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Last comments - Imperatorial (49-27 BCE)
AntonyVarusCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, AR Denarius - Crawford 494/328 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marc Antony and C. Vibius Varus, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.78g; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: Bare head of Antony with mourning beard, facing right.

Reverse: Fortuna facing left, holding Victory and cornucopia; flanked by C*VIBIVS - VARVS

References: Crawford 494/32; HCRI 149; Sydenham 1144; BMCRR 4293; Vibia 29; Antonia 26

Provenance: Ex JD Collection [NAC Auction 72 (16 May 2013), Lot 1265]; UBS Auction 78 (9 Sep 2008) Lot 1136; acquired from Hubert Herzfelder (d. Mar 1963).


This, one of the finest depictions of Antony on Roman coinage, depicts him with a beard of mourning for Julius Caesar. Antony and Octavian would wear such beards until the Liberators were defeated at Philippi later in 42 BCE. The moneyer, Varus, also struck similar coins for Octavian, though on a much smaller scale. Because of similar style on a later military mint issue by Antony, some scholars postulate that Antony so loved his portrait on the above coin type that he drafted the die engraver into his military mint.

The reverse alludes to the expectation of good fortune and victory for the Triumvirs over the Liberators.
1 commentsCarausius12/06/19 at 14:47Mat: Very nice coin!
untitled_(2).png
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, D. Junius Brutus Albinus, AR Denarius - Crawford 450/26 viewsRome, The Republic.
D. Junius Brutus Albinus, 48 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.94g; 20mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Head of Pietas facing right, her hair tied-up in a knot, wearing necklace and cruciform earing; PIETAS behind.

Reverse: Two hands clasping caduceus; ALBINVS·BRVTI·F, below.

References: Crawford 450/2; HCRI 26; Sydenham 942; BMCRR 3964; Postumia 10.

Provenance: Ex Goldberg 80 (3 Jun 2014), Lot 3067; Jacob K. Stein Collection [Gemini V (6 Jan 2009) Lot 246]; displayed at Cincinnati Art Museum, 1994-2008, no. 138.

Decimus Junius Brutus Albinus, not to be confused with his cousin, Marcus Brutus, lived on a similar trajectory to his cousin. He was first close with Julius Caesar, having served in the Gallic Wars and on Caesar’s side in the civil war against Pompey. Eventually, Albinus joined the conspiracy to assassinate Caesar. After the assassination, the Senate gave him control of Cisalpine Gaul where he came under assault by Antony who wanted control of the province. Albinus was killed by Gauls while trying to escape to Macedonia to join the other Liberators. This coin type was struck during the civil war between Caesar and Pompey when Albinus sided with Caesar. The reverse type, with its symbols of concord, alludes to Caesar’s policy of reconciliation during the war.

This particular example was part of a 182-coin exhibit at the Cincinnati Art Museum from 1994-2008. The intense, rainbow toning on the reverse can perhaps be attributed to the reverse being the “display” side during that 14-year museum run.

1 commentsCarausius12/06/19 at 01:39Jay GT4: Great toning and provenance
cascalongus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/236 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
8 commentsCarausius11/03/19 at 16:57Norbert: great coin & pedigree. Congrats
cascalongus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/236 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
8 commentsCarausius10/19/19 at 15:52Steve P: Wow, that coin is deadly! (congrats, my coin-frien...
cascalongus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/236 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
8 commentsCarausius10/12/19 at 20:44quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
cascalongus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/236 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
8 commentsCarausius10/10/19 at 01:49Nemonater: Amazing!
cascalongus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/236 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
8 commentsCarausius10/09/19 at 23:08okidoki: Indeed xxxxx
cascalongus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/236 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
8 commentsCarausius10/09/19 at 17:48Jay GT4: Masterpiece!
cascalongus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/236 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
8 commentsCarausius10/09/19 at 16:39*Alex: Excellent. Nice addition to your gallery.
cascalongus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/236 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
8 commentsCarausius10/09/19 at 16:05Tracy Aiello: Magnificent.
LepidusCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, AR Denarius - Crawford 495/2d53 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Aemilius Lepidus and Octavian, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.70g; 20mm).
Military Mint in Italy.

Obverse: LEPIDVS· PONT· MAX· III· V· R· P· C; bare head of Lepidus facing right.

Reverse: C· CAESAR· IMP· III· VIR· R ·P· C; bare head of Octavian facing right.

References: Crawford 495/2d; HCRI 140a; Sydenham 1323var (rev legend); Aemilia 35var (rev legend); BMCRR (Africa) 29-31var (rev legend); Banti & Simonetti 7 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Leu Numismatik Auction 8 (30 Jun 2019) Lot 949; Bank Leu 7 (9 May 1973) Lot 317; Joseph Martini Collection [Baranowsky (25 Feb 1931) Lot 1273] and [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (24 Feb 1930) Lot 1334]; Rodolfo Ratto Fixed Price List (1927) Lot 629; Dr. Bonazzi Collection a/k/a Riche Collection [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (23 Jan 1924) Lot 1352].

This reverse die differs from most of this denarius issue in that the inscription begins with the initial “C” for Octavian's first name (Caius), while the remainder of the issue begins, simply, "CAESAR." The coins appear to celebrate the formation of the Second Triumvirate, although it is unclear why Lepidus did not also strike coins with Antony’s portrait.

This particular example appeared in a remarkable number of important Roman Republican coin sales between 1924-1931, including sales of the collections of Dr. Bonazzi and Joseph Martini.
4 commentsCarausius09/28/19 at 11:02David Atherton: Incredible coin!
AntonyAugurCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, AR Denarius - Crawford 533/217 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius. 43 BCE.
AR Denarius (4.07g; 18mm).
Military mint in Athens, Summer 38 BCE.

Obverse: M ANTONIVS M F M N AVGVR IMP TER; Antony in the priestly robes of an augur, standing right and holding lituus.

Reverse: III VIR R P C COS DESIG ITER ET TERT; Radiate head of Sol facing right.

References: Crawford 533/2; HCRI 267; Sydenham 1199; BMCRR (East) 141; Antonia 80.

Provenance: Ex Kentfield Coll. [Heritage Auction 3067 (9 Jun 2018) Lot 33340]; Michele Baranowski Auction (25 Feb 1931), Lot 1274.

In 50 BCE, Antony was appointed to the College of Augurs, an important group whose job was divining the will of the gods by interpreting auspices (birds and such) and providing advice based on these divinations. Antony was particularly proud of this appointment and referred to it frequently on his coinage, perhaps as a means of highlighting his traditional republican sensibilities. On this coin, he is depicted in full augur regalia. Sol on the reverse is a reference to The East, which Antony controlled per the renewal of the Second Triumvirate several months earlier. The inscriptions reference his augurship, second imperatorial acclamation, and designated second and third consulships. The coin was likely struck in Athens where Antony and Octavia were living after their marriage.
2 commentsCarausius09/28/19 at 11:01David Atherton: Stunning!
LepidusCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, AR Denarius - Crawford 495/2d53 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Aemilius Lepidus and Octavian, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.70g; 20mm).
Military Mint in Italy.

Obverse: LEPIDVS· PONT· MAX· III· V· R· P· C; bare head of Lepidus facing right.

Reverse: C· CAESAR· IMP· III· VIR· R ·P· C; bare head of Octavian facing right.

References: Crawford 495/2d; HCRI 140a; Sydenham 1323var (rev legend); Aemilia 35var (rev legend); BMCRR (Africa) 29-31var (rev legend); Banti & Simonetti 7 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Leu Numismatik Auction 8 (30 Jun 2019) Lot 949; Bank Leu 7 (9 May 1973) Lot 317; Joseph Martini Collection [Baranowsky (25 Feb 1931) Lot 1273] and [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (24 Feb 1930) Lot 1334]; Rodolfo Ratto Fixed Price List (1927) Lot 629; Dr. Bonazzi Collection a/k/a Riche Collection [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (23 Jan 1924) Lot 1352].

This reverse die differs from most of this denarius issue in that the inscription begins with the initial “C” for Octavian's first name (Caius), while the remainder of the issue begins, simply, "CAESAR." The coins appear to celebrate the formation of the Second Triumvirate, although it is unclear why Lepidus did not also strike coins with Antony’s portrait.

This particular example appeared in a remarkable number of important Roman Republican coin sales between 1924-1931, including sales of the collections of Dr. Bonazzi and Joseph Martini.
4 commentsCarausius09/16/19 at 08:42antoninus1: Very nice Lepidus and an impressive provenance.
AntonyAugurCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, AR Denarius - Crawford 533/217 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius. 43 BCE.
AR Denarius (4.07g; 18mm).
Military mint in Athens, Summer 38 BCE.

Obverse: M ANTONIVS M F M N AVGVR IMP TER; Antony in the priestly robes of an augur, standing right and holding lituus.

Reverse: III VIR R P C COS DESIG ITER ET TERT; Radiate head of Sol facing right.

References: Crawford 533/2; HCRI 267; Sydenham 1199; BMCRR (East) 141; Antonia 80.

Provenance: Ex Kentfield Coll. [Heritage Auction 3067 (9 Jun 2018) Lot 33340]; Michele Baranowski Auction (25 Feb 1931), Lot 1274.

In 50 BCE, Antony was appointed to the College of Augurs, an important group whose job was divining the will of the gods by interpreting auspices (birds and such) and providing advice based on these divinations. Antony was particularly proud of this appointment and referred to it frequently on his coinage, perhaps as a means of highlighting his traditional republican sensibilities. On this coin, he is depicted in full augur regalia. Sol on the reverse is a reference to The East, which Antony controlled per the renewal of the Second Triumvirate several months earlier. The inscriptions reference his augurship, second imperatorial acclamation, and designated second and third consulships. The coin was likely struck in Athens where Antony and Octavia were living after their marriage.
2 commentsCarausius09/16/19 at 03:05Jay GT4: Wonderful!
LepidusCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, AR Denarius - Crawford 495/2d53 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Aemilius Lepidus and Octavian, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.70g; 20mm).
Military Mint in Italy.

Obverse: LEPIDVS· PONT· MAX· III· V· R· P· C; bare head of Lepidus facing right.

Reverse: C· CAESAR· IMP· III· VIR· R ·P· C; bare head of Octavian facing right.

References: Crawford 495/2d; HCRI 140a; Sydenham 1323var (rev legend); Aemilia 35var (rev legend); BMCRR (Africa) 29-31var (rev legend); Banti & Simonetti 7 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Leu Numismatik Auction 8 (30 Jun 2019) Lot 949; Bank Leu 7 (9 May 1973) Lot 317; Joseph Martini Collection [Baranowsky (25 Feb 1931) Lot 1273] and [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (24 Feb 1930) Lot 1334]; Rodolfo Ratto Fixed Price List (1927) Lot 629; Dr. Bonazzi Collection a/k/a Riche Collection [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (23 Jan 1924) Lot 1352].

This reverse die differs from most of this denarius issue in that the inscription begins with the initial “C” for Octavian's first name (Caius), while the remainder of the issue begins, simply, "CAESAR." The coins appear to celebrate the formation of the Second Triumvirate, although it is unclear why Lepidus did not also strike coins with Antony’s portrait.

This particular example appeared in a remarkable number of important Roman Republican coin sales between 1924-1931, including sales of the collections of Dr. Bonazzi and Joseph Martini.
4 commentsCarausius07/17/19 at 22:27quadrans: Nice piece..
LepidusCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, AR Denarius - Crawford 495/2d53 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Aemilius Lepidus and Octavian, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.70g; 20mm).
Military Mint in Italy.

Obverse: LEPIDVS· PONT· MAX· III· V· R· P· C; bare head of Lepidus facing right.

Reverse: C· CAESAR· IMP· III· VIR· R ·P· C; bare head of Octavian facing right.

References: Crawford 495/2d; HCRI 140a; Sydenham 1323var (rev legend); Aemilia 35var (rev legend); BMCRR (Africa) 29-31var (rev legend); Banti & Simonetti 7 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Leu Numismatik Auction 8 (30 Jun 2019) Lot 949; Bank Leu 7 (9 May 1973) Lot 317; Joseph Martini Collection [Baranowsky (25 Feb 1931) Lot 1273] and [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (24 Feb 1930) Lot 1334]; Rodolfo Ratto Fixed Price List (1927) Lot 629; Dr. Bonazzi Collection a/k/a Riche Collection [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (23 Jan 1924) Lot 1352].

This reverse die differs from most of this denarius issue in that the inscription begins with the initial “C” for Octavian's first name (Caius), while the remainder of the issue begins, simply, "CAESAR." The coins appear to celebrate the formation of the Second Triumvirate, although it is unclear why Lepidus did not also strike coins with Antony’s portrait.

This particular example appeared in a remarkable number of important Roman Republican coin sales between 1924-1931, including sales of the collections of Dr. Bonazzi and Joseph Martini.
4 commentsCarausius07/15/19 at 04:55Jay GT4: Wonderful. Congrats
AntCaesSchottCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, AR Denarius - Crawford 488/229 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius. 43 BCE.
AR Denarius (4.19g; 19mm).
Military mint in Cisalpine Gaul.

Obverse: M.A[NTON IMP RPC]; Antony's bare, bearded head facing right; lituus behind.

Reverse: CAESAR DIC; Laureate head of Julius Caesar facing right; jug behind.

References: Crawford 488/2; HCRI 123; Sydenham 1166; BMCRR (Gaul) 55; Antonia 5-6.

Provenance: Ex Roma E-Live Auction 1 (25-6 Jul 2018) Lot 531; Bernard Poindessault Collection [Oger-Blanchet (17 Nov 2017) Lot 148]; Edouard Schott Collection [E. Bourgey (21 Mar 1972) Lot 337].

This is one of Antony’s earliest issues following the creation of the Second Triumvirate with Octavian and Lepidus. The titulature "RPC" (tip of "C" just barely visible beneath Antony’s portrait on this specimen) reflects the new status. Antony is depicted with a slight beard of mourning, as is Octavian on his coins until the defeat of the Tyrannicides at Philippi the following year. Both Antony and Caesar have symbols of the augurate behind their portraits, as both were members of the college of augurs, and this served to highlight their common bond. The somewhat comical portrait style is reflective of the military mint, with limited die engraver talent.
1 commentsCarausius07/07/19 at 18:49Jay GT4: Outstanding! Wish mine was this nice
AntonyLegV.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion V Denarius28 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.79g; 19mm).
Military Mint traveling with Antony, 32-1 BCE.

Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; galley facing right.

Reverse: LEG V; Aquilia between two standards.

References: Crawford 544/18; HCRI 354; Sydenham 1221; BMCRR (East) 196; Banti 75 (this coin); Antonia 110.

Provenance: Ex Kress 109 (24-25 Oct 1958), Lot 749.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding. Thirty-seven examples of the LEG V variety appeared in the 1905 Delos hoard of 604 Antony Legionary denarii, making it one of the most common varieties of the series. However, an example with a verifiable old provenance, such as this coin, is quite rare.
2 commentsCarausius07/07/19 at 15:52Norbert: great coin & pedigree. Congrats
AntonyLegV.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion V Denarius28 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.79g; 19mm).
Military Mint traveling with Antony, 32-1 BCE.

Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; galley facing right.

Reverse: LEG V; Aquilia between two standards.

References: Crawford 544/18; HCRI 354; Sydenham 1221; BMCRR (East) 196; Banti 75 (this coin); Antonia 110.

Provenance: Ex Kress 109 (24-25 Oct 1958), Lot 749.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding. Thirty-seven examples of the LEG V variety appeared in the 1905 Delos hoard of 604 Antony Legionary denarii, making it one of the most common varieties of the series. However, an example with a verifiable old provenance, such as this coin, is quite rare.
2 commentsCarausius07/07/19 at 13:00Jay GT4: Wow, that is a wonderful coin
ArriusSecundus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, M. Arrius Secundus, AR Denarius - Crawford 513/251 viewsRome, The Imperators.
M. Arrius Secundus. 41 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.82g; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: M. ARRIVS - SECVNDVS; bare head, with slight beard, facing right.

Reverse: Victory honors - wreath, spear and phalera.

References: Crawford 513/2; HCRI 319; Sydenham 1084; BMCRR 4210; Arria 2.

Provenance: Nomisma 59 (14 May 2019) Lot 134; Munzen und Medaillen XIX (5-6 Jun 1959) Lot 172; Munzhandlung Basel 10 (15 Mar 1938) Lot 486.

M. Arrius Secundus was likely son of Quintus Arrius, who had a victory in the Servile War against one of Spartacus’ lieutenants, but subsequently lost a battle to Spartacus himself. He was the only member of his gens to strike coins, and not much else is known about him.

The slightly-bearded, obverse portrait, while probably depicting the moneyer’s father, Quintus Arrius, also bears a striking resemblance to contemporaneous portraits of Octavian. However, without any inscription naming Caesar, a positive identification of the portrait remains debated by scholars. David Sear suggests that the portrait is deliberately ambiguous, as the political and military climate was very risky and the moneyer likely wanted plausible deniability that the portrait was Octavian. The reverse shows awards of victory granted to the moneyer’s father for his Servile War victory: a laurel wreath, golden spear and phalera (a military decoration attached to a harness and worn over a cuirass).
2 commentsCarausius06/22/19 at 19:59Pharsalos: Wonderful coin, beautiful tone.
OctavianCuriaRaw.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Octavian, AR Denarius29 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Octavian, 44-27 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.92g; 20mm).
Italian Mint, Summer 30-29 BCE.

Obverse: Octavian’s bare head, facing right.

Reverse: Roman Senate House; IMP CAESAR on architrave.

References: RIC 266; HCRI 421; BMCRR 4358; Julia 161.

Provenance: Ex Heritage Auction 3063 (16 Jan 2018) Lot 33381; Spink Num. Circ. Vol LXXVIII, No. 6 (June 1970), inv. #6871, pl. 11.

The coin celebrates the dedication of the Curia Julia, a new meeting house for the Roman Senate, construction of which was commenced under Julius Caesar and completed by Octavian circa 29 BCE. Julius Caesar was assassinated at the Theater of Pompey where the Senate was meeting while construction of this new Senate house was underway. It is both ironic and politically astute that Octavian should commemorate this new Senate house on a coin, given that his hold on power made the Senate effectively irrelevant. The structure still stands today, having been restored through the imperial period and later converted to a church.
3 commentsCarausius06/14/19 at 17:18kc: Wow, a great example!
CassiusTripod.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Cassius, AR Denarius - Crawford 500/133 viewsRome, The Imperators.
C. Cassius Longinus. 44-42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.38g; 20mm).
Military Mint in Smyrna.

Obverse: C. CASSI – IMP; tripod with cauldron and laurel fillets.

Reverse: LENTVLVS SPINT; jug and lituus.

References: Crawford 500/1; HCRI 219; Sydenham 1308; BMCRR (East) 79; Cassia 14.

Provenance: Nomisma 59 (14 May 2019) Lot 121; P&P Santamaria (4 May 1961) Lot 168.

This coin was struck for Cassius, one of the chief assassins of Julius Caesar, when Brutus and Cassius met in Smyrna, circa early 42 BCE. The tripod obverse type was borrowed from a slightly earlier Aureus produced for Cassius by his legate, M. Aquinus. The tripod may reference Cassius’ membership in one of the sacred colleges. Cassius was elected to the augurate in 57 BCE, to which the implements on the reverse of this coin certainly allude. The coin was produced on Cassius’ behalf by P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther, who also produced coins for Brutus at the same time. For more information on Spinther, see my example of his Brutus denarius at: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-145289

Until the discovery of a large, mint-state, hoard in the early 2000’s, this was one of the rarest types in the Roman Republican series. While recent hoard examples of the type are scarce, old provenanced examples, like this, remain extremely rare.
2 commentsCarausius06/14/19 at 13:30Tracy Aiello: wow, that is an outstanding coin.
CassiusTripod.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Cassius, AR Denarius - Crawford 500/133 viewsRome, The Imperators.
C. Cassius Longinus. 44-42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.38g; 20mm).
Military Mint in Smyrna.

Obverse: C. CASSI – IMP; tripod with cauldron and laurel fillets.

Reverse: LENTVLVS SPINT; jug and lituus.

References: Crawford 500/1; HCRI 219; Sydenham 1308; BMCRR (East) 79; Cassia 14.

Provenance: Nomisma 59 (14 May 2019) Lot 121; P&P Santamaria (4 May 1961) Lot 168.

This coin was struck for Cassius, one of the chief assassins of Julius Caesar, when Brutus and Cassius met in Smyrna, circa early 42 BCE. The tripod obverse type was borrowed from a slightly earlier Aureus produced for Cassius by his legate, M. Aquinus. The tripod may reference Cassius’ membership in one of the sacred colleges. Cassius was elected to the augurate in 57 BCE, to which the implements on the reverse of this coin certainly allude. The coin was produced on Cassius’ behalf by P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther, who also produced coins for Brutus at the same time. For more information on Spinther, see my example of his Brutus denarius at: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-145289

Until the discovery of a large, mint-state, hoard in the early 2000’s, this was one of the rarest types in the Roman Republican series. While recent hoard examples of the type are scarce, old provenanced examples, like this, remain extremely rare.
2 commentsCarausius06/14/19 at 05:34Jay GT4: Exceptional
ArriusSecundus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, M. Arrius Secundus, AR Denarius - Crawford 513/251 viewsRome, The Imperators.
M. Arrius Secundus. 41 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.82g; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: M. ARRIVS - SECVNDVS; bare head, with slight beard, facing right.

Reverse: Victory honors - wreath, spear and phalera.

References: Crawford 513/2; HCRI 319; Sydenham 1084; BMCRR 4210; Arria 2.

Provenance: Nomisma 59 (14 May 2019) Lot 134; Munzen und Medaillen XIX (5-6 Jun 1959) Lot 172; Munzhandlung Basel 10 (15 Mar 1938) Lot 486.

M. Arrius Secundus was likely son of Quintus Arrius, who had a victory in the Servile War against one of Spartacus’ lieutenants, but subsequently lost a battle to Spartacus himself. He was the only member of his gens to strike coins, and not much else is known about him.

The slightly-bearded, obverse portrait, while probably depicting the moneyer’s father, Quintus Arrius, also bears a striking resemblance to contemporaneous portraits of Octavian. However, without any inscription naming Caesar, a positive identification of the portrait remains debated by scholars. David Sear suggests that the portrait is deliberately ambiguous, as the political and military climate was very risky and the moneyer likely wanted plausible deniability that the portrait was Octavian. The reverse shows awards of victory granted to the moneyer’s father for his Servile War victory: a laurel wreath, golden spear and phalera (a military decoration attached to a harness and worn over a cuirass).
2 commentsCarausius06/14/19 at 05:33Jay GT4: Lovely portrait
Acisculuscombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, L. Valerius Acisculus, AR Denarius - Crawford 474/1b - SEAR PLATE COIN!13 viewsRome, The Republic.
L. Valerius Acisculus, 45 BCE.
AR Denarius (4.17g; 21mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Filleted head of Apollo facing right; star above; pick-axe and ACISCVLVS behind; all within a wreath border.

Reverse: Europa riding bull to right with billowing veil; L VALERIVS in exergue.

References: Crawford 474/1b; HCRI 90a; Sydenham 998a; BMCRR 4102; Sear RCV I 469/2 (this coin illustrated); Banti 35/2 (this coin illustrated); Valeria 16.

Provenance: Ex Student and his Mentor Collection [NAC 83 (2015) Lot 442]; Credit de la Bourse (1995) Lot 1146; Munzen und Medaillen Liste 412 (1979), Lot 43; E.J. Haeberlin Collection [Cahn-Hess (17 Jul 1933) Lot 2800].

L. Valerius Acisculus issued an interesting series of types in 45 BCE. Not much is known about the moneyer except that he was also a Tribune of the Plebs. The pick-axe on obverse of these types is a punning allusion to the moneyer’s name, as the Latin word for pick-axe is “acisculus”. Scholars have long debated the meanings of the other devices, some going to great lengths to argue connections to the moneyer’s family. However, more recently, Crawford and Sear both concluded that the types, including the laurel wreath border on the obverse of this coin, likely allude to Julius Caesar’s military successes against Pompey and in the East.
2 commentsCarausius03/03/19 at 15:02Marsman: Beautiful
Acisculuscombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, L. Valerius Acisculus, AR Denarius - Crawford 474/1b - SEAR PLATE COIN!13 viewsRome, The Republic.
L. Valerius Acisculus, 45 BCE.
AR Denarius (4.17g; 21mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Filleted head of Apollo facing right; star above; pick-axe and ACISCVLVS behind; all within a wreath border.

Reverse: Europa riding bull to right with billowing veil; L VALERIVS in exergue.

References: Crawford 474/1b; HCRI 90a; Sydenham 998a; BMCRR 4102; Sear RCV I 469/2 (this coin illustrated); Banti 35/2 (this coin illustrated); Valeria 16.

Provenance: Ex Student and his Mentor Collection [NAC 83 (2015) Lot 442]; Credit de la Bourse (1995) Lot 1146; Munzen und Medaillen Liste 412 (1979), Lot 43; E.J. Haeberlin Collection [Cahn-Hess (17 Jul 1933) Lot 2800].

L. Valerius Acisculus issued an interesting series of types in 45 BCE. Not much is known about the moneyer except that he was also a Tribune of the Plebs. The pick-axe on obverse of these types is a punning allusion to the moneyer’s name, as the Latin word for pick-axe is “acisculus”. Scholars have long debated the meanings of the other devices, some going to great lengths to argue connections to the moneyer’s family. However, more recently, Crawford and Sear both concluded that the types, including the laurel wreath border on the obverse of this coin, likely allude to Julius Caesar’s military successes against Pompey and in the East.
2 commentsCarausius03/03/19 at 07:41quadrans: Nice one
3365112l.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Octavian, AR Denarius - Crawford 538/120 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Octavian, 44-27 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.79g; 20mm).
Italian Mint, Summer 37 BCE.

Obverse: IMP CAESAR-DIVI·F·III·VIR·ITER R·P·C; Octavian’s bare head, bearded and facing right.

Reverse: COS·ITER·ET·TER·DESIG; Simpulum, aspergillum, jug and lituus.

References: Crawford 538/1; Sydenham 1334; HCRI 312; BMCRR (Gaul) 116.

Provenance: Ex Ernst Ploil Collection [NAC 101 (24 Oct 2017), Lot 41]; Peus 386 (26 Apr 2006), Lot 663; Astarte 5 (1999), Lot 703.

The obverse inscription records the renewal of the second triumvirate in 37 BCE.
4 commentsCarausius02/22/19 at 19:50Norbert: nice coin, nice pedigree. Congrats
brutustripod.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus, AR Denarius - Crawford 502/214 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Brutus, 44-42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.76g; 17mm).
Military Mint, Spring-Summer 42 BCE.

Obverse: L·SESTI - PRO·Q; Veiled and draped bust of Libertas, facing right.

Reverse: Q·CAEPIO·BRVTVS·PRO·COS; Tripod with axe on left and simpulum on right.

References: Crawford 502/2; HCRI 201; Syd 1290; BMCRR East 41; Junia 37; Sestia 2.

Provenance: Ex Alan J. Harlan Collection [Triton XXII (9 Jan 2019), Lot 951]; Kunker 288 (13 Mar 2017) Lot 314; Theodor Prowe Collection [Hess (20 May 1912) Lot 933].

Marcus Junius Brutus was posthumously adopted by his maternal uncle, Quintus Servilius Caepio. Afterward, Brutus sometimes used the name Quintus Servilius Caepio Brutus, which both honored his uncle and advertised his maternal descent from Gaius Servilius Structus Ahala. Ahala was a Roman Republican hero who had killed someone with regal aspirations. In his early political career, Brutus issued coins with the portrait of Ahala on one side (see Crawford 433/2; http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-144687). Following the assassination of Caesar, Brutus resurrected his use of the name Quintus Servilius Caepio Brutus, as on this coin, again alluding to this Servilian connection in his family tree. Combined with the bust of Liberty on the obverse of this coin, the message is clear: that the assassins were liberators from monarchy in the old Republican tradition of their ancestors. The reverse shows the symbols of Brutus’ membership in the college of priests.

This example comes from the collection of Theodor Prowe of Moscow, one of the great collections of the early 20th century, which was auctioned in three separate 1912 sales by Bruder Egger (Greek) and Hess (Roman).
2 commentsCarausius02/17/19 at 20:43Enodia: Beautiful coin with a very pretty Libertas.
OctavianCuriaRaw.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Octavian, AR Denarius29 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Octavian, 44-27 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.92g; 20mm).
Italian Mint, Summer 30-29 BCE.

Obverse: Octavian’s bare head, facing right.

Reverse: Roman Senate House; IMP CAESAR on architrave.

References: RIC 266; HCRI 421; BMCRR 4358; Julia 161.

Provenance: Ex Heritage Auction 3063 (16 Jan 2018) Lot 33381; Spink Num. Circ. Vol LXXVIII, No. 6 (June 1970), inv. #6871, pl. 11.

The coin celebrates the dedication of the Curia Julia, a new meeting house for the Roman Senate, construction of which was commenced under Julius Caesar and completed by Octavian circa 29 BCE. Julius Caesar was assassinated at the Theater of Pompey where the Senate was meeting while construction of this new Senate house was underway. It is both ironic and politically astute that Octavian should commemorate this new Senate house on a coin, given that his hold on power made the Senate effectively irrelevant. The structure still stands today, having been restored through the imperial period and later converted to a church.
3 commentsCarausius02/17/19 at 14:04maridvnvm: Gorgeous
3365112l.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Octavian, AR Denarius - Crawford 538/120 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Octavian, 44-27 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.79g; 20mm).
Italian Mint, Summer 37 BCE.

Obverse: IMP CAESAR-DIVI·F·III·VIR·ITER R·P·C; Octavian’s bare head, bearded and facing right.

Reverse: COS·ITER·ET·TER·DESIG; Simpulum, aspergillum, jug and lituus.

References: Crawford 538/1; Sydenham 1334; HCRI 312; BMCRR (Gaul) 116.

Provenance: Ex Ernst Ploil Collection [NAC 101 (24 Oct 2017), Lot 41]; Peus 386 (26 Apr 2006), Lot 663; Astarte 5 (1999), Lot 703.

The obverse inscription records the renewal of the second triumvirate in 37 BCE.
4 commentsCarausius02/17/19 at 14:04maridvnvm: Very attractive
OctavianCuriaRaw.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Octavian, AR Denarius29 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Octavian, 44-27 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.92g; 20mm).
Italian Mint, Summer 30-29 BCE.

Obverse: Octavian’s bare head, facing right.

Reverse: Roman Senate House; IMP CAESAR on architrave.

References: RIC 266; HCRI 421; BMCRR 4358; Julia 161.

Provenance: Ex Heritage Auction 3063 (16 Jan 2018) Lot 33381; Spink Num. Circ. Vol LXXVIII, No. 6 (June 1970), inv. #6871, pl. 11.

The coin celebrates the dedication of the Curia Julia, a new meeting house for the Roman Senate, construction of which was commenced under Julius Caesar and completed by Octavian circa 29 BCE. Julius Caesar was assassinated at the Theater of Pompey where the Senate was meeting while construction of this new Senate house was underway. It is both ironic and politically astute that Octavian should commemorate this new Senate house on a coin, given that his hold on power made the Senate effectively irrelevant. The structure still stands today, having been restored through the imperial period and later converted to a church.
3 commentsCarausius02/17/19 at 08:48quadrans: Another nice piece
3365112l.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Octavian, AR Denarius - Crawford 538/120 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Octavian, 44-27 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.79g; 20mm).
Italian Mint, Summer 37 BCE.

Obverse: IMP CAESAR-DIVI·F·III·VIR·ITER R·P·C; Octavian’s bare head, bearded and facing right.

Reverse: COS·ITER·ET·TER·DESIG; Simpulum, aspergillum, jug and lituus.

References: Crawford 538/1; Sydenham 1334; HCRI 312; BMCRR (Gaul) 116.

Provenance: Ex Ernst Ploil Collection [NAC 101 (24 Oct 2017), Lot 41]; Peus 386 (26 Apr 2006), Lot 663; Astarte 5 (1999), Lot 703.

The obverse inscription records the renewal of the second triumvirate in 37 BCE.
4 commentsCarausius02/17/19 at 08:47quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
3365112l.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Octavian, AR Denarius - Crawford 538/120 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Octavian, 44-27 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.79g; 20mm).
Italian Mint, Summer 37 BCE.

Obverse: IMP CAESAR-DIVI·F·III·VIR·ITER R·P·C; Octavian’s bare head, bearded and facing right.

Reverse: COS·ITER·ET·TER·DESIG; Simpulum, aspergillum, jug and lituus.

References: Crawford 538/1; Sydenham 1334; HCRI 312; BMCRR (Gaul) 116.

Provenance: Ex Ernst Ploil Collection [NAC 101 (24 Oct 2017), Lot 41]; Peus 386 (26 Apr 2006), Lot 663; Astarte 5 (1999), Lot 703.

The obverse inscription records the renewal of the second triumvirate in 37 BCE.
4 commentsCarausius02/17/19 at 05:56Jay GT4: I wonder if Octavian could even grow a beard. Gr...
brutustripod.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus, AR Denarius - Crawford 502/214 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Brutus, 44-42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.76g; 17mm).
Military Mint, Spring-Summer 42 BCE.

Obverse: L·SESTI - PRO·Q; Veiled and draped bust of Libertas, facing right.

Reverse: Q·CAEPIO·BRVTVS·PRO·COS; Tripod with axe on left and simpulum on right.

References: Crawford 502/2; HCRI 201; Syd 1290; BMCRR East 41; Junia 37; Sestia 2.

Provenance: Ex Alan J. Harlan Collection [Triton XXII (9 Jan 2019), Lot 951]; Kunker 288 (13 Mar 2017) Lot 314; Theodor Prowe Collection [Hess (20 May 1912) Lot 933].

Marcus Junius Brutus was posthumously adopted by his maternal uncle, Quintus Servilius Caepio. Afterward, Brutus sometimes used the name Quintus Servilius Caepio Brutus, which both honored his uncle and advertised his maternal descent from Gaius Servilius Structus Ahala. Ahala was a Roman Republican hero who had killed someone with regal aspirations. In his early political career, Brutus issued coins with the portrait of Ahala on one side (see Crawford 433/2; http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-144687). Following the assassination of Caesar, Brutus resurrected his use of the name Quintus Servilius Caepio Brutus, as on this coin, again alluding to this Servilian connection in his family tree. Combined with the bust of Liberty on the obverse of this coin, the message is clear: that the assassins were liberators from monarchy in the old Republican tradition of their ancestors. The reverse shows the symbols of Brutus’ membership in the college of priests.

This example comes from the collection of Theodor Prowe of Moscow, one of the great collections of the early 20th century, which was auctioned in three separate 1912 sales by Bruder Egger (Greek) and Hess (Roman).
2 commentsCarausius02/17/19 at 05:54Jay GT4: Great provenance. Even better coin!
1521044195142126439108.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, 32 BCE60 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 32 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.72g; 18mm).
Athens Mint.

Obv: ANTON AVG IMP III COS DES III III V R P C. Bare head of Antony facing right.

Rev: ANTONIVS AVG IMP III, in two lines.

References: Crawford 542/2; HCRI 347; Sydenham 1209.

Provenance: Ex Andrew McCabe Collection [CNG eSale 385 (26 Oct 2016) Lot 470]; CNG 49 (17 Mar 1999), Lot 1316; Reinhold Faelten Collection [Stack's (20 Jan 1938) Lot 1495].

On the obverse, behind Antony’s ear, a small letter P, likely an engraver’s signature, is hidden within the hair line. This coin was struck in Athens in 32 BCE, while Antony and Cleopatra lived extravagantly among the Greeks. The coin’s inscription refers to a designated third consulship that Antony was supposed to share with Octavian in 31 BCE. Around the time this coin was minted, Antony notified his wife, Octavia (Octavian’s sister), in Rome that he was divorcing her. Octavian was outraged. Cleopatra’s growing influence over Antony was soon used by Octavian as progaganda to unite Italy and the West against Antony. Thus, the designated third consulship referenced on this coin never occurred, as the designated consuls went to war instead, ending with Antony’s naval defeat at Actium in September 31 BCE.
5 commentsCarausius02/07/19 at 18:22orfew: A lovely example
AntonyLeg2.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion II Denarius19 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.64g; 17mm).
Military Mint traveling with Antony, 32-1 BCE.

Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; galley facing right.

Reverse: LEG II; Aquilia between two standards.

References: Crawford 544/14; Sydenham 1216; HCRI 349; BMCRR East 190-92; Antonia 105.

Provenance: Ex Pat Coyle Coll. [Goldberg Auction 69 (29 May 2012) Lot 3471]; NAC 40 (16 May 2007), Lot 624.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding. Forty examples of the LEG II variety appeared in the 1905 Delos hoard of 604 Antony Legionary denarii, making it one of the most common varieties of the series.

The Legio II was likely a legion that was disbanded after Actium.
2 commentsCarausius02/05/19 at 21:42quadrans: Great piece ..
AntonyLeg2.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion II Denarius19 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.64g; 17mm).
Military Mint traveling with Antony, 32-1 BCE.

Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; galley facing right.

Reverse: LEG II; Aquilia between two standards.

References: Crawford 544/14; Sydenham 1216; HCRI 349; BMCRR East 190-92; Antonia 105.

Provenance: Ex Pat Coyle Coll. [Goldberg Auction 69 (29 May 2012) Lot 3471]; NAC 40 (16 May 2007), Lot 624.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding. Forty examples of the LEG II variety appeared in the 1905 Delos hoard of 604 Antony Legionary denarii, making it one of the most common varieties of the series.

The Legio II was likely a legion that was disbanded after Actium.
2 commentsCarausius02/05/19 at 12:45Jay GT4: Wonderful legionary eagle.
AntonyXVIIClassicaeCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion XVII Classicae Denarius18 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.41g; 20mm).
Military Mint traveling with Antony, 32-1 BCE.

Obverse: ANT AVG LLL VIR R P C; galley facing right.

Reverse: LEG XVII CLASSICAE; Aquilia between two standards.

References: Crawford 544/10; Sydenham 1238; HCRI 373; BMCRR East 223; Antonia 128

Provenance: Ex Nomisma 58 (6 Nov 2018) Lot 214.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding. Only 8 examples of the LEG XVII Classicae type appeared in the 1905 Delos hoard of 604 Antony Legionary denarii.

The Legio XVII Classicae was likely a legion of marines formed by Antony and disbanded after Actium. They were not the Legio XVII destroyed at Tuetoburg Forest under Varus in 9 CE.
2 commentsCarausius01/05/19 at 20:08Jay GT4: Great coin
AntonyXVIIClassicaeCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion XVII Classicae Denarius18 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.41g; 20mm).
Military Mint traveling with Antony, 32-1 BCE.

Obverse: ANT AVG LLL VIR R P C; galley facing right.

Reverse: LEG XVII CLASSICAE; Aquilia between two standards.

References: Crawford 544/10; Sydenham 1238; HCRI 373; BMCRR East 223; Antonia 128

Provenance: Ex Nomisma 58 (6 Nov 2018) Lot 214.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding. Only 8 examples of the LEG XVII Classicae type appeared in the 1905 Delos hoard of 604 Antony Legionary denarii.

The Legio XVII Classicae was likely a legion of marines formed by Antony and disbanded after Actium. They were not the Legio XVII destroyed at Tuetoburg Forest under Varus in 9 CE.
2 commentsCarausius01/05/19 at 15:24Jordan Montgomery: Fantastic example! It's not often you see such...
xF6AZcQ9M3dWKf27k4EC8Dtni2TngN.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, C. Vibius Varus, AR Denarius - Crawford 494/3847 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Caius Vibius Varus, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.56; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: Bust of Minerva wearing crested Corinthian helmet and aegis, facing right.

Reverse: Hercules standing front, head left, holding lion skin, hand resting on club.

References: Crawford 494/38; HCRI 194; Sydenham 1140; BMCRR 4303-5; Banti 67/10 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Künker Auction 280 (26 Sep 2016), Lot 396; ex Peus Auction 328 (1990), Lot 507; ex Kunst und Münzen (June 1977), Lot 209.

There is little known about any of the four moneyers of 42 BCE besides their coins. Grueber notes that there is equally little known connection between the Vibia gens and the devices on this coin. Sear suggests that the type represents the strength of the triumvirs in their impending fight with the republican forces.

6 commentsCarausius12/27/18 at 14:13okidoki: excellent great patina
xF6AZcQ9M3dWKf27k4EC8Dtni2TngN.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, C. Vibius Varus, AR Denarius - Crawford 494/3847 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Caius Vibius Varus, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.56; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: Bust of Minerva wearing crested Corinthian helmet and aegis, facing right.

Reverse: Hercules standing front, head left, holding lion skin, hand resting on club.

References: Crawford 494/38; HCRI 194; Sydenham 1140; BMCRR 4303-5; Banti 67/10 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Künker Auction 280 (26 Sep 2016), Lot 396; ex Peus Auction 328 (1990), Lot 507; ex Kunst und Münzen (June 1977), Lot 209.

There is little known about any of the four moneyers of 42 BCE besides their coins. Grueber notes that there is equally little known connection between the Vibia gens and the devices on this coin. Sear suggests that the type represents the strength of the triumvirs in their impending fight with the republican forces.

6 commentsCarausius12/25/18 at 13:36paul1888: A beautiful coin!
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, L. Lentulus and C. Marcellus, AR Denarius - Crawford 445/226 viewsRome, The Imperators.
L. Lentulus, C. Marcellus, 49 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.89g; 18mm).
Apollonia in Illyricum Mint.

Obverse: Head of Apollo facing right; L·LENT·C MARC COS surrounding.

Reverse: Jupiter facing right, holding thunderbolt and eagle; to right, alter decorated with garland; to left, * Q.

References: Crawford 445/2; HCRI 5; Sydenham 1030 (R3); BMCRR East 21; Cornelia 65.

Provenance: Ex NAC 92 (24 May 2016), Lot 1866; Vico 120 (2009), Lot 173; Argenor Numismatique Auction 4 (27 Apr 2001), Lot 94.

The dating for this type is firm because it was struck for the consuls, Lentulus and Marcellus, who shared the office in 49 BCE. Both consuls were Pompey supporters who fled Rome when Caesar marched on the City. Lentulus was later killed in Egypt, where he fled with Pompey following the defeat at Pharsalus. Little further is known of Marcellus and he likely died during the wars.

The head of Apollo on this type was chosen because the coins were struck in Apollonia, where Apollo was prominent on the coinage.

The Quaestor that produced these coins was T. Antistius. Antistius was already Quaestor in Macedonia when the Pompeians arrived in flight from Caesar. Cicero reports that Antistius was reluctant to assist the Pompeians who forced him to produce their coins. Antistius’ ambivalence is evidenced by his desire to remain anonymous, choosing only to identiy his office by the letter Q. He was pardoned by Caesar following Pompey’s defeat at Pharsalus.
3 commentsCarausius12/19/18 at 14:02Jay GT4: Beauty
xF6AZcQ9M3dWKf27k4EC8Dtni2TngN.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, C. Vibius Varus, AR Denarius - Crawford 494/3847 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Caius Vibius Varus, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.56; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: Bust of Minerva wearing crested Corinthian helmet and aegis, facing right.

Reverse: Hercules standing front, head left, holding lion skin, hand resting on club.

References: Crawford 494/38; HCRI 194; Sydenham 1140; BMCRR 4303-5; Banti 67/10 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Künker Auction 280 (26 Sep 2016), Lot 396; ex Peus Auction 328 (1990), Lot 507; ex Kunst und Münzen (June 1977), Lot 209.

There is little known about any of the four moneyers of 42 BCE besides their coins. Grueber notes that there is equally little known connection between the Vibia gens and the devices on this coin. Sear suggests that the type represents the strength of the triumvirs in their impending fight with the republican forces.

6 commentsCarausius12/18/18 at 18:06Enodia: Nice style and beautiful toning!
2297137l.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, L. Lentulus and C. Marcellus, AR Denarius - Crawford 445/226 viewsRome, The Imperators.
L. Lentulus, C. Marcellus, 49 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.89g; 18mm).
Apollonia in Illyricum Mint.

Obverse: Head of Apollo facing right; L·LENT·C MARC COS surrounding.

Reverse: Jupiter facing right, holding thunderbolt and eagle; to right, alter decorated with garland; to left, * Q.

References: Crawford 445/2; HCRI 5; Sydenham 1030 (R3); BMCRR East 21; Cornelia 65.

Provenance: Ex NAC 92 (24 May 2016), Lot 1866; Vico 120 (2009), Lot 173; Argenor Numismatique Auction 4 (27 Apr 2001), Lot 94.

The dating for this type is firm because it was struck for the consuls, Lentulus and Marcellus, who shared the office in 49 BCE. Both consuls were Pompey supporters who fled Rome when Caesar marched on the City. Lentulus was later killed in Egypt, where he fled with Pompey following the defeat at Pharsalus. Little further is known of Marcellus and he likely died during the wars.

The head of Apollo on this type was chosen because the coins were struck in Apollonia, where Apollo was prominent on the coinage.

The Quaestor that produced these coins was T. Antistius. Antistius was already Quaestor in Macedonia when the Pompeians arrived in flight from Caesar. Cicero reports that Antistius was reluctant to assist the Pompeians who forced him to produce their coins. Antistius’ ambivalence is evidenced by his desire to remain anonymous, choosing only to identiy his office by the letter Q. He was pardoned by Caesar following Pompey’s defeat at Pharsalus.
3 commentsCarausius12/18/18 at 18:02Enodia: Lovely coin.
xF6AZcQ9M3dWKf27k4EC8Dtni2TngN.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, C. Vibius Varus, AR Denarius - Crawford 494/3847 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Caius Vibius Varus, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.56; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: Bust of Minerva wearing crested Corinthian helmet and aegis, facing right.

Reverse: Hercules standing front, head left, holding lion skin, hand resting on club.

References: Crawford 494/38; HCRI 194; Sydenham 1140; BMCRR 4303-5; Banti 67/10 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Künker Auction 280 (26 Sep 2016), Lot 396; ex Peus Auction 328 (1990), Lot 507; ex Kunst und Münzen (June 1977), Lot 209.

There is little known about any of the four moneyers of 42 BCE besides their coins. Grueber notes that there is equally little known connection between the Vibia gens and the devices on this coin. Sear suggests that the type represents the strength of the triumvirs in their impending fight with the republican forces.

6 commentsCarausius12/18/18 at 06:22quadrans: Nice piece..
2297137l.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, L. Lentulus and C. Marcellus, AR Denarius - Crawford 445/226 viewsRome, The Imperators.
L. Lentulus, C. Marcellus, 49 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.89g; 18mm).
Apollonia in Illyricum Mint.

Obverse: Head of Apollo facing right; L·LENT·C MARC COS surrounding.

Reverse: Jupiter facing right, holding thunderbolt and eagle; to right, alter decorated with garland; to left, * Q.

References: Crawford 445/2; HCRI 5; Sydenham 1030 (R3); BMCRR East 21; Cornelia 65.

Provenance: Ex NAC 92 (24 May 2016), Lot 1866; Vico 120 (2009), Lot 173; Argenor Numismatique Auction 4 (27 Apr 2001), Lot 94.

The dating for this type is firm because it was struck for the consuls, Lentulus and Marcellus, who shared the office in 49 BCE. Both consuls were Pompey supporters who fled Rome when Caesar marched on the City. Lentulus was later killed in Egypt, where he fled with Pompey following the defeat at Pharsalus. Little further is known of Marcellus and he likely died during the wars.

The head of Apollo on this type was chosen because the coins were struck in Apollonia, where Apollo was prominent on the coinage.

The Quaestor that produced these coins was T. Antistius. Antistius was already Quaestor in Macedonia when the Pompeians arrived in flight from Caesar. Cicero reports that Antistius was reluctant to assist the Pompeians who forced him to produce their coins. Antistius’ ambivalence is evidenced by his desire to remain anonymous, choosing only to identiy his office by the letter Q. He was pardoned by Caesar following Pompey’s defeat at Pharsalus.
3 commentsCarausius12/18/18 at 06:17quadrans: Nice piece..
xF6AZcQ9M3dWKf27k4EC8Dtni2TngN.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, C. Vibius Varus, AR Denarius - Crawford 494/3847 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Caius Vibius Varus, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.56; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: Bust of Minerva wearing crested Corinthian helmet and aegis, facing right.

Reverse: Hercules standing front, head left, holding lion skin, hand resting on club.

References: Crawford 494/38; HCRI 194; Sydenham 1140; BMCRR 4303-5; Banti 67/10 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Künker Auction 280 (26 Sep 2016), Lot 396; ex Peus Auction 328 (1990), Lot 507; ex Kunst und Münzen (June 1977), Lot 209.

There is little known about any of the four moneyers of 42 BCE besides their coins. Grueber notes that there is equally little known connection between the Vibia gens and the devices on this coin. Sear suggests that the type represents the strength of the triumvirs in their impending fight with the republican forces.

6 commentsCarausius12/17/18 at 13:17Jay GT4: Amazing
xF6AZcQ9M3dWKf27k4EC8Dtni2TngN.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, C. Vibius Varus, AR Denarius - Crawford 494/3847 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Caius Vibius Varus, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.56; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: Bust of Minerva wearing crested Corinthian helmet and aegis, facing right.

Reverse: Hercules standing front, head left, holding lion skin, hand resting on club.

References: Crawford 494/38; HCRI 194; Sydenham 1140; BMCRR 4303-5; Banti 67/10 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Künker Auction 280 (26 Sep 2016), Lot 396; ex Peus Auction 328 (1990), Lot 507; ex Kunst und Münzen (June 1977), Lot 209.

There is little known about any of the four moneyers of 42 BCE besides their coins. Grueber notes that there is equally little known connection between the Vibia gens and the devices on this coin. Sear suggests that the type represents the strength of the triumvirs in their impending fight with the republican forces.

6 commentsCarausius12/17/18 at 08:11shanxi: nice details and colour
OctavAntonQuinar2.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Octavian and Antony, AR Quinarius - Crawford 529/4b15 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Antony and Octavian, 39 BCE.
AR Quinarius (1.60g; 14mm).
Military mint moving with Octavian.

Obverse: III ·VIR - R·P·C; veiled and diademed head of Concordia facing right.

Rev: M·ANTON - C·CAESAR; two hands clasped around caduceus.
References: Crawford 529/4b; HCRI 304; BMCRR (East) 128.

The coin likely celebrates the reconciliation of Octavian and Antony, memorialized by the pact at Brundisium in October of 40 BCE. Sear suggests that Octavian may have issued this type in Gaul, a former Antony stronghold and a big user of quinarii.
1 commentsCarausius12/08/18 at 06:35EB: Interesting
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Sextus Pompey, AR Denarius30 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Sextus Pompey, 42-36 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.49g; 20mm).
Sicilian mint, 42-40 BCE.

Obverse: MAG PIVS IMP ITER; Pharos of Messina with two windows and a balcony, surmounted by statue of Neptune wearing helmet and holding trident and resting foot on prow; galley with aquila passing before.

Rev: PRAEF CLAS ET ORAE MARIT EX S C; the monster, Scylla, her body terminating in two fish-tails and the foreparts of three dogs, facing left and wielding a rudder with two hands.

References: Crawford 511/4a; HCRI 335; Sydenham 1348; BMCRR (Sicily) 18-19; Banti 8/3 (this coin illustrated); Pompeia 22.

Provenance: Ex Kuenker Auction 312 (8 Oct 2018), Lot 2712; Walter Niggeler (d. 1964) Collection [Leu/Muenzen und Medaillen (21-22 Oct 1966), Lot 964].

Sextus Pompey was younger son of Pompey the Great. After Caesar's assassination, in 43 BCE, he was honored by the Senate with the title "Commander of the Fleet and Sea Coasts" (Praefectus classis et orae maritimae). Shortly following this honor, the Second Triumvirate was formed and placed Sextus' name on their proscription list. Sextus soon occupied Sicily where he provided haven to other Romans proscribed by the Triumvirs. He retained control of Sicily from 42 to 36 BCE. In 42 BCE, Octavian sent Salvidienus Rufus to dislodge Sextus, but Rufus was defeated. It was likely between this defeat of Rufus and the Pact of Misenum with the Triumvirs (39 BCE) that Sextus struck much of his coinage, including this type. The rough seas around Sicily were beneficial to Sextus and particularly rough on his enemies, thus Neptune and the marine monster Scylla, destroyer of ships, are prominently displayed on this coin.
3 commentsCarausius11/29/18 at 07:55quadrans: Another nice piece
4303550l.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Sextus Pompey, AR Denarius30 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Sextus Pompey, 42-36 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.49g; 20mm).
Sicilian mint, 42-40 BCE.

Obverse: MAG PIVS IMP ITER; Pharos of Messina with two windows and a balcony, surmounted by statue of Neptune wearing helmet and holding trident and resting foot on prow; galley with aquila passing before.

Rev: PRAEF CLAS ET ORAE MARIT EX S C; the monster, Scylla, her body terminating in two fish-tails and the foreparts of three dogs, facing left and wielding a rudder with two hands.

References: Crawford 511/4a; HCRI 335; Sydenham 1348; BMCRR (Sicily) 18-19; Banti 8/3 (this coin illustrated); Pompeia 22.

Provenance: Ex Kuenker Auction 312 (8 Oct 2018), Lot 2712; Walter Niggeler (d. 1964) Collection [Leu/Muenzen und Medaillen (21-22 Oct 1966), Lot 964].

Sextus Pompey was younger son of Pompey the Great. After Caesar's assassination, in 43 BCE, he was honored by the Senate with the title "Commander of the Fleet and Sea Coasts" (Praefectus classis et orae maritimae). Shortly following this honor, the Second Triumvirate was formed and placed Sextus' name on their proscription list. Sextus soon occupied Sicily where he provided haven to other Romans proscribed by the Triumvirs. He retained control of Sicily from 42 to 36 BCE. In 42 BCE, Octavian sent Salvidienus Rufus to dislodge Sextus, but Rufus was defeated. It was likely between this defeat of Rufus and the Pact of Misenum with the Triumvirs (39 BCE) that Sextus struck much of his coinage, including this type. The rough seas around Sicily were beneficial to Sextus and particularly rough on his enemies, thus Neptune and the marine monster Scylla, destroyer of ships, are prominently displayed on this coin.
3 commentsCarausius11/26/18 at 16:04shanxi: very interesting coin
4303550l.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Sextus Pompey, AR Denarius30 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Sextus Pompey, 42-36 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.49g; 20mm).
Sicilian mint, 42-40 BCE.

Obverse: MAG PIVS IMP ITER; Pharos of Messina with two windows and a balcony, surmounted by statue of Neptune wearing helmet and holding trident and resting foot on prow; galley with aquila passing before.

Rev: PRAEF CLAS ET ORAE MARIT EX S C; the monster, Scylla, her body terminating in two fish-tails and the foreparts of three dogs, facing left and wielding a rudder with two hands.

References: Crawford 511/4a; HCRI 335; Sydenham 1348; BMCRR (Sicily) 18-19; Banti 8/3 (this coin illustrated); Pompeia 22.

Provenance: Ex Kuenker Auction 312 (8 Oct 2018), Lot 2712; Walter Niggeler (d. 1964) Collection [Leu/Muenzen und Medaillen (21-22 Oct 1966), Lot 964].

Sextus Pompey was younger son of Pompey the Great. After Caesar's assassination, in 43 BCE, he was honored by the Senate with the title "Commander of the Fleet and Sea Coasts" (Praefectus classis et orae maritimae). Shortly following this honor, the Second Triumvirate was formed and placed Sextus' name on their proscription list. Sextus soon occupied Sicily where he provided haven to other Romans proscribed by the Triumvirs. He retained control of Sicily from 42 to 36 BCE. In 42 BCE, Octavian sent Salvidienus Rufus to dislodge Sextus, but Rufus was defeated. It was likely between this defeat of Rufus and the Pact of Misenum with the Triumvirs (39 BCE) that Sextus struck much of his coinage, including this type. The rough seas around Sicily were beneficial to Sextus and particularly rough on his enemies, thus Neptune and the marine monster Scylla, destroyer of ships, are prominently displayed on this coin.
3 commentsCarausius11/26/18 at 04:09Jay GT4: Great coin and provenance
4320276.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Octavian, AR Denarius13 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Octavian and Lucius Cornelius Balbus, 41 BCE
AR Denarius (3.36 grams; 18mm).
Military mint in Italy.

Obverse: C•CAESAR • III • VIR R•P•C; Bare head of Octavian, facing right.

Reverse: Club; BALBVS above, PRO • PR below

References: Crawford 518/1; HCRI 298; Sydenham 1325a; BMCRR (Gaul) 83-5; Julia 91.

Provenance: Ex Andrew McCabe Collection [CNG Esale 432 (14 Nov 2018) Lot 276]; ex American Numismatic Society Collection 1001.1.12863 [CNG 96 (14 May 2014) Lot 732]; ex Archer M. Huntington (d. 1955) Collection.

This scarce type was produced by Octavian’s legate, Lucius Cornelius Balbus, as propraetor. Balbus was a native of Gades (Cadiz) in Spain where there was a temple to Hercules, to which the Club reverse alludes. Balbus was favored and honored by both Pompey and Caesar. Upon Caesar’s assassination, he allied with Octavian who appointed him praetor urbanus and ultimately, in 40 BCE, he received the consulship (the first foreign-born citizen to do so). He was extremely wealthy and bequeathed 25 denarii to every Roman citizen in his will!
1 commentsCarausius11/25/18 at 04:50Jay GT4: Great piece! Not one you see every day
image00275.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Julius Caesar, AR Denarius48 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Julius Caesar, 47-6 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.87g; 18mm).
Military Mint in North Africa.

Obverse: Diademed head of Venus facing right, wearing necklace.

Reverse: Aeneas walking left, carrying his aged father, Anchises on his shoulder and the palladium in his right hand; CAESAR in right field.

References: Crawford 458/1; HCRI 55; BMCRR (East) 31-5; Julia 10.

Provenance: Ex Stöcklin Collection [Nomos 14 (17 May 2017) Lot 275]; ex E. J. Haeberlin Collection [Cahn-Hess (17 Jul 1933), Lot 2663].

Struck in Africa near the end of Caesar’s civil war struggle with Pompey, the coin advertises the mythical roots of the Julia gens descent from Venus and Anchises. The obverse depicts the goddess, Venus, while the reverse shows Aeneas carrying his aged father, Anchises, from Troy. Sear thought that among Caesar’s coinage, this issue was second in size only to the "elephant" coinage, and Crawford estimated 390 obverse dies and 433 reverse dies.
4 commentsCarausius09/04/18 at 14:48okidoki: 5 stars
image00275.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Julius Caesar, AR Denarius48 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Julius Caesar, 47-6 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.87g; 18mm).
Military Mint in North Africa.

Obverse: Diademed head of Venus facing right, wearing necklace.

Reverse: Aeneas walking left, carrying his aged father, Anchises on his shoulder and the palladium in his right hand; CAESAR in right field.

References: Crawford 458/1; HCRI 55; BMCRR (East) 31-5; Julia 10.

Provenance: Ex Stöcklin Collection [Nomos 14 (17 May 2017) Lot 275]; ex E. J. Haeberlin Collection [Cahn-Hess (17 Jul 1933), Lot 2663].

Struck in Africa near the end of Caesar’s civil war struggle with Pompey, the coin advertises the mythical roots of the Julia gens descent from Venus and Anchises. The obverse depicts the goddess, Venus, while the reverse shows Aeneas carrying his aged father, Anchises, from Troy. Sear thought that among Caesar’s coinage, this issue was second in size only to the "elephant" coinage, and Crawford estimated 390 obverse dies and 433 reverse dies.
4 commentsCarausius09/04/18 at 09:47shanxi: WOW, the father realy looks like an old man
image00275.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Julius Caesar, AR Denarius48 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Julius Caesar, 47-6 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.87g; 18mm).
Military Mint in North Africa.

Obverse: Diademed head of Venus facing right, wearing necklace.

Reverse: Aeneas walking left, carrying his aged father, Anchises on his shoulder and the palladium in his right hand; CAESAR in right field.

References: Crawford 458/1; HCRI 55; BMCRR (East) 31-5; Julia 10.

Provenance: Ex Stöcklin Collection [Nomos 14 (17 May 2017) Lot 275]; ex E. J. Haeberlin Collection [Cahn-Hess (17 Jul 1933), Lot 2663].

Struck in Africa near the end of Caesar’s civil war struggle with Pompey, the coin advertises the mythical roots of the Julia gens descent from Venus and Anchises. The obverse depicts the goddess, Venus, while the reverse shows Aeneas carrying his aged father, Anchises, from Troy. Sear thought that among Caesar’s coinage, this issue was second in size only to the "elephant" coinage, and Crawford estimated 390 obverse dies and 433 reverse dies.
4 commentsCarausius09/04/18 at 04:04Jay GT4: Amazing!
image00275.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Julius Caesar, AR Denarius48 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Julius Caesar, 47-6 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.87g; 18mm).
Military Mint in North Africa.

Obverse: Diademed head of Venus facing right, wearing necklace.

Reverse: Aeneas walking left, carrying his aged father, Anchises on his shoulder and the palladium in his right hand; CAESAR in right field.

References: Crawford 458/1; HCRI 55; BMCRR (East) 31-5; Julia 10.

Provenance: Ex Stöcklin Collection [Nomos 14 (17 May 2017) Lot 275]; ex E. J. Haeberlin Collection [Cahn-Hess (17 Jul 1933), Lot 2663].

Struck in Africa near the end of Caesar’s civil war struggle with Pompey, the coin advertises the mythical roots of the Julia gens descent from Venus and Anchises. The obverse depicts the goddess, Venus, while the reverse shows Aeneas carrying his aged father, Anchises, from Troy. Sear thought that among Caesar’s coinage, this issue was second in size only to the "elephant" coinage, and Crawford estimated 390 obverse dies and 433 reverse dies.
4 commentsCarausius09/03/18 at 23:52RomaVictor: .......Wow, what a beauty! Fabulous coin!
CaesarBuca.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Julius Caesar, AR Denarius33 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Julius Caesar and Lucius Aemilius Buca, 44 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.77g; 21mm).
Rome Mint, Feb-Mar 44 BCE.

Obverse: CAESAR DICT- PERPETVO; wreathed head of Julius Caesar facing right.

Reverse: Fasces and winged caduceus in saltire; axe, globe, clasped hands and L BVCA in angles.

References: Crawford 480/6; HCRI 103; Sydenham 1063; BMCRR 4157-9; Julia 37; Alföldi, Type XIII, Plate XCVIII, No. 78.

Provenance: Ex Goldberg Auction #104 (12 Jun 2018) Lot 3248.

Caesar was granted the title of Dictator for Life in mid-February, 44 BCE, thus all coins bearing DICT PERPETVO inscriptions can be firmly dated to the final month of Caesar’s life. This was a period of massive coinage output because Caesar was preparing for a campaign against the Parthians for which a substantial war chest would be needed. To meet the production needs, the college of moneyers was expanded from 3 to 4 moneyers. Nevertheless, manufacturing stress is evident by the frequent poor strikes and off-struck coins that survive today from these final Caesar portrait issues.

The moneyer Lucius Aemilius Buca may have been a relative of Sulla. He does not appear to have struck coins after Caesar’s assassination. With its symbolism, the reverse of this coin suggests Caesar’s growing grasp on religious, military and political power.
2 commentsCarausius08/23/18 at 22:14Vincent: Real nice, great historical coin!
CaesarSepullius.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Julius Caesar, AR Denarius24 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Julius Caesar and P. Sepullius Macer, 44 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.84g; 20mm).
Rome Mint, Feb-Mar 44 BCE.

Obverse: CAESAR - DICT PERPETVO; wreathed head of Julius Caesar facing right.

Reverse: P SEPVLLIVS – MACER; Venus facing left, holding Victory and staff; shield at feet.

References: Crawford 480/10; HCRI 107a; Sydenham 1073: Julia 48; Alföldi, Plate LXVI, No. 2 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Andrew McCabe Collection; privately purchased from Ritter 2010; ex Rauch Auction 85 (26 Nov 2009) Lot 323; ex Professor L. Fontana Collection (bef. 1974).

Caesar was granted the title of Dictator for Life in mid-February, 44 BCE, thus all coins bearing DICT PERPETVO inscriptions can be firmly dated to the final month of Caesar’s life. This was a period of massive coinage output because Caesar was preparing for a campaign against the Parthians for which a substantial war chest would be needed. To meet the production needs, the college of moneyers was expanded from 3 to 4 moneyers. Nevertheless, manufacturing stress is evident by the frequent poor strikes and off-struck coins that survive today from these final Caesar portrait issues.

The moneyer P. Sepullius Macer struck coins during and after Caesar’s lifetime, including one type for M. Antony that also appears in my gallery. His output of coins was particularly high compared to the other three moneyers of 44 BCE. This reverse type, common among the four moneyers, alludes to the descent of the Julia gens from Venus and Anchises.
1 commentsCarausius08/20/18 at 19:09okidoki: excellent and stylistic
IMG-20180410-WA0021.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Julius Caesar, AR Denarius28 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Julius Caesar, 49-44 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.93 g; 19mm).
Military mint travelling with Caesar, 49-48 BCE.

Obverse: Elephant walking right, trampling serpent; CAESAR in exergue.

Reverse: Simpulum, aspergillum, axe and apex.

References: Crawford 443/1: HCRI 9; Sydenham 1006; Julia 9.

Provenance: Ex Ploil Collection [NAC 101 (24 Oct 2017), Lot 10]; privately purchased December 1980.

Caesar’s “elephant” issue was massive, with Crawford estimating 750 obverse and 833 reverse dies. Stylistic variations range from elephants depicted accurately to elephants with pig-like characteristics. The CAESAR inscriptions on the well-executed elephant varieties typically have letters with serifs; while inscriptions on the piggish varieties have letters without serifs. Woytek believes the series was struck in Gallia Narbonensis and Hispania Citerior in circa 49BC during Caesar’s campaign against Pompey loyalists in Spain. Other scholars, like Crawford and Sear, believe the issue was commenced shortly after Caesar invaded Italy in 49 and continued until the defeat of Pompey at Pharsalus in 48 BCE. What’s clear is that Caesar struck these coins without authority, as he did not hold the office of moneyer or legate. As for interpretation of this coin type, many scholars, including Crawford and Sear, interpret the obverse (elephant trampling the serpent) as representing good (Caesar) triumphing over evil. Michael Harlan interprets the obverse as blaming the civil war on Pompey’s faction; the elephant representing Pompey’s supporter, Metellus Pius Scipio (whose family badge, frequently seen on Metellan coins, is an elephant), trampling the snake symbol of Salus, the health and safety of Rome. The reverse clearly depicts the emblems of the priesthood and alludes to Caesar’s office of pontifex maximus.
1 commentsCarausius08/20/18 at 10:18quadrans: Great coin , and details,
CaesarBuca.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Julius Caesar, AR Denarius33 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Julius Caesar and Lucius Aemilius Buca, 44 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.77g; 21mm).
Rome Mint, Feb-Mar 44 BCE.

Obverse: CAESAR DICT- PERPETVO; wreathed head of Julius Caesar facing right.

Reverse: Fasces and winged caduceus in saltire; axe, globe, clasped hands and L BVCA in angles.

References: Crawford 480/6; HCRI 103; Sydenham 1063; BMCRR 4157-9; Julia 37; Alföldi, Type XIII, Plate XCVIII, No. 78.

Provenance: Ex Goldberg Auction #104 (12 Jun 2018) Lot 3248.

Caesar was granted the title of Dictator for Life in mid-February, 44 BCE, thus all coins bearing DICT PERPETVO inscriptions can be firmly dated to the final month of Caesar’s life. This was a period of massive coinage output because Caesar was preparing for a campaign against the Parthians for which a substantial war chest would be needed. To meet the production needs, the college of moneyers was expanded from 3 to 4 moneyers. Nevertheless, manufacturing stress is evident by the frequent poor strikes and off-struck coins that survive today from these final Caesar portrait issues.

The moneyer Lucius Aemilius Buca may have been a relative of Sulla. He does not appear to have struck coins after Caesar’s assassination. With its symbolism, the reverse of this coin suggests Caesar’s growing grasp on religious, military and political power.
2 commentsCarausius08/20/18 at 10:17quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
PlautiusDenarius.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Plautius Plancus, AR Denarius61 viewsRome. The Republic.
L. Plautius Plancus, 47 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.94g; 19mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: L·PLAVTIVS; Facing mask of Medusa with coiled snakes on each side.

Reverse: PLANCVS; Victory facing, leading four horses and holding palm.

References: Crawford 453/1a; HCRI 29; Sydenham 959; BMCRR 4006; Plautia 14.

Provenance: Ex The New York Sale Auction XXXII (8 Jan 2014) Lot 205; NAC 54 (24 Mar 2010), Lot 256.

Lucius Plautius Plancus was a brother of L. Munatius Plancus, who became Prefect of the City under Caesar. Lucius was adopted by L. Plautius. In 47 BCE, Lucius was a moneyer and produced this coin. Two styles of the obverse were produced, one with coiled snakes on either side of Medusa's head; the other without snakes.

In 43 BCE, Lucius was proscribed by the Second Triumvirate and executed. The same year of Lucius’ proscription and execution, his brother, L. Munatius Plancus, placed in the capitol a painting by the 4th century BCE, Greek artist, Nicomachus of Thebes in which Victory is driving a quadriga and holding a palm. David Sear, in “History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators” suggests that Lucius may have owned the Nicomachus painting in 47 BCE (it would have passed to his brother upon his execution) and that the reverse of this coin was inspired by the painting. Sear is not the first numismatist to have proposed this theory regarding the Nicomachus painting. Eckhel had an equally conjectural theory for this coin type that connected the devices to a story involving one of Lucius’ ancestors as the basis for an annual celebration in Rome where masks were worn.

Regardless of the true derivation and meaning of the type, the coin is a remarkably artistic design for the period, and surely the devices must have some connection to the moneyer’s natural or adopted family.
3 commentsCarausius07/15/18 at 20:00Norbert: A wonderful coin. In my eyes one of the most fasci...
AntonySolDen.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, AR Denarius28 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marc Antony, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.95g; 18mm).
Military mint travelling with Antony, 42BCE.

Obverse: Antony's bearded head right; M ANTONI - IMP (ligate).

Reverse: Facing bust of Sol within distyle temple; III - VIR - R·P·C, around.

References: Crawford 496/1; HCRI 128; Sydenham 1168; BMCRR (Gaul) 62; Antonia 34.

Provenance: Italian export permit No. 13168 of 2018; ex Nomisma 32 (2006), Lot 129.

This coin was likely struck shortly after Brutus’s and Cassius’s defeat at Philippi in 42 BCE. Antony is still shown with his beard of mourning (he and Octavian would not shave until Caesar’s assassination was avenged), and it’s likely that the die engravers had not yet been instructed to remove the beard following Philippi. This is the last bearded image of Antony to appear on his coinage. There were two versions of this coin type: one with IMP spelled the standard way; the other with IMP ligate, as on this example. The ligate version is the scarcer version of the two. The reverse type emphasizing Sol was a common theme on Antony’s eastern coinage, perhaps reflecting his growing enchantment with eastern Hellenistic culture.
2 commentsCarausius07/09/18 at 09:38shanxi: OH, I'm getting jealous
AntonySolDen.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, AR Denarius28 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marc Antony, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.95g; 18mm).
Military mint travelling with Antony, 42BCE.

Obverse: Antony's bearded head right; M ANTONI - IMP (ligate).

Reverse: Facing bust of Sol within distyle temple; III - VIR - R·P·C, around.

References: Crawford 496/1; HCRI 128; Sydenham 1168; BMCRR (Gaul) 62; Antonia 34.

Provenance: Italian export permit No. 13168 of 2018; ex Nomisma 32 (2006), Lot 129.

This coin was likely struck shortly after Brutus’s and Cassius’s defeat at Philippi in 42 BCE. Antony is still shown with his beard of mourning (he and Octavian would not shave until Caesar’s assassination was avenged), and it’s likely that the die engravers had not yet been instructed to remove the beard following Philippi. This is the last bearded image of Antony to appear on his coinage. There were two versions of this coin type: one with IMP spelled the standard way; the other with IMP ligate, as on this example. The ligate version is the scarcer version of the two. The reverse type emphasizing Sol was a common theme on Antony’s eastern coinage, perhaps reflecting his growing enchantment with eastern Hellenistic culture.
2 commentsCarausius07/08/18 at 16:21Jay GT4: Great bearded portrait!
caesardenarius.png
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL - Julius Caesar - AR Denarius66 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Julius Caesar, 48 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.71g; 20mm).

Obverse: Head of Venus facing right; LII behind.

Reverse: Trophy with Gallic shield, carnyx and axe; CAESAR below.

References: Crawford 452/2; Sydenham 1009; HCRI 11; RSC 18.

Provenance: Ex Student/Mentor Collection [NAC 83 (15 May 2015) Lot 407]; ex Glendining's October 1965, Lot 22.

The Roman numeral LII behind the goddess' head on the obverse of this coin is accepted as a reference to Caesar's age at the time of the issue. There is some disagreement on the identity of the obverse goddess. Crawford identifies her as Venus, who is often depicted on Caesar's coins. Sear, in History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators, suggests Clementia (clemency) as the goddess, and a reference to Caesar's fairness to his countrymen following the defeat of Pompey at Pharsalus.
4 commentsCarausius07/08/18 at 11:38*Alex: Nice one.
463910.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion III Denarius27 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Mark Antony, 31 BCE.
Mint travelling with Antony.
AR Denarius (3.69g; 18mm).

Obv: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; Galley right.

Rev: LEG III; Aquilia between two standards.

Reference: Crawford 544/15; HCRI 350; Syd 1217; Viereck, Die Römische Flotte (1975), p. 292 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: ex CNG Classical Numismatic Review (Jul 2017); ex Triton IV (5 Dec 2000), Lot 432; ex Sternberg XII (18 Nov 1982), Lot 512; ex H.D.L. Viereck Collection (bef. 1975).

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding.
2 commentsCarausius07/08/18 at 11:37*Alex:
PlautiusDenarius.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Plautius Plancus, AR Denarius61 viewsRome. The Republic.
L. Plautius Plancus, 47 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.94g; 19mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: L·PLAVTIVS; Facing mask of Medusa with coiled snakes on each side.

Reverse: PLANCVS; Victory facing, leading four horses and holding palm.

References: Crawford 453/1a; HCRI 29; Sydenham 959; BMCRR 4006; Plautia 14.

Provenance: Ex The New York Sale Auction XXXII (8 Jan 2014) Lot 205; NAC 54 (24 Mar 2010), Lot 256.

Lucius Plautius Plancus was a brother of L. Munatius Plancus, who became Prefect of the City under Caesar. Lucius was adopted by L. Plautius. In 47 BCE, Lucius was a moneyer and produced this coin. Two styles of the obverse were produced, one with coiled snakes on either side of Medusa's head; the other without snakes.

In 43 BCE, Lucius was proscribed by the Second Triumvirate and executed. The same year of Lucius’ proscription and execution, his brother, L. Munatius Plancus, placed in the capitol a painting by the 4th century BCE, Greek artist, Nicomachus of Thebes in which Victory is driving a quadriga and holding a palm. David Sear, in “History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators” suggests that Lucius may have owned the Nicomachus painting in 47 BCE (it would have passed to his brother upon his execution) and that the reverse of this coin was inspired by the painting. Sear is not the first numismatist to have proposed this theory regarding the Nicomachus painting. Eckhel had an equally conjectural theory for this coin type that connected the devices to a story involving one of Lucius’ ancestors as the basis for an annual celebration in Rome where masks were worn.

Regardless of the true derivation and meaning of the type, the coin is a remarkably artistic design for the period, and surely the devices must have some connection to the moneyer’s natural or adopted family.
3 commentsCarausius07/04/18 at 22:31PMah: Superb example! A complex coin that almost always...
PlautiusDenarius.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Plautius Plancus, AR Denarius61 viewsRome. The Republic.
L. Plautius Plancus, 47 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.94g; 19mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: L·PLAVTIVS; Facing mask of Medusa with coiled snakes on each side.

Reverse: PLANCVS; Victory facing, leading four horses and holding palm.

References: Crawford 453/1a; HCRI 29; Sydenham 959; BMCRR 4006; Plautia 14.

Provenance: Ex The New York Sale Auction XXXII (8 Jan 2014) Lot 205; NAC 54 (24 Mar 2010), Lot 256.

Lucius Plautius Plancus was a brother of L. Munatius Plancus, who became Prefect of the City under Caesar. Lucius was adopted by L. Plautius. In 47 BCE, Lucius was a moneyer and produced this coin. Two styles of the obverse were produced, one with coiled snakes on either side of Medusa's head; the other without snakes.

In 43 BCE, Lucius was proscribed by the Second Triumvirate and executed. The same year of Lucius’ proscription and execution, his brother, L. Munatius Plancus, placed in the capitol a painting by the 4th century BCE, Greek artist, Nicomachus of Thebes in which Victory is driving a quadriga and holding a palm. David Sear, in “History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators” suggests that Lucius may have owned the Nicomachus painting in 47 BCE (it would have passed to his brother upon his execution) and that the reverse of this coin was inspired by the painting. Sear is not the first numismatist to have proposed this theory regarding the Nicomachus painting. Eckhel had an equally conjectural theory for this coin type that connected the devices to a story involving one of Lucius’ ancestors as the basis for an annual celebration in Rome where masks were worn.

Regardless of the true derivation and meaning of the type, the coin is a remarkably artistic design for the period, and surely the devices must have some connection to the moneyer’s natural or adopted family.
3 commentsCarausius07/02/18 at 14:42laney: That's an extremely interesting coin. Gorgeou...
1521044195142126439108.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, 32 BCE60 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 32 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.72g; 18mm).
Athens Mint.

Obv: ANTON AVG IMP III COS DES III III V R P C. Bare head of Antony facing right.

Rev: ANTONIVS AVG IMP III, in two lines.

References: Crawford 542/2; HCRI 347; Sydenham 1209.

Provenance: Ex Andrew McCabe Collection [CNG eSale 385 (26 Oct 2016) Lot 470]; CNG 49 (17 Mar 1999), Lot 1316; Reinhold Faelten Collection [Stack's (20 Jan 1938) Lot 1495].

On the obverse, behind Antony’s ear, a small letter P, likely an engraver’s signature, is hidden within the hair line. This coin was struck in Athens in 32 BCE, while Antony and Cleopatra lived extravagantly among the Greeks. The coin’s inscription refers to a designated third consulship that Antony was supposed to share with Octavian in 31 BCE. Around the time this coin was minted, Antony notified his wife, Octavia (Octavian’s sister), in Rome that he was divorcing her. Octavian was outraged. Cleopatra’s growing influence over Antony was soon used by Octavian as progaganda to unite Italy and the West against Antony. Thus, the designated third consulship referenced on this coin never occurred, as the designated consuls went to war instead, ending with Antony’s naval defeat at Actium in September 31 BCE.
5 commentsCarausius05/27/18 at 04:56Jay GT4: A must have portrait for any Antony collector
463910.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion III Denarius27 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Mark Antony, 31 BCE.
Mint travelling with Antony.
AR Denarius (3.69g; 18mm).

Obv: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; Galley right.

Rev: LEG III; Aquilia between two standards.

Reference: Crawford 544/15; HCRI 350; Syd 1217; Viereck, Die Römische Flotte (1975), p. 292 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: ex CNG Classical Numismatic Review (Jul 2017); ex Triton IV (5 Dec 2000), Lot 432; ex Sternberg XII (18 Nov 1982), Lot 512; ex H.D.L. Viereck Collection (bef. 1975).

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding.
2 commentsCarausius05/27/18 at 04:56Jay GT4: This is exceptional
IMG-20161218-WA0003.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion VI Denarius38 viewsRome, The Imperators
Mint traveling with Antony, ca. 31 BC
AR Denarius

Obv: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; Galley right.

Rev: LEG VI; Aquilia between two standards.

Reference: Crawford 544/19; HCRI 356

Provenance: ex CNG 103 (Sep 2016) Lot 664; ex Kirk Davis FPL 37 (Jan 2002), No. 45.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding.

2 commentsCarausius05/27/18 at 04:55Jay GT4: Outstanding
image00301.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus and Lentulus Spinther, 42 BCE53 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus and Lentulus Spinther, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.91g; 20mm).
Military Mint (Smyrna?).

Obv: BRVTVS; axe, simpulum and knife.

Rev: LENTVLVS SPINT; jug and lituus.

References: Crawford 500/7; HCRI 198; Sydenham 1310; BMCRR East 80-1; Junia 41.

Provenance: Ex Stoeklin Collection [Nomos14 (17 May 2017) Lot 301]; ex Munzhandlung Basel 6 (18 Mar 1936), Lot 1483; ex Trau Collection [Gilhoffer & Ranschburg & Hess (22 May 1935), Lot 37].

The sacrificial implements on the obverse refer to Brutus' membership in the college of Pontifs. The implements on the reverse refer to Spinther's membership in the augurate since 57 BCE.

Spinther was the son of P. Cornelius Lentulus, whose nickname was Spinther (reportedly because he resembled an actor by that name). It was a nickname that his father clearly liked as both he and his son later used it on coins. His father was an aristocrat of the Cornelia gens, who was liked by Julius Caesar and worked with Cicero in suppressing the Cataline conspiracy. He was later governor of part of Spain. With Caesar’s help, his father was elected consul in 57BC, when he recalled Cicero from exile. Thereafter he governed Cilicia, at which time Cicero wrote him a still-surviving letter. As relations deteriorated between Caesar and Pompey, both Spinthers sided with Pompey. Despite initial offers of amnesty by Caesar, Spinther senior would not remain neutral and was eventually killed or committed suicide during the civil wars. His son later allied with Caesar’s assassins and struck coins for both Brutus and Cassius.
3 commentsCarausius05/23/18 at 06:39quadrans: I like this..
1521044195142126439108.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, 32 BCE60 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 32 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.72g; 18mm).
Athens Mint.

Obv: ANTON AVG IMP III COS DES III III V R P C. Bare head of Antony facing right.

Rev: ANTONIVS AVG IMP III, in two lines.

References: Crawford 542/2; HCRI 347; Sydenham 1209.

Provenance: Ex Andrew McCabe Collection [CNG eSale 385 (26 Oct 2016) Lot 470]; CNG 49 (17 Mar 1999), Lot 1316; Reinhold Faelten Collection [Stack's (20 Jan 1938) Lot 1495].

On the obverse, behind Antony’s ear, a small letter P, likely an engraver’s signature, is hidden within the hair line. This coin was struck in Athens in 32 BCE, while Antony and Cleopatra lived extravagantly among the Greeks. The coin’s inscription refers to a designated third consulship that Antony was supposed to share with Octavian in 31 BCE. Around the time this coin was minted, Antony notified his wife, Octavia (Octavian’s sister), in Rome that he was divorcing her. Octavian was outraged. Cleopatra’s growing influence over Antony was soon used by Octavian as progaganda to unite Italy and the West against Antony. Thus, the designated third consulship referenced on this coin never occurred, as the designated consuls went to war instead, ending with Antony’s naval defeat at Actium in September 31 BCE.
5 commentsCarausius04/18/18 at 16:58Mat:
1521044195142126439108.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, 32 BCE60 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 32 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.72g; 18mm).
Athens Mint.

Obv: ANTON AVG IMP III COS DES III III V R P C. Bare head of Antony facing right.

Rev: ANTONIVS AVG IMP III, in two lines.

References: Crawford 542/2; HCRI 347; Sydenham 1209.

Provenance: Ex Andrew McCabe Collection [CNG eSale 385 (26 Oct 2016) Lot 470]; CNG 49 (17 Mar 1999), Lot 1316; Reinhold Faelten Collection [Stack's (20 Jan 1938) Lot 1495].

On the obverse, behind Antony’s ear, a small letter P, likely an engraver’s signature, is hidden within the hair line. This coin was struck in Athens in 32 BCE, while Antony and Cleopatra lived extravagantly among the Greeks. The coin’s inscription refers to a designated third consulship that Antony was supposed to share with Octavian in 31 BCE. Around the time this coin was minted, Antony notified his wife, Octavia (Octavian’s sister), in Rome that he was divorcing her. Octavian was outraged. Cleopatra’s growing influence over Antony was soon used by Octavian as progaganda to unite Italy and the West against Antony. Thus, the designated third consulship referenced on this coin never occurred, as the designated consuls went to war instead, ending with Antony’s naval defeat at Actium in September 31 BCE.
5 commentsCarausius04/18/18 at 14:36Canaan: Great addition with great provenance congrats
1521044195142126439108.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, 32 BCE60 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 32 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.72g; 18mm).
Athens Mint.

Obv: ANTON AVG IMP III COS DES III III V R P C. Bare head of Antony facing right.

Rev: ANTONIVS AVG IMP III, in two lines.

References: Crawford 542/2; HCRI 347; Sydenham 1209.

Provenance: Ex Andrew McCabe Collection [CNG eSale 385 (26 Oct 2016) Lot 470]; CNG 49 (17 Mar 1999), Lot 1316; Reinhold Faelten Collection [Stack's (20 Jan 1938) Lot 1495].

On the obverse, behind Antony’s ear, a small letter P, likely an engraver’s signature, is hidden within the hair line. This coin was struck in Athens in 32 BCE, while Antony and Cleopatra lived extravagantly among the Greeks. The coin’s inscription refers to a designated third consulship that Antony was supposed to share with Octavian in 31 BCE. Around the time this coin was minted, Antony notified his wife, Octavia (Octavian’s sister), in Rome that he was divorcing her. Octavian was outraged. Cleopatra’s growing influence over Antony was soon used by Octavian as progaganda to unite Italy and the West against Antony. Thus, the designated third consulship referenced on this coin never occurred, as the designated consuls went to war instead, ending with Antony’s naval defeat at Actium in September 31 BCE.
5 commentsCarausius04/18/18 at 13:55David Atherton: Wonderful!
image00301.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus and Lentulus Spinther, 42 BCE53 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus and Lentulus Spinther, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.91g; 20mm).
Military Mint (Smyrna?).

Obv: BRVTVS; axe, simpulum and knife.

Rev: LENTVLVS SPINT; jug and lituus.

References: Crawford 500/7; HCRI 198; Sydenham 1310; BMCRR East 80-1; Junia 41.

Provenance: Ex Stoeklin Collection [Nomos14 (17 May 2017) Lot 301]; ex Munzhandlung Basel 6 (18 Mar 1936), Lot 1483; ex Trau Collection [Gilhoffer & Ranschburg & Hess (22 May 1935), Lot 37].

The sacrificial implements on the obverse refer to Brutus' membership in the college of Pontifs. The implements on the reverse refer to Spinther's membership in the augurate since 57 BCE.

Spinther was the son of P. Cornelius Lentulus, whose nickname was Spinther (reportedly because he resembled an actor by that name). It was a nickname that his father clearly liked as both he and his son later used it on coins. His father was an aristocrat of the Cornelia gens, who was liked by Julius Caesar and worked with Cicero in suppressing the Cataline conspiracy. He was later governor of part of Spain. With Caesar’s help, his father was elected consul in 57BC, when he recalled Cicero from exile. Thereafter he governed Cilicia, at which time Cicero wrote him a still-surviving letter. As relations deteriorated between Caesar and Pompey, both Spinthers sided with Pompey. Despite initial offers of amnesty by Caesar, Spinther senior would not remain neutral and was eventually killed or committed suicide during the civil wars. His son later allied with Caesar’s assassins and struck coins for both Brutus and Cassius.
3 commentsCarausius04/04/18 at 17:24Nemonater:
2951797.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Sextus Pompey, 42 BCE45 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Sextus Pompey, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.87g; 21mm).
Sicilian mint.

Obv: [M]AG PIVS IMP [ITER]. Bust of Neptune facing right; trident over shoulder.

Rev: [PR]AEF CLAS ET OR[AE MAR IT EX S C]. Naval trophy.

References: Crawford 511/2; HCRI 333; Sydenham 1347 (R5).

Provenance: Ex Stack's Bowers August 2016 ANA (10 Aug 2016), Lot 20139; ex Nomos Obolos 4 (21 Feb 2016), Lot 522; ex RBW Collection [NAC 63 (17 May 2012), Lot 538]; privately purchased from SKA Zurich, July 1985.

Sextus Pompey was a son of Pompey the Great. After Caesar's assassination, in 43 BCE, he was honored by the Senate with the title "Commander of the Fleet and Sea Coasts". Shortly following this honor, the Second Triumvirate was formed and placed Sextus' name on their proscription list. Sextus soon occupied Sicily where he provided haven to other Romans proscribed by the Triumvirs. He retained control of Sicily from 42 to 36 BCE.
4 commentsCarausius04/03/18 at 20:44okidoki: great and sharp
2951797.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Sextus Pompey, 42 BCE45 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Sextus Pompey, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.87g; 21mm).
Sicilian mint.

Obv: [M]AG PIVS IMP [ITER]. Bust of Neptune facing right; trident over shoulder.

Rev: [PR]AEF CLAS ET OR[AE MAR IT EX S C]. Naval trophy.

References: Crawford 511/2; HCRI 333; Sydenham 1347 (R5).

Provenance: Ex Stack's Bowers August 2016 ANA (10 Aug 2016), Lot 20139; ex Nomos Obolos 4 (21 Feb 2016), Lot 522; ex RBW Collection [NAC 63 (17 May 2012), Lot 538]; privately purchased from SKA Zurich, July 1985.

Sextus Pompey was a son of Pompey the Great. After Caesar's assassination, in 43 BCE, he was honored by the Senate with the title "Commander of the Fleet and Sea Coasts". Shortly following this honor, the Second Triumvirate was formed and placed Sextus' name on their proscription list. Sextus soon occupied Sicily where he provided haven to other Romans proscribed by the Triumvirs. He retained control of Sicily from 42 to 36 BCE.
4 commentsCarausius04/03/18 at 20:28Norbert: seen a number of these in recent auctions - and I ...
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Sextus Pompey, 42 BCE45 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Sextus Pompey, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.87g; 21mm).
Sicilian mint.

Obv: [M]AG PIVS IMP [ITER]. Bust of Neptune facing right; trident over shoulder.

Rev: [PR]AEF CLAS ET OR[AE MAR IT EX S C]. Naval trophy.

References: Crawford 511/2; HCRI 333; Sydenham 1347 (R5).

Provenance: Ex Stack's Bowers August 2016 ANA (10 Aug 2016), Lot 20139; ex Nomos Obolos 4 (21 Feb 2016), Lot 522; ex RBW Collection [NAC 63 (17 May 2012), Lot 538]; privately purchased from SKA Zurich, July 1985.

Sextus Pompey was a son of Pompey the Great. After Caesar's assassination, in 43 BCE, he was honored by the Senate with the title "Commander of the Fleet and Sea Coasts". Shortly following this honor, the Second Triumvirate was formed and placed Sextus' name on their proscription list. Sextus soon occupied Sicily where he provided haven to other Romans proscribed by the Triumvirs. He retained control of Sicily from 42 to 36 BCE.
4 commentsCarausius04/02/18 at 19:41shanxi: WOW
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus and Lentulus Spinther, 42 BCE53 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus and Lentulus Spinther, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.91g; 20mm).
Military Mint (Smyrna?).

Obv: BRVTVS; axe, simpulum and knife.

Rev: LENTVLVS SPINT; jug and lituus.

References: Crawford 500/7; HCRI 198; Sydenham 1310; BMCRR East 80-1; Junia 41.

Provenance: Ex Stoeklin Collection [Nomos14 (17 May 2017) Lot 301]; ex Munzhandlung Basel 6 (18 Mar 1936), Lot 1483; ex Trau Collection [Gilhoffer & Ranschburg & Hess (22 May 1935), Lot 37].

The sacrificial implements on the obverse refer to Brutus' membership in the college of Pontifs. The implements on the reverse refer to Spinther's membership in the augurate since 57 BCE.

Spinther was the son of P. Cornelius Lentulus, whose nickname was Spinther (reportedly because he resembled an actor by that name). It was a nickname that his father clearly liked as both he and his son later used it on coins. His father was an aristocrat of the Cornelia gens, who was liked by Julius Caesar and worked with Cicero in suppressing the Cataline conspiracy. He was later governor of part of Spain. With Caesar’s help, his father was elected consul in 57BC, when he recalled Cicero from exile. Thereafter he governed Cilicia, at which time Cicero wrote him a still-surviving letter. As relations deteriorated between Caesar and Pompey, both Spinthers sided with Pompey. Despite initial offers of amnesty by Caesar, Spinther senior would not remain neutral and was eventually killed or committed suicide during the civil wars. His son later allied with Caesar’s assassins and struck coins for both Brutus and Cassius.
3 commentsCarausius04/02/18 at 12:54Jay GT4: On my list! A must have. Great example and prove...
2951797.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Sextus Pompey, 42 BCE45 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Sextus Pompey, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.87g; 21mm).
Sicilian mint.

Obv: [M]AG PIVS IMP [ITER]. Bust of Neptune facing right; trident over shoulder.

Rev: [PR]AEF CLAS ET OR[AE MAR IT EX S C]. Naval trophy.

References: Crawford 511/2; HCRI 333; Sydenham 1347 (R5).

Provenance: Ex Stack's Bowers August 2016 ANA (10 Aug 2016), Lot 20139; ex Nomos Obolos 4 (21 Feb 2016), Lot 522; ex RBW Collection [NAC 63 (17 May 2012), Lot 538]; privately purchased from SKA Zurich, July 1985.

Sextus Pompey was a son of Pompey the Great. After Caesar's assassination, in 43 BCE, he was honored by the Senate with the title "Commander of the Fleet and Sea Coasts". Shortly following this honor, the Second Triumvirate was formed and placed Sextus' name on their proscription list. Sextus soon occupied Sicily where he provided haven to other Romans proscribed by the Triumvirs. He retained control of Sicily from 42 to 36 BCE.
4 commentsCarausius04/02/18 at 12:53Jay GT4:
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus, 43-42 BCE30 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus, 43-2 BC
AR Denarius (3.76 g; 21 mm)
Mint traveling with Brutus

Obv: LEIBERTAS. Liberty head facing right.

Rev: CAEPIO BRVTVS PRO COS. Lyre with quiver and filleted olive branch.

References: Crawford 501/1; HCRI 199; Smyth (1856) IX/11(this coin described).

Provenance: Ex NAC 84 (2015), Lot 859; NAC 9 (16 Apr 1996), Lot 758; NAC 4 (27 Feb 1991), Lot 289; NAC 2 (21 Feb 1990), Lot 481; Duke of Northumberland Collection [Sotheby's, 4 Nov 1982, Lot 475], acquired before 1856.

Liberty is a common theme on coins of the tyranicides who claimed to have liberated The Republic from the regal aspirations of Julius Caesar; so it's no surprise to find Libertas prominent on this coin of Brutus. Sear points out that the reverese is likely derived from the frequent depiction of lyres, quivers and fillteted branches on Lycian Leage coins. This issue was iikely struck in Lycia.

This coin holds the oldest, verifiable provenance in my collection. It is from the Duke of Northumberland Collection, catalogued by Admiral William Smyth in his 1856 book, "Descriptive Catalogue of A Cabinet of Roman Family Coins Belonging to His Grace the Duke of Northumberland," and subsequently sold by Sotheby’s in 1982. The Smyth book has no plates (line drawn or otherwise), but it does contain detailed descriptions of the collection coins with weights in grains. This coin is among those described in Smyth’s book, therefore it must have been acquired by the Duke’s family before 1856. Smyth described the collection as being in the Duke’s family for many years, so the ownership history conceivably dates to the 18th century.
1 commentsCarausius04/02/18 at 12:53Jay GT4: Great historical piece
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, M. Antony, 44 BCE36 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, Apr-May 44 BCE
AR Denarius (4.09g; 19mm)
Rome Mint.

Obv: Antony's bearded, veiled head facing right; jug behind; lituus before.

Rev: P.SEPVLLIVS//MACER. Desultor on horseback, holding whip, galloping right with second horse; wreath and palm behind.

References: Crawford 480/22; HCRI 142; Antonia 2.

Provenance: Ex Kuenker 262 (13 Mar 2015), Lot 7819; ex Gorny & Mosch 141 (10 Oct 2005), Lot 238; Gorny & Mosch 133 (11 Oct 2004), Lot 378.

Minted in 44 BCE, shortly after the assassination of Julius Caesar, this denarius depicts Antony in mourning - veiled and unshaven - likely as he appeared in the Forum when he gave his famous funeral oration. It is probably the first depiction of Antony on a coin. The reverse shows a desultor with two horses, and likely refers to games held in 44 BCE which were largely dedicated to Caesar's memory. The type can be found in better condition, but rarely this complete.

Desultors appear on several Republican coin types, including Crawford 297/1, 346/1 and 480/21. Desultors rode multiple horses and likely changed horses through some sort of fancy leap or dismount maneuver. The practice, with four horses rather than two, is referenced in the Illiad (II.15.680), so likely dates to Homeric times or earlier. As depicted on Republican coins, a Roman desultor rode two horses, bare-back which he managed by reins and whip, and he wore a pileus (felt cap) typically associated with the Dioscuri. The pileus raises the possibility thst the practice had religious connotations rather than a mere circus trick.
2 commentsCarausius03/31/18 at 19:08Jay GT4: Outstanding bearded Antony!
p63B2jD9r8bT4Q4rwj7N6YLyGea59X.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, M. Antony, 44 BCE36 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, Apr-May 44 BCE
AR Denarius (4.09g; 19mm)
Rome Mint.

Obv: Antony's bearded, veiled head facing right; jug behind; lituus before.

Rev: P.SEPVLLIVS//MACER. Desultor on horseback, holding whip, galloping right with second horse; wreath and palm behind.

References: Crawford 480/22; HCRI 142; Antonia 2.

Provenance: Ex Kuenker 262 (13 Mar 2015), Lot 7819; ex Gorny & Mosch 141 (10 Oct 2005), Lot 238; Gorny & Mosch 133 (11 Oct 2004), Lot 378.

Minted in 44 BCE, shortly after the assassination of Julius Caesar, this denarius depicts Antony in mourning - veiled and unshaven - likely as he appeared in the Forum when he gave his famous funeral oration. It is probably the first depiction of Antony on a coin. The reverse shows a desultor with two horses, and likely refers to games held in 44 BCE which were largely dedicated to Caesar's memory. The type can be found in better condition, but rarely this complete.

Desultors appear on several Republican coin types, including Crawford 297/1, 346/1 and 480/21. Desultors rode multiple horses and likely changed horses through some sort of fancy leap or dismount maneuver. The practice, with four horses rather than two, is referenced in the Illiad (II.15.680), so likely dates to Homeric times or earlier. As depicted on Republican coins, a Roman desultor rode two horses, bare-back which he managed by reins and whip, and he wore a pileus (felt cap) typically associated with the Dioscuri. The pileus raises the possibility thst the practice had religious connotations rather than a mere circus trick.
2 commentsCarausius03/31/18 at 07:07Canaan: Great coin!!!
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL - Julius Caesar - AR Denarius66 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Julius Caesar, 48 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.71g; 20mm).

Obverse: Head of Venus facing right; LII behind.

Reverse: Trophy with Gallic shield, carnyx and axe; CAESAR below.

References: Crawford 452/2; Sydenham 1009; HCRI 11; RSC 18.

Provenance: Ex Student/Mentor Collection [NAC 83 (15 May 2015) Lot 407]; ex Glendining's October 1965, Lot 22.

The Roman numeral LII behind the goddess' head on the obverse of this coin is accepted as a reference to Caesar's age at the time of the issue. There is some disagreement on the identity of the obverse goddess. Crawford identifies her as Venus, who is often depicted on Caesar's coins. Sear, in History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators, suggests Clementia (clemency) as the goddess, and a reference to Caesar's fairness to his countrymen following the defeat of Pompey at Pharsalus.
4 commentsCarausius03/30/18 at 23:57Simon: wow!
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Restio AR Denarius34 viewsRome, The Republic
C. Antius Restiio, 47 BC
Rome Mint

Obv: RESTIO; Head of Restio right.

Rev: C ANTIVS C F; Hercules advancing right with club and trophy.

Reference: Crawford 455/1b; HCRI 34; Sydenham 970 var (no cloak over arm); Banti Antia 1/2 (this coin illustrated)

Provenance: ex Student & Mentor Collection [NAC 83 (20 May 2015) Lot 411]; ex F. Sternberg VII (1977), Lot 448; ex Carlo Crippa List 3 (1967), Lot 394.

This is a rare variety of Restio denarius, on which Hercules bears no cloak over his left arm. Banti's corpus contains only three examples of this variety, one of which is this coin.
2 commentsCarausius03/30/18 at 21:18Canaan: A great coin!!!
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL - Julius Caesar - AR Denarius66 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Julius Caesar, 48 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.71g; 20mm).

Obverse: Head of Venus facing right; LII behind.

Reverse: Trophy with Gallic shield, carnyx and axe; CAESAR below.

References: Crawford 452/2; Sydenham 1009; HCRI 11; RSC 18.

Provenance: Ex Student/Mentor Collection [NAC 83 (15 May 2015) Lot 407]; ex Glendining's October 1965, Lot 22.

The Roman numeral LII behind the goddess' head on the obverse of this coin is accepted as a reference to Caesar's age at the time of the issue. There is some disagreement on the identity of the obverse goddess. Crawford identifies her as Venus, who is often depicted on Caesar's coins. Sear, in History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators, suggests Clementia (clemency) as the goddess, and a reference to Caesar's fairness to his countrymen following the defeat of Pompey at Pharsalus.
4 commentsCarausius03/30/18 at 21:14Canaan: Great coin, details and tone i love it!!
caesardenarius.png
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL - Julius Caesar - AR Denarius66 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Julius Caesar, 48 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.71g; 20mm).

Obverse: Head of Venus facing right; LII behind.

Reverse: Trophy with Gallic shield, carnyx and axe; CAESAR below.

References: Crawford 452/2; Sydenham 1009; HCRI 11; RSC 18.

Provenance: Ex Student/Mentor Collection [NAC 83 (15 May 2015) Lot 407]; ex Glendining's October 1965, Lot 22.

The Roman numeral LII behind the goddess' head on the obverse of this coin is accepted as a reference to Caesar's age at the time of the issue. There is some disagreement on the identity of the obverse goddess. Crawford identifies her as Venus, who is often depicted on Caesar's coins. Sear, in History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators, suggests Clementia (clemency) as the goddess, and a reference to Caesar's fairness to his countrymen following the defeat of Pompey at Pharsalus.
4 commentsCarausius03/14/18 at 13:22Jay GT4: A beauty!
WWy6n82S2LfKKm3s5BenTk4Pq9No7A.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Restio AR Denarius34 viewsRome, The Republic
C. Antius Restiio, 47 BC
Rome Mint

Obv: RESTIO; Head of Restio right.

Rev: C ANTIVS C F; Hercules advancing right with club and trophy.

Reference: Crawford 455/1b; HCRI 34; Sydenham 970 var (no cloak over arm); Banti Antia 1/2 (this coin illustrated)

Provenance: ex Student & Mentor Collection [NAC 83 (20 May 2015) Lot 411]; ex F. Sternberg VII (1977), Lot 448; ex Carlo Crippa List 3 (1967), Lot 394.

This is a rare variety of Restio denarius, on which Hercules bears no cloak over his left arm. Banti's corpus contains only three examples of this variety, one of which is this coin.
2 commentsCarausius02/16/18 at 20:08Pharsalos: Amazing coin, the obverse bust is breathtaking.
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion VI Denarius38 viewsRome, The Imperators
Mint traveling with Antony, ca. 31 BC
AR Denarius

Obv: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; Galley right.

Rev: LEG VI; Aquilia between two standards.

Reference: Crawford 544/19; HCRI 356

Provenance: ex CNG 103 (Sep 2016) Lot 664; ex Kirk Davis FPL 37 (Jan 2002), No. 45.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding.

2 commentsCarausius02/16/18 at 00:49Stkp: Nice
   
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