you
Screenshot_2019-08-17_10_32_41.png
Sicily. The Mamertini, Æ Pentonkion.10 viewsMessana After 210 B.C. 12.91g - 26.1mm, Axis 12h.

Obv: Laureate head of Ares left.

Rev: ΜΑΜΕΡΤΙΝΩΝ / Π - Nude horseman, spear in his left hand, leading his horse left; Π in left field.

SNG ANS 430; Calciati 25; BMC 32.
2 commentsChristian Scarlioli08/18/19 at 02:50Jay GT4: Very nice
1542_-1548_MARY_Queen_of_Scots_AR_Bawbee.JPG
1542 - 1567, Mary I “Queen of Scots”, AR billon Bawbee (sixpence), Struck 1542 - 1558 at Edinburgh, Scotland20 viewsObverse: +MARIA•D•G•R•SCOTORVM. Crowned thistle, M to left, R to right, beaded circles and legend surrounding. Greek cross in legend.
Reverse: OPPIDVM•EDINBVRGI, retrograde N in legend. Crown over voided saltire cross, cinquefoil on either side, beaded circles and legend surrounding, fleur-de-lis within legend above.
Diameter: 22mm | Weight: 1.8gms | Die Axis: 10
SPINK: 5433

First period issue, before Mary's marriage to the French Dauphin, Francis. The cinquefoils refer to the Earl of Arran who acted as Regent until Mary came of age.

Mary I is one of the most well known, romantic and tragic figures in Scottish history. She was the only surviving child of King James V of Scotland and became queen on the death of her father when she was only six or seven days old. Mary was brought up in the Catholic faith and educated in France along with the French royal children, while Scotland was ruled in her name by regents, principally the Earl of Arran. In 1558 Mary married the French Dauphin, Francis, and following his accession in 1559 she became Queen consort of France and he King consort of Scotland. However, when Francis died in 1560 Mary was devastated and in 1561 she returned to Scotland. Four years later, in 1565, she married her half-cousin, Lord Darnley and the following year she bore him a son, who would later become James I of England. When in 1567, Darnley's house in Edinburgh was destroyed by an explosion and he was found murdered in the grounds, suspicion implicated Mary and her favourite, the Earl of Bothwell. When later that same year Mary married Bothwell those suspicions were not allayed, and following an uprising against her, she was imprisoned in Loch Leven Castle and forced to abdicate in favour of her one year old son. After an unsuccessful attempt to regain her throne and defeat at the battle of Langside in 1568, Mary fled south to England, only to be imprisoned by Elizabeth I who perceived her as a threat to the throne of England. For over eighteen years Elizabeth had Mary confined in various castles and manor houses throughout England until, in 1587, after being accused of numerous intrigues and plots against Elizabeth, Mary was beheaded at Fotheringhay Castle.
3 comments*Alex08/18/19 at 02:49Jay GT4: Interesting piece
RIC_68_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0068 Domitianus35 viewsObv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT, Laureate head right
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P, Seat, draped; above, winged thunderbolt
AR/Denarius (19.15 mm 3.29 g 6h) Struck in Rome 81 A.D. (4th group)
RIC 68 (R2), RSC, BMCRE, BNF unlisted
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus08/17/19 at 23:30orfew: Great coin. I really like these PONT denarii.
D68.JPG
Domitian RIC 68109 viewsAR Denarius, 3.08g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, winged thunderbolt
RIC 68 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.

The early pulvinar denarii struck by Domitian tell the story of an emperor who was awarded titles in stages. The "PONT" series were minted before Domitian obtained the full title Pontifex Maximus, presumably until the proper religious rites were completed. Most "PONT" denarii are listed as R2 or R3. Interestingly, this Group 4 denarius shares the same obverse die as my very rare Group 3 RIC 34 with the same reverse type but with a different legend, proof that the two groups were struck simultaneously. At this time the mint was divided up into different officinae based on reverse types. No obverses die matches are found with different reverse types.

A great early style portrait and finely toned.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/17/19 at 23:29orfew: A wonderful coin. These PONT denarii are really in...
Screenshot_2019-06-30_08_01_52.png
Cilician Armenia, Royal Period, King Hetoum I, AR Tram.11 viewsSis 1226-1270 A.D. 2.99g - 21.3mm, Axis 9h.

Obv: +ՎԱԻՈՂՈԻԹ - ԻԻՆUՑՈ I - Queen Zabel and King Hetoum standing facing, holding long cross between them.

Rev: +ՀԷԹՈԻՄ ԹԱԳԱԻՈՐ ՀԱՅ[ՈՑ] - Crowned lion standing right, head facing, left paw raised; long cross behind.

AC 340var (reverse legend).
2 commentsChristian Scarlioli08/17/19 at 23:11Stkp: Nice
1542_-1548_MARY_Queen_of_Scots_AR_Bawbee.JPG
1542 - 1567, Mary I “Queen of Scots”, AR billon Bawbee (sixpence), Struck 1542 - 1558 at Edinburgh, Scotland20 viewsObverse: +MARIA•D•G•R•SCOTORVM. Crowned thistle, M to left, R to right, beaded circles and legend surrounding. Greek cross in legend.
Reverse: OPPIDVM•EDINBVRGI, retrograde N in legend. Crown over voided saltire cross, cinquefoil on either side, beaded circles and legend surrounding, fleur-de-lis within legend above.
Diameter: 22mm | Weight: 1.8gms | Die Axis: 10
SPINK: 5433

First period issue, before Mary's marriage to the French Dauphin, Francis. The cinquefoils refer to the Earl of Arran who acted as Regent until Mary came of age.

Mary I is one of the most well known, romantic and tragic figures in Scottish history. She was the only surviving child of King James V of Scotland and became queen on the death of her father when she was only six or seven days old. Mary was brought up in the Catholic faith and educated in France along with the French royal children, while Scotland was ruled in her name by regents, principally the Earl of Arran. In 1558 Mary married the French Dauphin, Francis, and following his accession in 1559 she became Queen consort of France and he King consort of Scotland. However, when Francis died in 1560 Mary was devastated and in 1561 she returned to Scotland. Four years later, in 1565, she married her half-cousin, Lord Darnley and the following year she bore him a son, who would later become James I of England. When in 1567, Darnley's house in Edinburgh was destroyed by an explosion and he was found murdered in the grounds, suspicion implicated Mary and her favourite, the Earl of Bothwell. When later that same year Mary married Bothwell those suspicions were not allayed, and following an uprising against her, she was imprisoned in Loch Leven Castle and forced to abdicate in favour of her one year old son. After an unsuccessful attempt to regain her throne and defeat at the battle of Langside in 1568, Mary fled south to England, only to be imprisoned by Elizabeth I who perceived her as a threat to the throne of England. For over eighteen years Elizabeth had Mary confined in various castles and manor houses throughout England until, in 1587, after being accused of numerous intrigues and plots against Elizabeth, Mary was beheaded at Fotheringhay Castle.
3 comments*Alex08/17/19 at 23:11Stkp: Very nice
1542_-1548_MARY_Queen_of_Scots_AR_Bawbee.JPG
1542 - 1567, Mary I “Queen of Scots”, AR billon Bawbee (sixpence), Struck 1542 - 1558 at Edinburgh, Scotland20 viewsObverse: +MARIA•D•G•R•SCOTORVM. Crowned thistle, M to left, R to right, beaded circles and legend surrounding. Greek cross in legend.
Reverse: OPPIDVM•EDINBVRGI, retrograde N in legend. Crown over voided saltire cross, cinquefoil on either side, beaded circles and legend surrounding, fleur-de-lis within legend above.
Diameter: 22mm | Weight: 1.8gms | Die Axis: 10
SPINK: 5433

First period issue, before Mary's marriage to the French Dauphin, Francis. The cinquefoils refer to the Earl of Arran who acted as Regent until Mary came of age.

Mary I is one of the most well known, romantic and tragic figures in Scottish history. She was the only surviving child of King James V of Scotland and became queen on the death of her father when she was only six or seven days old. Mary was brought up in the Catholic faith and educated in France along with the French royal children, while Scotland was ruled in her name by regents, principally the Earl of Arran. In 1558 Mary married the French Dauphin, Francis, and following his accession in 1559 she became Queen consort of France and he King consort of Scotland. However, when Francis died in 1560 Mary was devastated and in 1561 she returned to Scotland. Four years later, in 1565, she married her half-cousin, Lord Darnley and the following year she bore him a son, who would later become James I of England. When in 1567, Darnley's house in Edinburgh was destroyed by an explosion and he was found murdered in the grounds, suspicion implicated Mary and her favourite, the Earl of Bothwell. When later that same year Mary married Bothwell those suspicions were not allayed, and following an uprising against her, she was imprisoned in Loch Leven Castle and forced to abdicate in favour of her one year old son. After an unsuccessful attempt to regain her throne and defeat at the battle of Langside in 1568, Mary fled south to England, only to be imprisoned by Elizabeth I who perceived her as a threat to the throne of England. For over eighteen years Elizabeth had Mary confined in various castles and manor houses throughout England until, in 1587, after being accused of numerous intrigues and plots against Elizabeth, Mary was beheaded at Fotheringhay Castle.
3 comments*Alex08/17/19 at 19:23quadrans: Great piece...
G_366_Dardanos.jpg
Asia Minor, Troas, Dardanos, Obol, Horseman, Cock11 viewsDardanos
Asia Minor, Troas
late 5th Century BC
Obol
Obv.: Horseman riding left
Rev.: Cock standing left within incuse square.
Ag, 0.56g, 8.75mm
Ref.: SNG Copenhagen 282, SNG ANS Berry #985.
Ex Numismatik Naumann, Auction 80, Lot 871 (part of)
2 commentsshanxi08/17/19 at 18:24shanxi: Thank you for the reference
G_366_Dardanos.jpg
Asia Minor, Troas, Dardanos, Obol, Horseman, Cock11 viewsDardanos
Asia Minor, Troas
late 5th Century BC
Obol
Obv.: Horseman riding left
Rev.: Cock standing left within incuse square.
Ag, 0.56g, 8.75mm
Ref.: SNG Copenhagen 282, SNG ANS Berry #985.
Ex Numismatik Naumann, Auction 80, Lot 871 (part of)
2 commentsshanxi08/17/19 at 12:05Anaximander: So small, and from such an obscure mint. For anoth...
052_Plautilla_RIC_IV-I_372,_AR-Den,_PLAVTILLA_AVG,_CONCORDIAE,_RSC-8,_BMC-739,_Laodicea_202_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_18-20mm,_3,39g-s.jpg
052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Laodicea ad Mare, RIC IV-I 372 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, CONCORDIAE, Concordia seated left, #140 views052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Laodicea ad Mare, RIC IV-I 372 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, CONCORDIAE, Concordia seated left, #1
Wife of Caracalla,
avers: PLAVTILLA AVG, Draped bust right.
reverse: CONCORDIAE, Concordia seated left, holding patera and double cornucopiae.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-20,0mm, weight: 3,39g, axis: 0h,
mint: Laodicea ad Mare, date: 202 A.D., ref: RIC IV 372 (Caracalla), RSC, BMC 739, Sear 7068,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans08/17/19 at 11:25Anaximander: Realism, not idealism. Surprising for an emperor&#...
052_Plautilla_RIC_IV-I_372,_AR-Den,_PLAVTILLA_AVG,_CONCORDIAE,_RSC-8,_BMC-739,_Laodicea_202_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_18-20mm,_3,39g-s.jpg
052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Laodicea ad Mare, RIC IV-I 372 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, CONCORDIAE, Concordia seated left, #140 views052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Laodicea ad Mare, RIC IV-I 372 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, CONCORDIAE, Concordia seated left, #1
Wife of Caracalla,
avers: PLAVTILLA AVG, Draped bust right.
reverse: CONCORDIAE, Concordia seated left, holding patera and double cornucopiae.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-20,0mm, weight: 3,39g, axis: 0h,
mint: Laodicea ad Mare, date: 202 A.D., ref: RIC IV 372 (Caracalla), RSC, BMC 739, Sear 7068,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans08/17/19 at 11:04okidoki: Interesting bust
Screenshot_2019-04-22_15_54_57.png
Medieval France, King Charles IX, Silver Teston, Mintmark H.13 viewsLa Rochelle 1577 A.D. 9.26g - 28.2mm, Axis 3h.

Obv: CAROLVS VIIII●DEI●G●FRANCOR●REX - Laureate and cuirassed bust left.

Rev: + SIT:NOMEN:DNI:BENEDICTVM:LXV11 / H - Crowned coat of arms, crowns over C's either side, Mintmark H below.

Dy.1106, Sb.4638.
2 commentsChristian Scarlioli08/17/19 at 10:31Christian Scarlioli: Thank you
052_Plautilla_RIC_IV-I_372,_AR-Den,_PLAVTILLA_AVG,_CONCORDIAE,_RSC-8,_BMC-739,_Laodicea_202_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_18-20mm,_3,39g-s.jpg
052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Laodicea ad Mare, RIC IV-I 372 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, CONCORDIAE, Concordia seated left, #140 views052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Laodicea ad Mare, RIC IV-I 372 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, CONCORDIAE, Concordia seated left, #1
Wife of Caracalla,
avers: PLAVTILLA AVG, Draped bust right.
reverse: CONCORDIAE, Concordia seated left, holding patera and double cornucopiae.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-20,0mm, weight: 3,39g, axis: 0h,
mint: Laodicea ad Mare, date: 202 A.D., ref: RIC IV 372 (Caracalla), RSC, BMC 739, Sear 7068,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans08/17/19 at 10:10shanxi: nice detailed example
Screenshot_2018-11-25_08_13_42.png
Cilician Armenia, Royal Period, King Levon III, AE Kardez.14 viewsSis 1301-1307 A.D. 3.03g - 19.01mm, Axis 2h.

Obv: +ԼԵՒՈՆ ԹԱԳԱՒՈՐ - king seated in oriental fashion holding globe in right hand and sceptre over shoulder in left.

Rev: +ՉՒՆԵԱԼ Ւ ՔԱՂԱՔ - Cross pattée.

AC 432.
2 commentsChristian Scarlioli08/17/19 at 10:03Christian Scarlioli: I have some more to add, I like the silver Trams t...
RIC_57A_Titus.jpg
RIC 0057A Titus45 viewsObv: IMP T CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS VII (counterclockwise), Laureate head right
Rev: PAX AVGVST / S C (in field), Pax standing left holding branch and cornucopia
AE/Sestertius (33.90 mm 25.98 g 6h) Struck in Rome 79 A.D. (Group 1)
RIC unpublished (provisionally assigned n. 57A)
ex Numismatik Naumann Auction 80 Lot 527
6 commentsFlaviusDomitianus08/17/19 at 00:58David Atherton: Stunning coin!
Bracteata,_H-192,_C1-272,_U-122,_Q-003,_0h,_14,5-15m,_0,19g-s.jpg
H-192 Bracteata, (uncertain), H-192, CNH I.-272, U-122, AR-Bracteata, #0353 viewsH-192 Bracteata, (uncertain), H-192, CNH I.-272, U-122, AR-Bracteata, #03
avers: Youthful head with floral wreath facing left, within the pearled circle.
reverse: Negative pictures.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 14,5-15,0mm, weight: 0,19g, axis:0h,
mint: Esztergom, date: A.D., ref: Huszár-192, CNH I.-272, Unger-122,
Kiss-Toth: Sigla, two small pellets in front of the head,
Q-003
1 commentsquadrans08/16/19 at 23:37Stkp: VERY nice
Bracteata,_H-191,_C1-271,_U-117,_Q-001,_0h,_13mm,_0,23gx-s.jpg
H-191 Bracteata, (uncertain), H-191, CNH I.-271, U-117, AR-Bracteata, #0149 viewsH-191 Bracteata, (uncertain), H-191, CNH I.-271, U-117, AR-Bracteata, #01
avers: Enthroned king facing, holding scepter and imperial orb, •B•–•R• to sides.
reverse: Negative pictures.
exergue: R/B//--, diameter: 13mm, weight: 0,23g, axis: 0h,
mint: Esztergom, date: A.D., ref: Huszár-191, CNH I.-271, Unger-117,
Kiss-Toth: Sigla, wedge on the scepter, over the right arm of the king.
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans08/16/19 at 23:37Stkp: Nice
Bracteata,_H-200,_C1-280,_U-118,_Q-003,_0h,_13,8mm,_0,26g-s.jpg
H-200 Bracteata, (uncertain), H-200, CNH I.-280, U-118, AR-Bracteata, #0348 viewsH-200 Bracteata, (uncertain), H-200, CNH I.-280, U-118, AR-Bracteata, #03
avers: BЄ LA RЄX, Triple human head.
reverse: Negative pictures.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 14mm, weight: 0,26g, axis:0h,
mint: Esztergom , date: A.D., ref: Huszár-200, CNH I.-280, Unger-118,
Kiss-Toth: Sigla- ,
Q-003
1 commentsquadrans08/16/19 at 23:36Stkp: Nice
Bracteata,_H-195,_C1-275,_U-121,_Q-005,_0h,_12,2-12,7mm,_0,36g-s.jpg
H-195 Bracteata, (uncertain), H-195, CNH I.-275, U-121, AR-Bracteata, #0548 viewsH-195 Bracteata, (uncertain), H-195, CNH I.-275, U-121, AR-Bracteata, #05
avers: King riding horse to the right, falcon on his wrist.
reverse: Negative pictures.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 12,2-12,7mm, weight: 0,36g, axis:0h,
mint: Esztergom, date: A.D., ref: Huszár-195, CNH I.-275, Unger-121,
Kiss-Toth: Sigla, small circle belove the right arm of the king,
Q-005
1 commentsquadrans08/16/19 at 23:36Stkp: Nice
Screenshot_2019-04-22_15_54_57.png
Medieval France, King Charles IX, Silver Teston, Mintmark H.13 viewsLa Rochelle 1577 A.D. 9.26g - 28.2mm, Axis 3h.

Obv: CAROLVS VIIII●DEI●G●FRANCOR●REX - Laureate and cuirassed bust left.

Rev: + SIT:NOMEN:DNI:BENEDICTVM:LXV11 / H - Crowned coat of arms, crowns over C's either side, Mintmark H below.

Dy.1106, Sb.4638.
2 commentsChristian Scarlioli08/16/19 at 23:27Stkp: Nice
Screenshot_2018-11-25_08_13_42.png
Cilician Armenia, Royal Period, King Levon III, AE Kardez.14 viewsSis 1301-1307 A.D. 3.03g - 19.01mm, Axis 2h.

Obv: +ԼԵՒՈՆ ԹԱԳԱՒՈՐ - king seated in oriental fashion holding globe in right hand and sceptre over shoulder in left.

Rev: +ՉՒՆԵԱԼ Ւ ՔԱՂԱՔ - Cross pattée.

AC 432.
2 commentsChristian Scarlioli08/16/19 at 23:26Stkp: Good to see that someone else collects these
RIC_57A_Titus.jpg
RIC 0057A Titus45 viewsObv: IMP T CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS VII (counterclockwise), Laureate head right
Rev: PAX AVGVST / S C (in field), Pax standing left holding branch and cornucopia
AE/Sestertius (33.90 mm 25.98 g 6h) Struck in Rome 79 A.D. (Group 1)
RIC unpublished (provisionally assigned n. 57A)
ex Numismatik Naumann Auction 80 Lot 527
6 commentsFlaviusDomitianus08/16/19 at 22:18Molinari: Nice!
RIC_57A_Titus.jpg
RIC 0057A Titus45 viewsObv: IMP T CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS VII (counterclockwise), Laureate head right
Rev: PAX AVGVST / S C (in field), Pax standing left holding branch and cornucopia
AE/Sestertius (33.90 mm 25.98 g 6h) Struck in Rome 79 A.D. (Group 1)
RIC unpublished (provisionally assigned n. 57A)
ex Numismatik Naumann Auction 80 Lot 527
6 commentsFlaviusDomitianus08/16/19 at 18:58quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
RIC_57A_Titus.jpg
RIC 0057A Titus45 viewsObv: IMP T CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS VII (counterclockwise), Laureate head right
Rev: PAX AVGVST / S C (in field), Pax standing left holding branch and cornucopia
AE/Sestertius (33.90 mm 25.98 g 6h) Struck in Rome 79 A.D. (Group 1)
RIC unpublished (provisionally assigned n. 57A)
ex Numismatik Naumann Auction 80 Lot 527
6 commentsFlaviusDomitianus08/16/19 at 18:31okidoki: very nice reverse
RIC_57A_Titus.jpg
RIC 0057A Titus45 viewsObv: IMP T CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS VII (counterclockwise), Laureate head right
Rev: PAX AVGVST / S C (in field), Pax standing left holding branch and cornucopia
AE/Sestertius (33.90 mm 25.98 g 6h) Struck in Rome 79 A.D. (Group 1)
RIC unpublished (provisionally assigned n. 57A)
ex Numismatik Naumann Auction 80 Lot 527
6 commentsFlaviusDomitianus08/16/19 at 17:04Jay GT4: Fantastic! Congrats Alberto
RIC_57A_Titus.jpg
RIC 0057A Titus45 viewsObv: IMP T CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS VII (counterclockwise), Laureate head right
Rev: PAX AVGVST / S C (in field), Pax standing left holding branch and cornucopia
AE/Sestertius (33.90 mm 25.98 g 6h) Struck in Rome 79 A.D. (Group 1)
RIC unpublished (provisionally assigned n. 57A)
ex Numismatik Naumann Auction 80 Lot 527
6 commentsFlaviusDomitianus08/16/19 at 13:10orfew: A wonderful addition
V1426(5A)3.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1426(5A)342 viewsAR Denarius, 3.25g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r.; no mintmark
RIC 1426(5A)3 (R3). BMC -. RPC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, May 2019.

This is an extremely rare denarius from Ephesus struck without a mintmark and the second known example of the Turreted female bust type lacking one. The Ephesian denarius issues struck under Vespasian all have mintmarks, save for the first and one tiny issue dated COS III. Aside from this turreted female type and the accompanying footnote, this issue is not represented in the new RIC II.1. Ted Buttrey wrote in the RIC II Addenda the following concerning the no mintmark issue:

'I’m not terribly happy about this. It’s a convenient way to draw together several pieces which lack the mintmark, placing them after the completion of the ΘΙ and ΘΥ Groups 3-5 and the inception of Group 6 with ΕΡΗ. But why should they have given up on a mintmark in mid-course, when all of Groups 2-9 are marked? The choices are – (i) mintmark on coins worn away; (ii) engraver forgot to add mintmark to the dies; (iii) issue deliberately produced without mintmark. Assuming (iii) for the moment, the new Group takes the place of fnn. 46-47, pp.162-3, and fits here nicely with V’s title for Groups 5-6, and T’s for Group 6, But I have no fixed opinion, and await the appearance of others of this variety.'

IMHO, either ii or iii are the most likely option. There are specimens from this non-mintmark issue (such as the present coin) that have no available space on the flan for a mintmark, thus, one was never intended either deliberately or accidentally. No mintmarks occur on various dies spanning different reverse types for both Vespasian and Titus Caesar, because of this I lean more towards this being intentional.

Struck in high relief with the reverse slightly off centred.

NB: This coin shares a reverse die with my Titus Caesar example of the type.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/16/19 at 11:30gallienus1: Rare and very interesting
V1426(5A)3.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1426(5A)342 viewsAR Denarius, 3.25g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r.; no mintmark
RIC 1426(5A)3 (R3). BMC -. RPC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, May 2019.

This is an extremely rare denarius from Ephesus struck without a mintmark and the second known example of the Turreted female bust type lacking one. The Ephesian denarius issues struck under Vespasian all have mintmarks, save for the first and one tiny issue dated COS III. Aside from this turreted female type and the accompanying footnote, this issue is not represented in the new RIC II.1. Ted Buttrey wrote in the RIC II Addenda the following concerning the no mintmark issue:

'I’m not terribly happy about this. It’s a convenient way to draw together several pieces which lack the mintmark, placing them after the completion of the ΘΙ and ΘΥ Groups 3-5 and the inception of Group 6 with ΕΡΗ. But why should they have given up on a mintmark in mid-course, when all of Groups 2-9 are marked? The choices are – (i) mintmark on coins worn away; (ii) engraver forgot to add mintmark to the dies; (iii) issue deliberately produced without mintmark. Assuming (iii) for the moment, the new Group takes the place of fnn. 46-47, pp.162-3, and fits here nicely with V’s title for Groups 5-6, and T’s for Group 6, But I have no fixed opinion, and await the appearance of others of this variety.'

IMHO, either ii or iii are the most likely option. There are specimens from this non-mintmark issue (such as the present coin) that have no available space on the flan for a mintmark, thus, one was never intended either deliberately or accidentally. No mintmarks occur on various dies spanning different reverse types for both Vespasian and Titus Caesar, because of this I lean more towards this being intentional.

Struck in high relief with the reverse slightly off centred.

NB: This coin shares a reverse die with my Titus Caesar example of the type.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/15/19 at 22:43Jay GT4: Wonderful portraits on a rare type!
PtolmyIX_SNGcop356_gf.jpg
Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX Soter II12 viewsCleopatra III and Ptolemy IX Soter II. 116/107 BC AR Tetradrachm (13.20 gm) of Alexandria, 108/107 BC. Diademed head of Ptolemy I r. / Eagle standing l. on thunderbolt. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ | ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ, L| to l. (RY 10), ΠΑ to r. VF. SNG Cop 8 #356-357; Svoronos 1671 (Ptolemy X of Paphos) pl. 57 #12; DCA 60; Morkholm PPCH XXI #961. cf Heritage Auction 231813 #65071.
1 commentsAnaximander08/15/19 at 20:54quadrans: Nice piece..
DSC00194.jpg
RIC 1407 Vespasian Eastern Denarius72 viewsIMP CAES VESPAS AVG
Laureate head of Vespasian right

PACI ORB TERR AVG
Turreted and draped female bust right below, horizontal Φ

Ephesus, 69-70 AD

3.23g


RIC V1407 (R); RPC 813

Rare

Ex-T.C. collection, Ex-Calgary Coin.

The Flavians as bringers of peace to the world.

New photo
8 commentsJay GT408/15/19 at 18:59Steve P: Hot diggity dawg!! ... that's a beauty!
V1426(5A)3.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1426(5A)342 viewsAR Denarius, 3.25g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r.; no mintmark
RIC 1426(5A)3 (R3). BMC -. RPC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, May 2019.

This is an extremely rare denarius from Ephesus struck without a mintmark and the second known example of the Turreted female bust type lacking one. The Ephesian denarius issues struck under Vespasian all have mintmarks, save for the first and one tiny issue dated COS III. Aside from this turreted female type and the accompanying footnote, this issue is not represented in the new RIC II.1. Ted Buttrey wrote in the RIC II Addenda the following concerning the no mintmark issue:

'I’m not terribly happy about this. It’s a convenient way to draw together several pieces which lack the mintmark, placing them after the completion of the ΘΙ and ΘΥ Groups 3-5 and the inception of Group 6 with ΕΡΗ. But why should they have given up on a mintmark in mid-course, when all of Groups 2-9 are marked? The choices are – (i) mintmark on coins worn away; (ii) engraver forgot to add mintmark to the dies; (iii) issue deliberately produced without mintmark. Assuming (iii) for the moment, the new Group takes the place of fnn. 46-47, pp.162-3, and fits here nicely with V’s title for Groups 5-6, and T’s for Group 6, But I have no fixed opinion, and await the appearance of others of this variety.'

IMHO, either ii or iii are the most likely option. There are specimens from this non-mintmark issue (such as the present coin) that have no available space on the flan for a mintmark, thus, one was never intended either deliberately or accidentally. No mintmarks occur on various dies spanning different reverse types for both Vespasian and Titus Caesar, because of this I lean more towards this being intentional.

Struck in high relief with the reverse slightly off centred.

NB: This coin shares a reverse die with my Titus Caesar example of the type.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/15/19 at 15:17quadrans: Great coin , and details,