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Last comments - Imperial Coinage of Domitian
D383a.jpg
Domitian RIC-38337 viewsÆ As, 9.49g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: MONETA AVGVST; S C in field; Moneta stg. l., with scales and cornucopiae
RIC 383 (C3). BMC -. BNC 374.
Acquired from Musa Numismatic, September 2019.

In 82 Domitian reformed the coinage by increasing the weight of the gold and fineness of the silver. Production of the bronze coinage was suspended while the mint was reorganised and resumed in 84 with new reverse types and a higher artistic standard. Appropriately, one of the first types struck on the bronze after the coinage reform was Moneta, 'mint goddess of the emperor'. H. Mattingly believes Moneta in this context can be seen as symbolising Domitian's control of the mint and as paymaster to the empire. A fitting reverse design for an emperor who cared so much for his coinage. Mirroring the silver, many of the bronze coins struck in the first year or so after the coinage reform have portraits with an aegis, an extra detail likely due to Domitian's attentive care. Under Domitian Moneta became a regular feature of the coinage and was struck year after year on the As issues. This example from 85 is one of the most common types struck for the As that year. Oddly enough, it is missing from the BM.

One gets the impression that Domitian was quite proud of his coinage reforms and Moneta was a symbolic reverse celebrating that achievement.

A nice example in hand, much better than the photo suggests.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/21/19 at 16:39Rob P: Very cool best of type ive seen
D383a.jpg
Domitian RIC-38337 viewsÆ As, 9.49g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: MONETA AVGVST; S C in field; Moneta stg. l., with scales and cornucopiae
RIC 383 (C3). BMC -. BNC 374.
Acquired from Musa Numismatic, September 2019.

In 82 Domitian reformed the coinage by increasing the weight of the gold and fineness of the silver. Production of the bronze coinage was suspended while the mint was reorganised and resumed in 84 with new reverse types and a higher artistic standard. Appropriately, one of the first types struck on the bronze after the coinage reform was Moneta, 'mint goddess of the emperor'. H. Mattingly believes Moneta in this context can be seen as symbolising Domitian's control of the mint and as paymaster to the empire. A fitting reverse design for an emperor who cared so much for his coinage. Mirroring the silver, many of the bronze coins struck in the first year or so after the coinage reform have portraits with an aegis, an extra detail likely due to Domitian's attentive care. Under Domitian Moneta became a regular feature of the coinage and was struck year after year on the As issues. This example from 85 is one of the most common types struck for the As that year. Oddly enough, it is missing from the BM.

One gets the impression that Domitian was quite proud of his coinage reforms and Moneta was a symbolic reverse celebrating that achievement.

A nice example in hand, much better than the photo suggests.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/21/19 at 09:52FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example
D383a.jpg
Domitian RIC-38337 viewsÆ As, 9.49g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: MONETA AVGVST; S C in field; Moneta stg. l., with scales and cornucopiae
RIC 383 (C3). BMC -. BNC 374.
Acquired from Musa Numismatic, September 2019.

In 82 Domitian reformed the coinage by increasing the weight of the gold and fineness of the silver. Production of the bronze coinage was suspended while the mint was reorganised and resumed in 84 with new reverse types and a higher artistic standard. Appropriately, one of the first types struck on the bronze after the coinage reform was Moneta, 'mint goddess of the emperor'. H. Mattingly believes Moneta in this context can be seen as symbolising Domitian's control of the mint and as paymaster to the empire. A fitting reverse design for an emperor who cared so much for his coinage. Mirroring the silver, many of the bronze coins struck in the first year or so after the coinage reform have portraits with an aegis, an extra detail likely due to Domitian's attentive care. Under Domitian Moneta became a regular feature of the coinage and was struck year after year on the As issues. This example from 85 is one of the most common types struck for the As that year. Oddly enough, it is missing from the BM.

One gets the impression that Domitian was quite proud of his coinage reforms and Moneta was a symbolic reverse celebrating that achievement.

A nice example in hand, much better than the photo suggests.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/20/19 at 22:59Jay GT4: Sweet!
V669a.jpg
01 Domitian as Caesar RIC 66923 viewsÆ As, 11.05g
Rome mint, 73-74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIAN COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
RIC 669 (C). BMC -. BNC 699.
Acquired from Musa Numismatics, August 2019.

The propaganda value of Pax for the Flavian dynasty after the Civil War, the revolt of Civilis, and the Jewish War cannot be underestimated. In her various guises she is one of the most popular types on Vespasian's coinage and shows up quite frequently during the reign on the coins struck for both himself and his sons. This As struck for Domitian as Caesar shows Pax leaning on a column, which likely copies a well known cult image of the goddess.

Tellingly, less than a decade later, Pax would not feature so prominently on Domitian's own coinage as Emperor.

Fine style early portrait.
1 commentsDavid Atherton09/07/19 at 12:43Jay GT4: Lovely portrait
D709a.jpg
Domitian RIC-70925 viewsÆ As, 10.61g
Rome mint, 90-91 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XV CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VIRTVTI AVGVSTI; S C in field; Virtus stg. r., foot on helmet, with spear and parazonium
RIC 709 (C2). BMC 452. BNC 482.
Acquired from Prafectus Coins, August 2019.

The Virtus type was struck repeatedly on Domitian's middle bronze from 84 onwards. I. Carradice in his 1983 monograph on Domitian's coinage says the following concerning the type - 'Virtus is a military type, symbolic of the courage of Domitian and the mutual devotion between the army and emperor.' Virtus first appears on the coinage in the flurry of Germania Capta types that were struck soon after Domitian's German triumph. She is depicted in traditional Amazon attire.

A superb example in fine style.
1 commentsDavid Atherton09/05/19 at 12:51Jay GT4: Wonderful reverse and strong portrait
D397sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-39742 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.19g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM XI CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, r., with aegis
Rev: GERMANIA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Trophy; to r., German captive stg. r., hands bound, head l.; to l., Germania std. l.; around arms
RIC 397 (R2). BMC 361. BNC -.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, August 2019.

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The details of the war are unclear, but the overall impression is that the conflict was a minor affair blown out of proportion by an emperor eager for military glory. Consequently, Domitian's Germanic triumph of 83 received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. Germania Capta types were first struck in silver in 84 and in bronze in 85. This iconic Germania Capta sestertius strongly echoes Vespasian's Judaea Capta types - but instead of a trophy we see a palm tree and a bound captive replaces the triumphal emperor. H. Mattingly writes in BMCRE 'the type is closely modelled on the Judaea Capta of Vespasian, but the German element is indicated by the heavy angular cloak worn by the man and by the oblong shields.' Comparing the two triumphs, the Josephian scholar Steve Mason remarked - 'The same people who produced Flavian Triumph I: Judaea were on hand for Flavian Triumph II: Germania, and sequels are rarely as good as the originals.'

The Germania Capta sestertii were produced for only a few short years between 85-88. The present example from the third issue of 85 is a rare variant with an obverse legend struck just after Domitian had become censor for life (CENS PER).
3 commentsDavid Atherton08/25/19 at 12:21Jay GT4: I love these huge 1st century sestertii
D397sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-39742 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.19g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM XI CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, r., with aegis
Rev: GERMANIA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Trophy; to r., German captive stg. r., hands bound, head l.; to l., Germania std. l.; around arms
RIC 397 (R2). BMC 361. BNC -.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, August 2019.

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The details of the war are unclear, but the overall impression is that the conflict was a minor affair blown out of proportion by an emperor eager for military glory. Consequently, Domitian's Germanic triumph of 83 received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. Germania Capta types were first struck in silver in 84 and in bronze in 85. This iconic Germania Capta sestertius strongly echoes Vespasian's Judaea Capta types - but instead of a trophy we see a palm tree and a bound captive replaces the triumphal emperor. H. Mattingly writes in BMCRE 'the type is closely modelled on the Judaea Capta of Vespasian, but the German element is indicated by the heavy angular cloak worn by the man and by the oblong shields.' Comparing the two triumphs, the Josephian scholar Steve Mason remarked - 'The same people who produced Flavian Triumph I: Judaea were on hand for Flavian Triumph II: Germania, and sequels are rarely as good as the originals.'

The Germania Capta sestertii were produced for only a few short years between 85-88. The present example from the third issue of 85 is a rare variant with an obverse legend struck just after Domitian had become censor for life (CENS PER).
3 commentsDavid Atherton08/25/19 at 10:43Nemonater: Awesome addition!
D397sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-39742 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.19g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM XI CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, r., with aegis
Rev: GERMANIA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Trophy; to r., German captive stg. r., hands bound, head l.; to l., Germania std. l.; around arms
RIC 397 (R2). BMC 361. BNC -.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, August 2019.

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The details of the war are unclear, but the overall impression is that the conflict was a minor affair blown out of proportion by an emperor eager for military glory. Consequently, Domitian's Germanic triumph of 83 received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. Germania Capta types were first struck in silver in 84 and in bronze in 85. This iconic Germania Capta sestertius strongly echoes Vespasian's Judaea Capta types - but instead of a trophy we see a palm tree and a bound captive replaces the triumphal emperor. H. Mattingly writes in BMCRE 'the type is closely modelled on the Judaea Capta of Vespasian, but the German element is indicated by the heavy angular cloak worn by the man and by the oblong shields.' Comparing the two triumphs, the Josephian scholar Steve Mason remarked - 'The same people who produced Flavian Triumph I: Judaea were on hand for Flavian Triumph II: Germania, and sequels are rarely as good as the originals.'

The Germania Capta sestertii were produced for only a few short years between 85-88. The present example from the third issue of 85 is a rare variant with an obverse legend struck just after Domitian had become censor for life (CENS PER).
3 commentsDavid Atherton08/25/19 at 09:34FlaviusDomitianus: Glad you got one of these.
D385a.jpg
Domitian RIC-38536 viewsÆ As, 10.60g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: SALVTI above, AVGVSTI below; S C in field; Altar
RIC 385 (C2). BMC 358. BNC 379.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, August 2019.

The SALVTI AVGVSTI altar type was first introduced on Domitian's aes coinage in 84 after a brief hiatus of the Senatorial mint's production in 82-83, presumably for re-organisational purposes. The structure on the reverse has been traditionally described as an altar, however, Marvin Tameanko has convincingly argued it is actually a sacellum, or small shrine. He states the steps at the base leading to two doors with handles are overwhelming evidence that the structure was much larger than an altar. As far as the shrine's significance - H. Mattingly in BMCRE II interprets the type as commemorating the Senate's dedication of an altar shrine celebrating Domitian's safe return from the Germanic Wars of 82-83. Alternately, the shrine may have been dedicated as an appeal to Salus for the emperor's continued good health. In any case, no trace of the shrine has survived antiquity.

This As with its aegis, large flan (30mm), and elegant idealised style are all hallmarks of the new direction introduced after the Senatorial mint's overhaul.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/19/19 at 17:14Gary W2: Nice detail on the altar. I also love the broad fl...
D367.jpg
Domitian RIC-36760 viewsÆ Dupondius, 11.64g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: ANNONA AVG; S C in exergue; Annona, std r., holding open on lap by two ends bag full of corn-ears; in front of her stands a small figure, l., also holding two ends of bag, and in the background, stern of ship
RIC 367 (C). BMC 347. BNC 364.
Ex eBay, August 2019.

A most curious reverse type was struck for Domitian on his dupondii for a short period between 84-88. Here we see Annona seated holding open a bag(?) of corn-ears and a mysterious small figure standing before her holding the other end of the bag with a ship's stern in the background. Overall, the reverse likely alludes to Domitian's care of the corn supply, hinted at by the stern, here a symbol of the all important African grain ships. The small individual before Annona has variously been described as a 'boy', a 'child', or ambiguously as just a 'figure'. H. Mattingly has the most imaginative explanation in BMCRE II - 'Annona herself, the spirit of the corn-supply, and the ship, the symbol of the overseas corn, are familiar: but who is the small figure who stands before her? He is certainly no child, but only a man reduced to tiny proportions beside the goddess; and the fact that he is bare to the waist may suggest that he is an Italian farmer. If this interpretation is right, the type records a definite policy of Domitian to encourage the growing of corn in Italy.' Mattingly may be correct about the overall meaning, but I think the figure is indeed a child, symbolic of the emperor's care, through Annona's auspices, for his subjects.

Flatly struck on one side, but in fine style.
7 commentsDavid Atherton08/19/19 at 15:45Mat: A nice find
D385a.jpg
Domitian RIC-38536 viewsÆ As, 10.60g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: SALVTI above, AVGVSTI below; S C in field; Altar
RIC 385 (C2). BMC 358. BNC 379.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, August 2019.

The SALVTI AVGVSTI altar type was first introduced on Domitian's aes coinage in 84 after a brief hiatus of the Senatorial mint's production in 82-83, presumably for re-organisational purposes. The structure on the reverse has been traditionally described as an altar, however, Marvin Tameanko has convincingly argued it is actually a sacellum, or small shrine. He states the steps at the base leading to two doors with handles are overwhelming evidence that the structure was much larger than an altar. As far as the shrine's significance - H. Mattingly in BMCRE II interprets the type as commemorating the Senate's dedication of an altar shrine celebrating Domitian's safe return from the Germanic Wars of 82-83. Alternately, the shrine may have been dedicated as an appeal to Salus for the emperor's continued good health. In any case, no trace of the shrine has survived antiquity.

This As with its aegis, large flan (30mm), and elegant idealised style are all hallmarks of the new direction introduced after the Senatorial mint's overhaul.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/19/19 at 15:44Mat: A wonderful bronze!
D385a.jpg
Domitian RIC-38536 viewsÆ As, 10.60g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: SALVTI above, AVGVSTI below; S C in field; Altar
RIC 385 (C2). BMC 358. BNC 379.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, August 2019.

The SALVTI AVGVSTI altar type was first introduced on Domitian's aes coinage in 84 after a brief hiatus of the Senatorial mint's production in 82-83, presumably for re-organisational purposes. The structure on the reverse has been traditionally described as an altar, however, Marvin Tameanko has convincingly argued it is actually a sacellum, or small shrine. He states the steps at the base leading to two doors with handles are overwhelming evidence that the structure was much larger than an altar. As far as the shrine's significance - H. Mattingly in BMCRE II interprets the type as commemorating the Senate's dedication of an altar shrine celebrating Domitian's safe return from the Germanic Wars of 82-83. Alternately, the shrine may have been dedicated as an appeal to Salus for the emperor's continued good health. In any case, no trace of the shrine has survived antiquity.

This As with its aegis, large flan (30mm), and elegant idealised style are all hallmarks of the new direction introduced after the Senatorial mint's overhaul.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/19/19 at 14:09FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example
D385a.jpg
Domitian RIC-38536 viewsÆ As, 10.60g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: SALVTI above, AVGVSTI below; S C in field; Altar
RIC 385 (C2). BMC 358. BNC 379.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, August 2019.

The SALVTI AVGVSTI altar type was first introduced on Domitian's aes coinage in 84 after a brief hiatus of the Senatorial mint's production in 82-83, presumably for re-organisational purposes. The structure on the reverse has been traditionally described as an altar, however, Marvin Tameanko has convincingly argued it is actually a sacellum, or small shrine. He states the steps at the base leading to two doors with handles are overwhelming evidence that the structure was much larger than an altar. As far as the shrine's significance - H. Mattingly in BMCRE II interprets the type as commemorating the Senate's dedication of an altar shrine celebrating Domitian's safe return from the Germanic Wars of 82-83. Alternately, the shrine may have been dedicated as an appeal to Salus for the emperor's continued good health. In any case, no trace of the shrine has survived antiquity.

This As with its aegis, large flan (30mm), and elegant idealised style are all hallmarks of the new direction introduced after the Senatorial mint's overhaul.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/19/19 at 11:03Jay GT4: Lovely patina
D68.JPG
Domitian RIC 68109 viewsAR Denarius, 3.08g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, winged thunderbolt
RIC 68 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.

The early pulvinar denarii struck by Domitian tell the story of an emperor who was awarded titles in stages. The "PONT" series were minted before Domitian obtained the full title Pontifex Maximus, presumably until the proper religious rites were completed. Most "PONT" denarii are listed as R2 or R3. Interestingly, this Group 4 denarius shares the same obverse die as my very rare Group 3 RIC 34 with the same reverse type but with a different legend, proof that the two groups were struck simultaneously. At this time the mint was divided up into different officinae based on reverse types. No obverses die matches are found with different reverse types.

A great early style portrait and finely toned.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/17/19 at 23:29orfew: A wonderful coin. These PONT denarii are really in...
D833.jpg
Domitian RIC-83354 viewsÆ Dupondius, 12.14g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 81 AD
Obv: IMP D CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VII; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in exergue; Roma std. l. on cuirass, with wreath and parazonium
RIC 833 (R). BMC 513. RPC 528. BNC 549.
Ex eBay, July 2019.

An unidentified Eastern mint struck aes coinage for Titus between 80-81 and then for Domitian in 81-82. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends, and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issues consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome.

Production at this Eastern mint continued uninterrupted between Titus' and Domitian's reigns, hinted at by Domitian's seamless adoption of Titus' types and legend formula after his accession - exemplified by the minor substitution of a 'D' for a 'T' in the obverse legend of this dupondius. Roma is the only reverse type struck on the dupondius for both issues. The coinage struck under Domitian at this mint is quite rare, owing to the short time frame in which it was produced. After its closure in early 82, the striking of imperial coinage would be consolidated at Rome for the remainder of Domitian's reign.

Handsome dark patina and honest wear.
3 commentsDavid Atherton08/13/19 at 03:03Steve P: pretty cool
D367.jpg
Domitian RIC-36760 viewsÆ Dupondius, 11.64g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: ANNONA AVG; S C in exergue; Annona, std r., holding open on lap by two ends bag full of corn-ears; in front of her stands a small figure, l., also holding two ends of bag, and in the background, stern of ship
RIC 367 (C). BMC 347. BNC 364.
Ex eBay, August 2019.

A most curious reverse type was struck for Domitian on his dupondii for a short period between 84-88. Here we see Annona seated holding open a bag(?) of corn-ears and a mysterious small figure standing before her holding the other end of the bag with a ship's stern in the background. Overall, the reverse likely alludes to Domitian's care of the corn supply, hinted at by the stern, here a symbol of the all important African grain ships. The small individual before Annona has variously been described as a 'boy', a 'child', or ambiguously as just a 'figure'. H. Mattingly has the most imaginative explanation in BMCRE II - 'Annona herself, the spirit of the corn-supply, and the ship, the symbol of the overseas corn, are familiar: but who is the small figure who stands before her? He is certainly no child, but only a man reduced to tiny proportions beside the goddess; and the fact that he is bare to the waist may suggest that he is an Italian farmer. If this interpretation is right, the type records a definite policy of Domitian to encourage the growing of corn in Italy.' Mattingly may be correct about the overall meaning, but I think the figure is indeed a child, symbolic of the emperor's care, through Annona's auspices, for his subjects.

Flatly struck on one side, but in fine style.
7 commentsDavid Atherton08/13/19 at 03:02Steve P: Super sweet addition, Atherton => keep that sh*t-u...
D367.jpg
Domitian RIC-36760 viewsÆ Dupondius, 11.64g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: ANNONA AVG; S C in exergue; Annona, std r., holding open on lap by two ends bag full of corn-ears; in front of her stands a small figure, l., also holding two ends of bag, and in the background, stern of ship
RIC 367 (C). BMC 347. BNC 364.
Ex eBay, August 2019.

A most curious reverse type was struck for Domitian on his dupondii for a short period between 84-88. Here we see Annona seated holding open a bag(?) of corn-ears and a mysterious small figure standing before her holding the other end of the bag with a ship's stern in the background. Overall, the reverse likely alludes to Domitian's care of the corn supply, hinted at by the stern, here a symbol of the all important African grain ships. The small individual before Annona has variously been described as a 'boy', a 'child', or ambiguously as just a 'figure'. H. Mattingly has the most imaginative explanation in BMCRE II - 'Annona herself, the spirit of the corn-supply, and the ship, the symbol of the overseas corn, are familiar: but who is the small figure who stands before her? He is certainly no child, but only a man reduced to tiny proportions beside the goddess; and the fact that he is bare to the waist may suggest that he is an Italian farmer. If this interpretation is right, the type records a definite policy of Domitian to encourage the growing of corn in Italy.' Mattingly may be correct about the overall meaning, but I think the figure is indeed a child, symbolic of the emperor's care, through Annona's auspices, for his subjects.

Flatly struck on one side, but in fine style.
7 commentsDavid Atherton08/11/19 at 10:05FlaviusDomitianus: I love this type.
D367.jpg
Domitian RIC-36760 viewsÆ Dupondius, 11.64g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: ANNONA AVG; S C in exergue; Annona, std r., holding open on lap by two ends bag full of corn-ears; in front of her stands a small figure, l., also holding two ends of bag, and in the background, stern of ship
RIC 367 (C). BMC 347. BNC 364.
Ex eBay, August 2019.

A most curious reverse type was struck for Domitian on his dupondii for a short period between 84-88. Here we see Annona seated holding open a bag(?) of corn-ears and a mysterious small figure standing before her holding the other end of the bag with a ship's stern in the background. Overall, the reverse likely alludes to Domitian's care of the corn supply, hinted at by the stern, here a symbol of the all important African grain ships. The small individual before Annona has variously been described as a 'boy', a 'child', or ambiguously as just a 'figure'. H. Mattingly has the most imaginative explanation in BMCRE II - 'Annona herself, the spirit of the corn-supply, and the ship, the symbol of the overseas corn, are familiar: but who is the small figure who stands before her? He is certainly no child, but only a man reduced to tiny proportions beside the goddess; and the fact that he is bare to the waist may suggest that he is an Italian farmer. If this interpretation is right, the type records a definite policy of Domitian to encourage the growing of corn in Italy.' Mattingly may be correct about the overall meaning, but I think the figure is indeed a child, symbolic of the emperor's care, through Annona's auspices, for his subjects.

Flatly struck on one side, but in fine style.
7 commentsDavid Atherton08/11/19 at 07:54quadrans: Nice find...
D367.jpg
Domitian RIC-36760 viewsÆ Dupondius, 11.64g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: ANNONA AVG; S C in exergue; Annona, std r., holding open on lap by two ends bag full of corn-ears; in front of her stands a small figure, l., also holding two ends of bag, and in the background, stern of ship
RIC 367 (C). BMC 347. BNC 364.
Ex eBay, August 2019.

A most curious reverse type was struck for Domitian on his dupondii for a short period between 84-88. Here we see Annona seated holding open a bag(?) of corn-ears and a mysterious small figure standing before her holding the other end of the bag with a ship's stern in the background. Overall, the reverse likely alludes to Domitian's care of the corn supply, hinted at by the stern, here a symbol of the all important African grain ships. The small individual before Annona has variously been described as a 'boy', a 'child', or ambiguously as just a 'figure'. H. Mattingly has the most imaginative explanation in BMCRE II - 'Annona herself, the spirit of the corn-supply, and the ship, the symbol of the overseas corn, are familiar: but who is the small figure who stands before her? He is certainly no child, but only a man reduced to tiny proportions beside the goddess; and the fact that he is bare to the waist may suggest that he is an Italian farmer. If this interpretation is right, the type records a definite policy of Domitian to encourage the growing of corn in Italy.' Mattingly may be correct about the overall meaning, but I think the figure is indeed a child, symbolic of the emperor's care, through Annona's auspices, for his subjects.

Flatly struck on one side, but in fine style.
7 commentsDavid Atherton08/11/19 at 07:48okidoki: Interesting reverse
D367.jpg
Domitian RIC-36760 viewsÆ Dupondius, 11.64g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: ANNONA AVG; S C in exergue; Annona, std r., holding open on lap by two ends bag full of corn-ears; in front of her stands a small figure, l., also holding two ends of bag, and in the background, stern of ship
RIC 367 (C). BMC 347. BNC 364.
Ex eBay, August 2019.

A most curious reverse type was struck for Domitian on his dupondii for a short period between 84-88. Here we see Annona seated holding open a bag(?) of corn-ears and a mysterious small figure standing before her holding the other end of the bag with a ship's stern in the background. Overall, the reverse likely alludes to Domitian's care of the corn supply, hinted at by the stern, here a symbol of the all important African grain ships. The small individual before Annona has variously been described as a 'boy', a 'child', or ambiguously as just a 'figure'. H. Mattingly has the most imaginative explanation in BMCRE II - 'Annona herself, the spirit of the corn-supply, and the ship, the symbol of the overseas corn, are familiar: but who is the small figure who stands before her? He is certainly no child, but only a man reduced to tiny proportions beside the goddess; and the fact that he is bare to the waist may suggest that he is an Italian farmer. If this interpretation is right, the type records a definite policy of Domitian to encourage the growing of corn in Italy.' Mattingly may be correct about the overall meaning, but I think the figure is indeed a child, symbolic of the emperor's care, through Annona's auspices, for his subjects.

Flatly struck on one side, but in fine style.
7 commentsDavid Atherton08/11/19 at 07:35shanxi: very interesting
D367.jpg
Domitian RIC-36760 viewsÆ Dupondius, 11.64g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: ANNONA AVG; S C in exergue; Annona, std r., holding open on lap by two ends bag full of corn-ears; in front of her stands a small figure, l., also holding two ends of bag, and in the background, stern of ship
RIC 367 (C). BMC 347. BNC 364.
Ex eBay, August 2019.

A most curious reverse type was struck for Domitian on his dupondii for a short period between 84-88. Here we see Annona seated holding open a bag(?) of corn-ears and a mysterious small figure standing before her holding the other end of the bag with a ship's stern in the background. Overall, the reverse likely alludes to Domitian's care of the corn supply, hinted at by the stern, here a symbol of the all important African grain ships. The small individual before Annona has variously been described as a 'boy', a 'child', or ambiguously as just a 'figure'. H. Mattingly has the most imaginative explanation in BMCRE II - 'Annona herself, the spirit of the corn-supply, and the ship, the symbol of the overseas corn, are familiar: but who is the small figure who stands before her? He is certainly no child, but only a man reduced to tiny proportions beside the goddess; and the fact that he is bare to the waist may suggest that he is an Italian farmer. If this interpretation is right, the type records a definite policy of Domitian to encourage the growing of corn in Italy.' Mattingly may be correct about the overall meaning, but I think the figure is indeed a child, symbolic of the emperor's care, through Annona's auspices, for his subjects.

Flatly struck on one side, but in fine style.
7 commentsDavid Atherton08/11/19 at 03:56Jay GT4: Glad you got this, I was considering bidding
D833.jpg
Domitian RIC-83354 viewsÆ Dupondius, 12.14g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 81 AD
Obv: IMP D CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VII; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in exergue; Roma std. l. on cuirass, with wreath and parazonium
RIC 833 (R). BMC 513. RPC 528. BNC 549.
Ex eBay, July 2019.

An unidentified Eastern mint struck aes coinage for Titus between 80-81 and then for Domitian in 81-82. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends, and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issues consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome.

Production at this Eastern mint continued uninterrupted between Titus' and Domitian's reigns, hinted at by Domitian's seamless adoption of Titus' types and legend formula after his accession - exemplified by the minor substitution of a 'D' for a 'T' in the obverse legend of this dupondius. Roma is the only reverse type struck on the dupondius for both issues. The coinage struck under Domitian at this mint is quite rare, owing to the short time frame in which it was produced. After its closure in early 82, the striking of imperial coinage would be consolidated at Rome for the remainder of Domitian's reign.

Handsome dark patina and honest wear.
3 commentsDavid Atherton08/10/19 at 09:34quadrans: Nice find...
D833.jpg
Domitian RIC-83354 viewsÆ Dupondius, 12.14g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 81 AD
Obv: IMP D CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VII; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in exergue; Roma std. l. on cuirass, with wreath and parazonium
RIC 833 (R). BMC 513. RPC 528. BNC 549.
Ex eBay, July 2019.

An unidentified Eastern mint struck aes coinage for Titus between 80-81 and then for Domitian in 81-82. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends, and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issues consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome.

Production at this Eastern mint continued uninterrupted between Titus' and Domitian's reigns, hinted at by Domitian's seamless adoption of Titus' types and legend formula after his accession - exemplified by the minor substitution of a 'D' for a 'T' in the obverse legend of this dupondius. Roma is the only reverse type struck on the dupondius for both issues. The coinage struck under Domitian at this mint is quite rare, owing to the short time frame in which it was produced. After its closure in early 82, the striking of imperial coinage would be consolidated at Rome for the remainder of Domitian's reign.

Handsome dark patina and honest wear.
3 commentsDavid Atherton08/10/19 at 07:15FlaviusDomitianus: These coins come often with a very dark patination...
D99a.jpg
Domitian RIC 99147 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT COS VIII P P; Minerva stg. l., with Victory and sceptre; at feet, shield
RIC 99 (R). BMC 25. RSC 592a. BNC -.
Acquired from Pars Coins, eBay, 20 January 2016.

A rare coin that is part of the first issue of 82, but the last to be struck on the old standard. After this issue Domitian would increase the fineness and weight of the denarius as part of a coinage reform. Minerva and Victory did not become one of the standard Minerva types that were struck year after year until the end of the reign. It made its last appearance in this issue and is the scarcest type of the series.

Struck with new dies in superb veristic style. A really beautiful denarius showcasing the fine technical and artistic craftsmanship of the Rome mint.
8 commentsDavid Atherton08/02/19 at 16:55orfew: That is gorgeous!
D707.jpg
Domitian RIC-70756 viewsÆ As, 9.32g
Rome mint, 90-91 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XV CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: FORTVNAE AVGVSTI; S C in field; Fortuna stg. l., with rudder and cornucopiae
RIC 707 (C). BMC 448. BNC 480.
Acquired from eBay, July 2019.

This common Fortuna type was repeatedly struck throughout Domitian's reign on his middle bronze. She also fleetingly showed up on the denarius in 82. Mattingly calls this Fortuna 'the special Fortuna that watches over the imperial office'. Suetonius writes that near the end of Domitian's reign on 1 January 96 'The Fortuna of Praeneste, which throughout the whole time he was emperor had habitually given him a happy and virtually the same answer to him whenever he entrusted the new year to her care, finally gave a most gloomy answer - and not without the mention of blood.'

Good middle period style and nicely centred.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/29/19 at 16:45okidoki: excellent
D707.jpg
Domitian RIC-70756 viewsÆ As, 9.32g
Rome mint, 90-91 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XV CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: FORTVNAE AVGVSTI; S C in field; Fortuna stg. l., with rudder and cornucopiae
RIC 707 (C). BMC 448. BNC 480.
Acquired from eBay, July 2019.

This common Fortuna type was repeatedly struck throughout Domitian's reign on his middle bronze. She also fleetingly showed up on the denarius in 82. Mattingly calls this Fortuna 'the special Fortuna that watches over the imperial office'. Suetonius writes that near the end of Domitian's reign on 1 January 96 'The Fortuna of Praeneste, which throughout the whole time he was emperor had habitually given him a happy and virtually the same answer to him whenever he entrusted the new year to her care, finally gave a most gloomy answer - and not without the mention of blood.'

Good middle period style and nicely centred.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/29/19 at 15:43Jay GT4: Not bad!
D707.jpg
Domitian RIC-70756 viewsÆ As, 9.32g
Rome mint, 90-91 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XV CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: FORTVNAE AVGVSTI; S C in field; Fortuna stg. l., with rudder and cornucopiae
RIC 707 (C). BMC 448. BNC 480.
Acquired from eBay, July 2019.

This common Fortuna type was repeatedly struck throughout Domitian's reign on his middle bronze. She also fleetingly showed up on the denarius in 82. Mattingly calls this Fortuna 'the special Fortuna that watches over the imperial office'. Suetonius writes that near the end of Domitian's reign on 1 January 96 'The Fortuna of Praeneste, which throughout the whole time he was emperor had habitually given him a happy and virtually the same answer to him whenever he entrusted the new year to her care, finally gave a most gloomy answer - and not without the mention of blood.'

Good middle period style and nicely centred.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/29/19 at 14:20FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example of the type.
D333aa.JPG
Domitian RIC-333109 viewsAR Denarius, 3.19g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT•P•P•; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 333 (R2). BMC specimen acquired 1987. RSC 180. BNC 80.
Acquired from Germania Inferior, January 2018.

In 82 Domitian increased the silver fineness of the denarius to nearly 100% purity. Three years later in mid 85 the fineness was again adjusted, this time downward to c. 90%, presumably for monetary or fiscal reasons. Domitian also assumed the powers of censor in April of 85 which was recorded on the coinage. The title was successively contracted in three issues - CENSORIA POTESTAT, CENS POTES, and CENS POT. According to metal analyses by Walker and more recently confirmed by Butcher and Ponting, Domitian's second coinage reform took place between the last two issues - the CENS POT issue being the first under the new standard. Curiously, this 'CENS POT' denarius has what appears to be 'al marco' weight adjustment marks, plainly visible on the reverse to the left of Minerva. Is it possibly during the minting of this first issue under the new standard the mint workers were extra careful with the coinage's weight? Whatever the case, the gouges must date to antiquity owing to the fact they are toned just as the unblemished surfaces are.

An extremely rare coin. Engraved in the period's typical fine style.

6 commentsDavid Atherton07/20/19 at 17:37orfew: Wonderful piece. Well done!
D110a.jpg
Domitian RIC-11055 viewsÆ As, 10.56g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VIII DES VIIII P P; S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
RIC 110 (C3). BMC 281. BNC 290.
Acquired from Holding History, eBay, June 2019.

Early in Domitian's reign Minerva figured prominently on the aes coinage. This As from early 82 featuring his patron deity with spear and shield would later be adopted by the denarius issues after the overhaul of the mint later in the year. It would become one of the standard four Minerva types for that denomination.

Fetching olive green patina.
4 commentsDavid Atherton07/07/19 at 20:22Nemonater: Beautiful!
D110a.jpg
Domitian RIC-11055 viewsÆ As, 10.56g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VIII DES VIIII P P; S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
RIC 110 (C3). BMC 281. BNC 290.
Acquired from Holding History, eBay, June 2019.

Early in Domitian's reign Minerva figured prominently on the aes coinage. This As from early 82 featuring his patron deity with spear and shield would later be adopted by the denarius issues after the overhaul of the mint later in the year. It would become one of the standard four Minerva types for that denomination.

Fetching olive green patina.
4 commentsDavid Atherton07/07/19 at 14:41FlaviusDomitianus: Nice patina
D110a.jpg
Domitian RIC-11055 viewsÆ As, 10.56g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VIII DES VIIII P P; S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
RIC 110 (C3). BMC 281. BNC 290.
Acquired from Holding History, eBay, June 2019.

Early in Domitian's reign Minerva figured prominently on the aes coinage. This As from early 82 featuring his patron deity with spear and shield would later be adopted by the denarius issues after the overhaul of the mint later in the year. It would become one of the standard four Minerva types for that denomination.

Fetching olive green patina.
4 commentsDavid Atherton07/07/19 at 13:56Vincent: He looks handsome...ahh, the bounty of youth...
D110a.jpg
Domitian RIC-11055 viewsÆ As, 10.56g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VIII DES VIIII P P; S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
RIC 110 (C3). BMC 281. BNC 290.
Acquired from Holding History, eBay, June 2019.

Early in Domitian's reign Minerva figured prominently on the aes coinage. This As from early 82 featuring his patron deity with spear and shield would later be adopted by the denarius issues after the overhaul of the mint later in the year. It would become one of the standard four Minerva types for that denomination.

Fetching olive green patina.
4 commentsDavid Atherton07/07/19 at 12:51Jay GT4: Delightful portrait
D281.jpg
Domitian RIC-28180 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.14g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: S C in exergue; Domitian stg. r., clasping hands over altar with officer stg. l.; behind officer, one soldier with standard and one soldier at r. with spear and shield
RIC 281 (R). BMC 301. BNC 321.
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, June 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 182. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), acquired from the Heynen Collection; inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his greatest military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The Germanic triumph received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. This rare sestertius depicts a rather ambiguous scene showing Domitian, the much larger figure on the left, clasping hands with a legate over an altar while two legionaries stand by. What exactly is going on here is a mystery. Mattingly in BMCRE II believed it to be 'the taking of the sacramentum, the military oath'. Others have postulated the scene shows Domitian greeting Agricola upon his return from Britannia. The Agricola connection is highly unlikely. The type is struck for several more years, so it cannot be referring to one single 'event'. It's an intriguing scene in the context of the Germania Capta series, perhaps depicting a post victory ceremony. Whatever the meaning, the reverse strongly underscores Domitian's bond with the military.

This wonderful old cabinet toned piece is from the collection of the German portrait painter Fritz Reusing.

3 commentsDavid Atherton06/29/19 at 06:26quadrans: Great coin
D281.jpg
Domitian RIC-28180 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.14g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: S C in exergue; Domitian stg. r., clasping hands over altar with officer stg. l.; behind officer, one soldier with standard and one soldier at r. with spear and shield
RIC 281 (R). BMC 301. BNC 321.
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, June 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 182. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), acquired from the Heynen Collection; inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his greatest military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The Germanic triumph received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. This rare sestertius depicts a rather ambiguous scene showing Domitian, the much larger figure on the left, clasping hands with a legate over an altar while two legionaries stand by. What exactly is going on here is a mystery. Mattingly in BMCRE II believed it to be 'the taking of the sacramentum, the military oath'. Others have postulated the scene shows Domitian greeting Agricola upon his return from Britannia. The Agricola connection is highly unlikely. The type is struck for several more years, so it cannot be referring to one single 'event'. It's an intriguing scene in the context of the Germania Capta series, perhaps depicting a post victory ceremony. Whatever the meaning, the reverse strongly underscores Domitian's bond with the military.

This wonderful old cabinet toned piece is from the collection of the German portrait painter Fritz Reusing.

3 commentsDavid Atherton06/28/19 at 15:26Steve P: Sweet centering ... I always love the looks of the...
D281.jpg
Domitian RIC-28180 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.14g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: S C in exergue; Domitian stg. r., clasping hands over altar with officer stg. l.; behind officer, one soldier with standard and one soldier at r. with spear and shield
RIC 281 (R). BMC 301. BNC 321.
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, June 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 182. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), acquired from the Heynen Collection; inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his greatest military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The Germanic triumph received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. This rare sestertius depicts a rather ambiguous scene showing Domitian, the much larger figure on the left, clasping hands with a legate over an altar while two legionaries stand by. What exactly is going on here is a mystery. Mattingly in BMCRE II believed it to be 'the taking of the sacramentum, the military oath'. Others have postulated the scene shows Domitian greeting Agricola upon his return from Britannia. The Agricola connection is highly unlikely. The type is struck for several more years, so it cannot be referring to one single 'event'. It's an intriguing scene in the context of the Germania Capta series, perhaps depicting a post victory ceremony. Whatever the meaning, the reverse strongly underscores Domitian's bond with the military.

This wonderful old cabinet toned piece is from the collection of the German portrait painter Fritz Reusing.

3 commentsDavid Atherton06/28/19 at 01:59Jay GT4: Fantastic addition and intriguing
T294.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-29472 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI AVG VESP F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
RIC 294 (C). BMC 231. BNC 238.
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 177. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

An exquisite sestertius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus featuring his patron deity Minerva. DIVI AVG VESP F tells us the coin was struck after Vespasian's deification. The date of Vespasian's consecratio is dated by the epigraphic evidence sometime between September 8, 79 - May 29, 80, so this sestertius could not have been struck much earlier than June 80. The Minerva reverse was one of the more common types struck during this second bronze issue for Domitian Caesar under Titus.

Although fine portraits can occasionally be seen in silver, it is on the larger canvas of the bronze where the full flower of Roman imperial portraiture can be seen. This sestertius has one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've come across. A superb example of the imperial engraver's art.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/25/19 at 17:13mix_val: Handsome portrait
T294.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-29472 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI AVG VESP F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
RIC 294 (C). BMC 231. BNC 238.
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 177. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

An exquisite sestertius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus featuring his patron deity Minerva. DIVI AVG VESP F tells us the coin was struck after Vespasian's deification. The date of Vespasian's consecratio is dated by the epigraphic evidence sometime between September 8, 79 - May 29, 80, so this sestertius could not have been struck much earlier than June 80. The Minerva reverse was one of the more common types struck during this second bronze issue for Domitian Caesar under Titus.

Although fine portraits can occasionally be seen in silver, it is on the larger canvas of the bronze where the full flower of Roman imperial portraiture can be seen. This sestertius has one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've come across. A superb example of the imperial engraver's art.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/23/19 at 14:29orfew: Now that was a talented engraver. A wonderful coin...
T294.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-29472 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI AVG VESP F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
RIC 294 (C). BMC 231. BNC 238.
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 177. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

An exquisite sestertius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus featuring his patron deity Minerva. DIVI AVG VESP F tells us the coin was struck after Vespasian's deification. The date of Vespasian's consecratio is dated by the epigraphic evidence sometime between September 8, 79 - May 29, 80, so this sestertius could not have been struck much earlier than June 80. The Minerva reverse was one of the more common types struck during this second bronze issue for Domitian Caesar under Titus.

Although fine portraits can occasionally be seen in silver, it is on the larger canvas of the bronze where the full flower of Roman imperial portraiture can be seen. This sestertius has one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've come across. A superb example of the imperial engraver's art.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/23/19 at 14:13kc: Good details and a realistic portrait.
T294.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-29472 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI AVG VESP F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
RIC 294 (C). BMC 231. BNC 238.
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 177. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

An exquisite sestertius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus featuring his patron deity Minerva. DIVI AVG VESP F tells us the coin was struck after Vespasian's deification. The date of Vespasian's consecratio is dated by the epigraphic evidence sometime between September 8, 79 - May 29, 80, so this sestertius could not have been struck much earlier than June 80. The Minerva reverse was one of the more common types struck during this second bronze issue for Domitian Caesar under Titus.

Although fine portraits can occasionally be seen in silver, it is on the larger canvas of the bronze where the full flower of Roman imperial portraiture can be seen. This sestertius has one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've come across. A superb example of the imperial engraver's art.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/23/19 at 12:39Pharsalos: Amazing portrait, beautifully engraved reverse too...
T294.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-29472 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI AVG VESP F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
RIC 294 (C). BMC 231. BNC 238.
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 177. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

An exquisite sestertius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus featuring his patron deity Minerva. DIVI AVG VESP F tells us the coin was struck after Vespasian's deification. The date of Vespasian's consecratio is dated by the epigraphic evidence sometime between September 8, 79 - May 29, 80, so this sestertius could not have been struck much earlier than June 80. The Minerva reverse was one of the more common types struck during this second bronze issue for Domitian Caesar under Titus.

Although fine portraits can occasionally be seen in silver, it is on the larger canvas of the bronze where the full flower of Roman imperial portraiture can be seen. This sestertius has one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've come across. A superb example of the imperial engraver's art.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/23/19 at 12:16FlaviusDomitianus: The sestertii of this issue have strong portraits....
T294.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-29472 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI AVG VESP F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
RIC 294 (C). BMC 231. BNC 238.
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 177. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

An exquisite sestertius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus featuring his patron deity Minerva. DIVI AVG VESP F tells us the coin was struck after Vespasian's deification. The date of Vespasian's consecratio is dated by the epigraphic evidence sometime between September 8, 79 - May 29, 80, so this sestertius could not have been struck much earlier than June 80. The Minerva reverse was one of the more common types struck during this second bronze issue for Domitian Caesar under Titus.

Although fine portraits can occasionally be seen in silver, it is on the larger canvas of the bronze where the full flower of Roman imperial portraiture can be seen. This sestertius has one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've come across. A superb example of the imperial engraver's art.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/23/19 at 12:11Jay GT4: Love the way the two tone patina highlights the po...
D751.jpg
Domitian RIC-75151 viewsÆ Sestertius, 23.75g
Rome mint, 92-94 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XVI CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IOVI VICTORI; S C in exergue; Jupiter std. l., with Victory and sceptre
RIC 751 (C2). BMC 464. BNC 491.
Acquired from eBay, May 2019. Ex Degani Coin Shop.

Just like the silver and gold, Domitian's aes coinage in the mid 80s settled down to a few predicable reverse types that were annually struck throughout the reign. The Sestertii were dominated by Victory crowning the emperor and the seated Jupiter with Victory, as seen on this coin. 'Jupiter the giver of Victory' was an important propaganda type because of the periodic conflicts on the Northern frontier that flared up form time to time. Domitian did not renew the consulship until 95, so these COS XVI sestertii are imprecisely dated between 92-94, which accounts for their extreme commonness.

A well worn example with a good portrait and fine olive green patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton05/26/19 at 23:20Vincent: Fine portrait and attractive likeness...yes bugs ...
D751.jpg
Domitian RIC-75151 viewsÆ Sestertius, 23.75g
Rome mint, 92-94 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XVI CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IOVI VICTORI; S C in exergue; Jupiter std. l., with Victory and sceptre
RIC 751 (C2). BMC 464. BNC 491.
Acquired from eBay, May 2019. Ex Degani Coin Shop.

Just like the silver and gold, Domitian's aes coinage in the mid 80s settled down to a few predicable reverse types that were annually struck throughout the reign. The Sestertii were dominated by Victory crowning the emperor and the seated Jupiter with Victory, as seen on this coin. 'Jupiter the giver of Victory' was an important propaganda type because of the periodic conflicts on the Northern frontier that flared up form time to time. Domitian did not renew the consulship until 95, so these COS XVI sestertii are imprecisely dated between 92-94, which accounts for their extreme commonness.

A well worn example with a good portrait and fine olive green patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton05/26/19 at 18:12Gary W2: Nice coin and patina. Domitian's overbite is e...
D751.jpg
Domitian RIC-75151 viewsÆ Sestertius, 23.75g
Rome mint, 92-94 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XVI CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IOVI VICTORI; S C in exergue; Jupiter std. l., with Victory and sceptre
RIC 751 (C2). BMC 464. BNC 491.
Acquired from eBay, May 2019. Ex Degani Coin Shop.

Just like the silver and gold, Domitian's aes coinage in the mid 80s settled down to a few predicable reverse types that were annually struck throughout the reign. The Sestertii were dominated by Victory crowning the emperor and the seated Jupiter with Victory, as seen on this coin. 'Jupiter the giver of Victory' was an important propaganda type because of the periodic conflicts on the Northern frontier that flared up form time to time. Domitian did not renew the consulship until 95, so these COS XVI sestertii are imprecisely dated between 92-94, which accounts for their extreme commonness.

A well worn example with a good portrait and fine olive green patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton05/26/19 at 17:42Jay GT4: Nice portrait
D686.jpg
Domitian RIC-686170 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome mint, 89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 686 (C2). BMC 159. RSC 258. BNC 154.
Acquired from Athena Numismatics, June 2014.

Late in 89 Domitian was voted a double triumph over the Chatti and the Dacians. This common denarius struck between mid September and 31 December records Domitian's 21st imperial acclamation, the culmination of the two campaigns. The portrait style is quite unusual featuring a bull necked, heavily jowled Domitian, perhaps features more fitting for Vespasian.

A large flan specimen with a distinctive colourful patina.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/12/19 at 20:34Jay GT4: Fantastic portrait
D183.jpg
Domitian RIC-183329 viewsAR Denarius, 2.90g
Rome mint, 84 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC; Bust of Domitian, laureate, draped, bearded, l.
Rev: P M TR POT III IMP V COS X P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 183 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, April 2014.

84 AD probably saw the peak of artistic quality with Domitian's precious metal coinage. Two years previous, the fineness of the denarius was increased and the style radically changed from the earlier issues. Upon Domitian's accession the veristic style of Vespasian and Titus still dominated, after the reform it became more idealised and much finer. By 84 the style had evolved to such a high degree that the mint was able to produce these finely engraved draped busts, albeit in small quantities. This extremely rare coin struck in 84 is an exquisite example of the new idealised style. This is the second known specimen of the type. Much experimentation was going on at the mint at this time with reverse types, busts, and style. I assume the amount of time an engraver spent on rendering these highly polished pieces was considerable, which could perhaps explain why they were not struck more commonly. RIC theorises the drapery represents a military cloak commemorating Domitian's recent German victory. Afterwards, the style remained idealised and fine but the finer portraits would sometimes appear with an aegis, the draped busts consigned to an experimental cul-de-sac. The idealised style would continue to evolve throughout the reign reaching baroque proportions by 88. It's a shame that this fine portrait bust was struck sparingly.

Ian Carradice speculated in his 1983 monograph Coinage and Finances in the Reign of Domitian that the same engraver who did this piece may have worked on an earlier left facing portrait from 81 (see my Domitian RIC 75). Although left facing portraits are extremely rare in Domitian's reign and it is not out of the realm of possibility that the same engraver was working at the mint three years later and produced another left facing bust, to my eyes the styles seem too different to warrant that conclusion.

The bust of Domitian here is superbly rendered, one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've ever seen on a denarius. Same obverse die as the unique specimen cited in RIC.

13 commentsDavid Atherton04/14/19 at 18:53orfew: Fantastic coin David! WOW
D623b.jpg
Domitian RIC-623b85 viewsÆ As, 10.13g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; S C in exergue; Domitian stg. l., sacrificing over altar; to l., flute player and lyre player stg. r.; in background, temple, wreath in pediment
RIC 623b (C2). BMC 434. BNC 471.
Acquired from Künker, January 2019. Ex Heinrich Pilartz Münzhandlung.

In October 88 AD Domitian held the Secular Games, a festival featuring theatrical performances and circus games accompanied by six various daytime and nighttime religious ceremonies. The games marked the transition from one era (saeculum) to another and were supposedly held once every 110 years, or the maximum span of a human lifetime, making them a 'once in a lifetime' event. Domitian conducted his games on the Augustan calculation, rejecting the formula for the Claudian games held in 47 AD. The festival was important enough to interrupt the normal striking of reverse types on the coinage and for the mint to produce a new unique issue commemorating the event both in precious metal and bronze. The precious metal designs tended to be symbolic while the bronze were more narrative in nature, focusing on the various religious sacrifices that were at the heart of the games.

The reverse on this as features a daytime victimless sacrifice of cakes to Apollo and Diana on the sixth and last day of the celebrations, held in front of an unidentified hexastyle temple somewhere on the Palatine. The stylised nature of the reverse's design makes it difficult to pinpoint the temple in question. The generic decorative wreath in the pediment offers no clues. Another variant of the type (RIC 623a) has an eagle in the pediment, perhaps an indication the engravers were not intending to depict a specific temple at all. The scene could stand alone and be an excellent representation for all the religious ceremonies of the games. The main message of the design is to show the Roman people that Domitian provided and responsibly held the Secular Games. The fact this type was struck in fairly large quantities hints it was an important piece of Domitianic propaganda.

Struck on a large flan in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton03/31/19 at 05:10Ancient Aussie: Fantastic coin David.
D821sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-821102 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Rome mint, 96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XVI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva, winged, flying l., with spear and shield
RIC 821 (R2). BMC 237D. RSC 297b. BNC - .
Ex jerusalemhadaya2012, eBay, 4 March 2019.

Domitian achieved tribunician power for the 16th time on 14 September 96 AD. He was assassinated in a palace plot four days later on 18 September. In between those two dates the mint struck only one issue of denarii recording Domitian as TR P XVI, needless to say they are extremely rare! The Senate decreed Damnatio Memoriae within a day of Domitian's assassination which would have quickly halted production at the mint for his coinage. The months leading up to Domitian's assassination saw the mint at Rome experimenting with many new reverse designs (altar, winged Minerva, Maia, temple reverses), breaking the monotony of the four standard Minerva types that had previously dominated the denarius. These new types are exceedingly rare and were perhaps experimental in nature. This denarius shows one of these new reverse types, Minerva Victrix, a more warrior like attribute of the goddess. The fact that this new type which originally appeared on the denarius when Domitian was TR P XV carried over to the briefly struck TR P XVI issue alongside the Maia and the M1, M3, and M4 Minerva types may hint that there was indeed change in the air at the mint. Perhaps the mix of new types with the older ones hint at a transition regarding the typology on his precious metal coinage? Regardless, the experiment was cut short by an assassin's blade, so we shall never know. This denarius may very well be the last coin ever struck for Domitian.

Fine late style with good natural toning. Same dies as the BM specimen.
10 commentsDavid Atherton03/24/19 at 21:02Harry G: Great coin!
D821sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-821102 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Rome mint, 96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XVI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva, winged, flying l., with spear and shield
RIC 821 (R2). BMC 237D. RSC 297b. BNC - .
Ex jerusalemhadaya2012, eBay, 4 March 2019.

Domitian achieved tribunician power for the 16th time on 14 September 96 AD. He was assassinated in a palace plot four days later on 18 September. In between those two dates the mint struck only one issue of denarii recording Domitian as TR P XVI, needless to say they are extremely rare! The Senate decreed Damnatio Memoriae within a day of Domitian's assassination which would have quickly halted production at the mint for his coinage. The months leading up to Domitian's assassination saw the mint at Rome experimenting with many new reverse designs (altar, winged Minerva, Maia, temple reverses), breaking the monotony of the four standard Minerva types that had previously dominated the denarius. These new types are exceedingly rare and were perhaps experimental in nature. This denarius shows one of these new reverse types, Minerva Victrix, a more warrior like attribute of the goddess. The fact that this new type which originally appeared on the denarius when Domitian was TR P XV carried over to the briefly struck TR P XVI issue alongside the Maia and the M1, M3, and M4 Minerva types may hint that there was indeed change in the air at the mint. Perhaps the mix of new types with the older ones hint at a transition regarding the typology on his precious metal coinage? Regardless, the experiment was cut short by an assassin's blade, so we shall never know. This denarius may very well be the last coin ever struck for Domitian.

Fine late style with good natural toning. Same dies as the BM specimen.
10 commentsDavid Atherton03/20/19 at 16:33mix_val: excellent find!
D821sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-821102 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Rome mint, 96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XVI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva, winged, flying l., with spear and shield
RIC 821 (R2). BMC 237D. RSC 297b. BNC - .
Ex jerusalemhadaya2012, eBay, 4 March 2019.

Domitian achieved tribunician power for the 16th time on 14 September 96 AD. He was assassinated in a palace plot four days later on 18 September. In between those two dates the mint struck only one issue of denarii recording Domitian as TR P XVI, needless to say they are extremely rare! The Senate decreed Damnatio Memoriae within a day of Domitian's assassination which would have quickly halted production at the mint for his coinage. The months leading up to Domitian's assassination saw the mint at Rome experimenting with many new reverse designs (altar, winged Minerva, Maia, temple reverses), breaking the monotony of the four standard Minerva types that had previously dominated the denarius. These new types are exceedingly rare and were perhaps experimental in nature. This denarius shows one of these new reverse types, Minerva Victrix, a more warrior like attribute of the goddess. The fact that this new type which originally appeared on the denarius when Domitian was TR P XV carried over to the briefly struck TR P XVI issue alongside the Maia and the M1, M3, and M4 Minerva types may hint that there was indeed change in the air at the mint. Perhaps the mix of new types with the older ones hint at a transition regarding the typology on his precious metal coinage? Regardless, the experiment was cut short by an assassin's blade, so we shall never know. This denarius may very well be the last coin ever struck for Domitian.

Fine late style with good natural toning. Same dies as the BM specimen.
10 commentsDavid Atherton03/20/19 at 14:34*Alex: Wow, well done David and great write-up too.
D821sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-821102 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Rome mint, 96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XVI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva, winged, flying l., with spear and shield
RIC 821 (R2). BMC 237D. RSC 297b. BNC - .
Ex jerusalemhadaya2012, eBay, 4 March 2019.

Domitian achieved tribunician power for the 16th time on 14 September 96 AD. He was assassinated in a palace plot four days later on 18 September. In between those two dates the mint struck only one issue of denarii recording Domitian as TR P XVI, needless to say they are extremely rare! The Senate decreed Damnatio Memoriae within a day of Domitian's assassination which would have quickly halted production at the mint for his coinage. The months leading up to Domitian's assassination saw the mint at Rome experimenting with many new reverse designs (altar, winged Minerva, Maia, temple reverses), breaking the monotony of the four standard Minerva types that had previously dominated the denarius. These new types are exceedingly rare and were perhaps experimental in nature. This denarius shows one of these new reverse types, Minerva Victrix, a more warrior like attribute of the goddess. The fact that this new type which originally appeared on the denarius when Domitian was TR P XV carried over to the briefly struck TR P XVI issue alongside the Maia and the M1, M3, and M4 Minerva types may hint that there was indeed change in the air at the mint. Perhaps the mix of new types with the older ones hint at a transition regarding the typology on his precious metal coinage? Regardless, the experiment was cut short by an assassin's blade, so we shall never know. This denarius may very well be the last coin ever struck for Domitian.

Fine late style with good natural toning. Same dies as the BM specimen.
10 commentsDavid Atherton03/19/19 at 14:48David Atherton: Thanks for the suggestion Curtis! I ammended the w...
D821sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-821102 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Rome mint, 96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XVI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva, winged, flying l., with spear and shield
RIC 821 (R2). BMC 237D. RSC 297b. BNC - .
Ex jerusalemhadaya2012, eBay, 4 March 2019.

Domitian achieved tribunician power for the 16th time on 14 September 96 AD. He was assassinated in a palace plot four days later on 18 September. In between those two dates the mint struck only one issue of denarii recording Domitian as TR P XVI, needless to say they are extremely rare! The Senate decreed Damnatio Memoriae within a day of Domitian's assassination which would have quickly halted production at the mint for his coinage. The months leading up to Domitian's assassination saw the mint at Rome experimenting with many new reverse designs (altar, winged Minerva, Maia, temple reverses), breaking the monotony of the four standard Minerva types that had previously dominated the denarius. These new types are exceedingly rare and were perhaps experimental in nature. This denarius shows one of these new reverse types, Minerva Victrix, a more warrior like attribute of the goddess. The fact that this new type which originally appeared on the denarius when Domitian was TR P XV carried over to the briefly struck TR P XVI issue alongside the Maia and the M1, M3, and M4 Minerva types may hint that there was indeed change in the air at the mint. Perhaps the mix of new types with the older ones hint at a transition regarding the typology on his precious metal coinage? Regardless, the experiment was cut short by an assassin's blade, so we shall never know. This denarius may very well be the last coin ever struck for Domitian.

Fine late style with good natural toning. Same dies as the BM specimen.
10 commentsDavid Atherton03/19/19 at 14:17curtislclay: Nice to have the crucial date TR P XVI so clear! Y...
D821sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-821102 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Rome mint, 96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XVI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva, winged, flying l., with spear and shield
RIC 821 (R2). BMC 237D. RSC 297b. BNC - .
Ex jerusalemhadaya2012, eBay, 4 March 2019.

Domitian achieved tribunician power for the 16th time on 14 September 96 AD. He was assassinated in a palace plot four days later on 18 September. In between those two dates the mint struck only one issue of denarii recording Domitian as TR P XVI, needless to say they are extremely rare! The Senate decreed Damnatio Memoriae within a day of Domitian's assassination which would have quickly halted production at the mint for his coinage. The months leading up to Domitian's assassination saw the mint at Rome experimenting with many new reverse designs (altar, winged Minerva, Maia, temple reverses), breaking the monotony of the four standard Minerva types that had previously dominated the denarius. These new types are exceedingly rare and were perhaps experimental in nature. This denarius shows one of these new reverse types, Minerva Victrix, a more warrior like attribute of the goddess. The fact that this new type which originally appeared on the denarius when Domitian was TR P XV carried over to the briefly struck TR P XVI issue alongside the Maia and the M1, M3, and M4 Minerva types may hint that there was indeed change in the air at the mint. Perhaps the mix of new types with the older ones hint at a transition regarding the typology on his precious metal coinage? Regardless, the experiment was cut short by an assassin's blade, so we shall never know. This denarius may very well be the last coin ever struck for Domitian.

Fine late style with good natural toning. Same dies as the BM specimen.
10 commentsDavid Atherton03/19/19 at 10:10Jay GT4: A important historical coin
D821sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-821102 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Rome mint, 96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XVI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva, winged, flying l., with spear and shield
RIC 821 (R2). BMC 237D. RSC 297b. BNC - .
Ex jerusalemhadaya2012, eBay, 4 March 2019.

Domitian achieved tribunician power for the 16th time on 14 September 96 AD. He was assassinated in a palace plot four days later on 18 September. In between those two dates the mint struck only one issue of denarii recording Domitian as TR P XVI, needless to say they are extremely rare! The Senate decreed Damnatio Memoriae within a day of Domitian's assassination which would have quickly halted production at the mint for his coinage. The months leading up to Domitian's assassination saw the mint at Rome experimenting with many new reverse designs (altar, winged Minerva, Maia, temple reverses), breaking the monotony of the four standard Minerva types that had previously dominated the denarius. These new types are exceedingly rare and were perhaps experimental in nature. This denarius shows one of these new reverse types, Minerva Victrix, a more warrior like attribute of the goddess. The fact that this new type which originally appeared on the denarius when Domitian was TR P XV carried over to the briefly struck TR P XVI issue alongside the Maia and the M1, M3, and M4 Minerva types may hint that there was indeed change in the air at the mint. Perhaps the mix of new types with the older ones hint at a transition regarding the typology on his precious metal coinage? Regardless, the experiment was cut short by an assassin's blade, so we shall never know. This denarius may very well be the last coin ever struck for Domitian.

Fine late style with good natural toning. Same dies as the BM specimen.
10 commentsDavid Atherton03/19/19 at 06:44quadrans: Great,
D821sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-821102 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Rome mint, 96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XVI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva, winged, flying l., with spear and shield
RIC 821 (R2). BMC 237D. RSC 297b. BNC - .
Ex jerusalemhadaya2012, eBay, 4 March 2019.

Domitian achieved tribunician power for the 16th time on 14 September 96 AD. He was assassinated in a palace plot four days later on 18 September. In between those two dates the mint struck only one issue of denarii recording Domitian as TR P XVI, needless to say they are extremely rare! The Senate decreed Damnatio Memoriae within a day of Domitian's assassination which would have quickly halted production at the mint for his coinage. The months leading up to Domitian's assassination saw the mint at Rome experimenting with many new reverse designs (altar, winged Minerva, Maia, temple reverses), breaking the monotony of the four standard Minerva types that had previously dominated the denarius. These new types are exceedingly rare and were perhaps experimental in nature. This denarius shows one of these new reverse types, Minerva Victrix, a more warrior like attribute of the goddess. The fact that this new type which originally appeared on the denarius when Domitian was TR P XV carried over to the briefly struck TR P XVI issue alongside the Maia and the M1, M3, and M4 Minerva types may hint that there was indeed change in the air at the mint. Perhaps the mix of new types with the older ones hint at a transition regarding the typology on his precious metal coinage? Regardless, the experiment was cut short by an assassin's blade, so we shall never know. This denarius may very well be the last coin ever struck for Domitian.

Fine late style with good natural toning. Same dies as the BM specimen.
10 commentsDavid Atherton03/19/19 at 06:26shanxi: congratulations
D821sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-821102 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Rome mint, 96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XVI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva, winged, flying l., with spear and shield
RIC 821 (R2). BMC 237D. RSC 297b. BNC - .
Ex jerusalemhadaya2012, eBay, 4 March 2019.

Domitian achieved tribunician power for the 16th time on 14 September 96 AD. He was assassinated in a palace plot four days later on 18 September. In between those two dates the mint struck only one issue of denarii recording Domitian as TR P XVI, needless to say they are extremely rare! The Senate decreed Damnatio Memoriae within a day of Domitian's assassination which would have quickly halted production at the mint for his coinage. The months leading up to Domitian's assassination saw the mint at Rome experimenting with many new reverse designs (altar, winged Minerva, Maia, temple reverses), breaking the monotony of the four standard Minerva types that had previously dominated the denarius. These new types are exceedingly rare and were perhaps experimental in nature. This denarius shows one of these new reverse types, Minerva Victrix, a more warrior like attribute of the goddess. The fact that this new type which originally appeared on the denarius when Domitian was TR P XV carried over to the briefly struck TR P XVI issue alongside the Maia and the M1, M3, and M4 Minerva types may hint that there was indeed change in the air at the mint. Perhaps the mix of new types with the older ones hint at a transition regarding the typology on his precious metal coinage? Regardless, the experiment was cut short by an assassin's blade, so we shall never know. This denarius may very well be the last coin ever struck for Domitian.

Fine late style with good natural toning. Same dies as the BM specimen.
10 commentsDavid Atherton03/19/19 at 06:09Enodia: Very interesting coin!
D821sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-821102 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Rome mint, 96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XVI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva, winged, flying l., with spear and shield
RIC 821 (R2). BMC 237D. RSC 297b. BNC - .
Ex jerusalemhadaya2012, eBay, 4 March 2019.

Domitian achieved tribunician power for the 16th time on 14 September 96 AD. He was assassinated in a palace plot four days later on 18 September. In between those two dates the mint struck only one issue of denarii recording Domitian as TR P XVI, needless to say they are extremely rare! The Senate decreed Damnatio Memoriae within a day of Domitian's assassination which would have quickly halted production at the mint for his coinage. The months leading up to Domitian's assassination saw the mint at Rome experimenting with many new reverse designs (altar, winged Minerva, Maia, temple reverses), breaking the monotony of the four standard Minerva types that had previously dominated the denarius. These new types are exceedingly rare and were perhaps experimental in nature. This denarius shows one of these new reverse types, Minerva Victrix, a more warrior like attribute of the goddess. The fact that this new type which originally appeared on the denarius when Domitian was TR P XV carried over to the briefly struck TR P XVI issue alongside the Maia and the M1, M3, and M4 Minerva types may hint that there was indeed change in the air at the mint. Perhaps the mix of new types with the older ones hint at a transition regarding the typology on his precious metal coinage? Regardless, the experiment was cut short by an assassin's blade, so we shall never know. This denarius may very well be the last coin ever struck for Domitian.

Fine late style with good natural toning. Same dies as the BM specimen.
10 commentsDavid Atherton03/19/19 at 05:36Mat: Sweet pick up
D101.jpg
Domitian RIC-10197 viewsAR Denarius, 3.43g
Rome Mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, winged thunderbolt
RIC 101 (R). BMC 26. RSC 597. BNC 30.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 712. Ex CNG E212, 17 June 2009, lot 294.

This denarius is part of the last issue before Domitian reformed the coinage in 82 AD. Prior to the reform Domitian's coinage maintained the same reverse types (evidenced by this carry over 'pulvinar' reverse of Titus), fabric, fineness, and style as those minted under Titus. After the reform all of that changed, along with the dismissal and banishment of the financial secretary Julius Aug. lib. who presumably did not approve of the new changes.

A sharp looking denarius in hand. Nicely toned too.
10 commentsDavid Atherton03/18/19 at 21:28orfew: A cool type
D251.jpg
Domitian RIC-25182 viewsÆ Quadrans, 3.32g
Rome Mint, 84-85 AD
Obv: (No legend) Rhinoceros stg. l.
Rev: IMP DOMIT AVG GERM; S C in centre
RIC 251 (R). BMC -. BNC 542.
Acquired from Marc Breitsprecher, February 2019.

A few years into Domitian's reign an extraordinary issue of quadrantes were struck featuring a rhinoceros. Although the coins are undated, their production can be narrowed down between late 83 when he assumed the title Germanicus and 85 when the consular date XI appeared on the quadrantes. The type is highly unusual and breaks with the standard obverses that were normally featured on the quadrans. One may ask, why a rhinoceros? Certainly the animal was rare in Rome and most difficult to obtain. The rhinoceros depicted on the coin is the African species, identified by the two horns. Martial in his book 'On Spectacles' tells of such a rhinoceros in the Colosseum. Presumably, these coins were struck with that very 'star performer' in mind. Ted Buttrey wrote about this coin type in his article Domitian, the Rhinoceros, and the Date of Martial's "Liber De Spectaculis": "it is wrong to write off the rhinoceros of Domitian's coin casually, as if the coin were a picture postcard from the zoo: 'This is a rhinoceros'. No, coin types are pointed. Everything has to do with imperial advertisement and with its importance at the moment of issue: 'This is my rhinoceros'. Domitian's rhinoceros, in its supremacy in the arena might well stand as a metaphor for the invincible success of the emperor conquering general who had recently assumed the historically-weighted title of Germanicus." Coming back to Martial, he also speaks of tokens being showered upon the cheering crowds - could these quadrantes struck cheaply and in massive quantities have been gifts to the cheering mob at the arena? In essence, can this coin double as currency and a souvenir from a long ago day at the games in the Colosseum?

This variant of the famous rhinoceros quadrans is somewhat rare (no examples in the BM) because of the obverse legend beginning in the upper right, more commonly it begins in the lower left. Artistically, most of the rhinos depicted on these coins have a lot to be desired. Some look like wild boars with horns added for effect. Happily, the animal depicted on this coin's obverse indeed looks every part the powerful and fearsome beast which awestruck Roman audiences - as a matter of fact, it appears to be charging with its head down. Perhaps the engraver was a witness to the very games martial describes?

As mentioned above, the rhino depicted on the coin is the two-horned African species. In contrast, the Indian rhino has one horn. Pliny in his Natural Histories describes the rhinoceros as a one horned creature (although confusingly he confirms its Ethiopian origins), Martial said it had two. The rhino was so rare in Rome, Pliny had to go all the way back to the games of Pompey the Great in 55 BC to find a reference for the animal on display in the city, apparently it was a one-horned Indian rhino. At any rate, both the numismatic evidence and Martial's description coincide rather nicely to confirm that Domitian, at great expense no doubt, brought to Rome an African rhinoceros for his shows in the new Colosseum. The surviving coins featuring this fantastic beast prove how important a feat this was to the emperor.

Well centred with a lovely green patina and fine style.
3 commentsDavid Atherton02/19/19 at 14:46*Alex: Excellent.
D251.jpg
Domitian RIC-25182 viewsÆ Quadrans, 3.32g
Rome Mint, 84-85 AD
Obv: (No legend) Rhinoceros stg. l.
Rev: IMP DOMIT AVG GERM; S C in centre
RIC 251 (R). BMC -. BNC 542.
Acquired from Marc Breitsprecher, February 2019.

A few years into Domitian's reign an extraordinary issue of quadrantes were struck featuring a rhinoceros. Although the coins are undated, their production can be narrowed down between late 83 when he assumed the title Germanicus and 85 when the consular date XI appeared on the quadrantes. The type is highly unusual and breaks with the standard obverses that were normally featured on the quadrans. One may ask, why a rhinoceros? Certainly the animal was rare in Rome and most difficult to obtain. The rhinoceros depicted on the coin is the African species, identified by the two horns. Martial in his book 'On Spectacles' tells of such a rhinoceros in the Colosseum. Presumably, these coins were struck with that very 'star performer' in mind. Ted Buttrey wrote about this coin type in his article Domitian, the Rhinoceros, and the Date of Martial's "Liber De Spectaculis": "it is wrong to write off the rhinoceros of Domitian's coin casually, as if the coin were a picture postcard from the zoo: 'This is a rhinoceros'. No, coin types are pointed. Everything has to do with imperial advertisement and with its importance at the moment of issue: 'This is my rhinoceros'. Domitian's rhinoceros, in its supremacy in the arena might well stand as a metaphor for the invincible success of the emperor conquering general who had recently assumed the historically-weighted title of Germanicus." Coming back to Martial, he also speaks of tokens being showered upon the cheering crowds - could these quadrantes struck cheaply and in massive quantities have been gifts to the cheering mob at the arena? In essence, can this coin double as currency and a souvenir from a long ago day at the games in the Colosseum?

This variant of the famous rhinoceros quadrans is somewhat rare (no examples in the BM) because of the obverse legend beginning in the upper right, more commonly it begins in the lower left. Artistically, most of the rhinos depicted on these coins have a lot to be desired. Some look like wild boars with horns added for effect. Happily, the animal depicted on this coin's obverse indeed looks every part the powerful and fearsome beast which awestruck Roman audiences - as a matter of fact, it appears to be charging with its head down. Perhaps the engraver was a witness to the very games martial describes?

As mentioned above, the rhino depicted on the coin is the two-horned African species. In contrast, the Indian rhino has one horn. Pliny in his Natural Histories describes the rhinoceros as a one horned creature (although confusingly he confirms its Ethiopian origins), Martial said it had two. The rhino was so rare in Rome, Pliny had to go all the way back to the games of Pompey the Great in 55 BC to find a reference for the animal on display in the city, apparently it was a one-horned Indian rhino. At any rate, both the numismatic evidence and Martial's description coincide rather nicely to confirm that Domitian, at great expense no doubt, brought to Rome an African rhinoceros for his shows in the new Colosseum. The surviving coins featuring this fantastic beast prove how important a feat this was to the emperor.

Well centred with a lovely green patina and fine style.
3 commentsDavid Atherton02/19/19 at 14:32quadrans: Nice piece..
D251.jpg
Domitian RIC-25182 viewsÆ Quadrans, 3.32g
Rome Mint, 84-85 AD
Obv: (No legend) Rhinoceros stg. l.
Rev: IMP DOMIT AVG GERM; S C in centre
RIC 251 (R). BMC -. BNC 542.
Acquired from Marc Breitsprecher, February 2019.

A few years into Domitian's reign an extraordinary issue of quadrantes were struck featuring a rhinoceros. Although the coins are undated, their production can be narrowed down between late 83 when he assumed the title Germanicus and 85 when the consular date XI appeared on the quadrantes. The type is highly unusual and breaks with the standard obverses that were normally featured on the quadrans. One may ask, why a rhinoceros? Certainly the animal was rare in Rome and most difficult to obtain. The rhinoceros depicted on the coin is the African species, identified by the two horns. Martial in his book 'On Spectacles' tells of such a rhinoceros in the Colosseum. Presumably, these coins were struck with that very 'star performer' in mind. Ted Buttrey wrote about this coin type in his article Domitian, the Rhinoceros, and the Date of Martial's "Liber De Spectaculis": "it is wrong to write off the rhinoceros of Domitian's coin casually, as if the coin were a picture postcard from the zoo: 'This is a rhinoceros'. No, coin types are pointed. Everything has to do with imperial advertisement and with its importance at the moment of issue: 'This is my rhinoceros'. Domitian's rhinoceros, in its supremacy in the arena might well stand as a metaphor for the invincible success of the emperor conquering general who had recently assumed the historically-weighted title of Germanicus." Coming back to Martial, he also speaks of tokens being showered upon the cheering crowds - could these quadrantes struck cheaply and in massive quantities have been gifts to the cheering mob at the arena? In essence, can this coin double as currency and a souvenir from a long ago day at the games in the Colosseum?

This variant of the famous rhinoceros quadrans is somewhat rare (no examples in the BM) because of the obverse legend beginning in the upper right, more commonly it begins in the lower left. Artistically, most of the rhinos depicted on these coins have a lot to be desired. Some look like wild boars with horns added for effect. Happily, the animal depicted on this coin's obverse indeed looks every part the powerful and fearsome beast which awestruck Roman audiences - as a matter of fact, it appears to be charging with its head down. Perhaps the engraver was a witness to the very games martial describes?

As mentioned above, the rhino depicted on the coin is the two-horned African species. In contrast, the Indian rhino has one horn. Pliny in his Natural Histories describes the rhinoceros as a one horned creature (although confusingly he confirms its Ethiopian origins), Martial said it had two. The rhino was so rare in Rome, Pliny had to go all the way back to the games of Pompey the Great in 55 BC to find a reference for the animal on display in the city, apparently it was a one-horned Indian rhino. At any rate, both the numismatic evidence and Martial's description coincide rather nicely to confirm that Domitian, at great expense no doubt, brought to Rome an African rhinoceros for his shows in the new Colosseum. The surviving coins featuring this fantastic beast prove how important a feat this was to the emperor.

Well centred with a lovely green patina and fine style.
3 commentsDavid Atherton02/19/19 at 12:00Jay GT4: Cool addition
D335.jpg
Domitian RIC-335134 viewsAR Denarius, 3.41g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP•VIIII COS XI CENS•POT•P•P•; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 335 (R2). BMC p. 315 note. RSC 178 corr. BNC -.
Ex Harry N Sneh Collection. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

A denarius which is part of the fourth issue of 85 minted after Domitian reduced the silver fineness back to the Neronian standard. Despite the reduction in silver content, the coin has been minted on a large flan and the portrait is in a similar fine style as the previous issues with the higher silver standard.

This coin is a RIC plate coin, mislabeled as 338, pl. 124.

6 commentsDavid Atherton02/16/19 at 04:17Jay GT4: Very nice
D623b.jpg
Domitian RIC-623b85 viewsÆ As, 10.13g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; S C in exergue; Domitian stg. l., sacrificing over altar; to l., flute player and lyre player stg. r.; in background, temple, wreath in pediment
RIC 623b (C2). BMC 434. BNC 471.
Acquired from Künker, January 2019. Ex Heinrich Pilartz Münzhandlung.

In October 88 AD Domitian held the Secular Games, a festival featuring theatrical performances and circus games accompanied by six various daytime and nighttime religious ceremonies. The games marked the transition from one era (saeculum) to another and were supposedly held once every 110 years, or the maximum span of a human lifetime, making them a 'once in a lifetime' event. Domitian conducted his games on the Augustan calculation, rejecting the formula for the Claudian games held in 47 AD. The festival was important enough to interrupt the normal striking of reverse types on the coinage and for the mint to produce a new unique issue commemorating the event both in precious metal and bronze. The precious metal designs tended to be symbolic while the bronze were more narrative in nature, focusing on the various religious sacrifices that were at the heart of the games.

The reverse on this as features a daytime victimless sacrifice of cakes to Apollo and Diana on the sixth and last day of the celebrations, held in front of an unidentified hexastyle temple somewhere on the Palatine. The stylised nature of the reverse's design makes it difficult to pinpoint the temple in question. The generic decorative wreath in the pediment offers no clues. Another variant of the type (RIC 623a) has an eagle in the pediment, perhaps an indication the engravers were not intending to depict a specific temple at all. The scene could stand alone and be an excellent representation for all the religious ceremonies of the games. The main message of the design is to show the Roman people that Domitian provided and responsibly held the Secular Games. The fact this type was struck in fairly large quantities hints it was an important piece of Domitianic propaganda.

Struck on a large flan in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/05/19 at 16:30Mat: Love the patina and all around sweet addition.
D623b.jpg
Domitian RIC-623b85 viewsÆ As, 10.13g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; S C in exergue; Domitian stg. l., sacrificing over altar; to l., flute player and lyre player stg. r.; in background, temple, wreath in pediment
RIC 623b (C2). BMC 434. BNC 471.
Acquired from Künker, January 2019. Ex Heinrich Pilartz Münzhandlung.

In October 88 AD Domitian held the Secular Games, a festival featuring theatrical performances and circus games accompanied by six various daytime and nighttime religious ceremonies. The games marked the transition from one era (saeculum) to another and were supposedly held once every 110 years, or the maximum span of a human lifetime, making them a 'once in a lifetime' event. Domitian conducted his games on the Augustan calculation, rejecting the formula for the Claudian games held in 47 AD. The festival was important enough to interrupt the normal striking of reverse types on the coinage and for the mint to produce a new unique issue commemorating the event both in precious metal and bronze. The precious metal designs tended to be symbolic while the bronze were more narrative in nature, focusing on the various religious sacrifices that were at the heart of the games.

The reverse on this as features a daytime victimless sacrifice of cakes to Apollo and Diana on the sixth and last day of the celebrations, held in front of an unidentified hexastyle temple somewhere on the Palatine. The stylised nature of the reverse's design makes it difficult to pinpoint the temple in question. The generic decorative wreath in the pediment offers no clues. Another variant of the type (RIC 623a) has an eagle in the pediment, perhaps an indication the engravers were not intending to depict a specific temple at all. The scene could stand alone and be an excellent representation for all the religious ceremonies of the games. The main message of the design is to show the Roman people that Domitian provided and responsibly held the Secular Games. The fact this type was struck in fairly large quantities hints it was an important piece of Domitianic propaganda.

Struck on a large flan in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/05/19 at 14:01FlaviusDomitianus: Good example of the type.
D623b.jpg
Domitian RIC-623b85 viewsÆ As, 10.13g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; S C in exergue; Domitian stg. l., sacrificing over altar; to l., flute player and lyre player stg. r.; in background, temple, wreath in pediment
RIC 623b (C2). BMC 434. BNC 471.
Acquired from Künker, January 2019. Ex Heinrich Pilartz Münzhandlung.

In October 88 AD Domitian held the Secular Games, a festival featuring theatrical performances and circus games accompanied by six various daytime and nighttime religious ceremonies. The games marked the transition from one era (saeculum) to another and were supposedly held once every 110 years, or the maximum span of a human lifetime, making them a 'once in a lifetime' event. Domitian conducted his games on the Augustan calculation, rejecting the formula for the Claudian games held in 47 AD. The festival was important enough to interrupt the normal striking of reverse types on the coinage and for the mint to produce a new unique issue commemorating the event both in precious metal and bronze. The precious metal designs tended to be symbolic while the bronze were more narrative in nature, focusing on the various religious sacrifices that were at the heart of the games.

The reverse on this as features a daytime victimless sacrifice of cakes to Apollo and Diana on the sixth and last day of the celebrations, held in front of an unidentified hexastyle temple somewhere on the Palatine. The stylised nature of the reverse's design makes it difficult to pinpoint the temple in question. The generic decorative wreath in the pediment offers no clues. Another variant of the type (RIC 623a) has an eagle in the pediment, perhaps an indication the engravers were not intending to depict a specific temple at all. The scene could stand alone and be an excellent representation for all the religious ceremonies of the games. The main message of the design is to show the Roman people that Domitian provided and responsibly held the Secular Games. The fact this type was struck in fairly large quantities hints it was an important piece of Domitianic propaganda.

Struck on a large flan in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/05/19 at 11:43Jay GT4: Amazing coin. Congrats David! Love the reverse a...
D623b.jpg
Domitian RIC-623b85 viewsÆ As, 10.13g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; S C in exergue; Domitian stg. l., sacrificing over altar; to l., flute player and lyre player stg. r.; in background, temple, wreath in pediment
RIC 623b (C2). BMC 434. BNC 471.
Acquired from Künker, January 2019. Ex Heinrich Pilartz Münzhandlung.

In October 88 AD Domitian held the Secular Games, a festival featuring theatrical performances and circus games accompanied by six various daytime and nighttime religious ceremonies. The games marked the transition from one era (saeculum) to another and were supposedly held once every 110 years, or the maximum span of a human lifetime, making them a 'once in a lifetime' event. Domitian conducted his games on the Augustan calculation, rejecting the formula for the Claudian games held in 47 AD. The festival was important enough to interrupt the normal striking of reverse types on the coinage and for the mint to produce a new unique issue commemorating the event both in precious metal and bronze. The precious metal designs tended to be symbolic while the bronze were more narrative in nature, focusing on the various religious sacrifices that were at the heart of the games.

The reverse on this as features a daytime victimless sacrifice of cakes to Apollo and Diana on the sixth and last day of the celebrations, held in front of an unidentified hexastyle temple somewhere on the Palatine. The stylised nature of the reverse's design makes it difficult to pinpoint the temple in question. The generic decorative wreath in the pediment offers no clues. Another variant of the type (RIC 623a) has an eagle in the pediment, perhaps an indication the engravers were not intending to depict a specific temple at all. The scene could stand alone and be an excellent representation for all the religious ceremonies of the games. The main message of the design is to show the Roman people that Domitian provided and responsibly held the Secular Games. The fact this type was struck in fairly large quantities hints it was an important piece of Domitianic propaganda.

Struck on a large flan in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/05/19 at 10:23quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
D623b.jpg
Domitian RIC-623b85 viewsÆ As, 10.13g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; S C in exergue; Domitian stg. l., sacrificing over altar; to l., flute player and lyre player stg. r.; in background, temple, wreath in pediment
RIC 623b (C2). BMC 434. BNC 471.
Acquired from Künker, January 2019. Ex Heinrich Pilartz Münzhandlung.

In October 88 AD Domitian held the Secular Games, a festival featuring theatrical performances and circus games accompanied by six various daytime and nighttime religious ceremonies. The games marked the transition from one era (saeculum) to another and were supposedly held once every 110 years, or the maximum span of a human lifetime, making them a 'once in a lifetime' event. Domitian conducted his games on the Augustan calculation, rejecting the formula for the Claudian games held in 47 AD. The festival was important enough to interrupt the normal striking of reverse types on the coinage and for the mint to produce a new unique issue commemorating the event both in precious metal and bronze. The precious metal designs tended to be symbolic while the bronze were more narrative in nature, focusing on the various religious sacrifices that were at the heart of the games.

The reverse on this as features a daytime victimless sacrifice of cakes to Apollo and Diana on the sixth and last day of the celebrations, held in front of an unidentified hexastyle temple somewhere on the Palatine. The stylised nature of the reverse's design makes it difficult to pinpoint the temple in question. The generic decorative wreath in the pediment offers no clues. Another variant of the type (RIC 623a) has an eagle in the pediment, perhaps an indication the engravers were not intending to depict a specific temple at all. The scene could stand alone and be an excellent representation for all the religious ceremonies of the games. The main message of the design is to show the Roman people that Domitian provided and responsibly held the Secular Games. The fact this type was struck in fairly large quantities hints it was an important piece of Domitianic propaganda.

Struck on a large flan in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/05/19 at 10:16shanxi: wonderful coin
V932.jpg
03c Domitian as Caesar RIC 93259 viewsÆ As, 10.65g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS IIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
RIC 932 (C). BMC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Ken Dorney, January 2019.

Spes, the goddess of hope, is seen here as an 'heir apparent' type. She is represented on Roman coins as a young girl, reminiscent of earlier Greek statures depicting Elpis. H. Mattingly in BMCRE II says 'the flower held by Spes is an opening bud, she is raising her skirt in order to hasten forward'. Spes occurs quite commonly throughout the Flavian coinage and is frequently paired up with the young Domitian Caesar, likely expressing a hope or expectation for future dynastic success. It is very Ironic that Spes is often associated with Domitian Caesar on the coinage, considering he would later be the family member most responsible for the dynasty's downfall in 96. Surprisingly, this common Spes type is not in the BM.

The obverse features a quintessential Flavian portrait - unflattering hook nose with full and heavy facial features. Pleasant dark green patina.
2 commentsDavid Atherton01/15/19 at 15:02okidoki: Nice David
V932.jpg
03c Domitian as Caesar RIC 93259 viewsÆ As, 10.65g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS IIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
RIC 932 (C). BMC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Ken Dorney, January 2019.

Spes, the goddess of hope, is seen here as an 'heir apparent' type. She is represented on Roman coins as a young girl, reminiscent of earlier Greek statures depicting Elpis. H. Mattingly in BMCRE II says 'the flower held by Spes is an opening bud, she is raising her skirt in order to hasten forward'. Spes occurs quite commonly throughout the Flavian coinage and is frequently paired up with the young Domitian Caesar, likely expressing a hope or expectation for future dynastic success. It is very Ironic that Spes is often associated with Domitian Caesar on the coinage, considering he would later be the family member most responsible for the dynasty's downfall in 96. Surprisingly, this common Spes type is not in the BM.

The obverse features a quintessential Flavian portrait - unflattering hook nose with full and heavy facial features. Pleasant dark green patina.
2 commentsDavid Atherton01/15/19 at 12:43FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition.
D78.jpg
Domitian RIC 7840 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.82g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; S C in field; Minerva stg. l., with spear
RIC 78 (C2). BMC 261. BNC 276.
Acquired from Vilmar, December 2018.

While Domitian's initial denarius output is dominated by the carry-over pulvinar types from Titus, his first issue of sestertii have a more personal touch with the reverses featuring his patron deity Minerva. These first bronze coins were not struck in massive quantities and likely date between mid October and 31 December 81. The reverse legend indicates he is consul for the seventh time and has already been voted as consul for the eighth time beginning 1 January 82.

Superb portrait with an aged brassy appearance.
2 commentsDavid Atherton12/26/18 at 07:38quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
D78.jpg
Domitian RIC 7840 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.82g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; S C in field; Minerva stg. l., with spear
RIC 78 (C2). BMC 261. BNC 276.
Acquired from Vilmar, December 2018.

While Domitian's initial denarius output is dominated by the carry-over pulvinar types from Titus, his first issue of sestertii have a more personal touch with the reverses featuring his patron deity Minerva. These first bronze coins were not struck in massive quantities and likely date between mid October and 31 December 81. The reverse legend indicates he is consul for the seventh time and has already been voted as consul for the eighth time beginning 1 January 82.

Superb portrait with an aged brassy appearance.
2 commentsDavid Atherton12/26/18 at 05:37Jay GT4: Nice one
D562.jpg
Domitian RIC-56287 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERMANICVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII across field; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 562 (R). BMC 141. RSC 67. BNC -.
Ex Spink eAuction 18055, 7 November 2018, The Michael Kelly Collection of Roman Coins part 2, lot 95.

In 88 AD Domitian struck a brief special issue of Minerva denarii with unusual obverse legends and austere reverse designs. The obverse legends deviate from the usual formula, sometimes spelling out fully DOMITIANVS and/or GERMANICVS and lacking a TR P number. The reverses feature only a terse legend across field with the IMP number absent. Here is an example from this rare issue with GERMANICVS spelled out on the obverse and the consular number across field on the reverse. Why the mint was experimenting with the legends and the layout of the reverses in 88 is a mystery. Perhaps the issue was struck in conjunction with a special event that year (the Secular Games?) and are commemorative in nature. Regardless, the mint soon returned the denarius to its conventional Minerva arrangement, hinting that these scarce issues were indeed struck for a special occasion.

Struck in good style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/06/18 at 03:02Jay GT4: Now that's nice!
D562.jpg
Domitian RIC-56287 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERMANICVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII across field; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 562 (R). BMC 141. RSC 67. BNC -.
Ex Spink eAuction 18055, 7 November 2018, The Michael Kelly Collection of Roman Coins part 2, lot 95.

In 88 AD Domitian struck a brief special issue of Minerva denarii with unusual obverse legends and austere reverse designs. The obverse legends deviate from the usual formula, sometimes spelling out fully DOMITIANVS and/or GERMANICVS and lacking a TR P number. The reverses feature only a terse legend across field with the IMP number absent. Here is an example from this rare issue with GERMANICVS spelled out on the obverse and the consular number across field on the reverse. Why the mint was experimenting with the legends and the layout of the reverses in 88 is a mystery. Perhaps the issue was struck in conjunction with a special event that year (the Secular Games?) and are commemorative in nature. Regardless, the mint soon returned the denarius to its conventional Minerva arrangement, hinting that these scarce issues were indeed struck for a special occasion.

Struck in good style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/06/18 at 00:22Nemonater: Fantastic portrait!
D562.jpg
Domitian RIC-56287 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERMANICVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII across field; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 562 (R). BMC 141. RSC 67. BNC -.
Ex Spink eAuction 18055, 7 November 2018, The Michael Kelly Collection of Roman Coins part 2, lot 95.

In 88 AD Domitian struck a brief special issue of Minerva denarii with unusual obverse legends and austere reverse designs. The obverse legends deviate from the usual formula, sometimes spelling out fully DOMITIANVS and/or GERMANICVS and lacking a TR P number. The reverses feature only a terse legend across field with the IMP number absent. Here is an example from this rare issue with GERMANICVS spelled out on the obverse and the consular number across field on the reverse. Why the mint was experimenting with the legends and the layout of the reverses in 88 is a mystery. Perhaps the issue was struck in conjunction with a special event that year (the Secular Games?) and are commemorative in nature. Regardless, the mint soon returned the denarius to its conventional Minerva arrangement, hinting that these scarce issues were indeed struck for a special occasion.

Struck in good style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/05/18 at 23:53orfew: Great acquisition
D562.jpg
Domitian RIC-56287 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERMANICVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII across field; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 562 (R). BMC 141. RSC 67. BNC -.
Ex Spink eAuction 18055, 7 November 2018, The Michael Kelly Collection of Roman Coins part 2, lot 95.

In 88 AD Domitian struck a brief special issue of Minerva denarii with unusual obverse legends and austere reverse designs. The obverse legends deviate from the usual formula, sometimes spelling out fully DOMITIANVS and/or GERMANICVS and lacking a TR P number. The reverses feature only a terse legend across field with the IMP number absent. Here is an example from this rare issue with GERMANICVS spelled out on the obverse and the consular number across field on the reverse. Why the mint was experimenting with the legends and the layout of the reverses in 88 is a mystery. Perhaps the issue was struck in conjunction with a special event that year (the Secular Games?) and are commemorative in nature. Regardless, the mint soon returned the denarius to its conventional Minerva arrangement, hinting that these scarce issues were indeed struck for a special occasion.

Struck in good style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/05/18 at 18:36quadrans: Nice piece..
D562.jpg
Domitian RIC-56287 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERMANICVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII across field; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 562 (R). BMC 141. RSC 67. BNC -.
Ex Spink eAuction 18055, 7 November 2018, The Michael Kelly Collection of Roman Coins part 2, lot 95.

In 88 AD Domitian struck a brief special issue of Minerva denarii with unusual obverse legends and austere reverse designs. The obverse legends deviate from the usual formula, sometimes spelling out fully DOMITIANVS and/or GERMANICVS and lacking a TR P number. The reverses feature only a terse legend across field with the IMP number absent. Here is an example from this rare issue with GERMANICVS spelled out on the obverse and the consular number across field on the reverse. Why the mint was experimenting with the legends and the layout of the reverses in 88 is a mystery. Perhaps the issue was struck in conjunction with a special event that year (the Secular Games?) and are commemorative in nature. Regardless, the mint soon returned the denarius to its conventional Minerva arrangement, hinting that these scarce issues were indeed struck for a special occasion.

Struck in good style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/05/18 at 13:29Mat: Lovely portrait on it
D562.jpg
Domitian RIC-56287 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERMANICVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII across field; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 562 (R). BMC 141. RSC 67. BNC -.
Ex Spink eAuction 18055, 7 November 2018, The Michael Kelly Collection of Roman Coins part 2, lot 95.

In 88 AD Domitian struck a brief special issue of Minerva denarii with unusual obverse legends and austere reverse designs. The obverse legends deviate from the usual formula, sometimes spelling out fully DOMITIANVS and/or GERMANICVS and lacking a TR P number. The reverses feature only a terse legend across field with the IMP number absent. Here is an example from this rare issue with GERMANICVS spelled out on the obverse and the consular number across field on the reverse. Why the mint was experimenting with the legends and the layout of the reverses in 88 is a mystery. Perhaps the issue was struck in conjunction with a special event that year (the Secular Games?) and are commemorative in nature. Regardless, the mint soon returned the denarius to its conventional Minerva arrangement, hinting that these scarce issues were indeed struck for a special occasion.

Struck in good style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/05/18 at 13:05FlaviusDomitianus: Excellent example, better than mine.
D15.jpg
Domitian RIC 1585 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P P COS VII DES VIII; Seat, draped; above, semicircular frame decorated with corn ears
RIC 15 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Savoca Blue 10, 30 September 2018, lot 1212.

The rapidity in which Domitian's first denarius issues of 81 came one after another hint that he was in a great hurry to strike coins as Augustus after Titus' death in mid September 81 AD, presumably for a legionary donative. Dio records that Domitian hastened to the praetorian camp to 'receive the title and authority of the emperor' and promised the soldiers the same bounty Titus had provided. The Roman mint immediately began striking coins for the new emperor. This denarius was struck before Domitian had been awarded the power of the tribunate (TR P). Perhaps it may have taken a few days for the Senate to award the power of the tribunate to Domitian because they had assembled at the small town of Reate where Titus had died and needed to be in Rome in order to vote him the right. Although this Group 2 denarius is not part of Domitian's first RIC issue, it is very likely to have been struck within the first few weeks of him assuming the purple. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. Judging by the rarity of the Group 2 denarii they could not have been struck for any great length of time.

The type of draped seat with semi circular frame is a carry-over 'pulvinaria' type from Titus, possibly originally struck in connection with the Colosseum's opening games' religious ceremonies. Domitian's 'pulvinaria' coins are a stop-gap issue struck until proper reverse types were designed for the new reign in early 82 when the mint and coinage were overhauled.

Good early style portrait, unsurprisingly reminiscent of those struck for him as Caesar under Titus.
4 commentsDavid Atherton10/16/18 at 22:20Jay GT4: Good eye!
D15.jpg
Domitian RIC 1585 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P P COS VII DES VIII; Seat, draped; above, semicircular frame decorated with corn ears
RIC 15 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Savoca Blue 10, 30 September 2018, lot 1212.

The rapidity in which Domitian's first denarius issues of 81 came one after another hint that he was in a great hurry to strike coins as Augustus after Titus' death in mid September 81 AD, presumably for a legionary donative. Dio records that Domitian hastened to the praetorian camp to 'receive the title and authority of the emperor' and promised the soldiers the same bounty Titus had provided. The Roman mint immediately began striking coins for the new emperor. This denarius was struck before Domitian had been awarded the power of the tribunate (TR P). Perhaps it may have taken a few days for the Senate to award the power of the tribunate to Domitian because they had assembled at the small town of Reate where Titus had died and needed to be in Rome in order to vote him the right. Although this Group 2 denarius is not part of Domitian's first RIC issue, it is very likely to have been struck within the first few weeks of him assuming the purple. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. Judging by the rarity of the Group 2 denarii they could not have been struck for any great length of time.

The type of draped seat with semi circular frame is a carry-over 'pulvinaria' type from Titus, possibly originally struck in connection with the Colosseum's opening games' religious ceremonies. Domitian's 'pulvinaria' coins are a stop-gap issue struck until proper reverse types were designed for the new reign in early 82 when the mint and coinage were overhauled.

Good early style portrait, unsurprisingly reminiscent of those struck for him as Caesar under Titus.
4 commentsDavid Atherton10/16/18 at 15:27FlaviusDomitianus: Nice find, completely overlooked by miself.
D15.jpg
Domitian RIC 1585 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P P COS VII DES VIII; Seat, draped; above, semicircular frame decorated with corn ears
RIC 15 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Savoca Blue 10, 30 September 2018, lot 1212.

The rapidity in which Domitian's first denarius issues of 81 came one after another hint that he was in a great hurry to strike coins as Augustus after Titus' death in mid September 81 AD, presumably for a legionary donative. Dio records that Domitian hastened to the praetorian camp to 'receive the title and authority of the emperor' and promised the soldiers the same bounty Titus had provided. The Roman mint immediately began striking coins for the new emperor. This denarius was struck before Domitian had been awarded the power of the tribunate (TR P). Perhaps it may have taken a few days for the Senate to award the power of the tribunate to Domitian because they had assembled at the small town of Reate where Titus had died and needed to be in Rome in order to vote him the right. Although this Group 2 denarius is not part of Domitian's first RIC issue, it is very likely to have been struck within the first few weeks of him assuming the purple. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. Judging by the rarity of the Group 2 denarii they could not have been struck for any great length of time.

The type of draped seat with semi circular frame is a carry-over 'pulvinaria' type from Titus, possibly originally struck in connection with the Colosseum's opening games' religious ceremonies. Domitian's 'pulvinaria' coins are a stop-gap issue struck until proper reverse types were designed for the new reign in early 82 when the mint and coinage were overhauled.

Good early style portrait, unsurprisingly reminiscent of those struck for him as Caesar under Titus.
4 commentsDavid Atherton10/16/18 at 13:14orfew: Wonderful acquisition
D15.jpg
Domitian RIC 1585 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P P COS VII DES VIII; Seat, draped; above, semicircular frame decorated with corn ears
RIC 15 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Savoca Blue 10, 30 September 2018, lot 1212.

The rapidity in which Domitian's first denarius issues of 81 came one after another hint that he was in a great hurry to strike coins as Augustus after Titus' death in mid September 81 AD, presumably for a legionary donative. Dio records that Domitian hastened to the praetorian camp to 'receive the title and authority of the emperor' and promised the soldiers the same bounty Titus had provided. The Roman mint immediately began striking coins for the new emperor. This denarius was struck before Domitian had been awarded the power of the tribunate (TR P). Perhaps it may have taken a few days for the Senate to award the power of the tribunate to Domitian because they had assembled at the small town of Reate where Titus had died and needed to be in Rome in order to vote him the right. Although this Group 2 denarius is not part of Domitian's first RIC issue, it is very likely to have been struck within the first few weeks of him assuming the purple. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. Judging by the rarity of the Group 2 denarii they could not have been struck for any great length of time.

The type of draped seat with semi circular frame is a carry-over 'pulvinaria' type from Titus, possibly originally struck in connection with the Colosseum's opening games' religious ceremonies. Domitian's 'pulvinaria' coins are a stop-gap issue struck until proper reverse types were designed for the new reign in early 82 when the mint and coinage were overhauled.

Good early style portrait, unsurprisingly reminiscent of those struck for him as Caesar under Titus.
4 commentsDavid Atherton10/16/18 at 10:32Nemonater: Awesome catch!
D221.jpg
Domitian RIC-22147 viewsÆ As, 10.23g
Rome mint, 84 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS X; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: MONETA AVGVST; S C in field; Moneta stg. l., with scales and cornucopiae
RIC 221 (C2). BMC 288. BNC 304.
Acquired from Marti Classical Numismatics, September 2018.

In 82 Domitian reformed the coinage by increasing the weight of the gold and fineness of the silver. Production of the bronze coinage was suspended while the mint was reorganised and resumed in 84 with new reverse types. Appropriately, one of the first types struck on the bronze after the coinage reform was Moneta, 'mint goddess of the emperor'. Mattingly believes Moneta in this context can be seen as symbolising Domitian's control of the mint and as paymaster to the empire. A fitting reverse design for an emperor who cared so much for his coinage.

Superb portrait and nice brown patina.
1 commentsDavid Atherton09/25/18 at 07:48Randygeki(h2): Great portrait
D16.jpg
Domitian RIC 1698 viewsAR Denarius, 3.43g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P P COS VII DES VIII; Seat, draped; above, semicircular frame decorated with three crescents
RIC 16 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 8.
Acquired from Germania Inferior, June 2018.

Domitian seems to have been somewhat in a hurry to strike coins as Augustus after Titus' death in mid September 81 AD, presumably for a legionary donative. This denarius was struck before Domitian had been awarded the power of the tribunate (TR P) and pontifex maximus (PM). Here his only titles are Augustus (AVG), Imperator (IMP), Consul for the 7th time (COS VII), and pater patriae, father of the country (P P). Perhaps it may have taken a few days for the Senate to award the power of the tribunate to Domitian because they had assembled at the small town of Reate where Titus had died and needed to be in Rome in order to vote him the right. The religious ceremonies required for Domitian to assume the title pontifex maximus had not yet finished by this time either, here he is simply PONT, or in other words a member of the College of Pontiffs. Some have argued that PONT is the same as PM, I disagree. Titus as Caesar early on had also used the title PONT on his denarii and he was never pontifex maximus under Vespasian - only the emperor can be Pontifex Maximus or greatest priest. Although this Group 2 denarius is not part of Domitian's first RIC issue, it is very likely to have been struck within the first few days of him assuming the purple. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. Judging by the rarity of the Group 2 denarii they could not have been struck for any great length of time.

Dark cabinet toning with a stylish early portrait.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/04/18 at 04:53Randygeki(h2): Nice!
D4.JPG
Domitian RIC 04101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR DOMITIANVS AVG; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII; Seat, draped; above, thunderbolt
RIC 4 (C). BMC 1. RSC 554. BNC 1.

The early issues of Domitian show a progression of the titles he assumed soon after his accession. This denarius is part of the first issue, evident by Domitian's sparse titles of IMP, AVG and TRP only, he is not yet Pontifex Maximus (PONT or PM) or Pater Patriae (P P). The reverse is a pulvinaria type carried over from Titus. The style is identical to the Domitian as Caesar denarii struck under Titus as well. NB: Thunderbolt is not winged.

A good example of the early portrait style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/03/18 at 22:22David Atherton: Jim, the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda deletes 'wi...
D4.JPG
Domitian RIC 04101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR DOMITIANVS AVG; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII; Seat, draped; above, thunderbolt
RIC 4 (C). BMC 1. RSC 554. BNC 1.

The early issues of Domitian show a progression of the titles he assumed soon after his accession. This denarius is part of the first issue, evident by Domitian's sparse titles of IMP, AVG and TRP only, he is not yet Pontifex Maximus (PONT or PM) or Pater Patriae (P P). The reverse is a pulvinaria type carried over from Titus. The style is identical to the Domitian as Caesar denarii struck under Titus as well. NB: Thunderbolt is not winged.

A good example of the early portrait style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/03/18 at 02:38Jim H: David, great point about the wingless thunderbolt!...
D16.jpg
Domitian RIC 1698 viewsAR Denarius, 3.43g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P P COS VII DES VIII; Seat, draped; above, semicircular frame decorated with three crescents
RIC 16 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 8.
Acquired from Germania Inferior, June 2018.

Domitian seems to have been somewhat in a hurry to strike coins as Augustus after Titus' death in mid September 81 AD, presumably for a legionary donative. This denarius was struck before Domitian had been awarded the power of the tribunate (TR P) and pontifex maximus (PM). Here his only titles are Augustus (AVG), Imperator (IMP), Consul for the 7th time (COS VII), and pater patriae, father of the country (P P). Perhaps it may have taken a few days for the Senate to award the power of the tribunate to Domitian because they had assembled at the small town of Reate where Titus had died and needed to be in Rome in order to vote him the right. The religious ceremonies required for Domitian to assume the title pontifex maximus had not yet finished by this time either, here he is simply PONT, or in other words a member of the College of Pontiffs. Some have argued that PONT is the same as PM, I disagree. Titus as Caesar early on had also used the title PONT on his denarii and he was never pontifex maximus under Vespasian - only the emperor can be Pontifex Maximus or greatest priest. Although this Group 2 denarius is not part of Domitian's first RIC issue, it is very likely to have been struck within the first few days of him assuming the purple. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. Judging by the rarity of the Group 2 denarii they could not have been struck for any great length of time.

Dark cabinet toning with a stylish early portrait.
5 commentsDavid Atherton07/11/18 at 13:02quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
D16.jpg
Domitian RIC 1698 viewsAR Denarius, 3.43g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P P COS VII DES VIII; Seat, draped; above, semicircular frame decorated with three crescents
RIC 16 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 8.
Acquired from Germania Inferior, June 2018.

Domitian seems to have been somewhat in a hurry to strike coins as Augustus after Titus' death in mid September 81 AD, presumably for a legionary donative. This denarius was struck before Domitian had been awarded the power of the tribunate (TR P) and pontifex maximus (PM). Here his only titles are Augustus (AVG), Imperator (IMP), Consul for the 7th time (COS VII), and pater patriae, father of the country (P P). Perhaps it may have taken a few days for the Senate to award the power of the tribunate to Domitian because they had assembled at the small town of Reate where Titus had died and needed to be in Rome in order to vote him the right. The religious ceremonies required for Domitian to assume the title pontifex maximus had not yet finished by this time either, here he is simply PONT, or in other words a member of the College of Pontiffs. Some have argued that PONT is the same as PM, I disagree. Titus as Caesar early on had also used the title PONT on his denarii and he was never pontifex maximus under Vespasian - only the emperor can be Pontifex Maximus or greatest priest. Although this Group 2 denarius is not part of Domitian's first RIC issue, it is very likely to have been struck within the first few days of him assuming the purple. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. Judging by the rarity of the Group 2 denarii they could not have been struck for any great length of time.

Dark cabinet toning with a stylish early portrait.
5 commentsDavid Atherton07/11/18 at 12:41maridvnvm: Absolutely gorgeous
D16.jpg
Domitian RIC 1698 viewsAR Denarius, 3.43g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P P COS VII DES VIII; Seat, draped; above, semicircular frame decorated with three crescents
RIC 16 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 8.
Acquired from Germania Inferior, June 2018.

Domitian seems to have been somewhat in a hurry to strike coins as Augustus after Titus' death in mid September 81 AD, presumably for a legionary donative. This denarius was struck before Domitian had been awarded the power of the tribunate (TR P) and pontifex maximus (PM). Here his only titles are Augustus (AVG), Imperator (IMP), Consul for the 7th time (COS VII), and pater patriae, father of the country (P P). Perhaps it may have taken a few days for the Senate to award the power of the tribunate to Domitian because they had assembled at the small town of Reate where Titus had died and needed to be in Rome in order to vote him the right. The religious ceremonies required for Domitian to assume the title pontifex maximus had not yet finished by this time either, here he is simply PONT, or in other words a member of the College of Pontiffs. Some have argued that PONT is the same as PM, I disagree. Titus as Caesar early on had also used the title PONT on his denarii and he was never pontifex maximus under Vespasian - only the emperor can be Pontifex Maximus or greatest priest. Although this Group 2 denarius is not part of Domitian's first RIC issue, it is very likely to have been struck within the first few days of him assuming the purple. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. Judging by the rarity of the Group 2 denarii they could not have been struck for any great length of time.

Dark cabinet toning with a stylish early portrait.
5 commentsDavid Atherton07/11/18 at 11:57Jay GT4: Really great coin
D16.jpg
Domitian RIC 1698 viewsAR Denarius, 3.43g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P P COS VII DES VIII; Seat, draped; above, semicircular frame decorated with three crescents
RIC 16 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 8.
Acquired from Germania Inferior, June 2018.

Domitian seems to have been somewhat in a hurry to strike coins as Augustus after Titus' death in mid September 81 AD, presumably for a legionary donative. This denarius was struck before Domitian had been awarded the power of the tribunate (TR P) and pontifex maximus (PM). Here his only titles are Augustus (AVG), Imperator (IMP), Consul for the 7th time (COS VII), and pater patriae, father of the country (P P). Perhaps it may have taken a few days for the Senate to award the power of the tribunate to Domitian because they had assembled at the small town of Reate where Titus had died and needed to be in Rome in order to vote him the right. The religious ceremonies required for Domitian to assume the title pontifex maximus had not yet finished by this time either, here he is simply PONT, or in other words a member of the College of Pontiffs. Some have argued that PONT is the same as PM, I disagree. Titus as Caesar early on had also used the title PONT on his denarii and he was never pontifex maximus under Vespasian - only the emperor can be Pontifex Maximus or greatest priest. Although this Group 2 denarius is not part of Domitian's first RIC issue, it is very likely to have been struck within the first few days of him assuming the purple. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. Judging by the rarity of the Group 2 denarii they could not have been struck for any great length of time.

Dark cabinet toning with a stylish early portrait.
5 commentsDavid Atherton07/11/18 at 11:12FlaviusDomitianus: PONT denarii are always welcome...
D12.jpg
Domitian RIC 1272 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P P COS VII DES VIII; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 12 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Marc Breitsprecher, January 2018.

A lot of interesting things are going on with this 81 AD Group 2 pulvinar denarius. Firstly, there is the rare 'PONT' obverse legend with DOMITIANVS fully spelled out. Secondly, an exceedingly rare reverse legend beginning with P P. And lastly, there is no TRP number. All of these elements combine together resulting in a very rare variant of a common type; as a matter of fact, this is the second known specimen! The new RIC II.1 was the first catalogue to publish this rare variant. Of note, my example is a reverse die match with the RIC 13 plate coin, which is the other rare dolphin/anchor variant from the group with the shorter DOMITIAN obverse legend.

NB: I am at a loss to explain why this issue lacks a TRP number, considering the previous issue (Domitian's first) records it.

Handsome, if a bit corroded.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/01/18 at 17:17tito labieno: Third known specimen.
V539.jpg
00 Domitian as Caesar RIC 53987 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIAN COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: No legend; Domitian on horse l.; cloak flying out behind, r. hand raised, sceptre in l.
RIC 539 (R). BMC 122. RSC 665. BNC -.
Acquired from NumisCorner, June 2018.

This is the first denarius struck at Rome for Domitian as Caesar. Fittingly, it commemorates Domitian's appearance at Vespasian and Titus' joint Jewish War Triumph - 'while taking part in the Judaean triumph, he rode on a white horse' (Suetonius, Domitian, ii), which was the normal conduct for a young prince on such occasions. The type was struck in three variants: firstly, with a clockwise obverse legend and DOMITIAN fully spelled out, as we see here. Secondly, it was shortened to DOMIT, with the legend still running clockwise. Lastly, the legend direction was changed to counter clockwise with DOMIT. The first two variants are quite rare, the last relatively common. On this coin we see a cloak flying out from behind Domitian. This interesting detail only appears on a few coins from the first variant and does not show up on subsequent issues of the type. Most likely this variant with the cloak was the earliest version of the type which was then quickly simplified by dropping the cloak all together.

Well centred in good early style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton07/01/18 at 04:56Randygeki(h2): Very cool!
V539.jpg
00 Domitian as Caesar RIC 53987 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIAN COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: No legend; Domitian on horse l.; cloak flying out behind, r. hand raised, sceptre in l.
RIC 539 (R). BMC 122. RSC 665. BNC -.
Acquired from NumisCorner, June 2018.

This is the first denarius struck at Rome for Domitian as Caesar. Fittingly, it commemorates Domitian's appearance at Vespasian and Titus' joint Jewish War Triumph - 'while taking part in the Judaean triumph, he rode on a white horse' (Suetonius, Domitian, ii), which was the normal conduct for a young prince on such occasions. The type was struck in three variants: firstly, with a clockwise obverse legend and DOMITIAN fully spelled out, as we see here. Secondly, it was shortened to DOMIT, with the legend still running clockwise. Lastly, the legend direction was changed to counter clockwise with DOMIT. The first two variants are quite rare, the last relatively common. On this coin we see a cloak flying out from behind Domitian. This interesting detail only appears on a few coins from the first variant and does not show up on subsequent issues of the type. Most likely this variant with the cloak was the earliest version of the type which was then quickly simplified by dropping the cloak all together.

Well centred in good early style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton06/28/18 at 00:22Nemonater: Beautiful!
V539.jpg
00 Domitian as Caesar RIC 53987 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIAN COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: No legend; Domitian on horse l.; cloak flying out behind, r. hand raised, sceptre in l.
RIC 539 (R). BMC 122. RSC 665. BNC -.
Acquired from NumisCorner, June 2018.

This is the first denarius struck at Rome for Domitian as Caesar. Fittingly, it commemorates Domitian's appearance at Vespasian and Titus' joint Jewish War Triumph - 'while taking part in the Judaean triumph, he rode on a white horse' (Suetonius, Domitian, ii), which was the normal conduct for a young prince on such occasions. The type was struck in three variants: firstly, with a clockwise obverse legend and DOMITIAN fully spelled out, as we see here. Secondly, it was shortened to DOMIT, with the legend still running clockwise. Lastly, the legend direction was changed to counter clockwise with DOMIT. The first two variants are quite rare, the last relatively common. On this coin we see a cloak flying out from behind Domitian. This interesting detail only appears on a few coins from the first variant and does not show up on subsequent issues of the type. Most likely this variant with the cloak was the earliest version of the type which was then quickly simplified by dropping the cloak all together.

Well centred in good early style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton06/27/18 at 18:00Jochen: Congrats!
V539.jpg
00 Domitian as Caesar RIC 53987 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIAN COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: No legend; Domitian on horse l.; cloak flying out behind, r. hand raised, sceptre in l.
RIC 539 (R). BMC 122. RSC 665. BNC -.
Acquired from NumisCorner, June 2018.

This is the first denarius struck at Rome for Domitian as Caesar. Fittingly, it commemorates Domitian's appearance at Vespasian and Titus' joint Jewish War Triumph - 'while taking part in the Judaean triumph, he rode on a white horse' (Suetonius, Domitian, ii), which was the normal conduct for a young prince on such occasions. The type was struck in three variants: firstly, with a clockwise obverse legend and DOMITIAN fully spelled out, as we see here. Secondly, it was shortened to DOMIT, with the legend still running clockwise. Lastly, the legend direction was changed to counter clockwise with DOMIT. The first two variants are quite rare, the last relatively common. On this coin we see a cloak flying out from behind Domitian. This interesting detail only appears on a few coins from the first variant and does not show up on subsequent issues of the type. Most likely this variant with the cloak was the earliest version of the type which was then quickly simplified by dropping the cloak all together.

Well centred in good early style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton06/27/18 at 00:29Jay GT4: Nice young portrait
V539.jpg
00 Domitian as Caesar RIC 53987 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIAN COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: No legend; Domitian on horse l.; cloak flying out behind, r. hand raised, sceptre in l.
RIC 539 (R). BMC 122. RSC 665. BNC -.
Acquired from NumisCorner, June 2018.

This is the first denarius struck at Rome for Domitian as Caesar. Fittingly, it commemorates Domitian's appearance at Vespasian and Titus' joint Jewish War Triumph - 'while taking part in the Judaean triumph, he rode on a white horse' (Suetonius, Domitian, ii), which was the normal conduct for a young prince on such occasions. The type was struck in three variants: firstly, with a clockwise obverse legend and DOMITIAN fully spelled out, as we see here. Secondly, it was shortened to DOMIT, with the legend still running clockwise. Lastly, the legend direction was changed to counter clockwise with DOMIT. The first two variants are quite rare, the last relatively common. On this coin we see a cloak flying out from behind Domitian. This interesting detail only appears on a few coins from the first variant and does not show up on subsequent issues of the type. Most likely this variant with the cloak was the earliest version of the type which was then quickly simplified by dropping the cloak all together.

Well centred in good early style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton06/26/18 at 22:53Mat: love the look of it
V922aaa.jpg
03b Domitian as Caesar RIC 922100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.31g
Rome mint, 76-77 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Pegasus, standing r.
RIC 922 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Marc Walter, May 2018. Ex Künker eLive Auction 37, 20 October 2015, lot 152.

A rare obverse legend variant of the Pegasus type struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian. Here we have 'CAES' instead of the much more common 'CAESAR'. No reverse die links between the two different obverses have been found, perhaps suggesting the 'CAES' issue came slightly later. Out of 240 Domitian Pegasus denarii on acsearch, only 6 have the 'CAES' obverse. The reverse copies a denarius struck for Augustus (RIC 297). Mattingly speculates it refers to Domitian's poetic aspirations.

Curtis Clay's comments concerning this variant - 'I had forgotten about this variety, but find that I had written into my BMC 193: Var. CAES for CAESAR, CNG Website 6247, May 2001 (2.78g). RIC new ed. 922 calls it R2 and cites examples in Glasgow (ill. pl. 10) and Oxford.'

Struck in the very finest of styles.
7 commentsDavid Atherton06/21/18 at 10:31okidoki: excellent
V922aaa.jpg
03b Domitian as Caesar RIC 922100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.31g
Rome mint, 76-77 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Pegasus, standing r.
RIC 922 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Marc Walter, May 2018. Ex Künker eLive Auction 37, 20 October 2015, lot 152.

A rare obverse legend variant of the Pegasus type struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian. Here we have 'CAES' instead of the much more common 'CAESAR'. No reverse die links between the two different obverses have been found, perhaps suggesting the 'CAES' issue came slightly later. Out of 240 Domitian Pegasus denarii on acsearch, only 6 have the 'CAES' obverse. The reverse copies a denarius struck for Augustus (RIC 297). Mattingly speculates it refers to Domitian's poetic aspirations.

Curtis Clay's comments concerning this variant - 'I had forgotten about this variety, but find that I had written into my BMC 193: Var. CAES for CAESAR, CNG Website 6247, May 2001 (2.78g). RIC new ed. 922 calls it R2 and cites examples in Glasgow (ill. pl. 10) and Oxford.'

Struck in the very finest of styles.
7 commentsDavid Atherton06/21/18 at 02:41ickster: I love everything about it, especially the toning ...
V922aaa.jpg
03b Domitian as Caesar RIC 922100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.31g
Rome mint, 76-77 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Pegasus, standing r.
RIC 922 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Marc Walter, May 2018. Ex Künker eLive Auction 37, 20 October 2015, lot 152.

A rare obverse legend variant of the Pegasus type struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian. Here we have 'CAES' instead of the much more common 'CAESAR'. No reverse die links between the two different obverses have been found, perhaps suggesting the 'CAES' issue came slightly later. Out of 240 Domitian Pegasus denarii on acsearch, only 6 have the 'CAES' obverse. The reverse copies a denarius struck for Augustus (RIC 297). Mattingly speculates it refers to Domitian's poetic aspirations.

Curtis Clay's comments concerning this variant - 'I had forgotten about this variety, but find that I had written into my BMC 193: Var. CAES for CAESAR, CNG Website 6247, May 2001 (2.78g). RIC new ed. 922 calls it R2 and cites examples in Glasgow (ill. pl. 10) and Oxford.'

Struck in the very finest of styles.
7 commentsDavid Atherton06/20/18 at 15:01quadrans: Nice piece..
V922aaa.jpg
03b Domitian as Caesar RIC 922100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.31g
Rome mint, 76-77 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Pegasus, standing r.
RIC 922 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Marc Walter, May 2018. Ex Künker eLive Auction 37, 20 October 2015, lot 152.

A rare obverse legend variant of the Pegasus type struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian. Here we have 'CAES' instead of the much more common 'CAESAR'. No reverse die links between the two different obverses have been found, perhaps suggesting the 'CAES' issue came slightly later. Out of 240 Domitian Pegasus denarii on acsearch, only 6 have the 'CAES' obverse. The reverse copies a denarius struck for Augustus (RIC 297). Mattingly speculates it refers to Domitian's poetic aspirations.

Curtis Clay's comments concerning this variant - 'I had forgotten about this variety, but find that I had written into my BMC 193: Var. CAES for CAESAR, CNG Website 6247, May 2001 (2.78g). RIC new ed. 922 calls it R2 and cites examples in Glasgow (ill. pl. 10) and Oxford.'

Struck in the very finest of styles.
7 commentsDavid Atherton06/20/18 at 01:23Randygeki(h2): Very cool!
V922aaa.jpg
03b Domitian as Caesar RIC 922100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.31g
Rome mint, 76-77 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Pegasus, standing r.
RIC 922 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Marc Walter, May 2018. Ex Künker eLive Auction 37, 20 October 2015, lot 152.

A rare obverse legend variant of the Pegasus type struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian. Here we have 'CAES' instead of the much more common 'CAESAR'. No reverse die links between the two different obverses have been found, perhaps suggesting the 'CAES' issue came slightly later. Out of 240 Domitian Pegasus denarii on acsearch, only 6 have the 'CAES' obverse. The reverse copies a denarius struck for Augustus (RIC 297). Mattingly speculates it refers to Domitian's poetic aspirations.

Curtis Clay's comments concerning this variant - 'I had forgotten about this variety, but find that I had written into my BMC 193: Var. CAES for CAESAR, CNG Website 6247, May 2001 (2.78g). RIC new ed. 922 calls it R2 and cites examples in Glasgow (ill. pl. 10) and Oxford.'

Struck in the very finest of styles.
7 commentsDavid Atherton06/19/18 at 18:11Jay GT4: Sweet
V922aaa.jpg
03b Domitian as Caesar RIC 922100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.31g
Rome mint, 76-77 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Pegasus, standing r.
RIC 922 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Marc Walter, May 2018. Ex Künker eLive Auction 37, 20 October 2015, lot 152.

A rare obverse legend variant of the Pegasus type struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian. Here we have 'CAES' instead of the much more common 'CAESAR'. No reverse die links between the two different obverses have been found, perhaps suggesting the 'CAES' issue came slightly later. Out of 240 Domitian Pegasus denarii on acsearch, only 6 have the 'CAES' obverse. The reverse copies a denarius struck for Augustus (RIC 297). Mattingly speculates it refers to Domitian's poetic aspirations.

Curtis Clay's comments concerning this variant - 'I had forgotten about this variety, but find that I had written into my BMC 193: Var. CAES for CAESAR, CNG Website 6247, May 2001 (2.78g). RIC new ed. 922 calls it R2 and cites examples in Glasgow (ill. pl. 10) and Oxford.'

Struck in the very finest of styles.
7 commentsDavid Atherton06/19/18 at 17:01Canaan: Great coin, Congrats!!
V922aaa.jpg
03b Domitian as Caesar RIC 922100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.31g
Rome mint, 76-77 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Pegasus, standing r.
RIC 922 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Marc Walter, May 2018. Ex Künker eLive Auction 37, 20 October 2015, lot 152.

A rare obverse legend variant of the Pegasus type struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian. Here we have 'CAES' instead of the much more common 'CAESAR'. No reverse die links between the two different obverses have been found, perhaps suggesting the 'CAES' issue came slightly later. Out of 240 Domitian Pegasus denarii on acsearch, only 6 have the 'CAES' obverse. The reverse copies a denarius struck for Augustus (RIC 297). Mattingly speculates it refers to Domitian's poetic aspirations.

Curtis Clay's comments concerning this variant - 'I had forgotten about this variety, but find that I had written into my BMC 193: Var. CAES for CAESAR, CNG Website 6247, May 2001 (2.78g). RIC new ed. 922 calls it R2 and cites examples in Glasgow (ill. pl. 10) and Oxford.'

Struck in the very finest of styles.
7 commentsDavid Atherton06/19/18 at 09:21FlaviusDomitianus: A choice rarity, congrats!
V1085.jpg
07b Domitian as Caesar RIC 108588 viewsAR Denarius, 3.08g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Salus, stg. r., resting on column, feeding snake out of patera
RIC 1085 (R2). BMC p. 47 note. RSC 385. BNC 238.
Acquired from eBay, 10 June 2018.

A rare left portrait variant of the common Salus type struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian. The reverse may be an illusion to Vespasian's ill health preceeding his death on 24 June 79. No specimens in the BM's collection, citing the Paris collection. A double die match with the RIC plate coin.

Good style and well centred.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/15/18 at 07:12Randygeki(h2): Neat find!
V1085.jpg
07b Domitian as Caesar RIC 108588 viewsAR Denarius, 3.08g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Salus, stg. r., resting on column, feeding snake out of patera
RIC 1085 (R2). BMC p. 47 note. RSC 385. BNC 238.
Acquired from eBay, 10 June 2018.

A rare left portrait variant of the common Salus type struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian. The reverse may be an illusion to Vespasian's ill health preceeding his death on 24 June 79. No specimens in the BM's collection, citing the Paris collection. A double die match with the RIC plate coin.

Good style and well centred.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/15/18 at 00:57Nemonater: Nice!
V1085.jpg
07b Domitian as Caesar RIC 108588 viewsAR Denarius, 3.08g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Salus, stg. r., resting on column, feeding snake out of patera
RIC 1085 (R2). BMC p. 47 note. RSC 385. BNC 238.
Acquired from eBay, 10 June 2018.

A rare left portrait variant of the common Salus type struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian. The reverse may be an illusion to Vespasian's ill health preceeding his death on 24 June 79. No specimens in the BM's collection, citing the Paris collection. A double die match with the RIC plate coin.

Good style and well centred.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/14/18 at 12:03orfew: Great coin David
V1085.jpg
07b Domitian as Caesar RIC 108588 viewsAR Denarius, 3.08g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Salus, stg. r., resting on column, feeding snake out of patera
RIC 1085 (R2). BMC p. 47 note. RSC 385. BNC 238.
Acquired from eBay, 10 June 2018.

A rare left portrait variant of the common Salus type struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian. The reverse may be an illusion to Vespasian's ill health preceeding his death on 24 June 79. No specimens in the BM's collection, citing the Paris collection. A double die match with the RIC plate coin.

Good style and well centred.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/14/18 at 10:10FlaviusDomitianus: At least the obverse is a die-match with mine too!
D855c_(2)med.jpg
Domitian RIC-85566 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.28g
Rome mint (for Asia), 95 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Temple with two columns, inscribed ROM ET AVG in entablature, enclosing Augustus. stg. front to l., with spear, crowned by Roma to r., with cornucopiae; G in exergue
RIC 855 (C). BMC p. 352, *. RSC 407. RPC 875 (2 spec.). BNC -.
Acquired from Emerald Imports, eBay, May 2018.

A small issue of cistophori were struck by Domitian in 95. The style and six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the probable mint. Interestingly, K. Butcher and M. Ponting's recent metal analysis of the series reveals it was struck from a different stock of metal than contemporaneous denarii, possibly from recycled republican and early imperial pieces. This rare reverse features the temple of Roma and Augustus at Pergamum copied from the cistophori of Claudius. The temple was erected in 29 BC and was an important centre of the imperial cult in the region. No archaeological remains have been found of the structure, only the coins hint at how it may have appeared. RPC speculates the 'G' in exergue may be the mark of an officina, although, why the Rome mint would use a mint mark on the cistophori and not on any other issues is quite puzzling.

This coin originally came in a NGC slab which noted it as 'fine style'. I quite agree.
5 commentsDavid Atherton06/08/18 at 04:24Randygeki(h2): Very awesome
D855c_(2)med.jpg
Domitian RIC-85566 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.28g
Rome mint (for Asia), 95 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Temple with two columns, inscribed ROM ET AVG in entablature, enclosing Augustus. stg. front to l., with spear, crowned by Roma to r., with cornucopiae; G in exergue
RIC 855 (C). BMC p. 352, *. RSC 407. RPC 875 (2 spec.). BNC -.
Acquired from Emerald Imports, eBay, May 2018.

A small issue of cistophori were struck by Domitian in 95. The style and six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the probable mint. Interestingly, K. Butcher and M. Ponting's recent metal analysis of the series reveals it was struck from a different stock of metal than contemporaneous denarii, possibly from recycled republican and early imperial pieces. This rare reverse features the temple of Roma and Augustus at Pergamum copied from the cistophori of Claudius. The temple was erected in 29 BC and was an important centre of the imperial cult in the region. No archaeological remains have been found of the structure, only the coins hint at how it may have appeared. RPC speculates the 'G' in exergue may be the mark of an officina, although, why the Rome mint would use a mint mark on the cistophori and not on any other issues is quite puzzling.

This coin originally came in a NGC slab which noted it as 'fine style'. I quite agree.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/30/18 at 20:40Jay GT4: Yeah baby yeah!
D855c_(2)med.jpg
Domitian RIC-85566 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.28g
Rome mint (for Asia), 95 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Temple with two columns, inscribed ROM ET AVG in entablature, enclosing Augustus. stg. front to l., with spear, crowned by Roma to r., with cornucopiae; G in exergue
RIC 855 (C). BMC p. 352, *. RSC 407. RPC 875 (2 spec.). BNC -.
Acquired from Emerald Imports, eBay, May 2018.

A small issue of cistophori were struck by Domitian in 95. The style and six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the probable mint. Interestingly, K. Butcher and M. Ponting's recent metal analysis of the series reveals it was struck from a different stock of metal than contemporaneous denarii, possibly from recycled republican and early imperial pieces. This rare reverse features the temple of Roma and Augustus at Pergamum copied from the cistophori of Claudius. The temple was erected in 29 BC and was an important centre of the imperial cult in the region. No archaeological remains have been found of the structure, only the coins hint at how it may have appeared. RPC speculates the 'G' in exergue may be the mark of an officina, although, why the Rome mint would use a mint mark on the cistophori and not on any other issues is quite puzzling.

This coin originally came in a NGC slab which noted it as 'fine style'. I quite agree.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/30/18 at 19:31Canaan: Very nice a must have!!!
D855c_(2)med.jpg
Domitian RIC-85566 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.28g
Rome mint (for Asia), 95 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Temple with two columns, inscribed ROM ET AVG in entablature, enclosing Augustus. stg. front to l., with spear, crowned by Roma to r., with cornucopiae; G in exergue
RIC 855 (C). BMC p. 352, *. RSC 407. RPC 875 (2 spec.). BNC -.
Acquired from Emerald Imports, eBay, May 2018.

A small issue of cistophori were struck by Domitian in 95. The style and six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the probable mint. Interestingly, K. Butcher and M. Ponting's recent metal analysis of the series reveals it was struck from a different stock of metal than contemporaneous denarii, possibly from recycled republican and early imperial pieces. This rare reverse features the temple of Roma and Augustus at Pergamum copied from the cistophori of Claudius. The temple was erected in 29 BC and was an important centre of the imperial cult in the region. No archaeological remains have been found of the structure, only the coins hint at how it may have appeared. RPC speculates the 'G' in exergue may be the mark of an officina, although, why the Rome mint would use a mint mark on the cistophori and not on any other issues is quite puzzling.

This coin originally came in a NGC slab which noted it as 'fine style'. I quite agree.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/30/18 at 14:22okidoki: great example,
D855c_(2)med.jpg
Domitian RIC-85566 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.28g
Rome mint (for Asia), 95 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Temple with two columns, inscribed ROM ET AVG in entablature, enclosing Augustus. stg. front to l., with spear, crowned by Roma to r., with cornucopiae; G in exergue
RIC 855 (C). BMC p. 352, *. RSC 407. RPC 875 (2 spec.). BNC -.
Acquired from Emerald Imports, eBay, May 2018.

A small issue of cistophori were struck by Domitian in 95. The style and six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the probable mint. Interestingly, K. Butcher and M. Ponting's recent metal analysis of the series reveals it was struck from a different stock of metal than contemporaneous denarii, possibly from recycled republican and early imperial pieces. This rare reverse features the temple of Roma and Augustus at Pergamum copied from the cistophori of Claudius. The temple was erected in 29 BC and was an important centre of the imperial cult in the region. No archaeological remains have been found of the structure, only the coins hint at how it may have appeared. RPC speculates the 'G' in exergue may be the mark of an officina, although, why the Rome mint would use a mint mark on the cistophori and not on any other issues is quite puzzling.

This coin originally came in a NGC slab which noted it as 'fine style'. I quite agree.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/30/18 at 10:29FlaviusDomitianus: Beautiful, looks die-linked with mine.
D851.jpg
Domitian RIC-85173 viewsAR Cistophorus, 9.99g
Rome mint (for Asia), 95 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII IMP XXII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XVII CENS P P P; Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand; G in exergue
RIC 851 (C). BMC 253. RSC 94. RPC 873 (8 spec.). BNC -.
Ex NFC Coins, eBay, 18 April 2018.

A small issue of cistophori were struck by Domitian in 95. Style and die axis identify Rome as the home mint. Curiously, K. Butcher and M. Ponting's metal analysis reveal they were struck from a different stock of metal than contemporary denarii, possibly from recycled older denarii. The traditional military type of aquila and standards is the most commonly encountered reverse from the series. It is copied from coins struck for Nero and Galba. The 'G' in exergue may be the mark of an officina.

Struck in good late style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/18 at 10:42Jay GT4: Love these Imperial Cistophoric coins
D788Asm.jpg
Domitian RIC-788A105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Rome mint, 95-96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. with aegis
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 788A. BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Dionysos Numismatik, eBay, 27 March 2018.

An extremely rare Domitian aegis portrait from 95/96, possibly the second known example with this reverse type. Domitian's aegis portraits on denarii were more commonly struck in 84 and 85, exceptionally so afterwards. The Rome mint was experimenting with new reverse designs and portrait types for the denarius issues during the last year of the reign. Perhaps the reintroduction of the aegis may have been part of this new programme? Of course we shall never know - Domitian's assassination in September 96 cut short any experimentation with his coinage. This rare variant only came to light recently and has been added to the RIC II.1 Addenda as RIC 788A.

Bold portrait and fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/18/18 at 12:53Jim H: An amazing find!
D851.jpg
Domitian RIC-85173 viewsAR Cistophorus, 9.99g
Rome mint (for Asia), 95 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII IMP XXII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XVII CENS P P P; Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand; G in exergue
RIC 851 (C). BMC 253. RSC 94. RPC 873 (8 spec.). BNC -.
Ex NFC Coins, eBay, 18 April 2018.

A small issue of cistophori were struck by Domitian in 95. Style and die axis identify Rome as the home mint. Curiously, K. Butcher and M. Ponting's metal analysis reveal they were struck from a different stock of metal than contemporary denarii, possibly from recycled older denarii. The traditional military type of aquila and standards is the most commonly encountered reverse from the series. It is copied from coins struck for Nero and Galba. The 'G' in exergue may be the mark of an officina.

Struck in good late style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/16/18 at 13:01Mat: Great portrait
D851.jpg
Domitian RIC-85173 viewsAR Cistophorus, 9.99g
Rome mint (for Asia), 95 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII IMP XXII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XVII CENS P P P; Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand; G in exergue
RIC 851 (C). BMC 253. RSC 94. RPC 873 (8 spec.). BNC -.
Ex NFC Coins, eBay, 18 April 2018.

A small issue of cistophori were struck by Domitian in 95. Style and die axis identify Rome as the home mint. Curiously, K. Butcher and M. Ponting's metal analysis reveal they were struck from a different stock of metal than contemporary denarii, possibly from recycled older denarii. The traditional military type of aquila and standards is the most commonly encountered reverse from the series. It is copied from coins struck for Nero and Galba. The 'G' in exergue may be the mark of an officina.

Struck in good late style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/16/18 at 11:20Nemonater: Great coin, I don't recall seeing the G before...
D851.jpg
Domitian RIC-85173 viewsAR Cistophorus, 9.99g
Rome mint (for Asia), 95 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII IMP XXII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XVII CENS P P P; Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand; G in exergue
RIC 851 (C). BMC 253. RSC 94. RPC 873 (8 spec.). BNC -.
Ex NFC Coins, eBay, 18 April 2018.

A small issue of cistophori were struck by Domitian in 95. Style and die axis identify Rome as the home mint. Curiously, K. Butcher and M. Ponting's metal analysis reveal they were struck from a different stock of metal than contemporary denarii, possibly from recycled older denarii. The traditional military type of aquila and standards is the most commonly encountered reverse from the series. It is copied from coins struck for Nero and Galba. The 'G' in exergue may be the mark of an officina.

Struck in good late style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/16/18 at 07:47FlaviusDomitianus: Nice catch!
D851.jpg
Domitian RIC-85173 viewsAR Cistophorus, 9.99g
Rome mint (for Asia), 95 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII IMP XXII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XVII CENS P P P; Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand; G in exergue
RIC 851 (C). BMC 253. RSC 94. RPC 873 (8 spec.). BNC -.
Ex NFC Coins, eBay, 18 April 2018.

A small issue of cistophori were struck by Domitian in 95. Style and die axis identify Rome as the home mint. Curiously, K. Butcher and M. Ponting's metal analysis reveal they were struck from a different stock of metal than contemporary denarii, possibly from recycled older denarii. The traditional military type of aquila and standards is the most commonly encountered reverse from the series. It is copied from coins struck for Nero and Galba. The 'G' in exergue may be the mark of an officina.

Struck in good late style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/16/18 at 07:47Canaan: Great details, a real beauty
D851.jpg
Domitian RIC-85173 viewsAR Cistophorus, 9.99g
Rome mint (for Asia), 95 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII IMP XXII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XVII CENS P P P; Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand; G in exergue
RIC 851 (C). BMC 253. RSC 94. RPC 873 (8 spec.). BNC -.
Ex NFC Coins, eBay, 18 April 2018.

A small issue of cistophori were struck by Domitian in 95. Style and die axis identify Rome as the home mint. Curiously, K. Butcher and M. Ponting's metal analysis reveal they were struck from a different stock of metal than contemporary denarii, possibly from recycled older denarii. The traditional military type of aquila and standards is the most commonly encountered reverse from the series. It is copied from coins struck for Nero and Galba. The 'G' in exergue may be the mark of an officina.

Struck in good late style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/16/18 at 06:11quadrans: Great coin , and details,
D332.jpg
Domitian RIC-332173 viewsAR Denarius, 3.36g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 332 (R2). BMC 78. RSC 179a. BNC -.
Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

This denarius was minted in 85 AD right after Domitian slightly lowered the fineness of his denarii to Neronian standards. He had previously in 82 raised the standard of the denarius to the levels set by Augustus but apparently financially could not maintain those standards. The coins were still minted at a higher standard than those under Vespasian or Titus and would remain so until the end of his reign.

This coin also illustrates the high artistic standards Domitian demanded of his die engravers. The addition of the aegis along with the fine style idealistic portrait shows the care the mint took in the minting of these coins.

The surface is slightly porous and the reverse faintly double struck but the overall eye appeal I believe overcomes all that.
7 commentsDavid Atherton05/11/18 at 03:33Jay GT4: This one's great
D332.jpg
Domitian RIC-332173 viewsAR Denarius, 3.36g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 332 (R2). BMC 78. RSC 179a. BNC -.
Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

This denarius was minted in 85 AD right after Domitian slightly lowered the fineness of his denarii to Neronian standards. He had previously in 82 raised the standard of the denarius to the levels set by Augustus but apparently financially could not maintain those standards. The coins were still minted at a higher standard than those under Vespasian or Titus and would remain so until the end of his reign.

This coin also illustrates the high artistic standards Domitian demanded of his die engravers. The addition of the aegis along with the fine style idealistic portrait shows the care the mint took in the minting of these coins.

The surface is slightly porous and the reverse faintly double struck but the overall eye appeal I believe overcomes all that.
7 commentsDavid Atherton05/11/18 at 02:34Nemonater: Wonderful style!
D788Asm.jpg
Domitian RIC-788A105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Rome mint, 95-96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. with aegis
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 788A. BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Dionysos Numismatik, eBay, 27 March 2018.

An extremely rare Domitian aegis portrait from 95/96, possibly the second known example with this reverse type. Domitian's aegis portraits on denarii were more commonly struck in 84 and 85, exceptionally so afterwards. The Rome mint was experimenting with new reverse designs and portrait types for the denarius issues during the last year of the reign. Perhaps the reintroduction of the aegis may have been part of this new programme? Of course we shall never know - Domitian's assassination in September 96 cut short any experimentation with his coinage. This rare variant only came to light recently and has been added to the RIC II.1 Addenda as RIC 788A.

Bold portrait and fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/01/18 at 00:11Nemonater: Great portrait, what a nose on that one!
D788Asm.jpg
Domitian RIC-788A105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Rome mint, 95-96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. with aegis
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 788A. BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Dionysos Numismatik, eBay, 27 March 2018.

An extremely rare Domitian aegis portrait from 95/96, possibly the second known example with this reverse type. Domitian's aegis portraits on denarii were more commonly struck in 84 and 85, exceptionally so afterwards. The Rome mint was experimenting with new reverse designs and portrait types for the denarius issues during the last year of the reign. Perhaps the reintroduction of the aegis may have been part of this new programme? Of course we shall never know - Domitian's assassination in September 96 cut short any experimentation with his coinage. This rare variant only came to light recently and has been added to the RIC II.1 Addenda as RIC 788A.

Bold portrait and fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton04/30/18 at 23:21quadrans: Nice piece..
D788Asm.jpg
Domitian RIC-788A105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Rome mint, 95-96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. with aegis
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 788A. BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Dionysos Numismatik, eBay, 27 March 2018.

An extremely rare Domitian aegis portrait from 95/96, possibly the second known example with this reverse type. Domitian's aegis portraits on denarii were more commonly struck in 84 and 85, exceptionally so afterwards. The Rome mint was experimenting with new reverse designs and portrait types for the denarius issues during the last year of the reign. Perhaps the reintroduction of the aegis may have been part of this new programme? Of course we shall never know - Domitian's assassination in September 96 cut short any experimentation with his coinage. This rare variant only came to light recently and has been added to the RIC II.1 Addenda as RIC 788A.

Bold portrait and fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton04/25/18 at 16:27Jay GT4: Oh that's Nice!
D788Asm.jpg
Domitian RIC-788A105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Rome mint, 95-96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. with aegis
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 788A. BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Dionysos Numismatik, eBay, 27 March 2018.

An extremely rare Domitian aegis portrait from 95/96, possibly the second known example with this reverse type. Domitian's aegis portraits on denarii were more commonly struck in 84 and 85, exceptionally so afterwards. The Rome mint was experimenting with new reverse designs and portrait types for the denarius issues during the last year of the reign. Perhaps the reintroduction of the aegis may have been part of this new programme? Of course we shall never know - Domitian's assassination in September 96 cut short any experimentation with his coinage. This rare variant only came to light recently and has been added to the RIC II.1 Addenda as RIC 788A.

Bold portrait and fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton04/25/18 at 15:21Mat: Great addition
D788Asm.jpg
Domitian RIC-788A105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Rome mint, 95-96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. with aegis
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 788A. BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Dionysos Numismatik, eBay, 27 March 2018.

An extremely rare Domitian aegis portrait from 95/96, possibly the second known example with this reverse type. Domitian's aegis portraits on denarii were more commonly struck in 84 and 85, exceptionally so afterwards. The Rome mint was experimenting with new reverse designs and portrait types for the denarius issues during the last year of the reign. Perhaps the reintroduction of the aegis may have been part of this new programme? Of course we shall never know - Domitian's assassination in September 96 cut short any experimentation with his coinage. This rare variant only came to light recently and has been added to the RIC II.1 Addenda as RIC 788A.

Bold portrait and fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton04/25/18 at 14:13okidoki: very nice, aegis always special
D334sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-33479 viewsAR Denarius, 3.11g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 334 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

A rare denarius from the first issue struck after Domitian's second coinage reform. In 82 Domitian increased the silver fineness of the denarius to nearly 100% purity. Three years later in mid 85 the fineness was again adjusted, this time downward to nearly 90%, still higher than the average 80% inherited from Titus. Domitian assumed the powers of censor in April of 85 which was recorded on the coinage. The title was successively contracted in three issues - CENSORIA POTESTAT, CENS POTES, and CENS POT. According to metal analyses by Walker and more recently confirmed by Butcher and Ponting, Domitian's second coinage reform took place between the last two issues - the CENS POT issue being the first under the new standard. This was the last issue to regularly show Domitian denarii with aegis. From 85 onwards the aegis would only appear sparingly on special issues.

Fine style with large flan.
4 commentsDavid Atherton03/15/18 at 08:27FlaviusDomitianus: Nice catch!
D334sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-33479 viewsAR Denarius, 3.11g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 334 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

A rare denarius from the first issue struck after Domitian's second coinage reform. In 82 Domitian increased the silver fineness of the denarius to nearly 100% purity. Three years later in mid 85 the fineness was again adjusted, this time downward to nearly 90%, still higher than the average 80% inherited from Titus. Domitian assumed the powers of censor in April of 85 which was recorded on the coinage. The title was successively contracted in three issues - CENSORIA POTESTAT, CENS POTES, and CENS POT. According to metal analyses by Walker and more recently confirmed by Butcher and Ponting, Domitian's second coinage reform took place between the last two issues - the CENS POT issue being the first under the new standard. This was the last issue to regularly show Domitian denarii with aegis. From 85 onwards the aegis would only appear sparingly on special issues.

Fine style with large flan.
4 commentsDavid Atherton03/15/18 at 05:23Randygeki(h2): Excellent find
D334sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-33479 viewsAR Denarius, 3.11g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 334 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

A rare denarius from the first issue struck after Domitian's second coinage reform. In 82 Domitian increased the silver fineness of the denarius to nearly 100% purity. Three years later in mid 85 the fineness was again adjusted, this time downward to nearly 90%, still higher than the average 80% inherited from Titus. Domitian assumed the powers of censor in April of 85 which was recorded on the coinage. The title was successively contracted in three issues - CENSORIA POTESTAT, CENS POTES, and CENS POT. According to metal analyses by Walker and more recently confirmed by Butcher and Ponting, Domitian's second coinage reform took place between the last two issues - the CENS POT issue being the first under the new standard. This was the last issue to regularly show Domitian denarii with aegis. From 85 onwards the aegis would only appear sparingly on special issues.

Fine style with large flan.
4 commentsDavid Atherton03/15/18 at 04:47Jay GT4: Love the Aegis
V920sm.jpg
03 Domitian as Caesar RIC 92099 viewsAR Denarius, 2.96g
Rome mint, 76-77AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Minerva stg. r. on prow, with spear and shield; to r., owl
RIC 920 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1947. RSC 45b. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

The first appearance of Minerva on a denarius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Vespasian. His devotion to the goddess came early in life, so it comes as no surprise he wished to honour her on the coins minted in his name. This denarius is a clear indication Domitian had some say in what reverse types were struck for him under Vespasian. The Minerva on prow is an early prototype of one of the four standard Minerva types (M2) Domitian would later extensively strike on his own denarii as Augustus. An extremely rare type for him as Caesar.

A pleasing coin with a Vespasian-like portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton03/15/18 at 04:17Randygeki(h2): Very cool!
D334sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-33479 viewsAR Denarius, 3.11g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 334 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

A rare denarius from the first issue struck after Domitian's second coinage reform. In 82 Domitian increased the silver fineness of the denarius to nearly 100% purity. Three years later in mid 85 the fineness was again adjusted, this time downward to nearly 90%, still higher than the average 80% inherited from Titus. Domitian assumed the powers of censor in April of 85 which was recorded on the coinage. The title was successively contracted in three issues - CENSORIA POTESTAT, CENS POTES, and CENS POT. According to metal analyses by Walker and more recently confirmed by Butcher and Ponting, Domitian's second coinage reform took place between the last two issues - the CENS POT issue being the first under the new standard. This was the last issue to regularly show Domitian denarii with aegis. From 85 onwards the aegis would only appear sparingly on special issues.

Fine style with large flan.
4 commentsDavid Atherton03/14/18 at 23:28Mat: Gotta love those aegis. Nice one!
V920sm.jpg
03 Domitian as Caesar RIC 92099 viewsAR Denarius, 2.96g
Rome mint, 76-77AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Minerva stg. r. on prow, with spear and shield; to r., owl
RIC 920 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1947. RSC 45b. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

The first appearance of Minerva on a denarius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Vespasian. His devotion to the goddess came early in life, so it comes as no surprise he wished to honour her on the coins minted in his name. This denarius is a clear indication Domitian had some say in what reverse types were struck for him under Vespasian. The Minerva on prow is an early prototype of one of the four standard Minerva types (M2) Domitian would later extensively strike on his own denarii as Augustus. An extremely rare type for him as Caesar.

A pleasing coin with a Vespasian-like portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton03/14/18 at 04:30Nemonater: Very cool. This is a type I would love to find!
V920sm.jpg
03 Domitian as Caesar RIC 92099 viewsAR Denarius, 2.96g
Rome mint, 76-77AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Minerva stg. r. on prow, with spear and shield; to r., owl
RIC 920 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1947. RSC 45b. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

The first appearance of Minerva on a denarius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Vespasian. His devotion to the goddess came early in life, so it comes as no surprise he wished to honour her on the coins minted in his name. This denarius is a clear indication Domitian had some say in what reverse types were struck for him under Vespasian. The Minerva on prow is an early prototype of one of the four standard Minerva types (M2) Domitian would later extensively strike on his own denarii as Augustus. An extremely rare type for him as Caesar.

A pleasing coin with a Vespasian-like portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton03/13/18 at 12:00Jay GT4: Nice find.I love the legend across the field
V920sm.jpg
03 Domitian as Caesar RIC 92099 viewsAR Denarius, 2.96g
Rome mint, 76-77AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Minerva stg. r. on prow, with spear and shield; to r., owl
RIC 920 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1947. RSC 45b. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

The first appearance of Minerva on a denarius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Vespasian. His devotion to the goddess came early in life, so it comes as no surprise he wished to honour her on the coins minted in his name. This denarius is a clear indication Domitian had some say in what reverse types were struck for him under Vespasian. The Minerva on prow is an early prototype of one of the four standard Minerva types (M2) Domitian would later extensively strike on his own denarii as Augustus. An extremely rare type for him as Caesar.

A pleasing coin with a Vespasian-like portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton03/13/18 at 10:01FlaviusDomitianus: Nice one, mine is from different dies.
V920sm.jpg
03 Domitian as Caesar RIC 92099 viewsAR Denarius, 2.96g
Rome mint, 76-77AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Minerva stg. r. on prow, with spear and shield; to r., owl
RIC 920 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1947. RSC 45b. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

The first appearance of Minerva on a denarius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Vespasian. His devotion to the goddess came early in life, so it comes as no surprise he wished to honour her on the coins minted in his name. This denarius is a clear indication Domitian had some say in what reverse types were struck for him under Vespasian. The Minerva on prow is an early prototype of one of the four standard Minerva types (M2) Domitian would later extensively strike on his own denarii as Augustus. An extremely rare type for him as Caesar.

A pleasing coin with a Vespasian-like portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton03/13/18 at 06:06quadrans: Great pick up,
V920sm.jpg
03 Domitian as Caesar RIC 92099 viewsAR Denarius, 2.96g
Rome mint, 76-77AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Minerva stg. r. on prow, with spear and shield; to r., owl
RIC 920 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1947. RSC 45b. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

The first appearance of Minerva on a denarius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Vespasian. His devotion to the goddess came early in life, so it comes as no surprise he wished to honour her on the coins minted in his name. This denarius is a clear indication Domitian had some say in what reverse types were struck for him under Vespasian. The Minerva on prow is an early prototype of one of the four standard Minerva types (M2) Domitian would later extensively strike on his own denarii as Augustus. An extremely rare type for him as Caesar.

A pleasing coin with a Vespasian-like portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton03/13/18 at 05:40orfew: Nice catch David
D12.jpg
Domitian RIC 1272 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P P COS VII DES VIII; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 12 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Marc Breitsprecher, January 2018.

A lot of interesting things are going on with this 81 AD Group 2 pulvinar denarius. Firstly, there is the rare 'PONT' obverse legend with DOMITIANVS fully spelled out. Secondly, an exceedingly rare reverse legend beginning with P P. And lastly, there is no TRP number. All of these elements combine together resulting in a very rare variant of a common type; as a matter of fact, this is the second known specimen! The new RIC II.1 was the first catalogue to publish this rare variant. Of note, my example is a reverse die match with the RIC 13 plate coin, which is the other rare dolphin/anchor variant from the group with the shorter DOMITIAN obverse legend.

NB: I am at a loss to explain why this issue lacks a TRP number, considering the previous issue (Domitian's first) records it.

Handsome, if a bit corroded.
3 commentsDavid Atherton03/07/18 at 15:58Jay GT4: Great eye to catch it. Congrats
D12.jpg
Domitian RIC 1272 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P P COS VII DES VIII; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 12 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Marc Breitsprecher, January 2018.

A lot of interesting things are going on with this 81 AD Group 2 pulvinar denarius. Firstly, there is the rare 'PONT' obverse legend with DOMITIANVS fully spelled out. Secondly, an exceedingly rare reverse legend beginning with P P. And lastly, there is no TRP number. All of these elements combine together resulting in a very rare variant of a common type; as a matter of fact, this is the second known specimen! The new RIC II.1 was the first catalogue to publish this rare variant. Of note, my example is a reverse die match with the RIC 13 plate coin, which is the other rare dolphin/anchor variant from the group with the shorter DOMITIAN obverse legend.

NB: I am at a loss to explain why this issue lacks a TRP number, considering the previous issue (Domitian's first) records it.

Handsome, if a bit corroded.
3 commentsDavid Atherton03/07/18 at 12:48FlaviusDomitianus: Nice rarity, congrats.
D585.JPG
Domitian RIC-585103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 585 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection

This denarius is from a very common issue struck in 88 which is peppered with exceedingly rare variants. Here we have an obverse legend spelling of 'GERMAN' instead of the much more common 'GERM'. The experimental nature of the scarce variants perhaps ties them with the Secular Games which were held later the same year. After 88, new legends and reverse designs did not make another appearance on Domitian's denarius issues until the last year (or months) of his reign in 95-96.

Fine portrait on a broad flan.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/21/18 at 05:22David Atherton: Thaks andi89 for informing me of the mistake. It i...
D585.JPG
Domitian RIC-585103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 585 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection

This denarius is from a very common issue struck in 88 which is peppered with exceedingly rare variants. Here we have an obverse legend spelling of 'GERMAN' instead of the much more common 'GERM'. The experimental nature of the scarce variants perhaps ties them with the Secular Games which were held later the same year. After 88, new legends and reverse designs did not make another appearance on Domitian's denarius issues until the last year (or months) of his reign in 95-96.

Fine portrait on a broad flan.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/21/18 at 03:05Randygeki(h2): Nice!
D585.JPG
Domitian RIC-585103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 585 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection

This denarius is from a very common issue struck in 88 which is peppered with exceedingly rare variants. Here we have an obverse legend spelling of 'GERMAN' instead of the much more common 'GERM'. The experimental nature of the scarce variants perhaps ties them with the Secular Games which were held later the same year. After 88, new legends and reverse designs did not make another appearance on Domitian's denarius issues until the last year (or months) of his reign in 95-96.

Fine portrait on a broad flan.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/20/18 at 15:49andi89: An AVG missing in description of avers legend...co...
D585.JPG
Domitian RIC-585103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 585 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection

This denarius is from a very common issue struck in 88 which is peppered with exceedingly rare variants. Here we have an obverse legend spelling of 'GERMAN' instead of the much more common 'GERM'. The experimental nature of the scarce variants perhaps ties them with the Secular Games which were held later the same year. After 88, new legends and reverse designs did not make another appearance on Domitian's denarius issues until the last year (or months) of his reign in 95-96.

Fine portrait on a broad flan.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/20/18 at 11:32Mat: another nice find
D585.JPG
Domitian RIC-585103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 585 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection

This denarius is from a very common issue struck in 88 which is peppered with exceedingly rare variants. Here we have an obverse legend spelling of 'GERMAN' instead of the much more common 'GERM'. The experimental nature of the scarce variants perhaps ties them with the Secular Games which were held later the same year. After 88, new legends and reverse designs did not make another appearance on Domitian's denarius issues until the last year (or months) of his reign in 95-96.

Fine portrait on a broad flan.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/20/18 at 10:01FlaviusDomitianus: Looks like a die-match with mine
D585.JPG
Domitian RIC-585103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 585 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection

This denarius is from a very common issue struck in 88 which is peppered with exceedingly rare variants. Here we have an obverse legend spelling of 'GERMAN' instead of the much more common 'GERM'. The experimental nature of the scarce variants perhaps ties them with the Secular Games which were held later the same year. After 88, new legends and reverse designs did not make another appearance on Domitian's denarius issues until the last year (or months) of his reign in 95-96.

Fine portrait on a broad flan.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/20/18 at 09:05Jay GT4: Great eye David
D555.JPG
Domitian RIC-55587 viewsAR Denarius, 2.88g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII across field; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 555 (R2). BMC p. 325 note. RSC 233a. BNC 113.
Ex Private Collection.

88 AD was the year Domitian held the Secular Games and the Rome mint struck a series of denarii with reverses that explicitly commemorated the event. Additionally, the mint was experimenting with the denarius' standard Minerva reverse designs and legends. These special Minerva issues struck early in 88 may have a connection to the games as well. This denarius has the normal Minerva with spear (M4) but unusually has the consular date across field and lacks the IMP number. Denarii with the legends across field are very rare. It is a Reverse die match with the RIC plate coin, a good indication of how rare the type is.

A bit under weight, but in fine style and nicely centred.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/18/18 at 06:07Randygeki(h2): Nice!
D555.JPG
Domitian RIC-55587 viewsAR Denarius, 2.88g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII across field; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 555 (R2). BMC p. 325 note. RSC 233a. BNC 113.
Ex Private Collection.

88 AD was the year Domitian held the Secular Games and the Rome mint struck a series of denarii with reverses that explicitly commemorated the event. Additionally, the mint was experimenting with the denarius' standard Minerva reverse designs and legends. These special Minerva issues struck early in 88 may have a connection to the games as well. This denarius has the normal Minerva with spear (M4) but unusually has the consular date across field and lacks the IMP number. Denarii with the legends across field are very rare. It is a Reverse die match with the RIC plate coin, a good indication of how rare the type is.

A bit under weight, but in fine style and nicely centred.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/14/18 at 15:01quadrans: Nice pick up..
D555.JPG
Domitian RIC-55587 viewsAR Denarius, 2.88g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII across field; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 555 (R2). BMC p. 325 note. RSC 233a. BNC 113.
Ex Private Collection.

88 AD was the year Domitian held the Secular Games and the Rome mint struck a series of denarii with reverses that explicitly commemorated the event. Additionally, the mint was experimenting with the denarius' standard Minerva reverse designs and legends. These special Minerva issues struck early in 88 may have a connection to the games as well. This denarius has the normal Minerva with spear (M4) but unusually has the consular date across field and lacks the IMP number. Denarii with the legends across field are very rare. It is a Reverse die match with the RIC plate coin, a good indication of how rare the type is.

A bit under weight, but in fine style and nicely centred.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/14/18 at 05:25FlaviusDomitianus: These are nice indeed.
D555.JPG
Domitian RIC-55587 viewsAR Denarius, 2.88g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII across field; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 555 (R2). BMC p. 325 note. RSC 233a. BNC 113.
Ex Private Collection.

88 AD was the year Domitian held the Secular Games and the Rome mint struck a series of denarii with reverses that explicitly commemorated the event. Additionally, the mint was experimenting with the denarius' standard Minerva reverse designs and legends. These special Minerva issues struck early in 88 may have a connection to the games as well. This denarius has the normal Minerva with spear (M4) but unusually has the consular date across field and lacks the IMP number. Denarii with the legends across field are very rare. It is a Reverse die match with the RIC plate coin, a good indication of how rare the type is.

A bit under weight, but in fine style and nicely centred.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/13/18 at 21:05Jay GT4: Me too! Awesome coin!
D555.JPG
Domitian RIC-55587 viewsAR Denarius, 2.88g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII across field; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 555 (R2). BMC p. 325 note. RSC 233a. BNC 113.
Ex Private Collection.

88 AD was the year Domitian held the Secular Games and the Rome mint struck a series of denarii with reverses that explicitly commemorated the event. Additionally, the mint was experimenting with the denarius' standard Minerva reverse designs and legends. These special Minerva issues struck early in 88 may have a connection to the games as well. This denarius has the normal Minerva with spear (M4) but unusually has the consular date across field and lacks the IMP number. Denarii with the legends across field are very rare. It is a Reverse die match with the RIC plate coin, a good indication of how rare the type is.

A bit under weight, but in fine style and nicely centred.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/13/18 at 21:04Nemonater: Awesome catch, first I've ever seen!
D738a.jpg
Domitian RIC-738105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 92 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 738 (R2). BMC (spec. acquired 1990). RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Dionysos, eBay, January 2018.

This denarius is from a very rare issue struck towards the end of summer 92 and can be dated by the TR P XI and IMP XXII, an exceedingly rare combination. This series commemorating Domitian's 22nd imperial acclamation was most likely awarded for a victory against the Sarmatians and Suevi near the end of the campaigning season just before he became TR P XII on 14th September. The rarity of this dating combination indicates just how tight the window was for this issue. Perhaps struck for just a few fleeting weeks (or days).

A bit ragged, but in good metal and nicely centred.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/07/18 at 21:19quadrans: nice pick up
D738a.jpg
Domitian RIC-738105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 92 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 738 (R2). BMC (spec. acquired 1990). RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Dionysos, eBay, January 2018.

This denarius is from a very rare issue struck towards the end of summer 92 and can be dated by the TR P XI and IMP XXII, an exceedingly rare combination. This series commemorating Domitian's 22nd imperial acclamation was most likely awarded for a victory against the Sarmatians and Suevi near the end of the campaigning season just before he became TR P XII on 14th September. The rarity of this dating combination indicates just how tight the window was for this issue. Perhaps struck for just a few fleeting weeks (or days).

A bit ragged, but in good metal and nicely centred.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/07/18 at 09:03Jay GT4: Nice find. I saw this one too
D738a.jpg
Domitian RIC-738105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 92 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 738 (R2). BMC (spec. acquired 1990). RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Dionysos, eBay, January 2018.

This denarius is from a very rare issue struck towards the end of summer 92 and can be dated by the TR P XI and IMP XXII, an exceedingly rare combination. This series commemorating Domitian's 22nd imperial acclamation was most likely awarded for a victory against the Sarmatians and Suevi near the end of the campaigning season just before he became TR P XII on 14th September. The rarity of this dating combination indicates just how tight the window was for this issue. Perhaps struck for just a few fleeting weeks (or days).

A bit ragged, but in good metal and nicely centred.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/07/18 at 07:14FlaviusDomitianus: Nice rarity
D738a.jpg
Domitian RIC-738105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 92 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 738 (R2). BMC (spec. acquired 1990). RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Dionysos, eBay, January 2018.

This denarius is from a very rare issue struck towards the end of summer 92 and can be dated by the TR P XI and IMP XXII, an exceedingly rare combination. This series commemorating Domitian's 22nd imperial acclamation was most likely awarded for a victory against the Sarmatians and Suevi near the end of the campaigning season just before he became TR P XII on 14th September. The rarity of this dating combination indicates just how tight the window was for this issue. Perhaps struck for just a few fleeting weeks (or days).

A bit ragged, but in good metal and nicely centred.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/07/18 at 05:53maridvnvm: Excellent find.
D738a.jpg
Domitian RIC-738105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 92 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 738 (R2). BMC (spec. acquired 1990). RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Dionysos, eBay, January 2018.

This denarius is from a very rare issue struck towards the end of summer 92 and can be dated by the TR P XI and IMP XXII, an exceedingly rare combination. This series commemorating Domitian's 22nd imperial acclamation was most likely awarded for a victory against the Sarmatians and Suevi near the end of the campaigning season just before he became TR P XII on 14th September. The rarity of this dating combination indicates just how tight the window was for this issue. Perhaps struck for just a few fleeting weeks (or days).

A bit ragged, but in good metal and nicely centred.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/07/18 at 03:19Randygeki(h2): Congrats
D333aa.JPG
Domitian RIC-333109 viewsAR Denarius, 3.19g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT•P•P•; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 333 (R2). BMC specimen acquired 1987. RSC 180. BNC 80.
Acquired from Germania Inferior, January 2018.

In 82 Domitian increased the silver fineness of the denarius to nearly 100% purity. Three years later in mid 85 the fineness was again adjusted, this time downward to c. 90%, presumably for monetary or fiscal reasons. Domitian also assumed the powers of censor in April of 85 which was recorded on the coinage. The title was successively contracted in three issues - CENSORIA POTESTAT, CENS POTES, and CENS POT. According to metal analyses by Walker and more recently confirmed by Butcher and Ponting, Domitian's second coinage reform took place between the last two issues - the CENS POT issue being the first under the new standard. Curiously, this 'CENS POT' denarius has what appears to be 'al marco' weight adjustment marks, plainly visible on the reverse to the left of Minerva. Is it possibly during the minting of this first issue under the new standard the mint workers were extra careful with the coinage's weight? Whatever the case, the gouges must date to antiquity owing to the fact they are toned just as the unblemished surfaces are.

An extremely rare coin. Engraved in the period's typical fine style.

6 commentsDavid Atherton01/30/18 at 16:53quadrans: Hmm Interesting piece...,
D333aa.JPG
Domitian RIC-333109 viewsAR Denarius, 3.19g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT•P•P•; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 333 (R2). BMC specimen acquired 1987. RSC 180. BNC 80.
Acquired from Germania Inferior, January 2018.

In 82 Domitian increased the silver fineness of the denarius to nearly 100% purity. Three years later in mid 85 the fineness was again adjusted, this time downward to c. 90%, presumably for monetary or fiscal reasons. Domitian also assumed the powers of censor in April of 85 which was recorded on the coinage. The title was successively contracted in three issues - CENSORIA POTESTAT, CENS POTES, and CENS POT. According to metal analyses by Walker and more recently confirmed by Butcher and Ponting, Domitian's second coinage reform took place between the last two issues - the CENS POT issue being the first under the new standard. Curiously, this 'CENS POT' denarius has what appears to be 'al marco' weight adjustment marks, plainly visible on the reverse to the left of Minerva. Is it possibly during the minting of this first issue under the new standard the mint workers were extra careful with the coinage's weight? Whatever the case, the gouges must date to antiquity owing to the fact they are toned just as the unblemished surfaces are.

An extremely rare coin. Engraved in the period's typical fine style.

6 commentsDavid Atherton01/24/18 at 12:03Mat: Nice find
D333aa.JPG
Domitian RIC-333109 viewsAR Denarius, 3.19g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT•P•P•; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 333 (R2). BMC specimen acquired 1987. RSC 180. BNC 80.
Acquired from Germania Inferior, January 2018.

In 82 Domitian increased the silver fineness of the denarius to nearly 100% purity. Three years later in mid 85 the fineness was again adjusted, this time downward to c. 90%, presumably for monetary or fiscal reasons. Domitian also assumed the powers of censor in April of 85 which was recorded on the coinage. The title was successively contracted in three issues - CENSORIA POTESTAT, CENS POTES, and CENS POT. According to metal analyses by Walker and more recently confirmed by Butcher and Ponting, Domitian's second coinage reform took place between the last two issues - the CENS POT issue being the first under the new standard. Curiously, this 'CENS POT' denarius has what appears to be 'al marco' weight adjustment marks, plainly visible on the reverse to the left of Minerva. Is it possibly during the minting of this first issue under the new standard the mint workers were extra careful with the coinage's weight? Whatever the case, the gouges must date to antiquity owing to the fact they are toned just as the unblemished surfaces are.

An extremely rare coin. Engraved in the period's typical fine style.

6 commentsDavid Atherton01/24/18 at 11:12okidoki: nice reverse
D333aa.JPG
Domitian RIC-333109 viewsAR Denarius, 3.19g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT•P•P•; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 333 (R2). BMC specimen acquired 1987. RSC 180. BNC 80.
Acquired from Germania Inferior, January 2018.

In 82 Domitian increased the silver fineness of the denarius to nearly 100% purity. Three years later in mid 85 the fineness was again adjusted, this time downward to c. 90%, presumably for monetary or fiscal reasons. Domitian also assumed the powers of censor in April of 85 which was recorded on the coinage. The title was successively contracted in three issues - CENSORIA POTESTAT, CENS POTES, and CENS POT. According to metal analyses by Walker and more recently confirmed by Butcher and Ponting, Domitian's second coinage reform took place between the last two issues - the CENS POT issue being the first under the new standard. Curiously, this 'CENS POT' denarius has what appears to be 'al marco' weight adjustment marks, plainly visible on the reverse to the left of Minerva. Is it possibly during the minting of this first issue under the new standard the mint workers were extra careful with the coinage's weight? Whatever the case, the gouges must date to antiquity owing to the fact they are toned just as the unblemished surfaces are.

An extremely rare coin. Engraved in the period's typical fine style.

6 commentsDavid Atherton01/24/18 at 09:11Jay GT4: Really great
D333aa.JPG
Domitian RIC-333109 viewsAR Denarius, 3.19g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT•P•P•; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 333 (R2). BMC specimen acquired 1987. RSC 180. BNC 80.
Acquired from Germania Inferior, January 2018.

In 82 Domitian increased the silver fineness of the denarius to nearly 100% purity. Three years later in mid 85 the fineness was again adjusted, this time downward to c. 90%, presumably for monetary or fiscal reasons. Domitian also assumed the powers of censor in April of 85 which was recorded on the coinage. The title was successively contracted in three issues - CENSORIA POTESTAT, CENS POTES, and CENS POT. According to metal analyses by Walker and more recently confirmed by Butcher and Ponting, Domitian's second coinage reform took place between the last two issues - the CENS POT issue being the first under the new standard. Curiously, this 'CENS POT' denarius has what appears to be 'al marco' weight adjustment marks, plainly visible on the reverse to the left of Minerva. Is it possibly during the minting of this first issue under the new standard the mint workers were extra careful with the coinage's weight? Whatever the case, the gouges must date to antiquity owing to the fact they are toned just as the unblemished surfaces are.

An extremely rare coin. Engraved in the period's typical fine style.

6 commentsDavid Atherton01/24/18 at 05:52Randygeki(h2): Cool addition
D573.jpg
Domitian RIC-57389 viewsAR Denarius, 3.32g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP•XIIII COS•XIIII CENS•P•P•P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 573 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from eBay, January 2018.

Very rare with 'GERMAN'. So rare in fact, Ian Carradice needed confirmation denarii existed with this spelling when he wrote Coinage and Finances In the Reign of Domitian in 1983. Since the publication of that work several examples have surfaced. The issue this denarius is from also features extremely rare aegis portraits. I think what we have here are the markings of a special issue, perhaps struck in conjunction with the Secular Games which were held the same year the special denarii were struck. The series also features many coins engraved in fine 'Flavian baroque' style, as clearly seen on this example.

Well centred and fine style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/21/18 at 09:31Nemonater: Great portrait!
D573.jpg
Domitian RIC-57389 viewsAR Denarius, 3.32g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP•XIIII COS•XIIII CENS•P•P•P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 573 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from eBay, January 2018.

Very rare with 'GERMAN'. So rare in fact, Ian Carradice needed confirmation denarii existed with this spelling when he wrote Coinage and Finances In the Reign of Domitian in 1983. Since the publication of that work several examples have surfaced. The issue this denarius is from also features extremely rare aegis portraits. I think what we have here are the markings of a special issue, perhaps struck in conjunction with the Secular Games which were held the same year the special denarii were struck. The series also features many coins engraved in fine 'Flavian baroque' style, as clearly seen on this example.

Well centred and fine style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/21/18 at 06:03Randygeki(h2): Cool addition
D573.jpg
Domitian RIC-57389 viewsAR Denarius, 3.32g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP•XIIII COS•XIIII CENS•P•P•P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 573 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from eBay, January 2018.

Very rare with 'GERMAN'. So rare in fact, Ian Carradice needed confirmation denarii existed with this spelling when he wrote Coinage and Finances In the Reign of Domitian in 1983. Since the publication of that work several examples have surfaced. The issue this denarius is from also features extremely rare aegis portraits. I think what we have here are the markings of a special issue, perhaps struck in conjunction with the Secular Games which were held the same year the special denarii were struck. The series also features many coins engraved in fine 'Flavian baroque' style, as clearly seen on this example.

Well centred and fine style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/18/18 at 06:56FlaviusDomitianus: Nice find, congrats.
D573.jpg
Domitian RIC-57389 viewsAR Denarius, 3.32g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP•XIIII COS•XIIII CENS•P•P•P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 573 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from eBay, January 2018.

Very rare with 'GERMAN'. So rare in fact, Ian Carradice needed confirmation denarii existed with this spelling when he wrote Coinage and Finances In the Reign of Domitian in 1983. Since the publication of that work several examples have surfaced. The issue this denarius is from also features extremely rare aegis portraits. I think what we have here are the markings of a special issue, perhaps struck in conjunction with the Secular Games which were held the same year the special denarii were struck. The series also features many coins engraved in fine 'Flavian baroque' style, as clearly seen on this example.

Well centred and fine style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/18/18 at 01:09Jay GT4: Nice find David. Definitely on my list
D118.jpg
Domitian RIC-11889 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.52g
Rome mint, 81- early 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PM; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (anti-clockwwise, outwardly, from high l.); Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 118 (C). BMC 57. RSC 625. BNC 56.
Acquired from Dmitry Markov, December 2017.

This undated quinarius is part of Domitian's first issue of quinarii coined early in the reign. The style and silver fineness of 80% indicate it was struck before the great coinage reform of 82 when the silver fineness was increased to 99%. Probably the most common variant of the type from the issue, 'common' being a relative term here!

Darkly toned and in fine early style. Punch-mark(?) in obverse field.
7 commentsDavid Atherton01/05/18 at 13:05Nemonater: Great style, i love it!
D118.jpg
Domitian RIC-11889 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.52g
Rome mint, 81- early 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PM; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (anti-clockwwise, outwardly, from high l.); Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 118 (C). BMC 57. RSC 625. BNC 56.
Acquired from Dmitry Markov, December 2017.

This undated quinarius is part of Domitian's first issue of quinarii coined early in the reign. The style and silver fineness of 80% indicate it was struck before the great coinage reform of 82 when the silver fineness was increased to 99%. Probably the most common variant of the type from the issue, 'common' being a relative term here!

Darkly toned and in fine early style. Punch-mark(?) in obverse field.
7 commentsDavid Atherton12/30/17 at 18:29socalcoins: Great example!
D769a.jpg
Domitian RIC-769110 viewsAR Denarius, 3.77g
Rome mint, 94 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 769 (C). BMC 221. RSC 284a. BNC 197.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2017. Ex G&N 14, 2 March 2017, lot 602.

Struck between mid September and 31 December. Although the frequency rating in RIC rates this denarius as 'common' it is a fairly rare dating combination, owing to the fact it was minted for just a few months.

Superb style and in fantastic condition.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/30/17 at 18:06socalcoins: Nice coin, David!
D769a.jpg
Domitian RIC-769110 viewsAR Denarius, 3.77g
Rome mint, 94 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 769 (C). BMC 221. RSC 284a. BNC 197.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2017. Ex G&N 14, 2 March 2017, lot 602.

Struck between mid September and 31 December. Although the frequency rating in RIC rates this denarius as 'common' it is a fairly rare dating combination, owing to the fact it was minted for just a few months.

Superb style and in fantastic condition.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/27/17 at 09:38FlaviusDomitianus: Nice one
D769a.jpg
Domitian RIC-769110 viewsAR Denarius, 3.77g
Rome mint, 94 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 769 (C). BMC 221. RSC 284a. BNC 197.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2017. Ex G&N 14, 2 March 2017, lot 602.

Struck between mid September and 31 December. Although the frequency rating in RIC rates this denarius as 'common' it is a fairly rare dating combination, owing to the fact it was minted for just a few months.

Superb style and in fantastic condition.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/27/17 at 05:31okidoki: congrats David
D769a.jpg
Domitian RIC-769110 viewsAR Denarius, 3.77g
Rome mint, 94 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 769 (C). BMC 221. RSC 284a. BNC 197.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2017. Ex G&N 14, 2 March 2017, lot 602.

Struck between mid September and 31 December. Although the frequency rating in RIC rates this denarius as 'common' it is a fairly rare dating combination, owing to the fact it was minted for just a few months.

Superb style and in fantastic condition.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/27/17 at 02:10Nemonater: Beautiful!
D769a.jpg
Domitian RIC-769110 viewsAR Denarius, 3.77g
Rome mint, 94 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 769 (C). BMC 221. RSC 284a. BNC 197.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2017. Ex G&N 14, 2 March 2017, lot 602.

Struck between mid September and 31 December. Although the frequency rating in RIC rates this denarius as 'common' it is a fairly rare dating combination, owing to the fact it was minted for just a few months.

Superb style and in fantastic condition.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/27/17 at 01:23Jay GT4: Outstanding David
D769a.jpg
Domitian RIC-769110 viewsAR Denarius, 3.77g
Rome mint, 94 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 769 (C). BMC 221. RSC 284a. BNC 197.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2017. Ex G&N 14, 2 March 2017, lot 602.

Struck between mid September and 31 December. Although the frequency rating in RIC rates this denarius as 'common' it is a fairly rare dating combination, owing to the fact it was minted for just a few months.

Superb style and in fantastic condition.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/27/17 at 01:23NORMAN K: excellant coin
D118.jpg
Domitian RIC-11889 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.52g
Rome mint, 81- early 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PM; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (anti-clockwwise, outwardly, from high l.); Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 118 (C). BMC 57. RSC 625. BNC 56.
Acquired from Dmitry Markov, December 2017.

This undated quinarius is part of Domitian's first issue of quinarii coined early in the reign. The style and silver fineness of 80% indicate it was struck before the great coinage reform of 82 when the silver fineness was increased to 99%. Probably the most common variant of the type from the issue, 'common' being a relative term here!

Darkly toned and in fine early style. Punch-mark(?) in obverse field.
7 commentsDavid Atherton12/25/17 at 04:43Pharsalos: Beautiful example.
D118.jpg
Domitian RIC-11889 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.52g
Rome mint, 81- early 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PM; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (anti-clockwwise, outwardly, from high l.); Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 118 (C). BMC 57. RSC 625. BNC 56.
Acquired from Dmitry Markov, December 2017.

This undated quinarius is part of Domitian's first issue of quinarii coined early in the reign. The style and silver fineness of 80% indicate it was struck before the great coinage reform of 82 when the silver fineness was increased to 99%. Probably the most common variant of the type from the issue, 'common' being a relative term here!

Darkly toned and in fine early style. Punch-mark(?) in obverse field.
7 commentsDavid Atherton12/21/17 at 03:30Randygeki(h2): Cool addition
D118.jpg
Domitian RIC-11889 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.52g
Rome mint, 81- early 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PM; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (anti-clockwwise, outwardly, from high l.); Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 118 (C). BMC 57. RSC 625. BNC 56.
Acquired from Dmitry Markov, December 2017.

This undated quinarius is part of Domitian's first issue of quinarii coined early in the reign. The style and silver fineness of 80% indicate it was struck before the great coinage reform of 82 when the silver fineness was increased to 99%. Probably the most common variant of the type from the issue, 'common' being a relative term here!

Darkly toned and in fine early style. Punch-mark(?) in obverse field.
7 commentsDavid Atherton12/20/17 at 23:48Jay GT4: Jealous!
D118.jpg
Domitian RIC-11889 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.52g
Rome mint, 81- early 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PM; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (anti-clockwwise, outwardly, from high l.); Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 118 (C). BMC 57. RSC 625. BNC 56.
Acquired from Dmitry Markov, December 2017.

This undated quinarius is part of Domitian's first issue of quinarii coined early in the reign. The style and silver fineness of 80% indicate it was struck before the great coinage reform of 82 when the silver fineness was increased to 99%. Probably the most common variant of the type from the issue, 'common' being a relative term here!

Darkly toned and in fine early style. Punch-mark(?) in obverse field.
7 commentsDavid Atherton12/20/17 at 11:35Mat: Nice portrait & reverse
D118.jpg
Domitian RIC-11889 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.52g
Rome mint, 81- early 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PM; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (anti-clockwwise, outwardly, from high l.); Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 118 (C). BMC 57. RSC 625. BNC 56.
Acquired from Dmitry Markov, December 2017.

This undated quinarius is part of Domitian's first issue of quinarii coined early in the reign. The style and silver fineness of 80% indicate it was struck before the great coinage reform of 82 when the silver fineness was increased to 99%. Probably the most common variant of the type from the issue, 'common' being a relative term here!

Darkly toned and in fine early style. Punch-mark(?) in obverse field.
7 commentsDavid Atherton12/20/17 at 06:59FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition, well toned
D26.jpg
Domitian RIC 2691 viewsAR Denarius, 3.53g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 26 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1987. RSC 63. BNC -.
Acquired from CGB, November 2017. Ex CGB Live Auction, 1 August 2017, lot brm_440753 (unsold).

An interesting denarius from Domitian's Group 3 denarii, a carry-over type from Titus' pulvinaria series. Curiously, the reverse legend lacks a TRP date (a title Domitian was awarded upon accession), yet it is matched with an obverse legend employed later in the year. This reverse legend is more appropriate chronologically paired with the early 'PONT' obverse dies with which it also shares a link. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. A possible explanation for such an odd legend pairing would be the mint workers continuing to use old reverse dies with newly engraved obverses. With that in mind, it is not surprising die links between Groups 2, 3, and 4 are known. Generally, denarii with the reverse legend lacking TRP are quite scarce - all of the types in the group have a frequency rating of rare or very rare. The dolphin and anchor reverse is probably the most common one in the issue.

A pleasing 'pinched' portrait in fine metal.
7 commentsDavid Atherton12/11/17 at 00:38Nemonater: Fantastic portrait!
D26.jpg
Domitian RIC 2691 viewsAR Denarius, 3.53g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 26 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1987. RSC 63. BNC -.
Acquired from CGB, November 2017. Ex CGB Live Auction, 1 August 2017, lot brm_440753 (unsold).

An interesting denarius from Domitian's Group 3 denarii, a carry-over type from Titus' pulvinaria series. Curiously, the reverse legend lacks a TRP date (a title Domitian was awarded upon accession), yet it is matched with an obverse legend employed later in the year. This reverse legend is more appropriate chronologically paired with the early 'PONT' obverse dies with which it also shares a link. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. A possible explanation for such an odd legend pairing would be the mint workers continuing to use old reverse dies with newly engraved obverses. With that in mind, it is not surprising die links between Groups 2, 3, and 4 are known. Generally, denarii with the reverse legend lacking TRP are quite scarce - all of the types in the group have a frequency rating of rare or very rare. The dolphin and anchor reverse is probably the most common one in the issue.

A pleasing 'pinched' portrait in fine metal.
7 commentsDavid Atherton11/30/17 at 04:21peterpil19: Portrait and the dolphin on the reverse - both exc...
D26.jpg
Domitian RIC 2691 viewsAR Denarius, 3.53g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 26 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1987. RSC 63. BNC -.
Acquired from CGB, November 2017. Ex CGB Live Auction, 1 August 2017, lot brm_440753 (unsold).

An interesting denarius from Domitian's Group 3 denarii, a carry-over type from Titus' pulvinaria series. Curiously, the reverse legend lacks a TRP date (a title Domitian was awarded upon accession), yet it is matched with an obverse legend employed later in the year. This reverse legend is more appropriate chronologically paired with the early 'PONT' obverse dies with which it also shares a link. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. A possible explanation for such an odd legend pairing would be the mint workers continuing to use old reverse dies with newly engraved obverses. With that in mind, it is not surprising die links between Groups 2, 3, and 4 are known. Generally, denarii with the reverse legend lacking TRP are quite scarce - all of the types in the group have a frequency rating of rare or very rare. The dolphin and anchor reverse is probably the most common one in the issue.

A pleasing 'pinched' portrait in fine metal.
7 commentsDavid Atherton11/30/17 at 00:32NORMAN K: beautiful portrait great detail. wow
D26.jpg
Domitian RIC 2691 viewsAR Denarius, 3.53g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 26 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1987. RSC 63. BNC -.
Acquired from CGB, November 2017. Ex CGB Live Auction, 1 August 2017, lot brm_440753 (unsold).

An interesting denarius from Domitian's Group 3 denarii, a carry-over type from Titus' pulvinaria series. Curiously, the reverse legend lacks a TRP date (a title Domitian was awarded upon accession), yet it is matched with an obverse legend employed later in the year. This reverse legend is more appropriate chronologically paired with the early 'PONT' obverse dies with which it also shares a link. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. A possible explanation for such an odd legend pairing would be the mint workers continuing to use old reverse dies with newly engraved obverses. With that in mind, it is not surprising die links between Groups 2, 3, and 4 are known. Generally, denarii with the reverse legend lacking TRP are quite scarce - all of the types in the group have a frequency rating of rare or very rare. The dolphin and anchor reverse is probably the most common one in the issue.

A pleasing 'pinched' portrait in fine metal.
7 commentsDavid Atherton11/29/17 at 17:31Jay GT4: Awesome
D26.jpg
Domitian RIC 2691 viewsAR Denarius, 3.53g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 26 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1987. RSC 63. BNC -.
Acquired from CGB, November 2017. Ex CGB Live Auction, 1 August 2017, lot brm_440753 (unsold).

An interesting denarius from Domitian's Group 3 denarii, a carry-over type from Titus' pulvinaria series. Curiously, the reverse legend lacks a TRP date (a title Domitian was awarded upon accession), yet it is matched with an obverse legend employed later in the year. This reverse legend is more appropriate chronologically paired with the early 'PONT' obverse dies with which it also shares a link. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. A possible explanation for such an odd legend pairing would be the mint workers continuing to use old reverse dies with newly engraved obverses. With that in mind, it is not surprising die links between Groups 2, 3, and 4 are known. Generally, denarii with the reverse legend lacking TRP are quite scarce - all of the types in the group have a frequency rating of rare or very rare. The dolphin and anchor reverse is probably the most common one in the issue.

A pleasing 'pinched' portrait in fine metal.
7 commentsDavid Atherton11/29/17 at 16:33quadrans: Great piece ..
D26.jpg
Domitian RIC 2691 viewsAR Denarius, 3.53g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 26 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1987. RSC 63. BNC -.
Acquired from CGB, November 2017. Ex CGB Live Auction, 1 August 2017, lot brm_440753 (unsold).

An interesting denarius from Domitian's Group 3 denarii, a carry-over type from Titus' pulvinaria series. Curiously, the reverse legend lacks a TRP date (a title Domitian was awarded upon accession), yet it is matched with an obverse legend employed later in the year. This reverse legend is more appropriate chronologically paired with the early 'PONT' obverse dies with which it also shares a link. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. A possible explanation for such an odd legend pairing would be the mint workers continuing to use old reverse dies with newly engraved obverses. With that in mind, it is not surprising die links between Groups 2, 3, and 4 are known. Generally, denarii with the reverse legend lacking TRP are quite scarce - all of the types in the group have a frequency rating of rare or very rare. The dolphin and anchor reverse is probably the most common one in the issue.

A pleasing 'pinched' portrait in fine metal.
7 commentsDavid Atherton11/29/17 at 08:41FlaviusDomitianus: Nice small portrait
D26.jpg
Domitian RIC 2691 viewsAR Denarius, 3.53g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 26 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1987. RSC 63. BNC -.
Acquired from CGB, November 2017. Ex CGB Live Auction, 1 August 2017, lot brm_440753 (unsold).

An interesting denarius from Domitian's Group 3 denarii, a carry-over type from Titus' pulvinaria series. Curiously, the reverse legend lacks a TRP date (a title Domitian was awarded upon accession), yet it is matched with an obverse legend employed later in the year. This reverse legend is more appropriate chronologically paired with the early 'PONT' obverse dies with which it also shares a link. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. A possible explanation for such an odd legend pairing would be the mint workers continuing to use old reverse dies with newly engraved obverses. With that in mind, it is not surprising die links between Groups 2, 3, and 4 are known. Generally, denarii with the reverse legend lacking TRP are quite scarce - all of the types in the group have a frequency rating of rare or very rare. The dolphin and anchor reverse is probably the most common one in the issue.

A pleasing 'pinched' portrait in fine metal.
7 commentsDavid Atherton11/29/17 at 04:43okidoki: wow
D597aab.JPG
Domitian RIC-597117 viewsAR Denarius, 2.60g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
RIC 597 (R2). BMC 133 var. RSC - (cf. 77a). BNC -.
Acquired from Michael Trenerry, August 2017.

An extremely rare example of the Secular Games herald denarius with portrait head left. Probably the fifth recorded specimen. Obverse die match with the RIC plate coin.

Somewhat worn, but nicely centred and in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton10/12/17 at 15:54Lucas H: Same obverse die as mine I think
D816_(5)sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-81672 viewsAR Denarius, 2.73g
Rome mint, 95-96 AD
Obv: DOMITIANVS AVG GERM; Head of Domitian, bare, bearded, r.
Rev: Temple, eight columns, seated figure in centre; IMP CAESAR on architrave
RIC 816 (R2). BMC 243. RSC 175. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

Domitian struck a rare undated issue of denarii depicting five different temples. Based on portrait style and the fact that Domitian's moneyers were experimenting with new reverse designs after 94, the issue has been dated to either 95 or 96. Four of the five temples have been identified - Serapis, Cybele, Minerva, and Capitoline Jupiter. The fifth type is an octastyle temple, as seen on the coin above, and its identification remains a mystery. Mattingly conjectured it could be the Temple of Divus Vespasian, P.V. Hill and D. Vagi thought it possibly the Temple of Jupiter Victor, R.H. Darwell-Smith speculated it is the Temple of Jupiter Custos, and M. Tameanko believed it to be the Temple of Divus Augustus. Tameanko makes the strongest case. Earlier renditions of the temple on the coinage under Caligula show it with a hexastyle facade. Domitian restored or rebuilt the temple after the fire of 80. His architect Rabirius may have completely overhauled the building in a more contemporary style producing an octastyle temple. Almost a hundred years later Antoninus Pius restored the temple again and struck a series of coins commemorating the event. His coins indeed depict an octastyle temple very much like the one seen on this denarius and may be proof that under Domitian the temple was rebuilt as an octastyle structure. However, until more evidence comes to light, the identification remains uncertain. Like Domitian's earlier Saecular Games series, the temple denarii were likely struck as a special issue, perhaps reflecting Domitian's new interest as builder. The remarkable bare headed portrait further enhances the issue as something special.

Needless to say it is a fantastically rare piece! Additionally, the eight column type may be the scarcest of the temple group, considering I have located only two other examples in trade over the last 15 years. The other two coins (OldRomanCoins 2002, HJB 145, lot 265) are obverse die matches with mine. Oddly, some specimens (BM 234 for example) lack IMP CAESAR on the architrave.

Worn, with some bumps and scrapes, but well-centred and in good style with plenty of eye appeal.
4 commentsDavid Atherton10/10/17 at 12:09Simon: Love the Temple. Nice find.
D816_(5)sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-81672 viewsAR Denarius, 2.73g
Rome mint, 95-96 AD
Obv: DOMITIANVS AVG GERM; Head of Domitian, bare, bearded, r.
Rev: Temple, eight columns, seated figure in centre; IMP CAESAR on architrave
RIC 816 (R2). BMC 243. RSC 175. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

Domitian struck a rare undated issue of denarii depicting five different temples. Based on portrait style and the fact that Domitian's moneyers were experimenting with new reverse designs after 94, the issue has been dated to either 95 or 96. Four of the five temples have been identified - Serapis, Cybele, Minerva, and Capitoline Jupiter. The fifth type is an octastyle temple, as seen on the coin above, and its identification remains a mystery. Mattingly conjectured it could be the Temple of Divus Vespasian, P.V. Hill and D. Vagi thought it possibly the Temple of Jupiter Victor, R.H. Darwell-Smith speculated it is the Temple of Jupiter Custos, and M. Tameanko believed it to be the Temple of Divus Augustus. Tameanko makes the strongest case. Earlier renditions of the temple on the coinage under Caligula show it with a hexastyle facade. Domitian restored or rebuilt the temple after the fire of 80. His architect Rabirius may have completely overhauled the building in a more contemporary style producing an octastyle temple. Almost a hundred years later Antoninus Pius restored the temple again and struck a series of coins commemorating the event. His coins indeed depict an octastyle temple very much like the one seen on this denarius and may be proof that under Domitian the temple was rebuilt as an octastyle structure. However, until more evidence comes to light, the identification remains uncertain. Like Domitian's earlier Saecular Games series, the temple denarii were likely struck as a special issue, perhaps reflecting Domitian's new interest as builder. The remarkable bare headed portrait further enhances the issue as something special.

Needless to say it is a fantastically rare piece! Additionally, the eight column type may be the scarcest of the temple group, considering I have located only two other examples in trade over the last 15 years. The other two coins (OldRomanCoins 2002, HJB 145, lot 265) are obverse die matches with mine. Oddly, some specimens (BM 234 for example) lack IMP CAESAR on the architrave.

Worn, with some bumps and scrapes, but well-centred and in good style with plenty of eye appeal.
4 commentsDavid Atherton10/10/17 at 09:58okidoki: nice temple
D816_(5)sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-81672 viewsAR Denarius, 2.73g
Rome mint, 95-96 AD
Obv: DOMITIANVS AVG GERM; Head of Domitian, bare, bearded, r.
Rev: Temple, eight columns, seated figure in centre; IMP CAESAR on architrave
RIC 816 (R2). BMC 243. RSC 175. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

Domitian struck a rare undated issue of denarii depicting five different temples. Based on portrait style and the fact that Domitian's moneyers were experimenting with new reverse designs after 94, the issue has been dated to either 95 or 96. Four of the five temples have been identified - Serapis, Cybele, Minerva, and Capitoline Jupiter. The fifth type is an octastyle temple, as seen on the coin above, and its identification remains a mystery. Mattingly conjectured it could be the Temple of Divus Vespasian, P.V. Hill and D. Vagi thought it possibly the Temple of Jupiter Victor, R.H. Darwell-Smith speculated it is the Temple of Jupiter Custos, and M. Tameanko believed it to be the Temple of Divus Augustus. Tameanko makes the strongest case. Earlier renditions of the temple on the coinage under Caligula show it with a hexastyle facade. Domitian restored or rebuilt the temple after the fire of 80. His architect Rabirius may have completely overhauled the building in a more contemporary style producing an octastyle temple. Almost a hundred years later Antoninus Pius restored the temple again and struck a series of coins commemorating the event. His coins indeed depict an octastyle temple very much like the one seen on this denarius and may be proof that under Domitian the temple was rebuilt as an octastyle structure. However, until more evidence comes to light, the identification remains uncertain. Like Domitian's earlier Saecular Games series, the temple denarii were likely struck as a special issue, perhaps reflecting Domitian's new interest as builder. The remarkable bare headed portrait further enhances the issue as something special.

Needless to say it is a fantastically rare piece! Additionally, the eight column type may be the scarcest of the temple group, considering I have located only two other examples in trade over the last 15 years. The other two coins (OldRomanCoins 2002, HJB 145, lot 265) are obverse die matches with mine. Oddly, some specimens (BM 234 for example) lack IMP CAESAR on the architrave.

Worn, with some bumps and scrapes, but well-centred and in good style with plenty of eye appeal.
4 commentsDavid Atherton10/10/17 at 06:33Randygeki(h2): Awesome coin
D816_(5)sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-81672 viewsAR Denarius, 2.73g
Rome mint, 95-96 AD
Obv: DOMITIANVS AVG GERM; Head of Domitian, bare, bearded, r.
Rev: Temple, eight columns, seated figure in centre; IMP CAESAR on architrave
RIC 816 (R2). BMC 243. RSC 175. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

Domitian struck a rare undated issue of denarii depicting five different temples. Based on portrait style and the fact that Domitian's moneyers were experimenting with new reverse designs after 94, the issue has been dated to either 95 or 96. Four of the five temples have been identified - Serapis, Cybele, Minerva, and Capitoline Jupiter. The fifth type is an octastyle temple, as seen on the coin above, and its identification remains a mystery. Mattingly conjectured it could be the Temple of Divus Vespasian, P.V. Hill and D. Vagi thought it possibly the Temple of Jupiter Victor, R.H. Darwell-Smith speculated it is the Temple of Jupiter Custos, and M. Tameanko believed it to be the Temple of Divus Augustus. Tameanko makes the strongest case. Earlier renditions of the temple on the coinage under Caligula show it with a hexastyle facade. Domitian restored or rebuilt the temple after the fire of 80. His architect Rabirius may have completely overhauled the building in a more contemporary style producing an octastyle temple. Almost a hundred years later Antoninus Pius restored the temple again and struck a series of coins commemorating the event. His coins indeed depict an octastyle temple very much like the one seen on this denarius and may be proof that under Domitian the temple was rebuilt as an octastyle structure. However, until more evidence comes to light, the identification remains uncertain. Like Domitian's earlier Saecular Games series, the temple denarii were likely struck as a special issue, perhaps reflecting Domitian's new interest as builder. The remarkable bare headed portrait further enhances the issue as something special.

Needless to say it is a fantastically rare piece! Additionally, the eight column type may be the scarcest of the temple group, considering I have located only two other examples in trade over the last 15 years. The other two coins (OldRomanCoins 2002, HJB 145, lot 265) are obverse die matches with mine. Oddly, some specimens (BM 234 for example) lack IMP CAESAR on the architrave.

Worn, with some bumps and scrapes, but well-centred and in good style with plenty of eye appeal.
4 commentsDavid Atherton10/10/17 at 02:28Jay GT4: An exceptional acquisition! Congrats!
D450sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-45078 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 450 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Numismeo, September 2017.

In 86 Domitian was awarded imperial acclamations at an accelerated pace due to the Dacian War, which resulted in some fairly rare denarius issues. This coin is from the extremely rare fourth issue of 86, probably struck for just a few days or so until word of the next imperial acclamation reached the mint. The Minerva fighting (M1) and Minerva on rostral column (M2) are the only two denarius types known for the issue. The coins are so rare that Mattingly even doubted the issue's existence (BMCRE p. 320 note).

Struck in fine style on a large flan.
6 commentsDavid Atherton10/04/17 at 14:10quadrans: Nice find
D450sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-45078 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 450 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Numismeo, September 2017.

In 86 Domitian was awarded imperial acclamations at an accelerated pace due to the Dacian War, which resulted in some fairly rare denarius issues. This coin is from the extremely rare fourth issue of 86, probably struck for just a few days or so until word of the next imperial acclamation reached the mint. The Minerva fighting (M1) and Minerva on rostral column (M2) are the only two denarius types known for the issue. The coins are so rare that Mattingly even doubted the issue's existence (BMCRE p. 320 note).

Struck in fine style on a large flan.
6 commentsDavid Atherton10/04/17 at 10:56Nemonater: Awesome!
D450sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-45078 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 450 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Numismeo, September 2017.

In 86 Domitian was awarded imperial acclamations at an accelerated pace due to the Dacian War, which resulted in some fairly rare denarius issues. This coin is from the extremely rare fourth issue of 86, probably struck for just a few days or so until word of the next imperial acclamation reached the mint. The Minerva fighting (M1) and Minerva on rostral column (M2) are the only two denarius types known for the issue. The coins are so rare that Mattingly even doubted the issue's existence (BMCRE p. 320 note).

Struck in fine style on a large flan.
6 commentsDavid Atherton10/04/17 at 08:59Jay GT4: Fantastic find and in excellent style
D450sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-45078 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 450 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Numismeo, September 2017.

In 86 Domitian was awarded imperial acclamations at an accelerated pace due to the Dacian War, which resulted in some fairly rare denarius issues. This coin is from the extremely rare fourth issue of 86, probably struck for just a few days or so until word of the next imperial acclamation reached the mint. The Minerva fighting (M1) and Minerva on rostral column (M2) are the only two denarius types known for the issue. The coins are so rare that Mattingly even doubted the issue's existence (BMCRE p. 320 note).

Struck in fine style on a large flan.
6 commentsDavid Atherton10/04/17 at 06:42FlaviusDomitianus: Nice reverse, same die as mine I think
D450sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-45078 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 450 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Numismeo, September 2017.

In 86 Domitian was awarded imperial acclamations at an accelerated pace due to the Dacian War, which resulted in some fairly rare denarius issues. This coin is from the extremely rare fourth issue of 86, probably struck for just a few days or so until word of the next imperial acclamation reached the mint. The Minerva fighting (M1) and Minerva on rostral column (M2) are the only two denarius types known for the issue. The coins are so rare that Mattingly even doubted the issue's existence (BMCRE p. 320 note).

Struck in fine style on a large flan.
6 commentsDavid Atherton10/04/17 at 03:52okidoki: wow
D450sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-45078 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 450 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Numismeo, September 2017.

In 86 Domitian was awarded imperial acclamations at an accelerated pace due to the Dacian War, which resulted in some fairly rare denarius issues. This coin is from the extremely rare fourth issue of 86, probably struck for just a few days or so until word of the next imperial acclamation reached the mint. The Minerva fighting (M1) and Minerva on rostral column (M2) are the only two denarius types known for the issue. The coins are so rare that Mattingly even doubted the issue's existence (BMCRE p. 320 note).

Struck in fine style on a large flan.
6 commentsDavid Atherton10/04/17 at 03:37Randygeki(h2): Sweet!
D652a.jpg
Domitian RIC-65263 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XVI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 652 (R2). BMC 145. RSC 243. BNC 138.
Acquired from NumisCorner, August 2017.

Domitian was acquiring imperial acclamations at a rapid pace in late 88 due to intense military activity in Germania and Dacia. The coins record the successive acclamations quite meticulously. Here is a very rare coin dated with his 16th imperial acclamation. Domitian was awarded his 17th imperial acclamation by 7 November, so this coin was struck at some point before then, perhaps for just a few days judging by the rarity of the title. We do not know what long lost victory the 16th salutation was awarded for, all that remains are the coins recording it. A reverse die match with the BM specimen, perhaps further evidence of its rarity.

Struck in good metal and nicely centred.
1 commentsDavid Atherton09/21/17 at 05:19FlaviusDomitianus: Nice rarity!
D56best2.jpg
Domitian RIC 5685 viewsAR Denarius, 3.22g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 56 (R2). BMC p. 299, ‡. RSC 560a. BNC -.
Ex eBay, September 2017.

Here is a rare Domitian 'PONT' denarius with the legend variant of DOMITIANVS fully spelled out. Denarii with 'PONT' instead of PM in the obverse legend come very early in the reign. Historically, PONT did not stand for Pontifex Maximus under Augustus, but did so under Nero (PONT was used after Nero was already Pontifex Maximus, BMC 9). It is possible Domitian followed Nero's example and used PONT as an abbreviation for Pontifex Maximus. Conversely, it is also possible he followed in Augustus' footsteps and used the temporary title 'PONT' until the ceremony electing him to the position was completed. We simply do not know. The records of the Arval brothers do not show Domitian as Pontifex Maximus by 30 October, so presumably he acquired the title in either November or December. The office seems to have had no fixed date of appointment. Knowing how much of a stickler Domitian was to keeping to the proper forms, the mint likely waited until his election as Pontifex Maximus before the title was displayed on the coinage. Whether or not that title on the coinage after the election was abbreviated as 'PONT' for a brief time is a mystery.

Struck in fine early style with a well centred obverse.
6 commentsDavid Atherton09/18/17 at 14:13David Atherton: Thank you Curtis for the clear explanation of PONT...
D56best2.jpg
Domitian RIC 5685 viewsAR Denarius, 3.22g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 56 (R2). BMC p. 299, ‡. RSC 560a. BNC -.
Ex eBay, September 2017.

Here is a rare Domitian 'PONT' denarius with the legend variant of DOMITIANVS fully spelled out. Denarii with 'PONT' instead of PM in the obverse legend come very early in the reign. Historically, PONT did not stand for Pontifex Maximus under Augustus, but did so under Nero (PONT was used after Nero was already Pontifex Maximus, BMC 9). It is possible Domitian followed Nero's example and used PONT as an abbreviation for Pontifex Maximus. Conversely, it is also possible he followed in Augustus' footsteps and used the temporary title 'PONT' until the ceremony electing him to the position was completed. We simply do not know. The records of the Arval brothers do not show Domitian as Pontifex Maximus by 30 October, so presumably he acquired the title in either November or December. The office seems to have had no fixed date of appointment. Knowing how much of a stickler Domitian was to keeping to the proper forms, the mint likely waited until his election as Pontifex Maximus before the title was displayed on the coinage. Whether or not that title on the coinage after the election was abbreviated as 'PONT' for a brief time is a mystery.

Struck in fine early style with a well centred obverse.
6 commentsDavid Atherton09/17/17 at 17:36curtislclay: A very nice specimen from this rare issue! As to i...
D56best2.jpg
Domitian RIC 5685 viewsAR Denarius, 3.22g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 56 (R2). BMC p. 299, ‡. RSC 560a. BNC -.
Ex eBay, September 2017.

Here is a rare Domitian 'PONT' denarius with the legend variant of DOMITIANVS fully spelled out. Denarii with 'PONT' instead of PM in the obverse legend come very early in the reign. Historically, PONT did not stand for Pontifex Maximus under Augustus, but did so under Nero (PONT was used after Nero was already Pontifex Maximus, BMC 9). It is possible Domitian followed Nero's example and used PONT as an abbreviation for Pontifex Maximus. Conversely, it is also possible he followed in Augustus' footsteps and used the temporary title 'PONT' until the ceremony electing him to the position was completed. We simply do not know. The records of the Arval brothers do not show Domitian as Pontifex Maximus by 30 October, so presumably he acquired the title in either November or December. The office seems to have had no fixed date of appointment. Knowing how much of a stickler Domitian was to keeping to the proper forms, the mint likely waited until his election as Pontifex Maximus before the title was displayed on the coinage. Whether or not that title on the coinage after the election was abbreviated as 'PONT' for a brief time is a mystery.

Struck in fine early style with a well centred obverse.
6 commentsDavid Atherton09/17/17 at 16:42quadrans: Great style , I like it..
D56best2.jpg
Domitian RIC 5685 viewsAR Denarius, 3.22g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 56 (R2). BMC p. 299, ‡. RSC 560a. BNC -.
Ex eBay, September 2017.

Here is a rare Domitian 'PONT' denarius with the legend variant of DOMITIANVS fully spelled out. Denarii with 'PONT' instead of PM in the obverse legend come very early in the reign. Historically, PONT did not stand for Pontifex Maximus under Augustus, but did so under Nero (PONT was used after Nero was already Pontifex Maximus, BMC 9). It is possible Domitian followed Nero's example and used PONT as an abbreviation for Pontifex Maximus. Conversely, it is also possible he followed in Augustus' footsteps and used the temporary title 'PONT' until the ceremony electing him to the position was completed. We simply do not know. The records of the Arval brothers do not show Domitian as Pontifex Maximus by 30 October, so presumably he acquired the title in either November or December. The office seems to have had no fixed date of appointment. Knowing how much of a stickler Domitian was to keeping to the proper forms, the mint likely waited until his election as Pontifex Maximus before the title was displayed on the coinage. Whether or not that title on the coinage after the election was abbreviated as 'PONT' for a brief time is a mystery.

Struck in fine early style with a well centred obverse.
6 commentsDavid Atherton09/14/17 at 13:25OldMoney: Nice one!
D56best2.jpg
Domitian RIC 5685 viewsAR Denarius, 3.22g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 56 (R2). BMC p. 299, ‡. RSC 560a. BNC -.
Ex eBay, September 2017.

Here is a rare Domitian 'PONT' denarius with the legend variant of DOMITIANVS fully spelled out. Denarii with 'PONT' instead of PM in the obverse legend come very early in the reign. Historically, PONT did not stand for Pontifex Maximus under Augustus, but did so under Nero (PONT was used after Nero was already Pontifex Maximus, BMC 9). It is possible Domitian followed Nero's example and used PONT as an abbreviation for Pontifex Maximus. Conversely, it is also possible he followed in Augustus' footsteps and used the temporary title 'PONT' until the ceremony electing him to the position was completed. We simply do not know. The records of the Arval brothers do not show Domitian as Pontifex Maximus by 30 October, so presumably he acquired the title in either November or December. The office seems to have had no fixed date of appointment. Knowing how much of a stickler Domitian was to keeping to the proper forms, the mint likely waited until his election as Pontifex Maximus before the title was displayed on the coinage. Whether or not that title on the coinage after the election was abbreviated as 'PONT' for a brief time is a mystery.

Struck in fine early style with a well centred obverse.
6 commentsDavid Atherton09/14/17 at 07:29FlaviusDomitianus: That's quite a find!
D56best2.jpg
Domitian RIC 5685 viewsAR Denarius, 3.22g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 56 (R2). BMC p. 299, ‡. RSC 560a. BNC -.
Ex eBay, September 2017.

Here is a rare Domitian 'PONT' denarius with the legend variant of DOMITIANVS fully spelled out. Denarii with 'PONT' instead of PM in the obverse legend come very early in the reign. Historically, PONT did not stand for Pontifex Maximus under Augustus, but did so under Nero (PONT was used after Nero was already Pontifex Maximus, BMC 9). It is possible Domitian followed Nero's example and used PONT as an abbreviation for Pontifex Maximus. Conversely, it is also possible he followed in Augustus' footsteps and used the temporary title 'PONT' until the ceremony electing him to the position was completed. We simply do not know. The records of the Arval brothers do not show Domitian as Pontifex Maximus by 30 October, so presumably he acquired the title in either November or December. The office seems to have had no fixed date of appointment. Knowing how much of a stickler Domitian was to keeping to the proper forms, the mint likely waited until his election as Pontifex Maximus before the title was displayed on the coinage. Whether or not that title on the coinage after the election was abbreviated as 'PONT' for a brief time is a mystery.

Struck in fine early style with a well centred obverse.
6 commentsDavid Atherton09/14/17 at 07:00Jay GT4: Lovely style and a nice strike
D597aab.JPG
Domitian RIC-597117 viewsAR Denarius, 2.60g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
RIC 597 (R2). BMC 133 var. RSC - (cf. 77a). BNC -.
Acquired from Michael Trenerry, August 2017.

An extremely rare example of the Secular Games herald denarius with portrait head left. Probably the fifth recorded specimen. Obverse die match with the RIC plate coin.

Somewhat worn, but nicely centred and in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton09/05/17 at 14:09quadrans: Hoops Great coin indeed
D597aab.JPG
Domitian RIC-597117 viewsAR Denarius, 2.60g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
RIC 597 (R2). BMC 133 var. RSC - (cf. 77a). BNC -.
Acquired from Michael Trenerry, August 2017.

An extremely rare example of the Secular Games herald denarius with portrait head left. Probably the fifth recorded specimen. Obverse die match with the RIC plate coin.

Somewhat worn, but nicely centred and in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton09/05/17 at 11:23Vincent: Nothing wrong with worn, beautiful and interesting...
D597aab.JPG
Domitian RIC-597117 viewsAR Denarius, 2.60g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
RIC 597 (R2). BMC 133 var. RSC - (cf. 77a). BNC -.
Acquired from Michael Trenerry, August 2017.

An extremely rare example of the Secular Games herald denarius with portrait head left. Probably the fifth recorded specimen. Obverse die match with the RIC plate coin.

Somewhat worn, but nicely centred and in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton09/05/17 at 11:22Mat: Nice addition
D597aab.JPG
Domitian RIC-597117 viewsAR Denarius, 2.60g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
RIC 597 (R2). BMC 133 var. RSC - (cf. 77a). BNC -.
Acquired from Michael Trenerry, August 2017.

An extremely rare example of the Secular Games herald denarius with portrait head left. Probably the fifth recorded specimen. Obverse die match with the RIC plate coin.

Somewhat worn, but nicely centred and in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton09/05/17 at 05:47FlaviusDomitianus: Nice catch. Same dies as mine, I think.
D597aab.JPG
Domitian RIC-597117 viewsAR Denarius, 2.60g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
RIC 597 (R2). BMC 133 var. RSC - (cf. 77a). BNC -.
Acquired from Michael Trenerry, August 2017.

An extremely rare example of the Secular Games herald denarius with portrait head left. Probably the fifth recorded specimen. Obverse die match with the RIC plate coin.

Somewhat worn, but nicely centred and in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton09/05/17 at 04:02ickster: This is a very nice find. Thanks for sharing. Cong...
T517.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-517115 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.77g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI F•DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: DIVO VESP across field; Altar shrine
RIC 517 (R). BMC 150. RSC 95. RPC 862 (6 spec.). BNC 112.
Acquired from NumisCorner, July 2017.

A fairly scarce Domitian Caesar cistophorus struck under Titus. The reverse honours the divine Vespasian and shows what catalogues have traditionally called a 'large altar' - in fact what the reverse depicts is a shrine in the shape of an altar. The doors, columns, and steps are strong evidence that what we are seeing is a building and not an altar. How the shrine related to the Temple of the Divine Vespasian is unknown.

Struck in good metal and fine Roman style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton09/02/17 at 06:45maridvnvm: Oh wow.
T517.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-517115 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.77g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI F•DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: DIVO VESP across field; Altar shrine
RIC 517 (R). BMC 150. RSC 95. RPC 862 (6 spec.). BNC 112.
Acquired from NumisCorner, July 2017.

A fairly scarce Domitian Caesar cistophorus struck under Titus. The reverse honours the divine Vespasian and shows what catalogues have traditionally called a 'large altar' - in fact what the reverse depicts is a shrine in the shape of an altar. The doors, columns, and steps are strong evidence that what we are seeing is a building and not an altar. How the shrine related to the Temple of the Divine Vespasian is unknown.

Struck in good metal and fine Roman style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton09/02/17 at 06:22quadrans: Yes, great coin ...
D599.jpg
Domitian RIC-59994 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.61g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
RIC 599 (C2). BMC 134. RSC 78. BNC 122.
Ex CNG E404, 23 August 2017, lot 504. Ex Helios 1, 17 April 2008, lot 248 (The Frank L. Kovacs Collection).

Unusually, this quinarius lacks the de rigueur Victory on the reverse, instead we have an interesting historical type of a Herald announcing Domitian's Ludi Saeculares. This was the only saeculum type struck on his quinarii. The games were held in 88 following the Augustan cycle. Presumably this piece was struck for commemorative purposes in conjunction with the games. RIC places the frequency rating for this type as 'very common' (C2), however, this seems a bit over generous. Perhaps a rating of 'common' (C) would be more appropriate. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes the frequency discrepancy, citing C. Clay's concern that only nineteen specimens are in King's survey of Roman quinarii.

A lovely piece with dark toning and fine style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton08/31/17 at 14:15okidoki: very nice details and looks
D599.jpg
Domitian RIC-59994 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.61g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
RIC 599 (C2). BMC 134. RSC 78. BNC 122.
Ex CNG E404, 23 August 2017, lot 504. Ex Helios 1, 17 April 2008, lot 248 (The Frank L. Kovacs Collection).

Unusually, this quinarius lacks the de rigueur Victory on the reverse, instead we have an interesting historical type of a Herald announcing Domitian's Ludi Saeculares. This was the only saeculum type struck on his quinarii. The games were held in 88 following the Augustan cycle. Presumably this piece was struck for commemorative purposes in conjunction with the games. RIC places the frequency rating for this type as 'very common' (C2), however, this seems a bit over generous. Perhaps a rating of 'common' (C) would be more appropriate. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes the frequency discrepancy, citing C. Clay's concern that only nineteen specimens are in King's survey of Roman quinarii.

A lovely piece with dark toning and fine style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton08/31/17 at 05:14ancientdave: Excellent find!
D599.jpg
Domitian RIC-59994 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.61g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
RIC 599 (C2). BMC 134. RSC 78. BNC 122.
Ex CNG E404, 23 August 2017, lot 504. Ex Helios 1, 17 April 2008, lot 248 (The Frank L. Kovacs Collection).

Unusually, this quinarius lacks the de rigueur Victory on the reverse, instead we have an interesting historical type of a Herald announcing Domitian's Ludi Saeculares. This was the only saeculum type struck on his quinarii. The games were held in 88 following the Augustan cycle. Presumably this piece was struck for commemorative purposes in conjunction with the games. RIC places the frequency rating for this type as 'very common' (C2), however, this seems a bit over generous. Perhaps a rating of 'common' (C) would be more appropriate. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes the frequency discrepancy, citing C. Clay's concern that only nineteen specimens are in King's survey of Roman quinarii.

A lovely piece with dark toning and fine style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton08/29/17 at 17:57quadrans: Nice small piece..
D599.jpg
Domitian RIC-59994 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.61g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
RIC 599 (C2). BMC 134. RSC 78. BNC 122.
Ex CNG E404, 23 August 2017, lot 504. Ex Helios 1, 17 April 2008, lot 248 (The Frank L. Kovacs Collection).

Unusually, this quinarius lacks the de rigueur Victory on the reverse, instead we have an interesting historical type of a Herald announcing Domitian's Ludi Saeculares. This was the only saeculum type struck on his quinarii. The games were held in 88 following the Augustan cycle. Presumably this piece was struck for commemorative purposes in conjunction with the games. RIC places the frequency rating for this type as 'very common' (C2), however, this seems a bit over generous. Perhaps a rating of 'common' (C) would be more appropriate. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes the frequency discrepancy, citing C. Clay's concern that only nineteen specimens are in King's survey of Roman quinarii.

A lovely piece with dark toning and fine style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton08/29/17 at 11:26orfew: Nice catch David
D599.jpg
Domitian RIC-59994 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.61g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
RIC 599 (C2). BMC 134. RSC 78. BNC 122.
Ex CNG E404, 23 August 2017, lot 504. Ex Helios 1, 17 April 2008, lot 248 (The Frank L. Kovacs Collection).

Unusually, this quinarius lacks the de rigueur Victory on the reverse, instead we have an interesting historical type of a Herald announcing Domitian's Ludi Saeculares. This was the only saeculum type struck on his quinarii. The games were held in 88 following the Augustan cycle. Presumably this piece was struck for commemorative purposes in conjunction with the games. RIC places the frequency rating for this type as 'very common' (C2), however, this seems a bit over generous. Perhaps a rating of 'common' (C) would be more appropriate. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes the frequency discrepancy, citing C. Clay's concern that only nineteen specimens are in King's survey of Roman quinarii.

A lovely piece with dark toning and fine style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton08/29/17 at 09:49FlaviusDomitianus: Nice find, different dies than mine.
D599.jpg
Domitian RIC-59994 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.61g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
RIC 599 (C2). BMC 134. RSC 78. BNC 122.
Ex CNG E404, 23 August 2017, lot 504. Ex Helios 1, 17 April 2008, lot 248 (The Frank L. Kovacs Collection).

Unusually, this quinarius lacks the de rigueur Victory on the reverse, instead we have an interesting historical type of a Herald announcing Domitian's Ludi Saeculares. This was the only saeculum type struck on his quinarii. The games were held in 88 following the Augustan cycle. Presumably this piece was struck for commemorative purposes in conjunction with the games. RIC places the frequency rating for this type as 'very common' (C2), however, this seems a bit over generous. Perhaps a rating of 'common' (C) would be more appropriate. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes the frequency discrepancy, citing C. Clay's concern that only nineteen specimens are in King's survey of Roman quinarii.

A lovely piece with dark toning and fine style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton08/29/17 at 09:27Canaan: Great example of the type, i love it!!!
D599.jpg
Domitian RIC-59994 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.61g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
RIC 599 (C2). BMC 134. RSC 78. BNC 122.
Ex CNG E404, 23 August 2017, lot 504. Ex Helios 1, 17 April 2008, lot 248 (The Frank L. Kovacs Collection).

Unusually, this quinarius lacks the de rigueur Victory on the reverse, instead we have an interesting historical type of a Herald announcing Domitian's Ludi Saeculares. This was the only saeculum type struck on his quinarii. The games were held in 88 following the Augustan cycle. Presumably this piece was struck for commemorative purposes in conjunction with the games. RIC places the frequency rating for this type as 'very common' (C2), however, this seems a bit over generous. Perhaps a rating of 'common' (C) would be more appropriate. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes the frequency discrepancy, citing C. Clay's concern that only nineteen specimens are in King's survey of Roman quinarii.

A lovely piece with dark toning and fine style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton08/29/17 at 09:17Jay GT4: Tough coin to find
D599.jpg
Domitian RIC-59994 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.61g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
RIC 599 (C2). BMC 134. RSC 78. BNC 122.
Ex CNG E404, 23 August 2017, lot 504. Ex Helios 1, 17 April 2008, lot 248 (The Frank L. Kovacs Collection).

Unusually, this quinarius lacks the de rigueur Victory on the reverse, instead we have an interesting historical type of a Herald announcing Domitian's Ludi Saeculares. This was the only saeculum type struck on his quinarii. The games were held in 88 following the Augustan cycle. Presumably this piece was struck for commemorative purposes in conjunction with the games. RIC places the frequency rating for this type as 'very common' (C2), however, this seems a bit over generous. Perhaps a rating of 'common' (C) would be more appropriate. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes the frequency discrepancy, citing C. Clay's concern that only nineteen specimens are in King's survey of Roman quinarii.

A lovely piece with dark toning and fine style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton08/29/17 at 08:57Sam: Nice and artistic reverse . Great addition to our ...
T517.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-517115 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.77g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI F•DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: DIVO VESP across field; Altar shrine
RIC 517 (R). BMC 150. RSC 95. RPC 862 (6 spec.). BNC 112.
Acquired from NumisCorner, July 2017.

A fairly scarce Domitian Caesar cistophorus struck under Titus. The reverse honours the divine Vespasian and shows what catalogues have traditionally called a 'large altar' - in fact what the reverse depicts is a shrine in the shape of an altar. The doors, columns, and steps are strong evidence that what we are seeing is a building and not an altar. How the shrine related to the Temple of the Divine Vespasian is unknown.

Struck in good metal and fine Roman style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/20/17 at 14:47ancientdave: Beautiful addition!
D688a.JPG
Domitian RIC-68847 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome mint, 89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 688 (C2). BMC 163. RSC 255. BNC 156.
Acquired from Numisbur (eBay), August 2017.

In 88 and 89, due to increased military campaigns in Germania and Dacia, imperial acclamations were being awarded to Domitian at a quick pace culminating in a double triumph the Senate voted Domitian over the chatti and Dacians at the end of 89. The rapid succession of titles was meticulously recorded on his denarii. This denarius dates between mid September and 31 December 89. Domitian's double triumph was held while this issue was struck.

Good style portrait typical of the period.
3 commentsDavid Atherton08/17/17 at 11:33Vincent: Minerva.. Like that Goddess ...Commodus was partia...
D688a.JPG
Domitian RIC-68847 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome mint, 89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 688 (C2). BMC 163. RSC 255. BNC 156.
Acquired from Numisbur (eBay), August 2017.

In 88 and 89, due to increased military campaigns in Germania and Dacia, imperial acclamations were being awarded to Domitian at a quick pace culminating in a double triumph the Senate voted Domitian over the chatti and Dacians at the end of 89. The rapid succession of titles was meticulously recorded on his denarii. This denarius dates between mid September and 31 December 89. Domitian's double triumph was held while this issue was struck.

Good style portrait typical of the period.
3 commentsDavid Atherton08/17/17 at 10:27quadrans: Nice find I agree..
D688a.JPG
Domitian RIC-68847 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome mint, 89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 688 (C2). BMC 163. RSC 255. BNC 156.
Acquired from Numisbur (eBay), August 2017.

In 88 and 89, due to increased military campaigns in Germania and Dacia, imperial acclamations were being awarded to Domitian at a quick pace culminating in a double triumph the Senate voted Domitian over the chatti and Dacians at the end of 89. The rapid succession of titles was meticulously recorded on his denarii. This denarius dates between mid September and 31 December 89. Domitian's double triumph was held while this issue was struck.

Good style portrait typical of the period.
3 commentsDavid Atherton08/17/17 at 09:01Jay GT4: Good find David, I suspect the coin is even better...
T517.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-517115 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.77g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI F•DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: DIVO VESP across field; Altar shrine
RIC 517 (R). BMC 150. RSC 95. RPC 862 (6 spec.). BNC 112.
Acquired from NumisCorner, July 2017.

A fairly scarce Domitian Caesar cistophorus struck under Titus. The reverse honours the divine Vespasian and shows what catalogues have traditionally called a 'large altar' - in fact what the reverse depicts is a shrine in the shape of an altar. The doors, columns, and steps are strong evidence that what we are seeing is a building and not an altar. How the shrine related to the Temple of the Divine Vespasian is unknown.

Struck in good metal and fine Roman style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/15/17 at 01:13Jay GT4: Awesome!
T517.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-517115 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.77g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI F•DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: DIVO VESP across field; Altar shrine
RIC 517 (R). BMC 150. RSC 95. RPC 862 (6 spec.). BNC 112.
Acquired from NumisCorner, July 2017.

A fairly scarce Domitian Caesar cistophorus struck under Titus. The reverse honours the divine Vespasian and shows what catalogues have traditionally called a 'large altar' - in fact what the reverse depicts is a shrine in the shape of an altar. The doors, columns, and steps are strong evidence that what we are seeing is a building and not an altar. How the shrine related to the Temple of the Divine Vespasian is unknown.

Struck in good metal and fine Roman style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/09/17 at 21:52Nemonater: I love it!
T517.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-517115 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.77g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI F•DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: DIVO VESP across field; Altar shrine
RIC 517 (R). BMC 150. RSC 95. RPC 862 (6 spec.). BNC 112.
Acquired from NumisCorner, July 2017.

A fairly scarce Domitian Caesar cistophorus struck under Titus. The reverse honours the divine Vespasian and shows what catalogues have traditionally called a 'large altar' - in fact what the reverse depicts is a shrine in the shape of an altar. The doors, columns, and steps are strong evidence that what we are seeing is a building and not an altar. How the shrine related to the Temple of the Divine Vespasian is unknown.

Struck in good metal and fine Roman style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/09/17 at 18:19Joe Sermarini: I didn't even know this type existed. Very nic...
T517.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-517115 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.77g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI F•DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: DIVO VESP across field; Altar shrine
RIC 517 (R). BMC 150. RSC 95. RPC 862 (6 spec.). BNC 112.
Acquired from NumisCorner, July 2017.

A fairly scarce Domitian Caesar cistophorus struck under Titus. The reverse honours the divine Vespasian and shows what catalogues have traditionally called a 'large altar' - in fact what the reverse depicts is a shrine in the shape of an altar. The doors, columns, and steps are strong evidence that what we are seeing is a building and not an altar. How the shrine related to the Temple of the Divine Vespasian is unknown.

Struck in good metal and fine Roman style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/09/17 at 08:33*Alex: I agree, a very nice coin.
T517.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-517115 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.77g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI F•DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: DIVO VESP across field; Altar shrine
RIC 517 (R). BMC 150. RSC 95. RPC 862 (6 spec.). BNC 112.
Acquired from NumisCorner, July 2017.

A fairly scarce Domitian Caesar cistophorus struck under Titus. The reverse honours the divine Vespasian and shows what catalogues have traditionally called a 'large altar' - in fact what the reverse depicts is a shrine in the shape of an altar. The doors, columns, and steps are strong evidence that what we are seeing is a building and not an altar. How the shrine related to the Temple of the Divine Vespasian is unknown.

Struck in good metal and fine Roman style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/09/17 at 05:16FlaviusDomitianus: Nice find, different dies than mine.
T517.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-517115 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.77g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI F•DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: DIVO VESP across field; Altar shrine
RIC 517 (R). BMC 150. RSC 95. RPC 862 (6 spec.). BNC 112.
Acquired from NumisCorner, July 2017.

A fairly scarce Domitian Caesar cistophorus struck under Titus. The reverse honours the divine Vespasian and shows what catalogues have traditionally called a 'large altar' - in fact what the reverse depicts is a shrine in the shape of an altar. The doors, columns, and steps are strong evidence that what we are seeing is a building and not an altar. How the shrine related to the Temple of the Divine Vespasian is unknown.

Struck in good metal and fine Roman style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/09/17 at 04:12Randygeki(h2): Very nice!
D40.jpg
Domitian RIC 40112 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Altar, garlanded and lighted
RIC 40 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, June 2017.

An early rare 'PONT' denarius struck towards the end of 81. The abbreviation 'PONT' for Ponitfex Maximus must have come early in the sequence of titles Domitian employed on his denarii and likely was short lived if its rarity is any indication. The records of the Arval brothers do not show Domitian as Pontifex Maximus by 30 October, so presumably he acquired the title in either November or December. Interestingly, the obverse legend displays the Greek influenced 'Y' instead of 'V', perhaps evidence of a Greek engraver's handiwork. The altar on the reverse is a carry-over pulvinaria type struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus, perhaps representing the pulvinar of Vesta and Vulcan.

A sharp VF denarius struck when the dies were fresh. Good early style.

7 commentsDavid Atherton07/22/17 at 11:45Jim H: Interesting theory about the dating. You could be...
D40.jpg
Domitian RIC 40112 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Altar, garlanded and lighted
RIC 40 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, June 2017.

An early rare 'PONT' denarius struck towards the end of 81. The abbreviation 'PONT' for Ponitfex Maximus must have come early in the sequence of titles Domitian employed on his denarii and likely was short lived if its rarity is any indication. The records of the Arval brothers do not show Domitian as Pontifex Maximus by 30 October, so presumably he acquired the title in either November or December. Interestingly, the obverse legend displays the Greek influenced 'Y' instead of 'V', perhaps evidence of a Greek engraver's handiwork. The altar on the reverse is a carry-over pulvinaria type struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus, perhaps representing the pulvinar of Vesta and Vulcan.

A sharp VF denarius struck when the dies were fresh. Good early style.

7 commentsDavid Atherton07/05/17 at 05:37Randygeki(h2): Excellent example!
D40.jpg
Domitian RIC 40112 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Altar, garlanded and lighted
RIC 40 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, June 2017.

An early rare 'PONT' denarius struck towards the end of 81. The abbreviation 'PONT' for Ponitfex Maximus must have come early in the sequence of titles Domitian employed on his denarii and likely was short lived if its rarity is any indication. The records of the Arval brothers do not show Domitian as Pontifex Maximus by 30 October, so presumably he acquired the title in either November or December. Interestingly, the obverse legend displays the Greek influenced 'Y' instead of 'V', perhaps evidence of a Greek engraver's handiwork. The altar on the reverse is a carry-over pulvinaria type struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus, perhaps representing the pulvinar of Vesta and Vulcan.

A sharp VF denarius struck when the dies were fresh. Good early style.

7 commentsDavid Atherton07/05/17 at 03:28quadrans: I agree, great coin in nice condition and details....
D40.jpg
Domitian RIC 40112 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Altar, garlanded and lighted
RIC 40 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, June 2017.

An early rare 'PONT' denarius struck towards the end of 81. The abbreviation 'PONT' for Ponitfex Maximus must have come early in the sequence of titles Domitian employed on his denarii and likely was short lived if its rarity is any indication. The records of the Arval brothers do not show Domitian as Pontifex Maximus by 30 October, so presumably he acquired the title in either November or December. Interestingly, the obverse legend displays the Greek influenced 'Y' instead of 'V', perhaps evidence of a Greek engraver's handiwork. The altar on the reverse is a carry-over pulvinaria type struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus, perhaps representing the pulvinar of Vesta and Vulcan.

A sharp VF denarius struck when the dies were fresh. Good early style.

7 commentsDavid Atherton07/04/17 at 18:38Curtis H2: Very nice!
D40.jpg
Domitian RIC 40112 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Altar, garlanded and lighted
RIC 40 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, June 2017.

An early rare 'PONT' denarius struck towards the end of 81. The abbreviation 'PONT' for Ponitfex Maximus must have come early in the sequence of titles Domitian employed on his denarii and likely was short lived if its rarity is any indication. The records of the Arval brothers do not show Domitian as Pontifex Maximus by 30 October, so presumably he acquired the title in either November or December. Interestingly, the obverse legend displays the Greek influenced 'Y' instead of 'V', perhaps evidence of a Greek engraver's handiwork. The altar on the reverse is a carry-over pulvinaria type struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus, perhaps representing the pulvinar of Vesta and Vulcan.

A sharp VF denarius struck when the dies were fresh. Good early style.

7 commentsDavid Atherton07/04/17 at 11:33Mat: Nice find, David.
D40.jpg
Domitian RIC 40112 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Altar, garlanded and lighted
RIC 40 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, June 2017.

An early rare 'PONT' denarius struck towards the end of 81. The abbreviation 'PONT' for Ponitfex Maximus must have come early in the sequence of titles Domitian employed on his denarii and likely was short lived if its rarity is any indication. The records of the Arval brothers do not show Domitian as Pontifex Maximus by 30 October, so presumably he acquired the title in either November or December. Interestingly, the obverse legend displays the Greek influenced 'Y' instead of 'V', perhaps evidence of a Greek engraver's handiwork. The altar on the reverse is a carry-over pulvinaria type struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus, perhaps representing the pulvinar of Vesta and Vulcan.

A sharp VF denarius struck when the dies were fresh. Good early style.

7 commentsDavid Atherton07/04/17 at 08:36Jay GT4: Not only rare but beautifully preserved!
D40.jpg
Domitian RIC 40112 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Altar, garlanded and lighted
RIC 40 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, June 2017.

An early rare 'PONT' denarius struck towards the end of 81. The abbreviation 'PONT' for Ponitfex Maximus must have come early in the sequence of titles Domitian employed on his denarii and likely was short lived if its rarity is any indication. The records of the Arval brothers do not show Domitian as Pontifex Maximus by 30 October, so presumably he acquired the title in either November or December. Interestingly, the obverse legend displays the Greek influenced 'Y' instead of 'V', perhaps evidence of a Greek engraver's handiwork. The altar on the reverse is a carry-over pulvinaria type struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus, perhaps representing the pulvinar of Vesta and Vulcan.

A sharp VF denarius struck when the dies were fresh. Good early style.

7 commentsDavid Atherton07/04/17 at 08:21FlaviusDomitianus: A double die-match with mine it seems! Nice catch...
D72c.jpg
Domitian RIC 72101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome Mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, winged thunderbolt
RIC 72 (R2). BMC -. RSC 575a. BNC -.
Ex Münzhandlung Dirk Löbbers (eBay), April 2017.

The reverse is a carry-over pulvinaria type from Titus' coinage with an added touch of filial piety on the obverse. The 'DIVI VESP F' in the obverse legend is a scarce variant not often seen on Domitian's denarii. To date, this is only the second denarius with this legend variant I've been able to obtain.

Sharp details and in good early style.


6 commentsDavid Atherton05/27/17 at 12:30Jim H: It appears to be a die match for mine. Speaks to ...
D72c.jpg
Domitian RIC 72101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome Mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, winged thunderbolt
RIC 72 (R2). BMC -. RSC 575a. BNC -.
Ex Münzhandlung Dirk Löbbers (eBay), April 2017.

The reverse is a carry-over pulvinaria type from Titus' coinage with an added touch of filial piety on the obverse. The 'DIVI VESP F' in the obverse legend is a scarce variant not often seen on Domitian's denarii. To date, this is only the second denarius with this legend variant I've been able to obtain.

Sharp details and in good early style.


6 commentsDavid Atherton05/03/17 at 02:47quadrans: Nice find..
D72c.jpg
Domitian RIC 72101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome Mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, winged thunderbolt
RIC 72 (R2). BMC -. RSC 575a. BNC -.
Ex Münzhandlung Dirk Löbbers (eBay), April 2017.

The reverse is a carry-over pulvinaria type from Titus' coinage with an added touch of filial piety on the obverse. The 'DIVI VESP F' in the obverse legend is a scarce variant not often seen on Domitian's denarii. To date, this is only the second denarius with this legend variant I've been able to obtain.

Sharp details and in good early style.


6 commentsDavid Atherton05/02/17 at 09:51djmacdo: Nice coin and informative description.
D72c.jpg
Domitian RIC 72101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome Mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, winged thunderbolt
RIC 72 (R2). BMC -. RSC 575a. BNC -.
Ex Münzhandlung Dirk Löbbers (eBay), April 2017.

The reverse is a carry-over pulvinaria type from Titus' coinage with an added touch of filial piety on the obverse. The 'DIVI VESP F' in the obverse legend is a scarce variant not often seen on Domitian's denarii. To date, this is only the second denarius with this legend variant I've been able to obtain.

Sharp details and in good early style.


6 commentsDavid Atherton05/02/17 at 08:48Jay GT4: Very nice
D72c.jpg
Domitian RIC 72101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome Mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, winged thunderbolt
RIC 72 (R2). BMC -. RSC 575a. BNC -.
Ex Münzhandlung Dirk Löbbers (eBay), April 2017.

The reverse is a carry-over pulvinaria type from Titus' coinage with an added touch of filial piety on the obverse. The 'DIVI VESP F' in the obverse legend is a scarce variant not often seen on Domitian's denarii. To date, this is only the second denarius with this legend variant I've been able to obtain.

Sharp details and in good early style.


6 commentsDavid Atherton05/02/17 at 05:25Randygeki(h2): Cool addition!
D72c.jpg
Domitian RIC 72101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome Mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, winged thunderbolt
RIC 72 (R2). BMC -. RSC 575a. BNC -.
Ex Münzhandlung Dirk Löbbers (eBay), April 2017.

The reverse is a carry-over pulvinaria type from Titus' coinage with an added touch of filial piety on the obverse. The 'DIVI VESP F' in the obverse legend is a scarce variant not often seen on Domitian's denarii. To date, this is only the second denarius with this legend variant I've been able to obtain.

Sharp details and in good early style.


6 commentsDavid Atherton05/02/17 at 04:39FlaviusDomitianus: Nice catch, congrats!
D444a.jpg
Domitian RIC-444149 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 444 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Ancient Treasures (eBay), April 2017.

Second known M1 specimen from the third issue of 86. This rare dating combination could not have been struck for very long after Domitian became TR P VI in mid September due to the the issue's extreme rarity. In fact, the final 'I' in the obverse legend appears to have been engraved over the tip of the bust, indicating it is a reworked TR P V die. Not long after this coin was struck (perhaps just a few days) word reached the mint of Domitian's thirteenth imperial acclamation, ending this issue's brief run.

Nicely toned with a very fine style portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton04/22/17 at 14:13Jim H: I was actually looking at this one myself. Too ba...
D444a.jpg
Domitian RIC-444149 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 444 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Ancient Treasures (eBay), April 2017.

Second known M1 specimen from the third issue of 86. This rare dating combination could not have been struck for very long after Domitian became TR P VI in mid September due to the the issue's extreme rarity. In fact, the final 'I' in the obverse legend appears to have been engraved over the tip of the bust, indicating it is a reworked TR P V die. Not long after this coin was struck (perhaps just a few days) word reached the mint of Domitian's thirteenth imperial acclamation, ending this issue's brief run.

Nicely toned with a very fine style portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton04/21/17 at 07:37Randygeki(h2): Cool find
D444a.jpg
Domitian RIC-444149 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 444 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Ancient Treasures (eBay), April 2017.

Second known M1 specimen from the third issue of 86. This rare dating combination could not have been struck for very long after Domitian became TR P VI in mid September due to the the issue's extreme rarity. In fact, the final 'I' in the obverse legend appears to have been engraved over the tip of the bust, indicating it is a reworked TR P V die. Not long after this coin was struck (perhaps just a few days) word reached the mint of Domitian's thirteenth imperial acclamation, ending this issue's brief run.

Nicely toned with a very fine style portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton04/16/17 at 14:54Norbert: Congratulations on the catch of the day.
D444a.jpg
Domitian RIC-444149 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 444 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Ancient Treasures (eBay), April 2017.

Second known M1 specimen from the third issue of 86. This rare dating combination could not have been struck for very long after Domitian became TR P VI in mid September due to the the issue's extreme rarity. In fact, the final 'I' in the obverse legend appears to have been engraved over the tip of the bust, indicating it is a reworked TR P V die. Not long after this coin was struck (perhaps just a few days) word reached the mint of Domitian's thirteenth imperial acclamation, ending this issue's brief run.

Nicely toned with a very fine style portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton04/16/17 at 10:39Jay GT4: Perfect example of why coins are so important for ...
D444a.jpg
Domitian RIC-444149 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 444 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Ancient Treasures (eBay), April 2017.

Second known M1 specimen from the third issue of 86. This rare dating combination could not have been struck for very long after Domitian became TR P VI in mid September due to the the issue's extreme rarity. In fact, the final 'I' in the obverse legend appears to have been engraved over the tip of the bust, indicating it is a reworked TR P V die. Not long after this coin was struck (perhaps just a few days) word reached the mint of Domitian's thirteenth imperial acclamation, ending this issue's brief run.

Nicely toned with a very fine style portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton04/16/17 at 04:23quadrans: Nice find.., Great coin.
D444a.jpg
Domitian RIC-444149 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 444 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Ancient Treasures (eBay), April 2017.

Second known M1 specimen from the third issue of 86. This rare dating combination could not have been struck for very long after Domitian became TR P VI in mid September due to the the issue's extreme rarity. In fact, the final 'I' in the obverse legend appears to have been engraved over the tip of the bust, indicating it is a reworked TR P V die. Not long after this coin was struck (perhaps just a few days) word reached the mint of Domitian's thirteenth imperial acclamation, ending this issue's brief run.

Nicely toned with a very fine style portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton04/14/17 at 15:45ickster: Great write up. Congrats on a rare find.
D444a.jpg
Domitian RIC-444149 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 444 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Ancient Treasures (eBay), April 2017.

Second known M1 specimen from the third issue of 86. This rare dating combination could not have been struck for very long after Domitian became TR P VI in mid September due to the the issue's extreme rarity. In fact, the final 'I' in the obverse legend appears to have been engraved over the tip of the bust, indicating it is a reworked TR P V die. Not long after this coin was struck (perhaps just a few days) word reached the mint of Domitian's thirteenth imperial acclamation, ending this issue's brief run.

Nicely toned with a very fine style portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton04/14/17 at 09:49FlaviusDomitianus: Congratulations on the sharp eye!
D444a.jpg
Domitian RIC-444149 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 444 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Ancient Treasures (eBay), April 2017.

Second known M1 specimen from the third issue of 86. This rare dating combination could not have been struck for very long after Domitian became TR P VI in mid September due to the the issue's extreme rarity. In fact, the final 'I' in the obverse legend appears to have been engraved over the tip of the bust, indicating it is a reworked TR P V die. Not long after this coin was struck (perhaps just a few days) word reached the mint of Domitian's thirteenth imperial acclamation, ending this issue's brief run.

Nicely toned with a very fine style portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton04/14/17 at 06:36okidoki: very nice details and looks
D183.jpg
Domitian RIC-183329 viewsAR Denarius, 2.90g
Rome mint, 84 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC; Bust of Domitian, laureate, draped, bearded, l.
Rev: P M TR POT III IMP V COS X P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 183 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, April 2014.

84 AD probably saw the peak of artistic quality with Domitian's precious metal coinage. Two years previous, the fineness of the denarius was increased and the style radically changed from the earlier issues. Upon Domitian's accession the veristic style of Vespasian and Titus still dominated, after the reform it became more idealised and much finer. By 84 the style had evolved to such a high degree that the mint was able to produce these finely engraved draped busts, albeit in small quantities. This extremely rare coin struck in 84 is an exquisite example of the new idealised style. This is the second known specimen of the type. Much experimentation was going on at the mint at this time with reverse types, busts, and style. I assume the amount of time an engraver spent on rendering these highly polished pieces was considerable, which could perhaps explain why they were not struck more commonly. RIC theorises the drapery represents a military cloak commemorating Domitian's recent German victory. Afterwards, the style remained idealised and fine but the finer portraits would sometimes appear with an aegis, the draped busts consigned to an experimental cul-de-sac. The idealised style would continue to evolve throughout the reign reaching baroque proportions by 88. It's a shame that this fine portrait bust was struck sparingly.

Ian Carradice speculated in his 1983 monograph Coinage and Finances in the Reign of Domitian that the same engraver who did this piece may have worked on an earlier left facing portrait from 81 (see my Domitian RIC 75). Although left facing portraits are extremely rare in Domitian's reign and it is not out of the realm of possibility that the same engraver was working at the mint three years later and produced another left facing bust, to my eyes the styles seem too different to warrant that conclusion.

The bust of Domitian here is superbly rendered, one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've ever seen on a denarius. Same obverse die as the unique specimen cited in RIC.

13 commentsDavid Atherton04/07/17 at 18:14imperator: this coin needs to be in the top ranking
D52sm.jpg
Domitian RIC 5275 viewsAR Denarius, 2.62g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 52 (R2). BMC p. 299, ||. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Lanz (eBay), February 2017.

Nothing more quite shows how much of a stickler Domitian was for keeping to the letter of the law than the 'PONT' denarii struck very early in his reign. Domitian would not call himself by the full title Pontifex Maximus until the proper religious ceremonies voting him as such were concluded. The PONT denarii provide numismatic evidence for Suetonius' claim that Domitian scrupulously observed the proper formalities (Dom. VII - IX). The coins themselves are quite rare, struck in a brief window of time while Domitian was being awarded his full titles.The resulting sequence of titles is quite fascinating!

Interestingly, the 'V' in AVG here looks more like a 'Y'. Some have speculated that this shows evidence of a Greek engraver working at the mint early in Domitian's reign.

Struck in good metal with a minor flan crack.
3 commentsDavid Atherton03/10/17 at 03:35Randygeki(h2): Great coin!
D52sm.jpg
Domitian RIC 5275 viewsAR Denarius, 2.62g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 52 (R2). BMC p. 299, ||. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Lanz (eBay), February 2017.

Nothing more quite shows how much of a stickler Domitian was for keeping to the letter of the law than the 'PONT' denarii struck very early in his reign. Domitian would not call himself by the full title Pontifex Maximus until the proper religious ceremonies voting him as such were concluded. The PONT denarii provide numismatic evidence for Suetonius' claim that Domitian scrupulously observed the proper formalities (Dom. VII - IX). The coins themselves are quite rare, struck in a brief window of time while Domitian was being awarded his full titles.The resulting sequence of titles is quite fascinating!

Interestingly, the 'V' in AVG here looks more like a 'Y'. Some have speculated that this shows evidence of a Greek engraver working at the mint early in Domitian's reign.

Struck in good metal with a minor flan crack.
3 commentsDavid Atherton03/08/17 at 22:43Jay GT4: Good catch!
D52sm.jpg
Domitian RIC 5275 viewsAR Denarius, 2.62g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 52 (R2). BMC p. 299, ||. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Lanz (eBay), February 2017.

Nothing more quite shows how much of a stickler Domitian was for keeping to the letter of the law than the 'PONT' denarii struck very early in his reign. Domitian would not call himself by the full title Pontifex Maximus until the proper religious ceremonies voting him as such were concluded. The PONT denarii provide numismatic evidence for Suetonius' claim that Domitian scrupulously observed the proper formalities (Dom. VII - IX). The coins themselves are quite rare, struck in a brief window of time while Domitian was being awarded his full titles.The resulting sequence of titles is quite fascinating!

Interestingly, the 'V' in AVG here looks more like a 'Y'. Some have speculated that this shows evidence of a Greek engraver working at the mint early in Domitian's reign.

Struck in good metal with a minor flan crack.
3 commentsDavid Atherton03/08/17 at 11:33FlaviusDomitianus: I regret I completely overlooked this one, congrat...
D674sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-67472 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD (sixth issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 674 (R2). BMC 157. RSC 254c. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

All the denarii from the sixth issue of 88-89 are quite scarce, perhaps struck for only for a few weeks or days prior to 14 September 89, upon which Domitian became TRP VIIII. The first Pannonian War may account for the rapid succession of imperial acclamations during this time period. This Minerva M1 type is the only example the BM has from the issue, just to indicate how rare it is.

Solid portrait with honest wear.
3 commentsDavid Atherton01/26/17 at 06:04FlaviusDomitianus: Nice catch!
D677sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-67764 viewsAR Denarius, 2.91g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD (sixth issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 677 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

A very rare denarius from the scarce sixth issue of 88-89, perhaps struck for only a few weeks or days prior to 14 September 89, upon which Domitian became TRP VIIII. The first Pannonian War may account for the rapid succession of imperial acclamations during this time period.

A few marks, but still has some good eye appeal in hand.
2 commentsDavid Atherton01/25/17 at 03:54Randygeki(h2): Cool addition!
D674sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-67472 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD (sixth issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 674 (R2). BMC 157. RSC 254c. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

All the denarii from the sixth issue of 88-89 are quite scarce, perhaps struck for only for a few weeks or days prior to 14 September 89, upon which Domitian became TRP VIIII. The first Pannonian War may account for the rapid succession of imperial acclamations during this time period. This Minerva M1 type is the only example the BM has from the issue, just to indicate how rare it is.

Solid portrait with honest wear.
3 commentsDavid Atherton01/25/17 at 03:54Randygeki(h2): I like it too, congrats!
D674sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-67472 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD (sixth issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 674 (R2). BMC 157. RSC 254c. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

All the denarii from the sixth issue of 88-89 are quite scarce, perhaps struck for only for a few weeks or days prior to 14 September 89, upon which Domitian became TRP VIIII. The first Pannonian War may account for the rapid succession of imperial acclamations during this time period. This Minerva M1 type is the only example the BM has from the issue, just to indicate how rare it is.

Solid portrait with honest wear.
3 commentsDavid Atherton01/24/17 at 23:25Mat: I like the portrait on this
D677sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-67764 viewsAR Denarius, 2.91g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD (sixth issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 677 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

A very rare denarius from the scarce sixth issue of 88-89, perhaps struck for only a few weeks or days prior to 14 September 89, upon which Domitian became TRP VIIII. The first Pannonian War may account for the rapid succession of imperial acclamations during this time period.

A few marks, but still has some good eye appeal in hand.
2 commentsDavid Atherton01/24/17 at 23:24Mat: Nice addition, David
D577b.jpg
Domitian RIC-57783 viewsAR Denarius, 2.73g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 577 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

At first glance this Domitian Minerva denarius is nothing special, however, upon closer inspection one can see the obverse legend has the rare GERMAN spelling instead of the very common GERM. RIC cites only two specimens - one in Belgrade, another in a private collection. This is a very common issue from 88, but unusually it is peppered with scarce variants, such as this rare obverse legend. Other rarities include busts with aegis and a unique 5 aurei piece (subsequently stolen from Paris). Perhaps it's a special issue struck in conjunction with the Secular Games which were held in 88.

Worn, but with a fine style portrait.
3 commentsDavid Atherton01/17/17 at 05:23FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition, congrats!
D577b.jpg
Domitian RIC-57783 viewsAR Denarius, 2.73g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 577 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

At first glance this Domitian Minerva denarius is nothing special, however, upon closer inspection one can see the obverse legend has the rare GERMAN spelling instead of the very common GERM. RIC cites only two specimens - one in Belgrade, another in a private collection. This is a very common issue from 88, but unusually it is peppered with scarce variants, such as this rare obverse legend. Other rarities include busts with aegis and a unique 5 aurei piece (subsequently stolen from Paris). Perhaps it's a special issue struck in conjunction with the Secular Games which were held in 88.

Worn, but with a fine style portrait.
3 commentsDavid Atherton01/17/17 at 03:41Randygeki(h2): YOu got an eye for this for sure
D577b.jpg
Domitian RIC-57783 viewsAR Denarius, 2.73g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 577 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

At first glance this Domitian Minerva denarius is nothing special, however, upon closer inspection one can see the obverse legend has the rare GERMAN spelling instead of the very common GERM. RIC cites only two specimens - one in Belgrade, another in a private collection. This is a very common issue from 88, but unusually it is peppered with scarce variants, such as this rare obverse legend. Other rarities include busts with aegis and a unique 5 aurei piece (subsequently stolen from Paris). Perhaps it's a special issue struck in conjunction with the Secular Games which were held in 88.

Worn, but with a fine style portrait.
3 commentsDavid Atherton01/17/17 at 03:14Jay GT4: When you know what to look for...
D184sma.jpg
Domitian RIC-18469 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Rome mint, 84 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P M TR POT III IMP V COS X P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 184 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

In 82 AD when Domitian overhauled the mint and increased the fineness of the denarius, he also apparently brought in new engravers who began working in a more elaborate, idealised style. The second denarius issue of 84 is the first to employ the new style and it would dominate the denarius issues for the rest of Domitian's reign. Domitian adopted the title GERMANICVS in the first issue of 84, shortening it to GERMANIC here in the second issue, all of which are extremely rare. This denarius from that second issue is a fine example of the new idealised style with its large portrait and delicately rendered features. RIC cites two specimens of the type, none of which are in the BM or Paris. Notably, the coin is a detectorist find from outside the boundaries of the Empire in Eastern Europe.

Darkly toned and somewhat porous (which accounts for the low weight).
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/14/17 at 13:31Jim H: Wow! What a find!
D184sma.jpg
Domitian RIC-18469 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Rome mint, 84 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P M TR POT III IMP V COS X P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 184 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

In 82 AD when Domitian overhauled the mint and increased the fineness of the denarius, he also apparently brought in new engravers who began working in a more elaborate, idealised style. The second denarius issue of 84 is the first to employ the new style and it would dominate the denarius issues for the rest of Domitian's reign. Domitian adopted the title GERMANICVS in the first issue of 84, shortening it to GERMANIC here in the second issue, all of which are extremely rare. This denarius from that second issue is a fine example of the new idealised style with its large portrait and delicately rendered features. RIC cites two specimens of the type, none of which are in the BM or Paris. Notably, the coin is a detectorist find from outside the boundaries of the Empire in Eastern Europe.

Darkly toned and somewhat porous (which accounts for the low weight).
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/12/17 at 06:32FlaviusDomitianus: A desirable piece.
D184sma.jpg
Domitian RIC-18469 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Rome mint, 84 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P M TR POT III IMP V COS X P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 184 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

In 82 AD when Domitian overhauled the mint and increased the fineness of the denarius, he also apparently brought in new engravers who began working in a more elaborate, idealised style. The second denarius issue of 84 is the first to employ the new style and it would dominate the denarius issues for the rest of Domitian's reign. Domitian adopted the title GERMANICVS in the first issue of 84, shortening it to GERMANIC here in the second issue, all of which are extremely rare. This denarius from that second issue is a fine example of the new idealised style with its large portrait and delicately rendered features. RIC cites two specimens of the type, none of which are in the BM or Paris. Notably, the coin is a detectorist find from outside the boundaries of the Empire in Eastern Europe.

Darkly toned and somewhat porous (which accounts for the low weight).
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/12/17 at 03:54Randygeki(h2): Sweet addition!
D184sma.jpg
Domitian RIC-18469 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Rome mint, 84 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P M TR POT III IMP V COS X P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 184 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

In 82 AD when Domitian overhauled the mint and increased the fineness of the denarius, he also apparently brought in new engravers who began working in a more elaborate, idealised style. The second denarius issue of 84 is the first to employ the new style and it would dominate the denarius issues for the rest of Domitian's reign. Domitian adopted the title GERMANICVS in the first issue of 84, shortening it to GERMANIC here in the second issue, all of which are extremely rare. This denarius from that second issue is a fine example of the new idealised style with its large portrait and delicately rendered features. RIC cites two specimens of the type, none of which are in the BM or Paris. Notably, the coin is a detectorist find from outside the boundaries of the Empire in Eastern Europe.

Darkly toned and somewhat porous (which accounts for the low weight).
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/12/17 at 01:30Jay GT4: Awesome!
D517.jpg
Domitian RIC-517104 viewsAR Denarius, 3.30g
Rome mint, 87 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 517 (C). BMC 111. RSC 228. BNC 110.
Acquired from Historiche Münzen & Medaillen, December 2016.

From the Second issue of 87, struck between 14 September and 31 December.

Struck on a large flan in beautiful 'Flavian Baroque' style. One of the finest portraits of Domitian in my collection.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/29/16 at 06:18Randygeki(h2): Awesome coin
D517.jpg
Domitian RIC-517104 viewsAR Denarius, 3.30g
Rome mint, 87 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 517 (C). BMC 111. RSC 228. BNC 110.
Acquired from Historiche Münzen & Medaillen, December 2016.

From the Second issue of 87, struck between 14 September and 31 December.

Struck on a large flan in beautiful 'Flavian Baroque' style. One of the finest portraits of Domitian in my collection.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/29/16 at 04:49FlaviusDomitianus: A stylish portrait indeed.
D517.jpg
Domitian RIC-517104 viewsAR Denarius, 3.30g
Rome mint, 87 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 517 (C). BMC 111. RSC 228. BNC 110.
Acquired from Historiche Münzen & Medaillen, December 2016.

From the Second issue of 87, struck between 14 September and 31 December.

Struck on a large flan in beautiful 'Flavian Baroque' style. One of the finest portraits of Domitian in my collection.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/28/16 at 23:31Sam: Very nice , thank you for sharing.
D517.jpg
Domitian RIC-517104 viewsAR Denarius, 3.30g
Rome mint, 87 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 517 (C). BMC 111. RSC 228. BNC 110.
Acquired from Historiche Münzen & Medaillen, December 2016.

From the Second issue of 87, struck between 14 September and 31 December.

Struck on a large flan in beautiful 'Flavian Baroque' style. One of the finest portraits of Domitian in my collection.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/28/16 at 21:49Nemonater: What a soulful portrait, outstanding style!
D517.jpg
Domitian RIC-517104 viewsAR Denarius, 3.30g
Rome mint, 87 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 517 (C). BMC 111. RSC 228. BNC 110.
Acquired from Historiche Münzen & Medaillen, December 2016.

From the Second issue of 87, struck between 14 September and 31 December.

Struck on a large flan in beautiful 'Flavian Baroque' style. One of the finest portraits of Domitian in my collection.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/28/16 at 20:01Jay GT4: Atractive portrait!
D516_zpsoack8r5q~original.jpg
Domitian RIC-51692 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.54g
Rome mint, 87 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 516 (C). BMC 109. RSC 220. BNC 109.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, November 2016. Ex Roma Auction XII, 29 September 2016, lot 712.

Although this quinarius is listed as 'common' in RIC, compared to denarii the output of quinarii was meagre during the Flavian era. Struck in the first issue of 87, 1 January to 13 September. Interestingly, the corresponding gold quinarius with these titles is unique.

Well centred with full legends and darkly toned.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/25/16 at 17:53socalcoins: Very nice coin, David!
D516_zpsoack8r5q~original.jpg
Domitian RIC-51692 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.54g
Rome mint, 87 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 516 (C). BMC 109. RSC 220. BNC 109.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, November 2016. Ex Roma Auction XII, 29 September 2016, lot 712.

Although this quinarius is listed as 'common' in RIC, compared to denarii the output of quinarii was meagre during the Flavian era. Struck in the first issue of 87, 1 January to 13 September. Interestingly, the corresponding gold quinarius with these titles is unique.

Well centred with full legends and darkly toned.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/23/16 at 13:53Sam: Superb addition, congratulations !
D516_zpsoack8r5q~original.jpg
Domitian RIC-51692 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.54g
Rome mint, 87 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 516 (C). BMC 109. RSC 220. BNC 109.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, November 2016. Ex Roma Auction XII, 29 September 2016, lot 712.

Although this quinarius is listed as 'common' in RIC, compared to denarii the output of quinarii was meagre during the Flavian era. Struck in the first issue of 87, 1 January to 13 September. Interestingly, the corresponding gold quinarius with these titles is unique.

Well centred with full legends and darkly toned.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/23/16 at 13:32ancientdave: Great example!
D516_zpsoack8r5q~original.jpg
Domitian RIC-51692 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.54g
Rome mint, 87 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 516 (C). BMC 109. RSC 220. BNC 109.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, November 2016. Ex Roma Auction XII, 29 September 2016, lot 712.

Although this quinarius is listed as 'common' in RIC, compared to denarii the output of quinarii was meagre during the Flavian era. Struck in the first issue of 87, 1 January to 13 September. Interestingly, the corresponding gold quinarius with these titles is unique.

Well centred with full legends and darkly toned.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/23/16 at 08:41FlaviusDomitianus: Nice toning, mine is from different dies
D516_zpsoack8r5q~original.jpg
Domitian RIC-51692 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.54g
Rome mint, 87 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 516 (C). BMC 109. RSC 220. BNC 109.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, November 2016. Ex Roma Auction XII, 29 September 2016, lot 712.

Although this quinarius is listed as 'common' in RIC, compared to denarii the output of quinarii was meagre during the Flavian era. Struck in the first issue of 87, 1 January to 13 September. Interestingly, the corresponding gold quinarius with these titles is unique.

Well centred with full legends and darkly toned.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/23/16 at 04:26okidoki: very nice
D516_zpsoack8r5q~original.jpg
Domitian RIC-51692 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.54g
Rome mint, 87 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 516 (C). BMC 109. RSC 220. BNC 109.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, November 2016. Ex Roma Auction XII, 29 September 2016, lot 712.

Although this quinarius is listed as 'common' in RIC, compared to denarii the output of quinarii was meagre during the Flavian era. Struck in the first issue of 87, 1 January to 13 September. Interestingly, the corresponding gold quinarius with these titles is unique.

Well centred with full legends and darkly toned.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/23/16 at 03:05quadrans: Nice find..
D844eee.jpg
Domitian RIC-84486 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.66g
Rome mint (for Asia), 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR DOMITIANVS AVG; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 844 (R). BMC p. 352. RSC 668. RPC 868 (3 spec.). BNC 224.
Ex. Harlan J. Berk 144, 13 July 2005, lot 572.

Rare with undated obverse legend. Struck contemporaneously or subsequently with COS VIII dated cistophori. Style and 6h die axis point to a Rome mint issue.

Good Titus-like portrait in fine early style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/03/16 at 02:12ancientdave: Wow, a most excellent addition!
D844eee.jpg
Domitian RIC-84486 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.66g
Rome mint (for Asia), 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR DOMITIANVS AVG; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 844 (R). BMC p. 352. RSC 668. RPC 868 (3 spec.). BNC 224.
Ex. Harlan J. Berk 144, 13 July 2005, lot 572.

Rare with undated obverse legend. Struck contemporaneously or subsequently with COS VIII dated cistophori. Style and 6h die axis point to a Rome mint issue.

Good Titus-like portrait in fine early style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/01/16 at 21:01*Alex: I agree with Jay, I love those coins too.
D844eee.jpg
Domitian RIC-84486 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.66g
Rome mint (for Asia), 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR DOMITIANVS AVG; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 844 (R). BMC p. 352. RSC 668. RPC 868 (3 spec.). BNC 224.
Ex. Harlan J. Berk 144, 13 July 2005, lot 572.

Rare with undated obverse legend. Struck contemporaneously or subsequently with COS VIII dated cistophori. Style and 6h die axis point to a Rome mint issue.

Good Titus-like portrait in fine early style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/01/16 at 10:45Jay GT4: Love these big silver coins!
D844eee.jpg
Domitian RIC-84486 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.66g
Rome mint (for Asia), 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR DOMITIANVS AVG; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 844 (R). BMC p. 352. RSC 668. RPC 868 (3 spec.). BNC 224.
Ex. Harlan J. Berk 144, 13 July 2005, lot 572.

Rare with undated obverse legend. Struck contemporaneously or subsequently with COS VIII dated cistophori. Style and 6h die axis point to a Rome mint issue.

Good Titus-like portrait in fine early style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/01/16 at 10:18okidoki: congrats
D844eee.jpg
Domitian RIC-84486 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.66g
Rome mint (for Asia), 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR DOMITIANVS AVG; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 844 (R). BMC p. 352. RSC 668. RPC 868 (3 spec.). BNC 224.
Ex. Harlan J. Berk 144, 13 July 2005, lot 572.

Rare with undated obverse legend. Struck contemporaneously or subsequently with COS VIII dated cistophori. Style and 6h die axis point to a Rome mint issue.

Good Titus-like portrait in fine early style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/01/16 at 07:51Nemonater: Wonderful addition!
D844eee.jpg
Domitian RIC-84486 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.66g
Rome mint (for Asia), 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR DOMITIANVS AVG; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 844 (R). BMC p. 352. RSC 668. RPC 868 (3 spec.). BNC 224.
Ex. Harlan J. Berk 144, 13 July 2005, lot 572.

Rare with undated obverse legend. Struck contemporaneously or subsequently with COS VIII dated cistophori. Style and 6h die axis point to a Rome mint issue.

Good Titus-like portrait in fine early style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton10/31/16 at 21:10Mat: Nice portrait & find
D661.jpg
Domitian RIC-661139 viewsAR Denarius, 3.13g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XVII COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 661 (R). BMC 150. RSC 244. BNC 141.
Acquired from CNG, November 2014.

All the coins that record Domitian's 17th imperial salutation are quite rare. Most likely it was awarded for some long forgotten battle during the campaign against the Dacians. A military diploma dated 7 November, 88 records Domitian as IMP XVII, so this issue must have been struck briefly at the end of 88 and/or very early in 89.

The portrait style is quite superb. The engravers at Rome were really doing some outstanding work during this time period.


8 commentsDavid Atherton10/18/16 at 03:11Jim H: Interesting aegis on the Min4. You rarely see tha...
D169.jpg
Domitian RIC-169112 viewsAR Denarius, 3.44g
Rome mint, 83 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT II COS VIIII DES X P P; Minverva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 169 (R). BMC p. 307 note. RSC 601. BNC 42.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, October 2015. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

Domitian was very concerned about the quality of his coinage. In 82 AD he restored the fineness of the denarius to the levels of Augustus, striking them in nearly 100% silver. This coin from 83 was produced soon after the new standard was introduced. The portrait style is somewhere between the earlier veristic style seen in the first few months of the reign and the more elaborate, idealised style the engravers employed from 84 onward. This issue is also significant because it introduces for the first time the four standard Minerva types that would dominate the reverse of the denarius until the end of the reign.

Struck in fine style on a large flan. The scrape on the cheek isn't so noticeable in hand.
7 commentsDavid Atherton10/15/16 at 11:48Jim H: I would call the scrape an intentional cut and att...
D768.jpg
Domitian RIC-76897 viewsAR Denarius, 3.21g
Rome mint, 94 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear, shield at her l. side (M3)
RIC 768 (C). BMC (spec. acquired 1989). RSC 284b. BNC -.
Acquired from Mauseus, August 2016.

This denarius is part of the last issue of 94, struck after mid September until the end of the year. The issue is somewhat scarce, although RIC rates all the denarii in it as 'common'.

Nice portrait and well centred.
2 commentsDavid Atherton09/15/16 at 19:15mauseus: Glad you are pleased , it has found a worthy ...
D768.jpg
Domitian RIC-76897 viewsAR Denarius, 3.21g
Rome mint, 94 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear, shield at her l. side (M3)
RIC 768 (C). BMC (spec. acquired 1989). RSC 284b. BNC -.
Acquired from Mauseus, August 2016.

This denarius is part of the last issue of 94, struck after mid September until the end of the year. The issue is somewhat scarce, although RIC rates all the denarii in it as 'common'.

Nice portrait and well centred.
2 commentsDavid Atherton09/14/16 at 00:18Nemonater: Another excellent find, well done!
D665a.jpg
Domitian RIC-66566 viewsAR Denarius, 3.12g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XVIII COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her l. side (M3)
RIC 665 (R2). BMC p. 331, *. RSC 247b. BNC 144.

A very rare denarius from Domitian's third issue of 88-89 recording his 18th imperial acclamation. Domitian was campaigning against the Dacians in 88 and presumably that is the likely explanation for most of the imperial acclamations during the time period. Those denarii with IMP XVIII are some of the rarest and were probably struck for just a few days. A military diploma dated 7 November, 88 records Domitian as IMP XVII, therefore this tiny issue must have been struck soon after that date at the end of 88 and/or very early in 89. RIC speculates mid December 88. All the denarii from this issue are quite scarce.

Struck in good metal in average style.
2 commentsDavid Atherton09/06/16 at 05:55FlaviusDomitianus: This is a hole I must fill too. Nice find.
D665a.jpg
Domitian RIC-66566 viewsAR Denarius, 3.12g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XVIII COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her l. side (M3)
RIC 665 (R2). BMC p. 331, *. RSC 247b. BNC 144.

A very rare denarius from Domitian's third issue of 88-89 recording his 18th imperial acclamation. Domitian was campaigning against the Dacians in 88 and presumably that is the likely explanation for most of the imperial acclamations during the time period. Those denarii with IMP XVIII are some of the rarest and were probably struck for just a few days. A military diploma dated 7 November, 88 records Domitian as IMP XVII, therefore this tiny issue must have been struck soon after that date at the end of 88 and/or very early in 89. RIC speculates mid December 88. All the denarii from this issue are quite scarce.

Struck in good metal in average style.
2 commentsDavid Atherton09/06/16 at 00:37quadrans: Nice find
V1089sm.jpg
08b Domitian as Caesar RIC-1089181 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.46g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 1089 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 243.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Domitian Caesar in 79. RIC records only one example in Paris (BNC 243) and lists the rarity as 'unique', this specimen then is the second known example. Domitian's COS VI coins most likely date towards the end of Vespasian's reign and the beginning of Titus' rule, indicating the issue was struck uninterrupted after Vespasian's death in June.

Struck in good metal in neat and fine style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/21/16 at 16:48ancientdave: Awesome find, congrats!
D447.jpg
Domitian RIC-44767 viewsAR Denarius, 2.95g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear, shield at her l. side (M3)
RIC 447 (R). BMC (spec. acquired 1987). RSC -. BNC 101.
Ex TimesAncient, eBay, July 2016.

Imperial acclamations were awarded to Domitian at a fairly quick pace during 86 because of the Dacian campaign. Many issues were struck only for a brief time before news arrived of a new imperial salutation. This denarius is from the very rare third issue.

Coined in fine style on a large flan.
2 commentsDavid Atherton08/10/16 at 13:37quadrans: I agree nice find, good eye..
D447.jpg
Domitian RIC-44767 viewsAR Denarius, 2.95g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear, shield at her l. side (M3)
RIC 447 (R). BMC (spec. acquired 1987). RSC -. BNC 101.
Ex TimesAncient, eBay, July 2016.

Imperial acclamations were awarded to Domitian at a fairly quick pace during 86 because of the Dacian campaign. Many issues were struck only for a brief time before news arrived of a new imperial salutation. This denarius is from the very rare third issue.

Coined in fine style on a large flan.
2 commentsDavid Atherton08/10/16 at 06:00FlaviusDomitianus: Sharp eye, nice find.
V1089sm.jpg
08b Domitian as Caesar RIC-1089181 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.46g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 1089 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 243.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Domitian Caesar in 79. RIC records only one example in Paris (BNC 243) and lists the rarity as 'unique', this specimen then is the second known example. Domitian's COS VI coins most likely date towards the end of Vespasian's reign and the beginning of Titus' rule, indicating the issue was struck uninterrupted after Vespasian's death in June.

Struck in good metal in neat and fine style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/08/16 at 16:59Nemonater: Fantastic addition!
V1089sm.jpg
08b Domitian as Caesar RIC-1089181 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.46g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 1089 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 243.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Domitian Caesar in 79. RIC records only one example in Paris (BNC 243) and lists the rarity as 'unique', this specimen then is the second known example. Domitian's COS VI coins most likely date towards the end of Vespasian's reign and the beginning of Titus' rule, indicating the issue was struck uninterrupted after Vespasian's death in June.

Struck in good metal in neat and fine style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/02/16 at 15:21Fatih K: Excellent !
V1089sm.jpg
08b Domitian as Caesar RIC-1089181 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.46g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 1089 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 243.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Domitian Caesar in 79. RIC records only one example in Paris (BNC 243) and lists the rarity as 'unique', this specimen then is the second known example. Domitian's COS VI coins most likely date towards the end of Vespasian's reign and the beginning of Titus' rule, indicating the issue was struck uninterrupted after Vespasian's death in June.

Struck in good metal in neat and fine style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/02/16 at 10:12Sam: Superb addition, congratulations !
V1089sm.jpg
08b Domitian as Caesar RIC-1089181 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.46g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 1089 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 243.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Domitian Caesar in 79. RIC records only one example in Paris (BNC 243) and lists the rarity as 'unique', this specimen then is the second known example. Domitian's COS VI coins most likely date towards the end of Vespasian's reign and the beginning of Titus' rule, indicating the issue was struck uninterrupted after Vespasian's death in June.

Struck in good metal in neat and fine style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/02/16 at 09:30quadrans: Rare piece...!..
V1089sm.jpg
08b Domitian as Caesar RIC-1089181 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.46g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 1089 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 243.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Domitian Caesar in 79. RIC records only one example in Paris (BNC 243) and lists the rarity as 'unique', this specimen then is the second known example. Domitian's COS VI coins most likely date towards the end of Vespasian's reign and the beginning of Titus' rule, indicating the issue was struck uninterrupted after Vespasian's death in June.

Struck in good metal in neat and fine style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/02/16 at 07:02okidoki: Nice find indeed
V1089sm.jpg
08b Domitian as Caesar RIC-1089181 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.46g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 1089 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 243.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Domitian Caesar in 79. RIC records only one example in Paris (BNC 243) and lists the rarity as 'unique', this specimen then is the second known example. Domitian's COS VI coins most likely date towards the end of Vespasian's reign and the beginning of Titus' rule, indicating the issue was struck uninterrupted after Vespasian's death in June.

Struck in good metal in neat and fine style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/02/16 at 05:22maridvnvm: Great find.
V1089sm.jpg
08b Domitian as Caesar RIC-1089181 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.46g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 1089 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 243.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Domitian Caesar in 79. RIC records only one example in Paris (BNC 243) and lists the rarity as 'unique', this specimen then is the second known example. Domitian's COS VI coins most likely date towards the end of Vespasian's reign and the beginning of Titus' rule, indicating the issue was struck uninterrupted after Vespasian's death in June.

Struck in good metal in neat and fine style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/02/16 at 05:14FlaviusDomitianus: Great find, congrats!
V1089sm.jpg
08b Domitian as Caesar RIC-1089181 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.46g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 1089 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 243.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Domitian Caesar in 79. RIC records only one example in Paris (BNC 243) and lists the rarity as 'unique', this specimen then is the second known example. Domitian's COS VI coins most likely date towards the end of Vespasian's reign and the beginning of Titus' rule, indicating the issue was struck uninterrupted after Vespasian's death in June.

Struck in good metal in neat and fine style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/02/16 at 03:54ickster: Congrats on a once in a lifetime find! Thanks for ...
V633.jpg
02a Domitian as Caesar RIC 79146 viewsAR Quinarius (Broken), 1.04g
Rome mint, 75 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMIT COS III; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 791 (C). BMC 158. RSC 634. BNC 136.
Acquired from GB Collection, June 2016

Quinarii were struck under Vespasian for Domitian Caesar from 73 onwards. This common piece dates to 75 when the largest quinarius issue of the reign was produced.

Broken, but enough of the major devices remain to identify it properly. I think I got the better half.
1 commentsDavid Atherton06/28/16 at 00:08Jay GT4: I've never seen a Quinarius of Domitian!
D439a.jpg
Domitian RIC-43957 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG•GERM P M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP•XII COS XII CENS•P•P•P•; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 439 (R). BMC p. 319, ‡. RSC 202. BNC 98.
Acquired from Romae Aeternae, June 2016.

The second denarius issue of 86 records Domitian's 12th imperial acclamation. TR P V indicates it was struck before mid September. A fairly rare issue.

Obverse scratches, but I think the fine portrait redeems the coin.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/17/16 at 14:35FlaviusDomitianus: Nice portrait, the reverse seems die linked with m...
D439a.jpg
Domitian RIC-43957 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG•GERM P M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP•XII COS XII CENS•P•P•P•; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 439 (R). BMC p. 319, ‡. RSC 202. BNC 98.
Acquired from Romae Aeternae, June 2016.

The second denarius issue of 86 records Domitian's 12th imperial acclamation. TR P V indicates it was struck before mid September. A fairly rare issue.

Obverse scratches, but I think the fine portrait redeems the coin.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/16/16 at 17:09Legatus: Outstanding!!
D439a.jpg
Domitian RIC-43957 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG•GERM P M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP•XII COS XII CENS•P•P•P•; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 439 (R). BMC p. 319, ‡. RSC 202. BNC 98.
Acquired from Romae Aeternae, June 2016.

The second denarius issue of 86 records Domitian's 12th imperial acclamation. TR P V indicates it was struck before mid September. A fairly rare issue.

Obverse scratches, but I think the fine portrait redeems the coin.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/16/16 at 01:10Jay GT4: A lovely portrait
D439a.jpg
Domitian RIC-43957 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG•GERM P M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP•XII COS XII CENS•P•P•P•; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 439 (R). BMC p. 319, ‡. RSC 202. BNC 98.
Acquired from Romae Aeternae, June 2016.

The second denarius issue of 86 records Domitian's 12th imperial acclamation. TR P V indicates it was struck before mid September. A fairly rare issue.

Obverse scratches, but I think the fine portrait redeems the coin.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/15/16 at 23:40Mat: Great portrait indeed.
D392A.jpg
Domitian RIC-392A113 viewsAR Denarius, 2.90g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XI COS XI CENS P P•P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 392A (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, May 2016.

A previously unknown Minerva type 3 from Domitian's rare sixth issue of denarii for 85. Until this coin recently surfaced only three of the four standard Minerva types were known for this issue, now all four are accounted for. Ted Buttrey was notified of this coin's existence and he has assigned it as RIC 392A in the Flavian RIC Addenda. In the Flavian RIC Addenda another specimen is now noted - Hurston list 43, 1985, lot 10.

Well toned with rainbow hints and a stylish portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/04/16 at 02:30kc: Beautiful coin, Congratulations
D392A.jpg
Domitian RIC-392A113 viewsAR Denarius, 2.90g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XI COS XI CENS P P•P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 392A (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, May 2016.

A previously unknown Minerva type 3 from Domitian's rare sixth issue of denarii for 85. Until this coin recently surfaced only three of the four standard Minerva types were known for this issue, now all four are accounted for. Ted Buttrey was notified of this coin's existence and he has assigned it as RIC 392A in the Flavian RIC Addenda. In the Flavian RIC Addenda another specimen is now noted - Hurston list 43, 1985, lot 10.

Well toned with rainbow hints and a stylish portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/25/16 at 14:17NORMAN K: Very nice
D392A.jpg
Domitian RIC-392A113 viewsAR Denarius, 2.90g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XI COS XI CENS P P•P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 392A (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, May 2016.

A previously unknown Minerva type 3 from Domitian's rare sixth issue of denarii for 85. Until this coin recently surfaced only three of the four standard Minerva types were known for this issue, now all four are accounted for. Ted Buttrey was notified of this coin's existence and he has assigned it as RIC 392A in the Flavian RIC Addenda. In the Flavian RIC Addenda another specimen is now noted - Hurston list 43, 1985, lot 10.

Well toned with rainbow hints and a stylish portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/16 at 22:14Nemonater: What a great piece of the Flavian puzzle!
D392A.jpg
Domitian RIC-392A113 viewsAR Denarius, 2.90g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XI COS XI CENS P P•P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 392A (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, May 2016.

A previously unknown Minerva type 3 from Domitian's rare sixth issue of denarii for 85. Until this coin recently surfaced only three of the four standard Minerva types were known for this issue, now all four are accounted for. Ted Buttrey was notified of this coin's existence and he has assigned it as RIC 392A in the Flavian RIC Addenda. In the Flavian RIC Addenda another specimen is now noted - Hurston list 43, 1985, lot 10.

Well toned with rainbow hints and a stylish portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/16 at 22:09Molinari: Sweet!
D392A.jpg
Domitian RIC-392A113 viewsAR Denarius, 2.90g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XI COS XI CENS P P•P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 392A (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, May 2016.

A previously unknown Minerva type 3 from Domitian's rare sixth issue of denarii for 85. Until this coin recently surfaced only three of the four standard Minerva types were known for this issue, now all four are accounted for. Ted Buttrey was notified of this coin's existence and he has assigned it as RIC 392A in the Flavian RIC Addenda. In the Flavian RIC Addenda another specimen is now noted - Hurston list 43, 1985, lot 10.

Well toned with rainbow hints and a stylish portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/16 at 13:54quadrans: Nice specimen...
D392A.jpg
Domitian RIC-392A113 viewsAR Denarius, 2.90g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XI COS XI CENS P P•P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 392A (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, May 2016.

A previously unknown Minerva type 3 from Domitian's rare sixth issue of denarii for 85. Until this coin recently surfaced only three of the four standard Minerva types were known for this issue, now all four are accounted for. Ted Buttrey was notified of this coin's existence and he has assigned it as RIC 392A in the Flavian RIC Addenda. In the Flavian RIC Addenda another specimen is now noted - Hurston list 43, 1985, lot 10.

Well toned with rainbow hints and a stylish portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/16 at 10:35Jay GT4: Steve always has nice little gems! Congrats
D657.jpg
Domitian RIC-65764 viewsAR Denarius, 3.23g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XVII COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear amd shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 657 (R). BMC 148. RSC 247. BNC 139.
Acquired from Zurqieh, April 2016

Domitian did not take the consulship in 89, so this rare denarius is dated by TR P VIII between September 88 and September 89. The date can be further narrowed down by the 17th imperial acclamation. A military diploma dated 7 November, 88 records Domitian as IMP XVII, so this issue must have been struck briefly at the end of 88, perhaps just a month or so due to the rarity of the acclamation number on the denarii and the fact they were being awarded at a fairly rapid pace due to increased military activity along the Danube.

Solid portrait struck on good metal. Much better in hand.
2 commentsDavid Atherton05/13/16 at 08:42Kained but Able: Great when you can get such a precise date. Helps ...
D657.jpg
Domitian RIC-65764 viewsAR Denarius, 3.23g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XVII COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear amd shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 657 (R). BMC 148. RSC 247. BNC 139.
Acquired from Zurqieh, April 2016

Domitian did not take the consulship in 89, so this rare denarius is dated by TR P VIII between September 88 and September 89. The date can be further narrowed down by the 17th imperial acclamation. A military diploma dated 7 November, 88 records Domitian as IMP XVII, so this issue must have been struck briefly at the end of 88, perhaps just a month or so due to the rarity of the acclamation number on the denarii and the fact they were being awarded at a fairly rapid pace due to increased military activity along the Danube.

Solid portrait struck on good metal. Much better in hand.
2 commentsDavid Atherton05/13/16 at 06:55FlaviusDomitianus: Great find, congrats!
V1496lg.jpg
09e Domitian as Caesar-RIC 1496110 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS IIII; Winged caduceus
RIC 1496 (R2). BMC 489. RSC 369. RPC 1469 (2 spec.). BNC 377.
Acquired from Britaly Coins, April 2016.

The small series struck under Vespasian this coin comes from is quite mysterious. The mint is not known for certain, although Ephesus is a prime suspect. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman silver Coinage analysed the Ephesian and 'o' mint series and their data shows both issues are made from the same bullion. Not definitive proof the two series are from the same mint, but good evidence of a strong link. Unlike the Ephesian series, the 'o' issue is full of blundered legends and mules. This denarius struck for Domitian Caesar has a PON MAX reverse legend, an impossible title for the young prince. However, what the mint masters lacked in competency, the engravers made up for in their stylish portraits.

A wonderful portrait struck on a large flan. An obverse die match with my RIC V1494.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/11/16 at 03:32ancientdave: A very nice find!
V1496lg.jpg
09e Domitian as Caesar-RIC 1496110 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS IIII; Winged caduceus
RIC 1496 (R2). BMC 489. RSC 369. RPC 1469 (2 spec.). BNC 377.
Acquired from Britaly Coins, April 2016.

The small series struck under Vespasian this coin comes from is quite mysterious. The mint is not known for certain, although Ephesus is a prime suspect. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman silver Coinage analysed the Ephesian and 'o' mint series and their data shows both issues are made from the same bullion. Not definitive proof the two series are from the same mint, but good evidence of a strong link. Unlike the Ephesian series, the 'o' issue is full of blundered legends and mules. This denarius struck for Domitian Caesar has a PON MAX reverse legend, an impossible title for the young prince. However, what the mint masters lacked in competency, the engravers made up for in their stylish portraits.

A wonderful portrait struck on a large flan. An obverse die match with my RIC V1494.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/10/16 at 21:12Pharsalos: I've never seen this type before; the portrait...
V1496lg.jpg
09e Domitian as Caesar-RIC 1496110 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS IIII; Winged caduceus
RIC 1496 (R2). BMC 489. RSC 369. RPC 1469 (2 spec.). BNC 377.
Acquired from Britaly Coins, April 2016.

The small series struck under Vespasian this coin comes from is quite mysterious. The mint is not known for certain, although Ephesus is a prime suspect. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman silver Coinage analysed the Ephesian and 'o' mint series and their data shows both issues are made from the same bullion. Not definitive proof the two series are from the same mint, but good evidence of a strong link. Unlike the Ephesian series, the 'o' issue is full of blundered legends and mules. This denarius struck for Domitian Caesar has a PON MAX reverse legend, an impossible title for the young prince. However, what the mint masters lacked in competency, the engravers made up for in their stylish portraits.

A wonderful portrait struck on a large flan. An obverse die match with my RIC V1494.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/10/16 at 14:29Sam: A wonderful portrait and rare. Congratulations Da...
V1496lg.jpg
09e Domitian as Caesar-RIC 1496110 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS IIII; Winged caduceus
RIC 1496 (R2). BMC 489. RSC 369. RPC 1469 (2 spec.). BNC 377.
Acquired from Britaly Coins, April 2016.

The small series struck under Vespasian this coin comes from is quite mysterious. The mint is not known for certain, although Ephesus is a prime suspect. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman silver Coinage analysed the Ephesian and 'o' mint series and their data shows both issues are made from the same bullion. Not definitive proof the two series are from the same mint, but good evidence of a strong link. Unlike the Ephesian series, the 'o' issue is full of blundered legends and mules. This denarius struck for Domitian Caesar has a PON MAX reverse legend, an impossible title for the young prince. However, what the mint masters lacked in competency, the engravers made up for in their stylish portraits.

A wonderful portrait struck on a large flan. An obverse die match with my RIC V1494.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/10/16 at 11:13Mat: Love the portrait
V1496lg.jpg
09e Domitian as Caesar-RIC 1496110 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS IIII; Winged caduceus
RIC 1496 (R2). BMC 489. RSC 369. RPC 1469 (2 spec.). BNC 377.
Acquired from Britaly Coins, April 2016.

The small series struck under Vespasian this coin comes from is quite mysterious. The mint is not known for certain, although Ephesus is a prime suspect. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman silver Coinage analysed the Ephesian and 'o' mint series and their data shows both issues are made from the same bullion. Not definitive proof the two series are from the same mint, but good evidence of a strong link. Unlike the Ephesian series, the 'o' issue is full of blundered legends and mules. This denarius struck for Domitian Caesar has a PON MAX reverse legend, an impossible title for the young prince. However, what the mint masters lacked in competency, the engravers made up for in their stylish portraits.

A wonderful portrait struck on a large flan. An obverse die match with my RIC V1494.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/10/16 at 10:58Jay GT4: Great style!
V1496lg.jpg
09e Domitian as Caesar-RIC 1496110 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS IIII; Winged caduceus
RIC 1496 (R2). BMC 489. RSC 369. RPC 1469 (2 spec.). BNC 377.
Acquired from Britaly Coins, April 2016.

The small series struck under Vespasian this coin comes from is quite mysterious. The mint is not known for certain, although Ephesus is a prime suspect. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman silver Coinage analysed the Ephesian and 'o' mint series and their data shows both issues are made from the same bullion. Not definitive proof the two series are from the same mint, but good evidence of a strong link. Unlike the Ephesian series, the 'o' issue is full of blundered legends and mules. This denarius struck for Domitian Caesar has a PON MAX reverse legend, an impossible title for the young prince. However, what the mint masters lacked in competency, the engravers made up for in their stylish portraits.

A wonderful portrait struck on a large flan. An obverse die match with my RIC V1494.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/10/16 at 10:54Nemonater: What a dramatic portrait, I really love it. The r...
D28.jpg
Domitian RIC 28133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.23g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 28 (R2). BMC p. 433. RSC 56a. BNC -.

The Minerva on this denarius is distinctively quite flamboyant and was struck in the Autumn of 81 soon after Domitian became emperor. This is one of the earliest appearances of Minerva for Domitian as Augustus and it copies the same type coined for him as Caesar under Titus the previous year. The reverse is a die match with the RIC plate coin.

A rare coin in lovely style and well centred.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/29/16 at 05:26okidoki: congrats David
D28.jpg
Domitian RIC 28133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.23g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 28 (R2). BMC p. 433. RSC 56a. BNC -.

The Minerva on this denarius is distinctively quite flamboyant and was struck in the Autumn of 81 soon after Domitian became emperor. This is one of the earliest appearances of Minerva for Domitian as Augustus and it copies the same type coined for him as Caesar under Titus the previous year. The reverse is a die match with the RIC plate coin.

A rare coin in lovely style and well centred.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/26/16 at 08:40Nemonater: Another beauty!
D28.jpg
Domitian RIC 28133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.23g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 28 (R2). BMC p. 433. RSC 56a. BNC -.

The Minerva on this denarius is distinctively quite flamboyant and was struck in the Autumn of 81 soon after Domitian became emperor. This is one of the earliest appearances of Minerva for Domitian as Augustus and it copies the same type coined for him as Caesar under Titus the previous year. The reverse is a die match with the RIC plate coin.

A rare coin in lovely style and well centred.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/26/16 at 06:28FlaviusDomitianus: The reverse die could be the same as mine. Nice co...
D28.jpg
Domitian RIC 28133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.23g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 28 (R2). BMC p. 433. RSC 56a. BNC -.

The Minerva on this denarius is distinctively quite flamboyant and was struck in the Autumn of 81 soon after Domitian became emperor. This is one of the earliest appearances of Minerva for Domitian as Augustus and it copies the same type coined for him as Caesar under Titus the previous year. The reverse is a die match with the RIC plate coin.

A rare coin in lovely style and well centred.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/26/16 at 01:52quadrans: Nice find...
D28.jpg
Domitian RIC 28133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.23g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 28 (R2). BMC p. 433. RSC 56a. BNC -.

The Minerva on this denarius is distinctively quite flamboyant and was struck in the Autumn of 81 soon after Domitian became emperor. This is one of the earliest appearances of Minerva for Domitian as Augustus and it copies the same type coined for him as Caesar under Titus the previous year. The reverse is a die match with the RIC plate coin.

A rare coin in lovely style and well centred.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/25/16 at 20:43Mat: Beautiful coin all around.
D28.jpg
Domitian RIC 28133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.23g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 28 (R2). BMC p. 433. RSC 56a. BNC -.

The Minerva on this denarius is distinctively quite flamboyant and was struck in the Autumn of 81 soon after Domitian became emperor. This is one of the earliest appearances of Minerva for Domitian as Augustus and it copies the same type coined for him as Caesar under Titus the previous year. The reverse is a die match with the RIC plate coin.

A rare coin in lovely style and well centred.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/25/16 at 20:41orfew: Nice reverse !
D28.jpg
Domitian RIC 28133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.23g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 28 (R2). BMC p. 433. RSC 56a. BNC -.

The Minerva on this denarius is distinctively quite flamboyant and was struck in the Autumn of 81 soon after Domitian became emperor. This is one of the earliest appearances of Minerva for Domitian as Augustus and it copies the same type coined for him as Caesar under Titus the previous year. The reverse is a die match with the RIC plate coin.

A rare coin in lovely style and well centred.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/25/16 at 20:30Jay GT4: Very nice representation of Minerva
D435b.jpg
Domitian RIC-43593 viewsAR Denarius, 2.98g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 435 (R). BMC 93. RSC 201b. BNC 97.
Ex Dionysos, eBay, April 2016.

This denarius is part of the third issue of 86. At the time Domitian was waging a war against the Dacians and the imperial salutations were being awarded at a fast pace, this coin records his 12th acclamation. The denarii from these issues tend to be in fine style and quite scarce.

Nicely centred with a noble portrait.
2 commentsDavid Atherton04/19/16 at 09:40Nemonater: Wonderful portrait!
D435b.jpg
Domitian RIC-43593 viewsAR Denarius, 2.98g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 435 (R). BMC 93. RSC 201b. BNC 97.
Ex Dionysos, eBay, April 2016.

This denarius is part of the third issue of 86. At the time Domitian was waging a war against the Dacians and the imperial salutations were being awarded at a fast pace, this coin records his 12th acclamation. The denarii from these issues tend to be in fine style and quite scarce.

Nicely centred with a noble portrait.
2 commentsDavid Atherton04/19/16 at 05:36FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition, my example id from different dies.
T97.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC 9779 viewsAR Denarius, 2.74g
Rome mint, 80 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Salus, stg. r., resting on column, feeding snake out of patera
RIC 97 (C). BMC 84. RSC 386. BNC -.
Ex Lanz, eBay, 28 March 2016.

The Salus feeding snake type was struck for Domitian Caesar under both Vespasian as COS VI and Titus as COS VII. AVG F in the obverse legend indicates this denarius was coined before Vespasian's deification, after which DIVI F was used. This Salus type was unique to Domitan Caesar and was discontinued in the following DIVI F issue when a whole new slate of reverse designs were employed.

Not as commonly found as the COS VI version.


6 commentsDavid Atherton04/11/16 at 20:06curtislclay: Reka Devnia figures: allegedly 18 COS VI, all in S...
T97.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC 9779 viewsAR Denarius, 2.74g
Rome mint, 80 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Salus, stg. r., resting on column, feeding snake out of patera
RIC 97 (C). BMC 84. RSC 386. BNC -.
Ex Lanz, eBay, 28 March 2016.

The Salus feeding snake type was struck for Domitian Caesar under both Vespasian as COS VI and Titus as COS VII. AVG F in the obverse legend indicates this denarius was coined before Vespasian's deification, after which DIVI F was used. This Salus type was unique to Domitan Caesar and was discontinued in the following DIVI F issue when a whole new slate of reverse designs were employed.

Not as commonly found as the COS VI version.


6 commentsDavid Atherton04/11/16 at 19:15quadrans: Good choice..
T97.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC 9779 viewsAR Denarius, 2.74g
Rome mint, 80 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Salus, stg. r., resting on column, feeding snake out of patera
RIC 97 (C). BMC 84. RSC 386. BNC -.
Ex Lanz, eBay, 28 March 2016.

The Salus feeding snake type was struck for Domitian Caesar under both Vespasian as COS VI and Titus as COS VII. AVG F in the obverse legend indicates this denarius was coined before Vespasian's deification, after which DIVI F was used. This Salus type was unique to Domitan Caesar and was discontinued in the following DIVI F issue when a whole new slate of reverse designs were employed.

Not as commonly found as the COS VI version.


6 commentsDavid Atherton04/11/16 at 19:14Jay GT4: Nice portrait!
T97.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC 9779 viewsAR Denarius, 2.74g
Rome mint, 80 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Salus, stg. r., resting on column, feeding snake out of patera
RIC 97 (C). BMC 84. RSC 386. BNC -.
Ex Lanz, eBay, 28 March 2016.

The Salus feeding snake type was struck for Domitian Caesar under both Vespasian as COS VI and Titus as COS VII. AVG F in the obverse legend indicates this denarius was coined before Vespasian's deification, after which DIVI F was used. This Salus type was unique to Domitan Caesar and was discontinued in the following DIVI F issue when a whole new slate of reverse designs were employed.

Not as commonly found as the COS VI version.


6 commentsDavid Atherton04/11/16 at 13:18FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example.
T97.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC 9779 viewsAR Denarius, 2.74g
Rome mint, 80 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Salus, stg. r., resting on column, feeding snake out of patera
RIC 97 (C). BMC 84. RSC 386. BNC -.
Ex Lanz, eBay, 28 March 2016.

The Salus feeding snake type was struck for Domitian Caesar under both Vespasian as COS VI and Titus as COS VII. AVG F in the obverse legend indicates this denarius was coined before Vespasian's deification, after which DIVI F was used. This Salus type was unique to Domitan Caesar and was discontinued in the following DIVI F issue when a whole new slate of reverse designs were employed.

Not as commonly found as the COS VI version.


6 commentsDavid Atherton04/11/16 at 12:42orfew: I love the reverse.
T97.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC 9779 viewsAR Denarius, 2.74g
Rome mint, 80 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Salus, stg. r., resting on column, feeding snake out of patera
RIC 97 (C). BMC 84. RSC 386. BNC -.
Ex Lanz, eBay, 28 March 2016.

The Salus feeding snake type was struck for Domitian Caesar under both Vespasian as COS VI and Titus as COS VII. AVG F in the obverse legend indicates this denarius was coined before Vespasian's deification, after which DIVI F was used. This Salus type was unique to Domitan Caesar and was discontinued in the following DIVI F issue when a whole new slate of reverse designs were employed.

Not as commonly found as the COS VI version.


6 commentsDavid Atherton04/11/16 at 11:00okidoki: very nice
D454a.jpg
Domitian RIC-45444 viewsAR Denarius, 3.46g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 454 (R). BMC p. 320, †. RSC 208. BNC 103.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, October 2015. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

This denarius from the rare fifth issue struck after mid September 86 at a time when Domitian's imperial acclamations were piling up rather quickly due to campaigns along the Danube. These issues tend to be superb in style and craftsmanship.

A nicely toned coin with a regal portrait.
1 commentsDavid Atherton04/07/16 at 03:02NORMAN K: excellant coin
D666a.jpg
Domitian RIC-66698 viewsAR Denarius, 3.46g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XVIII COS XIIII CENS P•P•P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 666 (R2). BMC p. 331 note. RSC 247a. BNC -.
Acquired from Lancelot Coin Co., eBay, March 2016.

A very rare denarius which records Domitian's 18th imperial acclamation, most likely struck in late 88. Imperial acclamations were coming fast and furious during the 88-89 time period, which is the primary means of differentiating the many various issues since Domitian did not take the consulship in 89. He was campaigning against the Dacians in 88 and presumably that is the likely explanation of the rapid succession of imperial acclamations during the time period. Those denarii with IMP XVIII are some of the rarest and were probably struck for just a few days. A military diploma dated 7 November, 88 records Domitian as IMP XVII, therefore this tiny issue must have been struck soon after that date at the end of 88 and/or very early in 89. RIC speculates mid December 88.

A nice solid denarius in good metal and fine style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/05/16 at 03:32quadrans: Great..
D666a.jpg
Domitian RIC-66698 viewsAR Denarius, 3.46g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XVIII COS XIIII CENS P•P•P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 666 (R2). BMC p. 331 note. RSC 247a. BNC -.
Acquired from Lancelot Coin Co., eBay, March 2016.

A very rare denarius which records Domitian's 18th imperial acclamation, most likely struck in late 88. Imperial acclamations were coming fast and furious during the 88-89 time period, which is the primary means of differentiating the many various issues since Domitian did not take the consulship in 89. He was campaigning against the Dacians in 88 and presumably that is the likely explanation of the rapid succession of imperial acclamations during the time period. Those denarii with IMP XVIII are some of the rarest and were probably struck for just a few days. A military diploma dated 7 November, 88 records Domitian as IMP XVII, therefore this tiny issue must have been struck soon after that date at the end of 88 and/or very early in 89. RIC speculates mid December 88.

A nice solid denarius in good metal and fine style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/01/16 at 19:25okidoki: very nice David
D666a.jpg
Domitian RIC-66698 viewsAR Denarius, 3.46g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XVIII COS XIIII CENS P•P•P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 666 (R2). BMC p. 331 note. RSC 247a. BNC -.
Acquired from Lancelot Coin Co., eBay, March 2016.

A very rare denarius which records Domitian's 18th imperial acclamation, most likely struck in late 88. Imperial acclamations were coming fast and furious during the 88-89 time period, which is the primary means of differentiating the many various issues since Domitian did not take the consulship in 89. He was campaigning against the Dacians in 88 and presumably that is the likely explanation of the rapid succession of imperial acclamations during the time period. Those denarii with IMP XVIII are some of the rarest and were probably struck for just a few days. A military diploma dated 7 November, 88 records Domitian as IMP XVII, therefore this tiny issue must have been struck soon after that date at the end of 88 and/or very early in 89. RIC speculates mid December 88.

A nice solid denarius in good metal and fine style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/31/16 at 07:29FlaviusDomitianus: The reverse is possibly fro the same dies as mine....
D666a.jpg
Domitian RIC-66698 viewsAR Denarius, 3.46g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XVIII COS XIIII CENS P•P•P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 666 (R2). BMC p. 331 note. RSC 247a. BNC -.
Acquired from Lancelot Coin Co., eBay, March 2016.

A very rare denarius which records Domitian's 18th imperial acclamation, most likely struck in late 88. Imperial acclamations were coming fast and furious during the 88-89 time period, which is the primary means of differentiating the many various issues since Domitian did not take the consulship in 89. He was campaigning against the Dacians in 88 and presumably that is the likely explanation of the rapid succession of imperial acclamations during the time period. Those denarii with IMP XVIII are some of the rarest and were probably struck for just a few days. A military diploma dated 7 November, 88 records Domitian as IMP XVII, therefore this tiny issue must have been struck soon after that date at the end of 88 and/or very early in 89. RIC speculates mid December 88.

A nice solid denarius in good metal and fine style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/30/16 at 23:47Jay GT4: Great eye as always David
D666a.jpg
Domitian RIC-66698 viewsAR Denarius, 3.46g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XVIII COS XIIII CENS P•P•P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 666 (R2). BMC p. 331 note. RSC 247a. BNC -.
Acquired from Lancelot Coin Co., eBay, March 2016.

A very rare denarius which records Domitian's 18th imperial acclamation, most likely struck in late 88. Imperial acclamations were coming fast and furious during the 88-89 time period, which is the primary means of differentiating the many various issues since Domitian did not take the consulship in 89. He was campaigning against the Dacians in 88 and presumably that is the likely explanation of the rapid succession of imperial acclamations during the time period. Those denarii with IMP XVIII are some of the rarest and were probably struck for just a few days. A military diploma dated 7 November, 88 records Domitian as IMP XVII, therefore this tiny issue must have been struck soon after that date at the end of 88 and/or very early in 89. RIC speculates mid December 88.

A nice solid denarius in good metal and fine style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/30/16 at 23:20orfew: I love the reverse
D58.jpg
Domitian RIC 5898 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 58 (C). BMC 11. RSC 560. BNC 28.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, March 2016. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

Domitian's devotion to his patron deity Minerva can be detected quite early in his reign on the coinage. This reverse design struck in late 81 would later become one of the standard four Minerva types he would repeat over and over again on the denarius.

In fine early veristic style and beautifully toned with rainbow highlights.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/22/16 at 06:55FlaviusDomitianus: Nice toning.
D58.jpg
Domitian RIC 5898 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 58 (C). BMC 11. RSC 560. BNC 28.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, March 2016. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

Domitian's devotion to his patron deity Minerva can be detected quite early in his reign on the coinage. This reverse design struck in late 81 would later become one of the standard four Minerva types he would repeat over and over again on the denarius.

In fine early veristic style and beautifully toned with rainbow highlights.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/22/16 at 06:01okidoki: congrats David
D58.jpg
Domitian RIC 5898 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 58 (C). BMC 11. RSC 560. BNC 28.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, March 2016. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

Domitian's devotion to his patron deity Minerva can be detected quite early in his reign on the coinage. This reverse design struck in late 81 would later become one of the standard four Minerva types he would repeat over and over again on the denarius.

In fine early veristic style and beautifully toned with rainbow highlights.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/22/16 at 02:19Jay GT4: Oh wow! That's nice
D58.jpg
Domitian RIC 5898 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 58 (C). BMC 11. RSC 560. BNC 28.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, March 2016. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

Domitian's devotion to his patron deity Minerva can be detected quite early in his reign on the coinage. This reverse design struck in late 81 would later become one of the standard four Minerva types he would repeat over and over again on the denarius.

In fine early veristic style and beautifully toned with rainbow highlights.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/22/16 at 01:12orfew: Nice portrait
D58.jpg
Domitian RIC 5898 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 58 (C). BMC 11. RSC 560. BNC 28.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, March 2016. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

Domitian's devotion to his patron deity Minerva can be detected quite early in his reign on the coinage. This reverse design struck in late 81 would later become one of the standard four Minerva types he would repeat over and over again on the denarius.

In fine early veristic style and beautifully toned with rainbow highlights.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/22/16 at 00:04Sam: Superb.
IMG_0344.JPG
Domitian as Caesar RIC 99101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 80 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Vesta, std. l., with palladium and sceptre
RIC 99 (R). BMC 83. RSC 380a. BNC 70.
Acquired from Artifact Man, February 2016.

The Vesta type was struck for Domitian Caesar with him as COS VI in 79 under Vespasian and COS VII in 80 under Titus. This denarius bears the COS VII dating and is much rarer than the common COS VI. Perhaps the window of time these rare COS VII Vesta denarii were struck was quite small because a whole new set of reverse designs were soon employed for him later in the year after Vespasian's deification (the DIVI F issue).

A fine denarius with dark toning.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/04/16 at 20:56Randygeki(h2): Very nice!
IMG_0344.JPG
Domitian as Caesar RIC 99101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 80 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Vesta, std. l., with palladium and sceptre
RIC 99 (R). BMC 83. RSC 380a. BNC 70.
Acquired from Artifact Man, February 2016.

The Vesta type was struck for Domitian Caesar with him as COS VI in 79 under Vespasian and COS VII in 80 under Titus. This denarius bears the COS VII dating and is much rarer than the common COS VI. Perhaps the window of time these rare COS VII Vesta denarii were struck was quite small because a whole new set of reverse designs were soon employed for him later in the year after Vespasian's deification (the DIVI F issue).

A fine denarius with dark toning.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/01/16 at 08:33FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition, I don't have this one.
IMG_0344.JPG
Domitian as Caesar RIC 99101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 80 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Vesta, std. l., with palladium and sceptre
RIC 99 (R). BMC 83. RSC 380a. BNC 70.
Acquired from Artifact Man, February 2016.

The Vesta type was struck for Domitian Caesar with him as COS VI in 79 under Vespasian and COS VII in 80 under Titus. This denarius bears the COS VII dating and is much rarer than the common COS VI. Perhaps the window of time these rare COS VII Vesta denarii were struck was quite small because a whole new set of reverse designs were soon employed for him later in the year after Vespasian's deification (the DIVI F issue).

A fine denarius with dark toning.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/29/16 at 19:50Jay GT4: Love these dark coins
IMG_0344.JPG
Domitian as Caesar RIC 99101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 80 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Vesta, std. l., with palladium and sceptre
RIC 99 (R). BMC 83. RSC 380a. BNC 70.
Acquired from Artifact Man, February 2016.

The Vesta type was struck for Domitian Caesar with him as COS VI in 79 under Vespasian and COS VII in 80 under Titus. This denarius bears the COS VII dating and is much rarer than the common COS VI. Perhaps the window of time these rare COS VII Vesta denarii were struck was quite small because a whole new set of reverse designs were soon employed for him later in the year after Vespasian's deification (the DIVI F issue).

A fine denarius with dark toning.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/29/16 at 19:13Sam: Valuable addition.
IMG_0344.JPG
Domitian as Caesar RIC 99101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 80 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Vesta, std. l., with palladium and sceptre
RIC 99 (R). BMC 83. RSC 380a. BNC 70.
Acquired from Artifact Man, February 2016.

The Vesta type was struck for Domitian Caesar with him as COS VI in 79 under Vespasian and COS VII in 80 under Titus. This denarius bears the COS VII dating and is much rarer than the common COS VI. Perhaps the window of time these rare COS VII Vesta denarii were struck was quite small because a whole new set of reverse designs were soon employed for him later in the year after Vespasian's deification (the DIVI F issue).

A fine denarius with dark toning.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/29/16 at 19:01orfew: Nice toning and an interesting portrait
D99a.jpg
Domitian RIC 99147 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT COS VIII P P; Minerva stg. l., with Victory and sceptre; at feet, shield
RIC 99 (R). BMC 25. RSC 592a. BNC -.
Acquired from Pars Coins, eBay, 20 January 2016.

A rare coin that is part of the first issue of 82, but the last to be struck on the old standard. After this issue Domitian would increase the fineness and weight of the denarius as part of a coinage reform. Minerva and Victory did not become one of the standard Minerva types that were struck year after year until the end of the reign. It made its last appearance in this issue and is the scarcest type of the series.

Struck with new dies in superb veristic style. A really beautiful denarius showcasing the fine technical and artistic craftsmanship of the Rome mint.
8 commentsDavid Atherton02/20/16 at 15:53NORMAN K: No imagination necessary on this coin. Its all th...
D99a.jpg
Domitian RIC 99147 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT COS VIII P P; Minerva stg. l., with Victory and sceptre; at feet, shield
RIC 99 (R). BMC 25. RSC 592a. BNC -.
Acquired from Pars Coins, eBay, 20 January 2016.

A rare coin that is part of the first issue of 82, but the last to be struck on the old standard. After this issue Domitian would increase the fineness and weight of the denarius as part of a coinage reform. Minerva and Victory did not become one of the standard Minerva types that were struck year after year until the end of the reign. It made its last appearance in this issue and is the scarcest type of the series.

Struck with new dies in superb veristic style. A really beautiful denarius showcasing the fine technical and artistic craftsmanship of the Rome mint.
8 commentsDavid Atherton01/28/16 at 20:05Nemonater: Perfect coin, well done!
D99a.jpg
Domitian RIC 99147 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT COS VIII P P; Minerva stg. l., with Victory and sceptre; at feet, shield
RIC 99 (R). BMC 25. RSC 592a. BNC -.
Acquired from Pars Coins, eBay, 20 January 2016.

A rare coin that is part of the first issue of 82, but the last to be struck on the old standard. After this issue Domitian would increase the fineness and weight of the denarius as part of a coinage reform. Minerva and Victory did not become one of the standard Minerva types that were struck year after year until the end of the reign. It made its last appearance in this issue and is the scarcest type of the series.

Struck with new dies in superb veristic style. A really beautiful denarius showcasing the fine technical and artistic craftsmanship of the Rome mint.
8 commentsDavid Atherton01/28/16 at 17:08quadrans: Huhh, Great.., BOT coin, to go there....
D99a.jpg
Domitian RIC 99147 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT COS VIII P P; Minerva stg. l., with Victory and sceptre; at feet, shield
RIC 99 (R). BMC 25. RSC 592a. BNC -.
Acquired from Pars Coins, eBay, 20 January 2016.

A rare coin that is part of the first issue of 82, but the last to be struck on the old standard. After this issue Domitian would increase the fineness and weight of the denarius as part of a coinage reform. Minerva and Victory did not become one of the standard Minerva types that were struck year after year until the end of the reign. It made its last appearance in this issue and is the scarcest type of the series.

Struck with new dies in superb veristic style. A really beautiful denarius showcasing the fine technical and artistic craftsmanship of the Rome mint.
8 commentsDavid Atherton01/28/16 at 01:50Matt Inglima: Beautiful!
D99a.jpg
Domitian RIC 99147 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT COS VIII P P; Minerva stg. l., with Victory and sceptre; at feet, shield
RIC 99 (R). BMC 25. RSC 592a. BNC -.
Acquired from Pars Coins, eBay, 20 January 2016.

A rare coin that is part of the first issue of 82, but the last to be struck on the old standard. After this issue Domitian would increase the fineness and weight of the denarius as part of a coinage reform. Minerva and Victory did not become one of the standard Minerva types that were struck year after year until the end of the reign. It made its last appearance in this issue and is the scarcest type of the series.

Struck with new dies in superb veristic style. A really beautiful denarius showcasing the fine technical and artistic craftsmanship of the Rome mint.
8 commentsDavid Atherton01/28/16 at 00:45ickster: Superb!
D99a.jpg
Domitian RIC 99147 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT COS VIII P P; Minerva stg. l., with Victory and sceptre; at feet, shield
RIC 99 (R). BMC 25. RSC 592a. BNC -.
Acquired from Pars Coins, eBay, 20 January 2016.

A rare coin that is part of the first issue of 82, but the last to be struck on the old standard. After this issue Domitian would increase the fineness and weight of the denarius as part of a coinage reform. Minerva and Victory did not become one of the standard Minerva types that were struck year after year until the end of the reign. It made its last appearance in this issue and is the scarcest type of the series.

Struck with new dies in superb veristic style. A really beautiful denarius showcasing the fine technical and artistic craftsmanship of the Rome mint.
8 commentsDavid Atherton01/27/16 at 23:11Jay GT4: Oh wow, that is a great portrait!
D99a.jpg
Domitian RIC 99147 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT COS VIII P P; Minerva stg. l., with Victory and sceptre; at feet, shield
RIC 99 (R). BMC 25. RSC 592a. BNC -.
Acquired from Pars Coins, eBay, 20 January 2016.

A rare coin that is part of the first issue of 82, but the last to be struck on the old standard. After this issue Domitian would increase the fineness and weight of the denarius as part of a coinage reform. Minerva and Victory did not become one of the standard Minerva types that were struck year after year until the end of the reign. It made its last appearance in this issue and is the scarcest type of the series.

Struck with new dies in superb veristic style. A really beautiful denarius showcasing the fine technical and artistic craftsmanship of the Rome mint.
8 commentsDavid Atherton01/27/16 at 22:57Mat: Wonderfully centered and great portrait.
D344.jpg
Domitian RIC-34499 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 85 AD (fifth issue)
Obv: IMP•CAES•DOMIT AVG•GERM•P•M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP•VIIII COS XI CENS•POT P•P•; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 344 (R2). BMC -. RSC 186. BNC 87.
Ex CNG E363, 11 November 2015, lot 319.

An extremely rare denarius from the fifth issue of 85. Coined shortly after Domitian reduced the fineness of the denarius by 5% to the old Neronian level after having raised it in 82 to the Augustan standard. RIC cites Paris and Oxford with examples of this type.

Struck on a large flan (21 mm!) in superb fine style.

4 commentsDavid Atherton01/23/16 at 19:15ancientdave: Wow! The portrait is of the finest style, so appea...
D95.jpg
Domitian RIC 95136 viewsAR Denarius, 3.03g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT COS VIII P P; Curule chair, wreath above
RIC 95 (C). BMC 28A. RSC 595. BNC -.
Acquired from Lucernae, eBay, December 2015.

Coined at the very beginning of 82, just before Domitian overhauled the mint and increased the fineness of the denarius. The type is a continuation of the 'pulvinaria' series, most likely struck as a stop-gap until the mint master finished preparations for the new reverse designs.

In good early veristic style with a rich dark tone.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/01/16 at 14:46Matt Inglima: A great coin to finish off the year! May 2016 bri...
D95.jpg
Domitian RIC 95136 viewsAR Denarius, 3.03g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT COS VIII P P; Curule chair, wreath above
RIC 95 (C). BMC 28A. RSC 595. BNC -.
Acquired from Lucernae, eBay, December 2015.

Coined at the very beginning of 82, just before Domitian overhauled the mint and increased the fineness of the denarius. The type is a continuation of the 'pulvinaria' series, most likely struck as a stop-gap until the mint master finished preparations for the new reverse designs.

In good early veristic style with a rich dark tone.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/01/16 at 11:34Sam: Beautiful.
D95.jpg
Domitian RIC 95136 viewsAR Denarius, 3.03g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT COS VIII P P; Curule chair, wreath above
RIC 95 (C). BMC 28A. RSC 595. BNC -.
Acquired from Lucernae, eBay, December 2015.

Coined at the very beginning of 82, just before Domitian overhauled the mint and increased the fineness of the denarius. The type is a continuation of the 'pulvinaria' series, most likely struck as a stop-gap until the mint master finished preparations for the new reverse designs.

In good early veristic style with a rich dark tone.
4 commentsDavid Atherton12/31/15 at 06:35okidoki: excellent i love it
D95.jpg
Domitian RIC 95136 viewsAR Denarius, 3.03g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT COS VIII P P; Curule chair, wreath above
RIC 95 (C). BMC 28A. RSC 595. BNC -.
Acquired from Lucernae, eBay, December 2015.

Coined at the very beginning of 82, just before Domitian overhauled the mint and increased the fineness of the denarius. The type is a continuation of the 'pulvinaria' series, most likely struck as a stop-gap until the mint master finished preparations for the new reverse designs.

In good early veristic style with a rich dark tone.
4 commentsDavid Atherton12/31/15 at 06:11FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition.
D772c.jpg
Domitian RIC-772121 viewsAR Denarius, 2.48g
Rome mint, 95 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear, shield at her l. side (M3)
RIC 772 (C2). BMC 224. RSC 287. BNC 202.
Acquired from Cerberus Ancient Coins, December 2015.

Domitian held the consulship in 95, which dates this denarius between 1 January and 13 September of that year. Flavian specialist Brian Jones speculates that during 95/96 Domitian waged a campaign against the Iazyges in the vicinity of Singidunum. This military activity may account for the large issues of denarii struck during the final years of the reign. Admittedly, tying denarius issues to military campaigns is guess work at best.

The engravers in the last couple of years of Domitian's reign sometimes depicted his portrait with a slight upward tilt. Harold Mattingly described these portraits as 'eyes to heaven'. This coin shows it quite well.
1 commentsDavid Atherton12/28/15 at 23:37Jay GT4: Interesting coin David
D735.jpg
Domitian RIC-735105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.56g
Rome mint, 92 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 735 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2015. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

This coin is from a very rare issue struck towards the end of summer 92 and can be dated by the TR P XI and IMP XXII, an exceedingly rare combination. A few dies with IMP XXI were altered with an additional 'I', which can be seen here squeezed before COS on the reverse. Perhaps word of the new imperial acclamation reached the mint the same day this coin was struck.

Well centered with an above average portrait. Nicely toned too.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/23/15 at 19:43Jay GT4: Very cool
D735.jpg
Domitian RIC-735105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.56g
Rome mint, 92 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 735 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2015. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

This coin is from a very rare issue struck towards the end of summer 92 and can be dated by the TR P XI and IMP XXII, an exceedingly rare combination. A few dies with IMP XXI were altered with an additional 'I', which can be seen here squeezed before COS on the reverse. Perhaps word of the new imperial acclamation reached the mint the same day this coin was struck.

Well centered with an above average portrait. Nicely toned too.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/23/15 at 01:44orfew: Great coin
D735.jpg
Domitian RIC-735105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.56g
Rome mint, 92 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 735 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2015. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

This coin is from a very rare issue struck towards the end of summer 92 and can be dated by the TR P XI and IMP XXII, an exceedingly rare combination. A few dies with IMP XXI were altered with an additional 'I', which can be seen here squeezed before COS on the reverse. Perhaps word of the new imperial acclamation reached the mint the same day this coin was struck.

Well centered with an above average portrait. Nicely toned too.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/22/15 at 20:59Nemonater: What a cool coin, well done!
D735.jpg
Domitian RIC-735105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.56g
Rome mint, 92 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 735 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2015. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

This coin is from a very rare issue struck towards the end of summer 92 and can be dated by the TR P XI and IMP XXII, an exceedingly rare combination. A few dies with IMP XXI were altered with an additional 'I', which can be seen here squeezed before COS on the reverse. Perhaps word of the new imperial acclamation reached the mint the same day this coin was struck.

Well centered with an above average portrait. Nicely toned too.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/22/15 at 14:06FlaviusDomitianus: Sharp eye!
D735.jpg
Domitian RIC-735105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.56g
Rome mint, 92 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 735 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2015. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

This coin is from a very rare issue struck towards the end of summer 92 and can be dated by the TR P XI and IMP XXII, an exceedingly rare combination. A few dies with IMP XXI were altered with an additional 'I', which can be seen here squeezed before COS on the reverse. Perhaps word of the new imperial acclamation reached the mint the same day this coin was struck.

Well centered with an above average portrait. Nicely toned too.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/22/15 at 10:46okidoki: nice coin
D344.jpg
Domitian RIC-34499 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 85 AD (fifth issue)
Obv: IMP•CAES•DOMIT AVG•GERM•P•M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP•VIIII COS XI CENS•POT P•P•; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 344 (R2). BMC -. RSC 186. BNC 87.
Ex CNG E363, 11 November 2015, lot 319.

An extremely rare denarius from the fifth issue of 85. Coined shortly after Domitian reduced the fineness of the denarius by 5% to the old Neronian level after having raised it in 82 to the Augustan standard. RIC cites Paris and Oxford with examples of this type.

Struck on a large flan (21 mm!) in superb fine style.

4 commentsDavid Atherton11/19/15 at 01:37Jay GT4: Love these big flans
D344.jpg
Domitian RIC-34499 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 85 AD (fifth issue)
Obv: IMP•CAES•DOMIT AVG•GERM•P•M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP•VIIII COS XI CENS•POT P•P•; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 344 (R2). BMC -. RSC 186. BNC 87.
Ex CNG E363, 11 November 2015, lot 319.

An extremely rare denarius from the fifth issue of 85. Coined shortly after Domitian reduced the fineness of the denarius by 5% to the old Neronian level after having raised it in 82 to the Augustan standard. RIC cites Paris and Oxford with examples of this type.

Struck on a large flan (21 mm!) in superb fine style.

4 commentsDavid Atherton11/17/15 at 20:53orfew: What a lovely rare example.
D344.jpg
Domitian RIC-34499 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 85 AD (fifth issue)
Obv: IMP•CAES•DOMIT AVG•GERM•P•M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP•VIIII COS XI CENS•POT P•P•; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 344 (R2). BMC -. RSC 186. BNC 87.
Ex CNG E363, 11 November 2015, lot 319.

An extremely rare denarius from the fifth issue of 85. Coined shortly after Domitian reduced the fineness of the denarius by 5% to the old Neronian level after having raised it in 82 to the Augustan standard. RIC cites Paris and Oxford with examples of this type.

Struck on a large flan (21 mm!) in superb fine style.

4 commentsDavid Atherton11/17/15 at 18:44Mat: A nice portrait on this one.
D186.jpg
Domitian RIC-186143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.48g
Rome mint, 84 AD (second issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: P M TR POT III IMP V COS X P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 186 (R2). BMC 48. RSC 352. BNC 47.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, November 2015. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

In 82 AD when Domitian overhauled the mint and increased the fineness of the denarius, he also apparently brought in new engravers who began working in a more elaborate, idealised style. Two years later that new style came into full bloom, as can be seen on this gorgeous example from the second issue of 84. All of the coins from 84 are quite scarce due to both Gresham's law and the low rate of production. Much experimentation was going on at the mint at this time with reverse types, busts, and style. I assume the amount of time an engraver spent on rendering these highly polished pieces was considerable, which could perhaps explain why they were not struck more commonly.

The aegis draped over the left shoulder along with the icy regal portrait makes for a most compelling piece. Struck on a large flan (21 mm!) this is a very impressive coin in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/10/15 at 11:37Jay GT4: Wow, what an exceptional portrait!
D186.jpg
Domitian RIC-186143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.48g
Rome mint, 84 AD (second issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: P M TR POT III IMP V COS X P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 186 (R2). BMC 48. RSC 352. BNC 47.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, November 2015. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

In 82 AD when Domitian overhauled the mint and increased the fineness of the denarius, he also apparently brought in new engravers who began working in a more elaborate, idealised style. Two years later that new style came into full bloom, as can be seen on this gorgeous example from the second issue of 84. All of the coins from 84 are quite scarce due to both Gresham's law and the low rate of production. Much experimentation was going on at the mint at this time with reverse types, busts, and style. I assume the amount of time an engraver spent on rendering these highly polished pieces was considerable, which could perhaps explain why they were not struck more commonly.

The aegis draped over the left shoulder along with the icy regal portrait makes for a most compelling piece. Struck on a large flan (21 mm!) this is a very impressive coin in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/10/15 at 09:29quadrans: I agree very nice specimen..
D186.jpg
Domitian RIC-186143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.48g
Rome mint, 84 AD (second issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: P M TR POT III IMP V COS X P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 186 (R2). BMC 48. RSC 352. BNC 47.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, November 2015. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

In 82 AD when Domitian overhauled the mint and increased the fineness of the denarius, he also apparently brought in new engravers who began working in a more elaborate, idealised style. Two years later that new style came into full bloom, as can be seen on this gorgeous example from the second issue of 84. All of the coins from 84 are quite scarce due to both Gresham's law and the low rate of production. Much experimentation was going on at the mint at this time with reverse types, busts, and style. I assume the amount of time an engraver spent on rendering these highly polished pieces was considerable, which could perhaps explain why they were not struck more commonly.

The aegis draped over the left shoulder along with the icy regal portrait makes for a most compelling piece. Struck on a large flan (21 mm!) this is a very impressive coin in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/10/15 at 02:28Matt Inglima: Everything about this coin is AMAZING! I'm gla...
D186.jpg
Domitian RIC-186143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.48g
Rome mint, 84 AD (second issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: P M TR POT III IMP V COS X P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 186 (R2). BMC 48. RSC 352. BNC 47.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, November 2015. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

In 82 AD when Domitian overhauled the mint and increased the fineness of the denarius, he also apparently brought in new engravers who began working in a more elaborate, idealised style. Two years later that new style came into full bloom, as can be seen on this gorgeous example from the second issue of 84. All of the coins from 84 are quite scarce due to both Gresham's law and the low rate of production. Much experimentation was going on at the mint at this time with reverse types, busts, and style. I assume the amount of time an engraver spent on rendering these highly polished pieces was considerable, which could perhaps explain why they were not struck more commonly.

The aegis draped over the left shoulder along with the icy regal portrait makes for a most compelling piece. Struck on a large flan (21 mm!) this is a very impressive coin in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/09/15 at 18:59Nemonater: Beautiful!
D186.jpg
Domitian RIC-186143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.48g
Rome mint, 84 AD (second issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: P M TR POT III IMP V COS X P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 186 (R2). BMC 48. RSC 352. BNC 47.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, November 2015. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

In 82 AD when Domitian overhauled the mint and increased the fineness of the denarius, he also apparently brought in new engravers who began working in a more elaborate, idealised style. Two years later that new style came into full bloom, as can be seen on this gorgeous example from the second issue of 84. All of the coins from 84 are quite scarce due to both Gresham's law and the low rate of production. Much experimentation was going on at the mint at this time with reverse types, busts, and style. I assume the amount of time an engraver spent on rendering these highly polished pieces was considerable, which could perhaps explain why they were not struck more commonly.

The aegis draped over the left shoulder along with the icy regal portrait makes for a most compelling piece. Struck on a large flan (21 mm!) this is a very impressive coin in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/09/15 at 18:51FlaviusDomitianus: Great addition indeed.
D186.jpg
Domitian RIC-186143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.48g
Rome mint, 84 AD (second issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: P M TR POT III IMP V COS X P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 186 (R2). BMC 48. RSC 352. BNC 47.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, November 2015. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

In 82 AD when Domitian overhauled the mint and increased the fineness of the denarius, he also apparently brought in new engravers who began working in a more elaborate, idealised style. Two years later that new style came into full bloom, as can be seen on this gorgeous example from the second issue of 84. All of the coins from 84 are quite scarce due to both Gresham's law and the low rate of production. Much experimentation was going on at the mint at this time with reverse types, busts, and style. I assume the amount of time an engraver spent on rendering these highly polished pieces was considerable, which could perhaps explain why they were not struck more commonly.

The aegis draped over the left shoulder along with the icy regal portrait makes for a most compelling piece. Struck on a large flan (21 mm!) this is a very impressive coin in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/09/15 at 18:40Mat: Stunning piece, David!
D676a.jpg
Domitian RIC-67676 viewsAR Denarius, 2.98g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD (sixth issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her l. side (M3)
RIC 676 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 151.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, October 2015.

TRP VIII and IMP XXI is a very scarce dating combination on Domitian's denarii. The rarity of the dating indicates it was most likely struck for a short period of time, perhaps only for a few weeks or days prior to 14 September 89, upon which Domitian became TRP VIIII. The first Pannonian War would account for the rapid succession of imperial acclamations during this time period.

A good, solid portrait and well centered strike. Notable personally as the first coin from this issue I have acquired.

5 commentsDavid Atherton11/01/15 at 06:49FlaviusDomitianus: Another nice find.
D676a.jpg
Domitian RIC-67676 viewsAR Denarius, 2.98g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD (sixth issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her l. side (M3)
RIC 676 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 151.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, October 2015.

TRP VIII and IMP XXI is a very scarce dating combination on Domitian's denarii. The rarity of the dating indicates it was most likely struck for a short period of time, perhaps only for a few weeks or days prior to 14 September 89, upon which Domitian became TRP VIIII. The first Pannonian War would account for the rapid succession of imperial acclamations during this time period.

A good, solid portrait and well centered strike. Notable personally as the first coin from this issue I have acquired.

5 commentsDavid Atherton11/01/15 at 05:49quadrans: Congratulation David?.
D676a.jpg
Domitian RIC-67676 viewsAR Denarius, 2.98g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD (sixth issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her l. side (M3)
RIC 676 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 151.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, October 2015.

TRP VIII and IMP XXI is a very scarce dating combination on Domitian's denarii. The rarity of the dating indicates it was most likely struck for a short period of time, perhaps only for a few weeks or days prior to 14 September 89, upon which Domitian became TRP VIIII. The first Pannonian War would account for the rapid succession of imperial acclamations during this time period.

A good, solid portrait and well centered strike. Notable personally as the first coin from this issue I have acquired.

5 commentsDavid Atherton10/31/15 at 23:45Sam: Nice and rare issue.
D676a.jpg
Domitian RIC-67676 viewsAR Denarius, 2.98g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD (sixth issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her l. side (M3)
RIC 676 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 151.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, October 2015.

TRP VIII and IMP XXI is a very scarce dating combination on Domitian's denarii. The rarity of the dating indicates it was most likely struck for a short period of time, perhaps only for a few weeks or days prior to 14 September 89, upon which Domitian became TRP VIIII. The first Pannonian War would account for the rapid succession of imperial acclamations during this time period.

A good, solid portrait and well centered strike. Notable personally as the first coin from this issue I have acquired.

5 commentsDavid Atherton10/31/15 at 22:45Jay GT4: Lovely rarity
D676a.jpg
Domitian RIC-67676 viewsAR Denarius, 2.98g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD (sixth issue)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her l. side (M3)
RIC 676 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 151.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, October 2015.

TRP VIII and IMP XXI is a very scarce dating combination on Domitian's denarii. The rarity of the dating indicates it was most likely struck for a short period of time, perhaps only for a few weeks or days prior to 14 September 89, upon which Domitian became TRP VIIII. The first Pannonian War would account for the rapid succession of imperial acclamations during this time period.

A good, solid portrait and well centered strike. Notable personally as the first coin from this issue I have acquired.

5 commentsDavid Atherton10/31/15 at 22:34orfew: Very nice David
D169.jpg
Domitian RIC-169