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Last comments - Imperial Coinage of Titus
T230.jpg
Titus RIC-23021 views As, 12.12g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and caduceus
RIC 230 (C). BMC 212. BNC 219.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, November 2019.

A common carry-over Pax type from Vespasian's reign. She is seen here with an olive branch and Felicitas' caduceus. The perennial propaganda value of advertising and taking credit for peace on the coinage cannot be underestimated.

A fine style left facing portrait.
1 commentsDavid Atherton12/06/19 at 01:37Jay GT4: Lovely portrait
V1173b.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-127352 views As, 10.61g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP AVG F TR P COS VI CENSOR; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
RIC 1273 (C3). BMC 868. BNC 877.
Acquired from eBay, November 2019.

The Lyon mint struck a fairly substantial issue of bronze coinage for the Western provinces late in Vespasian's reign, presumably to rectify a shortage in the region. One of the most popular types struck during the issue was Spes, the goddess of hope. Here she represents Vespasian's hope for a happy dynastic future. The depiction of Spes raising her skirt and holding a flower likely copies a familiar cult statue of the goddess.

Fine style with hints of rainbow toning.
3 commentsDavid Atherton11/30/19 at 09:10quadrans: Nice 👍
T204.jpg
Titus RIC-20422 views Dupondius, 11.48g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, l.
Rev: SALVS AVG; S C in exergue; Salus std. l., with patera
RIC 204 (C). BMC 197. BNC 198.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, November 2019. Ex Wendt, Auction XIII, 9 November 1976, lot 973.

Titus' bronze issue dated COS VIII is quite large due to the fact he did not renew the consulship in 81 and the coins most likely spanned both years. With that in mind, the meaning behind this Salus type is quite intriguing. Titus died on 13 September 81 and there is some circumstantial evidence hinting that the illness was prolonged, perhaps evident as early as June of that year. Dio and Suetonius report that he wept openly in front of the crowds at the games, perhaps due to deteriorating health. Did the mint master have time enough before Titus' death to strike a coin reverse featuring the goddess of health and well-being in the hopes of divine aid? Conversely, H. Mattingly speculates the Salus reverse commemorates an altar to the goddess dedicated by Titus. Perhaps that may be so. It is not a rare coin, indicating it was struck for a longer rather than shorter period of time.

Dark chocolate patina and good style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton11/22/19 at 14:32Mat: Hearty portrait on that one!
T204.jpg
Titus RIC-20422 views Dupondius, 11.48g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, l.
Rev: SALVS AVG; S C in exergue; Salus std. l., with patera
RIC 204 (C). BMC 197. BNC 198.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, November 2019. Ex Wendt, Auction XIII, 9 November 1976, lot 973.

Titus' bronze issue dated COS VIII is quite large due to the fact he did not renew the consulship in 81 and the coins most likely spanned both years. With that in mind, the meaning behind this Salus type is quite intriguing. Titus died on 13 September 81 and there is some circumstantial evidence hinting that the illness was prolonged, perhaps evident as early as June of that year. Dio and Suetonius report that he wept openly in front of the crowds at the games, perhaps due to deteriorating health. Did the mint master have time enough before Titus' death to strike a coin reverse featuring the goddess of health and well-being in the hopes of divine aid? Conversely, H. Mattingly speculates the Salus reverse commemorates an altar to the goddess dedicated by Titus. Perhaps that may be so. It is not a rare coin, indicating it was struck for a longer rather than shorter period of time.

Dark chocolate patina and good style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton11/22/19 at 11:38Jay GT4: Very bold details
T204.jpg
Titus RIC-20422 views Dupondius, 11.48g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, l.
Rev: SALVS AVG; S C in exergue; Salus std. l., with patera
RIC 204 (C). BMC 197. BNC 198.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, November 2019. Ex Wendt, Auction XIII, 9 November 1976, lot 973.

Titus' bronze issue dated COS VIII is quite large due to the fact he did not renew the consulship in 81 and the coins most likely spanned both years. With that in mind, the meaning behind this Salus type is quite intriguing. Titus died on 13 September 81 and there is some circumstantial evidence hinting that the illness was prolonged, perhaps evident as early as June of that year. Dio and Suetonius report that he wept openly in front of the crowds at the games, perhaps due to deteriorating health. Did the mint master have time enough before Titus' death to strike a coin reverse featuring the goddess of health and well-being in the hopes of divine aid? Conversely, H. Mattingly speculates the Salus reverse commemorates an altar to the goddess dedicated by Titus. Perhaps that may be so. It is not a rare coin, indicating it was struck for a longer rather than shorter period of time.

Dark chocolate patina and good style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton11/22/19 at 11:10FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example.
T204.jpg
Titus RIC-20422 views Dupondius, 11.48g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, l.
Rev: SALVS AVG; S C in exergue; Salus std. l., with patera
RIC 204 (C). BMC 197. BNC 198.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, November 2019. Ex Wendt, Auction XIII, 9 November 1976, lot 973.

Titus' bronze issue dated COS VIII is quite large due to the fact he did not renew the consulship in 81 and the coins most likely spanned both years. With that in mind, the meaning behind this Salus type is quite intriguing. Titus died on 13 September 81 and there is some circumstantial evidence hinting that the illness was prolonged, perhaps evident as early as June of that year. Dio and Suetonius report that he wept openly in front of the crowds at the games, perhaps due to deteriorating health. Did the mint master have time enough before Titus' death to strike a coin reverse featuring the goddess of health and well-being in the hopes of divine aid? Conversely, H. Mattingly speculates the Salus reverse commemorates an altar to the goddess dedicated by Titus. Perhaps that may be so. It is not a rare coin, indicating it was struck for a longer rather than shorter period of time.

Dark chocolate patina and good style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton11/22/19 at 11:09Vincent: Really nice style and execution...beautiful surfac...
V1173b.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-127352 views As, 10.61g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP AVG F TR P COS VI CENSOR; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
RIC 1273 (C3). BMC 868. BNC 877.
Acquired from eBay, November 2019.

The Lyon mint struck a fairly substantial issue of bronze coinage for the Western provinces late in Vespasian's reign, presumably to rectify a shortage in the region. One of the most popular types struck during the issue was Spes, the goddess of hope. Here she represents Vespasian's hope for a happy dynastic future. The depiction of Spes raising her skirt and holding a flower likely copies a familiar cult statue of the goddess.

Fine style with hints of rainbow toning.
3 commentsDavid Atherton11/14/19 at 15:17Mat: Nice find, David
V1173b.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-127352 views As, 10.61g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP AVG F TR P COS VI CENSOR; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
RIC 1273 (C3). BMC 868. BNC 877.
Acquired from eBay, November 2019.

The Lyon mint struck a fairly substantial issue of bronze coinage for the Western provinces late in Vespasian's reign, presumably to rectify a shortage in the region. One of the most popular types struck during the issue was Spes, the goddess of hope. Here she represents Vespasian's hope for a happy dynastic future. The depiction of Spes raising her skirt and holding a flower likely copies a familiar cult statue of the goddess.

Fine style with hints of rainbow toning.
3 commentsDavid Atherton11/14/19 at 11:12FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example!
V615.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 61562 views Dupondius, 9.66g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP COS II CENS; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: FELICITAS PVBLICA; S C in field; Felicitas stg. l., with caduceus and cornucopiae
RIC 615 (R). BMC -. BNC 674.
Acquired from eBay, October 2019. Formerly in NGC holder 5767629-014, with grade 'VF'.

A rare variant of the common Felicitas reverse with a unique obverse legend struck for this one type in this one issue. A die pair match with the BNC plate coin. Missing from the BM's extensive collection.

Felicitas symbolising prosperity and abundance was one of the more common types struck during Vespasian's reign, often shared with Titus Caesar.

Strong early style portrait.
3 commentsDavid Atherton11/01/19 at 18:09Vincent: Powerful portrait and stand out detail....RARE leg...
V615.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 61562 views Dupondius, 9.66g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP COS II CENS; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: FELICITAS PVBLICA; S C in field; Felicitas stg. l., with caduceus and cornucopiae
RIC 615 (R). BMC -. BNC 674.
Acquired from eBay, October 2019. Formerly in NGC holder 5767629-014, with grade 'VF'.

A rare variant of the common Felicitas reverse with a unique obverse legend struck for this one type in this one issue. A die pair match with the BNC plate coin. Missing from the BM's extensive collection.

Felicitas symbolising prosperity and abundance was one of the more common types struck during Vespasian's reign, often shared with Titus Caesar.

Strong early style portrait.
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/31/19 at 15:36curtislclay: RIC notes that this was probably the latest obv. l...
V615.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 61562 views Dupondius, 9.66g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP COS II CENS; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: FELICITAS PVBLICA; S C in field; Felicitas stg. l., with caduceus and cornucopiae
RIC 615 (R). BMC -. BNC 674.
Acquired from eBay, October 2019. Formerly in NGC holder 5767629-014, with grade 'VF'.

A rare variant of the common Felicitas reverse with a unique obverse legend struck for this one type in this one issue. A die pair match with the BNC plate coin. Missing from the BM's extensive collection.

Felicitas symbolising prosperity and abundance was one of the more common types struck during Vespasian's reign, often shared with Titus Caesar.

Strong early style portrait.
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/31/19 at 03:04Jay GT4: Great eye to catch this one
T137sm.jpg
Titus RIC-13728 views Sestertius, 23.56g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona stg. l., with statuette of Aequitas and cornucopiae; to l., modius with corn ears; to r., stern of ship
RIC 137 (C2). BMC 153. BNC 152.
Acquired from Dr. Busso Peus Nachf., September 2019.

Ensuring that the urban plebs were well fed was an important responsibility of the emperor. The reliability of the imperial grain supply from Africa was crucial. This sestertius struck in 80-81 by Titus advertises his commitment, through the auspices of Annona, to fairly provide enough bread for the dole. Annona holding a figure of Aequitas, while standing next to a modius full of corn, and with a docked grain ship in the background was explicitly powerful propaganda. Every pleb had little doubt who to thank for their daily bread. This fairly common sestertius was struck during Titus' great issue of bronze in 80-81. Oddly, the reverse lacks the Senatus Consulto decree seen on most of his imperial bronze.

A fabulous portrait in fine style.
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/03/19 at 18:58okidoki: very nice
T137sm.jpg
Titus RIC-13728 views Sestertius, 23.56g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona stg. l., with statuette of Aequitas and cornucopiae; to l., modius with corn ears; to r., stern of ship
RIC 137 (C2). BMC 153. BNC 152.
Acquired from Dr. Busso Peus Nachf., September 2019.

Ensuring that the urban plebs were well fed was an important responsibility of the emperor. The reliability of the imperial grain supply from Africa was crucial. This sestertius struck in 80-81 by Titus advertises his commitment, through the auspices of Annona, to fairly provide enough bread for the dole. Annona holding a figure of Aequitas, while standing next to a modius full of corn, and with a docked grain ship in the background was explicitly powerful propaganda. Every pleb had little doubt who to thank for their daily bread. This fairly common sestertius was struck during Titus' great issue of bronze in 80-81. Oddly, the reverse lacks the Senatus Consulto decree seen on most of his imperial bronze.

A fabulous portrait in fine style.
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/03/19 at 15:59ickster: I agree with Jay - nice portrait. I like these hea...
T137sm.jpg
Titus RIC-13728 views Sestertius, 23.56g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona stg. l., with statuette of Aequitas and cornucopiae; to l., modius with corn ears; to r., stern of ship
RIC 137 (C2). BMC 153. BNC 152.
Acquired from Dr. Busso Peus Nachf., September 2019.

Ensuring that the urban plebs were well fed was an important responsibility of the emperor. The reliability of the imperial grain supply from Africa was crucial. This sestertius struck in 80-81 by Titus advertises his commitment, through the auspices of Annona, to fairly provide enough bread for the dole. Annona holding a figure of Aequitas, while standing next to a modius full of corn, and with a docked grain ship in the background was explicitly powerful propaganda. Every pleb had little doubt who to thank for their daily bread. This fairly common sestertius was struck during Titus' great issue of bronze in 80-81. Oddly, the reverse lacks the Senatus Consulto decree seen on most of his imperial bronze.

A fabulous portrait in fine style.
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/03/19 at 14:39Jay GT4: Great portrait
T70.jpg
Titus RIC 7038 views As, 8.70g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
RIC 70 (R2). BMC p. 253 note. BNC -.
Acquired from Mnzen & Medaillen, September 2019.

Titus' first issues of bronze as Augustus struck in 79, dated COS VII, are all very rare. They were produced sometime during the last six months of the year after his rise to the purple at the end of June, presumably in very modest numbers based on the meagre specimens that have survived antiquity. This As from that scanty issue features the familiar Pax and column type, likely based on a familiar cult image of the deity. Pax is holding a caduceus, an allusion to the peaceful prosperity credited to the emperor. Missing from both the London and Paris collections.

Worn, but with a beautiful olive green patina and bold legends.
1 commentsDavid Atherton09/27/19 at 19:27FlaviusDomitianus: Nice find. Obverse die could be the same as my exa...
V635.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 63532 views As, 10.08g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in exergue; Titus stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
RIC 635 (R). BMC -. BNC 688.
Acquired from Marc Breitsprecher, September 2019.

In 71 AD Vespasian and Titus held a double triumph celebrating their victory in the recently concluded Judaean War. The spectacular triumph was held a few days after Titus' arrival from the East in June and could be viewed as his effective homecoming party. Mary Beard has shrewdly observed that the triumph served as 'the Flavian coronation, the official launch party and press night of the Flavian dynasty.' It was the first time after Vespasian's rise to the purple that the whole family could be seen together by the Roman populace. Vespasian and Titus were identically dressed riding in matching quadrigas while Domitian trotted alongside on a splendid mount. By showcasing his eldest son on an equal footing in the procession, it left little doubt who would succeed after his death. Coins were struck in all metals to commemorate the event. Here is a rare As with a reverse depicting Titus Caesar in a triumphal quadriga, a clear commemoration of the joint triumph. Oddly, this type is more commonly seen in silver from Antioch. The piece serves as a superb memento of the 'Greatest Show on Earth' triumph put on by the Flavian regime in the late First century.

Not in the BM. RIC cites only a specimen in the Paris collection (BNC 688), a double die match with this coin as pointed out by C. Clay.

Worn, but the major devices are still quite visible.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/19/19 at 16:04David Atherton: Yes, I believe you are correct - a double die matc...
V635.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 63532 views As, 10.08g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in exergue; Titus stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
RIC 635 (R). BMC -. BNC 688.
Acquired from Marc Breitsprecher, September 2019.

In 71 AD Vespasian and Titus held a double triumph celebrating their victory in the recently concluded Judaean War. The spectacular triumph was held a few days after Titus' arrival from the East in June and could be viewed as his effective homecoming party. Mary Beard has shrewdly observed that the triumph served as 'the Flavian coronation, the official launch party and press night of the Flavian dynasty.' It was the first time after Vespasian's rise to the purple that the whole family could be seen together by the Roman populace. Vespasian and Titus were identically dressed riding in matching quadrigas while Domitian trotted alongside on a splendid mount. By showcasing his eldest son on an equal footing in the procession, it left little doubt who would succeed after his death. Coins were struck in all metals to commemorate the event. Here is a rare As with a reverse depicting Titus Caesar in a triumphal quadriga, a clear commemoration of the joint triumph. Oddly, this type is more commonly seen in silver from Antioch. The piece serves as a superb memento of the 'Greatest Show on Earth' triumph put on by the Flavian regime in the late First century.

Not in the BM. RIC cites only a specimen in the Paris collection (BNC 688), a double die match with this coin as pointed out by C. Clay.

Worn, but the major devices are still quite visible.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/19/19 at 15:37curtislclay: A die match with Paris 688 on both sides, I would ...
V635.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 63532 views As, 10.08g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in exergue; Titus stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
RIC 635 (R). BMC -. BNC 688.
Acquired from Marc Breitsprecher, September 2019.

In 71 AD Vespasian and Titus held a double triumph celebrating their victory in the recently concluded Judaean War. The spectacular triumph was held a few days after Titus' arrival from the East in June and could be viewed as his effective homecoming party. Mary Beard has shrewdly observed that the triumph served as 'the Flavian coronation, the official launch party and press night of the Flavian dynasty.' It was the first time after Vespasian's rise to the purple that the whole family could be seen together by the Roman populace. Vespasian and Titus were identically dressed riding in matching quadrigas while Domitian trotted alongside on a splendid mount. By showcasing his eldest son on an equal footing in the procession, it left little doubt who would succeed after his death. Coins were struck in all metals to commemorate the event. Here is a rare As with a reverse depicting Titus Caesar in a triumphal quadriga, a clear commemoration of the joint triumph. Oddly, this type is more commonly seen in silver from Antioch. The piece serves as a superb memento of the 'Greatest Show on Earth' triumph put on by the Flavian regime in the late First century.

Not in the BM. RIC cites only a specimen in the Paris collection (BNC 688), a double die match with this coin as pointed out by C. Clay.

Worn, but the major devices are still quite visible.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/19/19 at 13:28Jay GT4: Awesome find!
T248.jpg
Titus RIC-24850 views As, 10.39g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
RIC 248 (C). BMC 217. BNC 222.
Acquired from eBay, September 2019.

A fairly common As struck in Titus' large second issue of bronze in 80-81. Because Titus did not take up the consulship in 81, the issue cannot be dated more precisely. The Victory on prow is a carry-over type from the coinage of Vespasian, who in turn borrowed it from the coinage of Augustus. It is a fairly popular generic design symbolising the emperor's military successes. The prow lends it a nautical theme, perhaps alluding to a successful ongoing Flavian naval policy.

Very attractively toned with a pleasing portrait.
2 commentsDavid Atherton09/14/19 at 13:25Jay GT4: Attractive portrait with pleasing tone
T248.jpg
Titus RIC-24850 views As, 10.39g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
RIC 248 (C). BMC 217. BNC 222.
Acquired from eBay, September 2019.

A fairly common As struck in Titus' large second issue of bronze in 80-81. Because Titus did not take up the consulship in 81, the issue cannot be dated more precisely. The Victory on prow is a carry-over type from the coinage of Vespasian, who in turn borrowed it from the coinage of Augustus. It is a fairly popular generic design symbolising the emperor's military successes. The prow lends it a nautical theme, perhaps alluding to a successful ongoing Flavian naval policy.

Very attractively toned with a pleasing portrait.
2 commentsDavid Atherton09/14/19 at 09:57FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example.
V644a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 64452 views As, 10.31g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA NAVALIS; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
RIC 644 (R). BMC 677. BNC 691.
Acquired from Praefetus Coins, July 2019.

A fairly scarce variant of the Victoria Navalis type, struck in 73 when Titus held the joint censorship with Vespasian. The type would be repeatedly struck throughout Vespasian's reign for both father and son, perhaps indicating how important it was to their military gravitas. Traditionally, it has been attributed to the naval victory Vespasian and Titus won on Lake Gennesaret (the Sea of Galilee) during the Jewish War. By any definition it is a most bizarre 'naval' battle indeed. Near the close of the Galilean campaign, Vespasian and Titus marched to Lake Gennesaret in order to secure the cities along its coastline. Tiberias fell without much resistance, but the neighbouring city of Taricheae was a tougher nut to crack. Home to many of the Jewish rebels who had fled Tiberias, they put up a small fight on the plain outside the city and were quickly defeated by Titus' troops who then stormed the city and began slaughtering the inhabitants. Many of the rebels took flight to waiting boats they had previously commandeered on the lake. These were likely local fishing or ferry vessels not intended for use in war. Vespasian ordered the legionaries to construct large rafts in order to pursue the rebel's makeshift flotilla. With the coastline guarded by Roman horsemen the legionaries launched their rafts and sailed out in a large line toward the enemy. The Jewish boats were no match for the heavily armoured Roman rafts. The legionaries easily picked off the Jewish rebels who had no means of escape. The slaughter was intense, so much so that Josephus claims 6,500 Jews were killed. Several years later during Vespasian and Titus' Jewish War Triumph in Rome, ships were displayed to commemorate the battle. Were the Victoria Navalis coins struck with the same event in mind? As unlikely as it seems, the impromptu 'naval' battle at Lake Gennesaret is the best candidate for Vespasian striking this Actium-lite reverse type. The connection to Augustus would not have been lost on his contemporaries. Flavian propaganda at its most exaggerated.

Dark golden brown patina with a fine reverse.

3 commentsDavid Atherton08/06/19 at 13:50Vincent: Love the rdverse, so elegant and classical....nice...
V644a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 64452 views As, 10.31g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA NAVALIS; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
RIC 644 (R). BMC 677. BNC 691.
Acquired from Praefetus Coins, July 2019.

A fairly scarce variant of the Victoria Navalis type, struck in 73 when Titus held the joint censorship with Vespasian. The type would be repeatedly struck throughout Vespasian's reign for both father and son, perhaps indicating how important it was to their military gravitas. Traditionally, it has been attributed to the naval victory Vespasian and Titus won on Lake Gennesaret (the Sea of Galilee) during the Jewish War. By any definition it is a most bizarre 'naval' battle indeed. Near the close of the Galilean campaign, Vespasian and Titus marched to Lake Gennesaret in order to secure the cities along its coastline. Tiberias fell without much resistance, but the neighbouring city of Taricheae was a tougher nut to crack. Home to many of the Jewish rebels who had fled Tiberias, they put up a small fight on the plain outside the city and were quickly defeated by Titus' troops who then stormed the city and began slaughtering the inhabitants. Many of the rebels took flight to waiting boats they had previously commandeered on the lake. These were likely local fishing or ferry vessels not intended for use in war. Vespasian ordered the legionaries to construct large rafts in order to pursue the rebel's makeshift flotilla. With the coastline guarded by Roman horsemen the legionaries launched their rafts and sailed out in a large line toward the enemy. The Jewish boats were no match for the heavily armoured Roman rafts. The legionaries easily picked off the Jewish rebels who had no means of escape. The slaughter was intense, so much so that Josephus claims 6,500 Jews were killed. Several years later during Vespasian and Titus' Jewish War Triumph in Rome, ships were displayed to commemorate the battle. Were the Victoria Navalis coins struck with the same event in mind? As unlikely as it seems, the impromptu 'naval' battle at Lake Gennesaret is the best candidate for Vespasian striking this Actium-lite reverse type. The connection to Augustus would not have been lost on his contemporaries. Flavian propaganda at its most exaggerated.

Dark golden brown patina with a fine reverse.

3 commentsDavid Atherton08/05/19 at 19:53Nemonater: Beautiful patina
V644a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 64452 views As, 10.31g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA NAVALIS; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
RIC 644 (R). BMC 677. BNC 691.
Acquired from Praefetus Coins, July 2019.

A fairly scarce variant of the Victoria Navalis type, struck in 73 when Titus held the joint censorship with Vespasian. The type would be repeatedly struck throughout Vespasian's reign for both father and son, perhaps indicating how important it was to their military gravitas. Traditionally, it has been attributed to the naval victory Vespasian and Titus won on Lake Gennesaret (the Sea of Galilee) during the Jewish War. By any definition it is a most bizarre 'naval' battle indeed. Near the close of the Galilean campaign, Vespasian and Titus marched to Lake Gennesaret in order to secure the cities along its coastline. Tiberias fell without much resistance, but the neighbouring city of Taricheae was a tougher nut to crack. Home to many of the Jewish rebels who had fled Tiberias, they put up a small fight on the plain outside the city and were quickly defeated by Titus' troops who then stormed the city and began slaughtering the inhabitants. Many of the rebels took flight to waiting boats they had previously commandeered on the lake. These were likely local fishing or ferry vessels not intended for use in war. Vespasian ordered the legionaries to construct large rafts in order to pursue the rebel's makeshift flotilla. With the coastline guarded by Roman horsemen the legionaries launched their rafts and sailed out in a large line toward the enemy. The Jewish boats were no match for the heavily armoured Roman rafts. The legionaries easily picked off the Jewish rebels who had no means of escape. The slaughter was intense, so much so that Josephus claims 6,500 Jews were killed. Several years later during Vespasian and Titus' Jewish War Triumph in Rome, ships were displayed to commemorate the battle. Were the Victoria Navalis coins struck with the same event in mind? As unlikely as it seems, the impromptu 'naval' battle at Lake Gennesaret is the best candidate for Vespasian striking this Actium-lite reverse type. The connection to Augustus would not have been lost on his contemporaries. Flavian propaganda at its most exaggerated.

Dark golden brown patina with a fine reverse.

3 commentsDavid Atherton08/05/19 at 18:33Jay GT4: A decent example. Congrats
T16A.jpg
Titus RIC 16A82 viewsAR Denarius, 2.83g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
RIC 16A (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Roma Numismatics, E-Sale 58, 20 June 2019, lot 1078.

A unique First issue Annona paired with a Second issue obverse legend. The Annona reverse was a carry-over type struck for Titus as Caesar under Vespasian just before his death and was likely issued in the first few days of Titus' reign as a stop-gap until new reverse designs could be created. It is by far the rarest type from the First issue. The obverse legend changed in the second issue from the First issue's IMP T CAESAR to IMP TITVS CAES, this would be the standard obverse legend on the denarii for the remainder of the reign. The appearance of the Annona type with the new obverse legend is possibly a mule using an old First issue reverse die with a new Second issue obverse. There is a slight possibility that it was an intentional strike, but the fact that no other Second issue Annona specimens have surfaced is a strong indication it is accidental.

I informed Ian Carradice of the piece and he has assigned it RIC 16A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda with the note: 'Perhaps a mule, with rev die from the previous issue'.

Good Roman style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton07/16/19 at 23:30Nemonater: Awesome addition!
T16A.jpg
Titus RIC 16A82 viewsAR Denarius, 2.83g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
RIC 16A (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Roma Numismatics, E-Sale 58, 20 June 2019, lot 1078.

A unique First issue Annona paired with a Second issue obverse legend. The Annona reverse was a carry-over type struck for Titus as Caesar under Vespasian just before his death and was likely issued in the first few days of Titus' reign as a stop-gap until new reverse designs could be created. It is by far the rarest type from the First issue. The obverse legend changed in the second issue from the First issue's IMP T CAESAR to IMP TITVS CAES, this would be the standard obverse legend on the denarii for the remainder of the reign. The appearance of the Annona type with the new obverse legend is possibly a mule using an old First issue reverse die with a new Second issue obverse. There is a slight possibility that it was an intentional strike, but the fact that no other Second issue Annona specimens have surfaced is a strong indication it is accidental.

I informed Ian Carradice of the piece and he has assigned it RIC 16A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda with the note: 'Perhaps a mule, with rev die from the previous issue'.

Good Roman style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton07/16/19 at 21:53okidoki: Nice find
T16A.jpg
Titus RIC 16A82 viewsAR Denarius, 2.83g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
RIC 16A (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Roma Numismatics, E-Sale 58, 20 June 2019, lot 1078.

A unique First issue Annona paired with a Second issue obverse legend. The Annona reverse was a carry-over type struck for Titus as Caesar under Vespasian just before his death and was likely issued in the first few days of Titus' reign as a stop-gap until new reverse designs could be created. It is by far the rarest type from the First issue. The obverse legend changed in the second issue from the First issue's IMP T CAESAR to IMP TITVS CAES, this would be the standard obverse legend on the denarii for the remainder of the reign. The appearance of the Annona type with the new obverse legend is possibly a mule using an old First issue reverse die with a new Second issue obverse. There is a slight possibility that it was an intentional strike, but the fact that no other Second issue Annona specimens have surfaced is a strong indication it is accidental.

I informed Ian Carradice of the piece and he has assigned it RIC 16A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda with the note: 'Perhaps a mule, with rev die from the previous issue'.

Good Roman style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton07/16/19 at 21:35Jay GT4: Great find David
T6.JPG
Titus RIC 06109 viewsAR Denarius, 2.80g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 6 (R2). BMC p. 432. RSC 270a. BNC 1.
Acquired from Marc Walter, eBay, 25 August 2012.

Minted in 79 AD after 1 July, this is an early denarius, indicated by the absence of P P (Pater Patriae) in the reverse legend.
The Ceres reverse is a carry-over type struck by Vespasian in 79 before his death and adopted by Titus after he donned the purple.

A type that is quite rare and hard to come by in trade. A reverse die match with the RIC plate coin.
7 commentsDavid Atherton07/14/19 at 02:30Jay GT4: Great rarity
T498aa.jpg
Titus RIC-49844 views Sestertius, 24.38g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 498 (C). BMC 309. RPC 501. BNC 323.
Acquired from Munthandel G. Henzen, June 2019.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. This sestertius with its massive portrait and large reverse figure is quite typical for this elusive mint. The reverse copies a common Pax type struck contemporaneously at Rome.

Good style with dark brown patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/13/19 at 23:20Jay GT4: Nice big coin!
T498aa.jpg
Titus RIC-49844 views Sestertius, 24.38g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 498 (C). BMC 309. RPC 501. BNC 323.
Acquired from Munthandel G. Henzen, June 2019.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. This sestertius with its massive portrait and large reverse figure is quite typical for this elusive mint. The reverse copies a common Pax type struck contemporaneously at Rome.

Good style with dark brown patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/13/19 at 21:23quadrans: Great portrait,...
T498aa.jpg
Titus RIC-49844 views Sestertius, 24.38g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 498 (C). BMC 309. RPC 501. BNC 323.
Acquired from Munthandel G. Henzen, June 2019.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. This sestertius with its massive portrait and large reverse figure is quite typical for this elusive mint. The reverse copies a common Pax type struck contemporaneously at Rome.

Good style with dark brown patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/13/19 at 18:47FlaviusDomitianus: Pleasant example with honest wear.
T220.jpg
Titus RIC-22070 views As, 9.10g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: AETERNIT AVGVST; S C in field; Aeternitas stg. r., l. foot on globe, with sceptre and cornucopiae
RIC 220 (R). BMC p. 266 note. BNC 212.
Acquired from eBay, June 2019.

Aeternitas, the personification of eternity, as a coin type was first introduced during the reign of Vespasian and would be periodically struck until the 4th century. This As featuring Aeternitas was struck during Titus' second and largest bronze issue in 80-81. Mattingly in BMCRE II speculates the type here refers to the consecration of Vespasian - 'Aeternitas holds sceptre and cornucopiae, the attributes of majesty and prosperity, while the globe under her foot shows that the application is world-wide. Stress is laid more on the great future than on the great past of the Flavian line.' A most fitting interpretation for a coin that declares 'The eternity of the Augustus'.

Honest wear with greenish-brown patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/13/19 at 08:34quadrans: Nice one
T220.jpg
Titus RIC-22070 views As, 9.10g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: AETERNIT AVGVST; S C in field; Aeternitas stg. r., l. foot on globe, with sceptre and cornucopiae
RIC 220 (R). BMC p. 266 note. BNC 212.
Acquired from eBay, June 2019.

Aeternitas, the personification of eternity, as a coin type was first introduced during the reign of Vespasian and would be periodically struck until the 4th century. This As featuring Aeternitas was struck during Titus' second and largest bronze issue in 80-81. Mattingly in BMCRE II speculates the type here refers to the consecration of Vespasian - 'Aeternitas holds sceptre and cornucopiae, the attributes of majesty and prosperity, while the globe under her foot shows that the application is world-wide. Stress is laid more on the great future than on the great past of the Flavian line.' A most fitting interpretation for a coin that declares 'The eternity of the Augustus'.

Honest wear with greenish-brown patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/08/19 at 16:16Jay GT4: Nice portrait
T220.jpg
Titus RIC-22070 views As, 9.10g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: AETERNIT AVGVST; S C in field; Aeternitas stg. r., l. foot on globe, with sceptre and cornucopiae
RIC 220 (R). BMC p. 266 note. BNC 212.
Acquired from eBay, June 2019.

Aeternitas, the personification of eternity, as a coin type was first introduced during the reign of Vespasian and would be periodically struck until the 4th century. This As featuring Aeternitas was struck during Titus' second and largest bronze issue in 80-81. Mattingly in BMCRE II speculates the type here refers to the consecration of Vespasian - 'Aeternitas holds sceptre and cornucopiae, the attributes of majesty and prosperity, while the globe under her foot shows that the application is world-wide. Stress is laid more on the great future than on the great past of the Flavian line.' A most fitting interpretation for a coin that declares 'The eternity of the Augustus'.

Honest wear with greenish-brown patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/08/19 at 14:59FlaviusDomitianus: Nice find.
T16A.jpg
Titus RIC 16A82 viewsAR Denarius, 2.83g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
RIC 16A (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Roma Numismatics, E-Sale 58, 20 June 2019, lot 1078.

A unique First issue Annona paired with a Second issue obverse legend. The Annona reverse was a carry-over type struck for Titus as Caesar under Vespasian just before his death and was likely issued in the first few days of Titus' reign as a stop-gap until new reverse designs could be created. It is by far the rarest type from the First issue. The obverse legend changed in the second issue from the First issue's IMP T CAESAR to IMP TITVS CAES, this would be the standard obverse legend on the denarii for the remainder of the reign. The appearance of the Annona type with the new obverse legend is possibly a mule using an old First issue reverse die with a new Second issue obverse. There is a slight possibility that it was an intentional strike, but the fact that no other Second issue Annona specimens have surfaced is a strong indication it is accidental.

I informed Ian Carradice of the piece and he has assigned it RIC 16A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda with the note: 'Perhaps a mule, with rev die from the previous issue'.

Good Roman style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/29/19 at 18:57kc: Cheap rarity!
T16A.jpg
Titus RIC 16A82 viewsAR Denarius, 2.83g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
RIC 16A (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Roma Numismatics, E-Sale 58, 20 June 2019, lot 1078.

A unique First issue Annona paired with a Second issue obverse legend. The Annona reverse was a carry-over type struck for Titus as Caesar under Vespasian just before his death and was likely issued in the first few days of Titus' reign as a stop-gap until new reverse designs could be created. It is by far the rarest type from the First issue. The obverse legend changed in the second issue from the First issue's IMP T CAESAR to IMP TITVS CAES, this would be the standard obverse legend on the denarii for the remainder of the reign. The appearance of the Annona type with the new obverse legend is possibly a mule using an old First issue reverse die with a new Second issue obverse. There is a slight possibility that it was an intentional strike, but the fact that no other Second issue Annona specimens have surfaced is a strong indication it is accidental.

I informed Ian Carradice of the piece and he has assigned it RIC 16A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda with the note: 'Perhaps a mule, with rev die from the previous issue'.

Good Roman style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/29/19 at 18:42FlaviusDomitianus: Well spotted!
T16A.jpg
Titus RIC 16A82 viewsAR Denarius, 2.83g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
RIC 16A (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Roma Numismatics, E-Sale 58, 20 June 2019, lot 1078.

A unique First issue Annona paired with a Second issue obverse legend. The Annona reverse was a carry-over type struck for Titus as Caesar under Vespasian just before his death and was likely issued in the first few days of Titus' reign as a stop-gap until new reverse designs could be created. It is by far the rarest type from the First issue. The obverse legend changed in the second issue from the First issue's IMP T CAESAR to IMP TITVS CAES, this would be the standard obverse legend on the denarii for the remainder of the reign. The appearance of the Annona type with the new obverse legend is possibly a mule using an old First issue reverse die with a new Second issue obverse. There is a slight possibility that it was an intentional strike, but the fact that no other Second issue Annona specimens have surfaced is a strong indication it is accidental.

I informed Ian Carradice of the piece and he has assigned it RIC 16A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda with the note: 'Perhaps a mule, with rev die from the previous issue'.

Good Roman style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/29/19 at 17:40Mat: I like the look of this one
V627.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 62775 views As, 10.28g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
RIC 627 (R). BMC p. 153 note. BNC 682.
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 164. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), acquired from O. Helbing of Munich, 1929; inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schrer (1890-1976).

Pax in various guises and types was struck repeatedly throughout Vespasian's reign for both himself and Titus Caesar. This variant with Pax leaning on a column was a perennial favourite. Pax's popularity on the coinage can perhaps be explained by Vespasian's construction of the Temple of Peace which was completed in 75.

Nice old cabinet toning.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/18/19 at 07:09Vincent: Exceptional! Best portrait yet of his I've see...
V627.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 62775 views As, 10.28g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
RIC 627 (R). BMC p. 153 note. BNC 682.
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 164. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), acquired from O. Helbing of Munich, 1929; inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schrer (1890-1976).

Pax in various guises and types was struck repeatedly throughout Vespasian's reign for both himself and Titus Caesar. This variant with Pax leaning on a column was a perennial favourite. Pax's popularity on the coinage can perhaps be explained by Vespasian's construction of the Temple of Peace which was completed in 75.

Nice old cabinet toning.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/16/19 at 18:52okidoki: very nice
V627.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 62775 views As, 10.28g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
RIC 627 (R). BMC p. 153 note. BNC 682.
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 164. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), acquired from O. Helbing of Munich, 1929; inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schrer (1890-1976).

Pax in various guises and types was struck repeatedly throughout Vespasian's reign for both himself and Titus Caesar. This variant with Pax leaning on a column was a perennial favourite. Pax's popularity on the coinage can perhaps be explained by Vespasian's construction of the Temple of Peace which was completed in 75.

Nice old cabinet toning.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/16/19 at 17:56FlaviusDomitianus: Nice coin with a great provenance
V627.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 62775 views As, 10.28g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
RIC 627 (R). BMC p. 153 note. BNC 682.
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 164. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), acquired from O. Helbing of Munich, 1929; inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schrer (1890-1976).

Pax in various guises and types was struck repeatedly throughout Vespasian's reign for both himself and Titus Caesar. This variant with Pax leaning on a column was a perennial favourite. Pax's popularity on the coinage can perhaps be explained by Vespasian's construction of the Temple of Peace which was completed in 75.

Nice old cabinet toning.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/16/19 at 17:40Jay GT4: Great addition
T503.jpg
Titus RIC-50394 views Dupondius, 12.49g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in exergue; Roma std. l. on cuirass, with wreath and parazonium
RIC 503 (R). BMC 314. RPC 507. BNC 325.
Acquired from eBay, April 2019. Formerly in NGC holder 4680932-001, grade 'XF', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. Only one reverse is known for the dupondius, the Roma type seen on this coin.

Beautifully toned with an extraordinarily decadent portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton05/30/19 at 16:55Gary W2: Just beautiful David and I agree about the portrai...
T503.jpg
Titus RIC-50394 views Dupondius, 12.49g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in exergue; Roma std. l. on cuirass, with wreath and parazonium
RIC 503 (R). BMC 314. RPC 507. BNC 325.
Acquired from eBay, April 2019. Formerly in NGC holder 4680932-001, grade 'XF', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. Only one reverse is known for the dupondius, the Roma type seen on this coin.

Beautifully toned with an extraordinarily decadent portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton05/30/19 at 13:57*Alex: Superb portrait, and I like the reverse too. Great...
T503.jpg
Titus RIC-50394 views Dupondius, 12.49g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in exergue; Roma std. l. on cuirass, with wreath and parazonium
RIC 503 (R). BMC 314. RPC 507. BNC 325.
Acquired from eBay, April 2019. Formerly in NGC holder 4680932-001, grade 'XF', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. Only one reverse is known for the dupondius, the Roma type seen on this coin.

Beautifully toned with an extraordinarily decadent portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton05/25/19 at 08:21Ancient Aussie: Absolutely fantastic coin David.
T215b.jpg
Titus RIC-21571 views As, 9.73g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: AEQVITAS AVGVST; S C in field; Aequitas stg. l., with scales and rod
RIC 215 (C). BMC 204. BNC 207.
Ex eBay, 10 May 2019.

Titus produced a sizeable bronze issue in 80-81. He did not renew the consulship in 81, so it is difficult to pin down a precise date. Owing to the issue's large size it is likely many of the coins did indeed spill over into 81. Here we see a common Aequitas type from that large issue which was originally struck under Vespasian, who in turn copied it from Galba. Aequitas likely represents fairness in issuing out the corn dole.

Honest wear with a dark olive green patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/19 at 05:41Randygeki(h2): Very nice!
T215b.jpg
Titus RIC-21571 views As, 9.73g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: AEQVITAS AVGVST; S C in field; Aequitas stg. l., with scales and rod
RIC 215 (C). BMC 204. BNC 207.
Ex eBay, 10 May 2019.

Titus produced a sizeable bronze issue in 80-81. He did not renew the consulship in 81, so it is difficult to pin down a precise date. Owing to the issue's large size it is likely many of the coins did indeed spill over into 81. Here we see a common Aequitas type from that large issue which was originally struck under Vespasian, who in turn copied it from Galba. Aequitas likely represents fairness in issuing out the corn dole.

Honest wear with a dark olive green patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/21/19 at 07:03quadrans: Nice piece..
T215b.jpg
Titus RIC-21571 views As, 9.73g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: AEQVITAS AVGVST; S C in field; Aequitas stg. l., with scales and rod
RIC 215 (C). BMC 204. BNC 207.
Ex eBay, 10 May 2019.

Titus produced a sizeable bronze issue in 80-81. He did not renew the consulship in 81, so it is difficult to pin down a precise date. Owing to the issue's large size it is likely many of the coins did indeed spill over into 81. Here we see a common Aequitas type from that large issue which was originally struck under Vespasian, who in turn copied it from Galba. Aequitas likely represents fairness in issuing out the corn dole.

Honest wear with a dark olive green patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/20/19 at 22:20Gary W2: Interesting. Nice coin David.
T215b.jpg
Titus RIC-21571 views As, 9.73g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: AEQVITAS AVGVST; S C in field; Aequitas stg. l., with scales and rod
RIC 215 (C). BMC 204. BNC 207.
Ex eBay, 10 May 2019.

Titus produced a sizeable bronze issue in 80-81. He did not renew the consulship in 81, so it is difficult to pin down a precise date. Owing to the issue's large size it is likely many of the coins did indeed spill over into 81. Here we see a common Aequitas type from that large issue which was originally struck under Vespasian, who in turn copied it from Galba. Aequitas likely represents fairness in issuing out the corn dole.

Honest wear with a dark olive green patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/20/19 at 17:14Mat: Nice portrait
T215b.jpg
Titus RIC-21571 views As, 9.73g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: AEQVITAS AVGVST; S C in field; Aequitas stg. l., with scales and rod
RIC 215 (C). BMC 204. BNC 207.
Ex eBay, 10 May 2019.

Titus produced a sizeable bronze issue in 80-81. He did not renew the consulship in 81, so it is difficult to pin down a precise date. Owing to the issue's large size it is likely many of the coins did indeed spill over into 81. Here we see a common Aequitas type from that large issue which was originally struck under Vespasian, who in turn copied it from Galba. Aequitas likely represents fairness in issuing out the corn dole.

Honest wear with a dark olive green patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/20/19 at 13:26Jay GT4: Lovely
titus as caesar jupiterr2.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 863136 viewsAR Denarius, 3.37g
Rome Mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIAN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IOVIS CVSTOS; Jupiter stg. facing, with patera over altar and sceptre
RIC 863 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harlan J Berk 159, 3 June 2008, lot 271.

Rated R2 by the RIC and unlisted previously, this was a most difficult coin for me to find.

Here is Curtis Clay's text from HJB's 159th buy or bid sale, which I cannot improve upon:

"A rare variant of the obverse legend for this reverse type, only recently published, allowing us to date the type's introduction precisely to 76 AD. In the course of that year, the obverse legend on Titus' gold and silver coins was expanded from T CAESAR IMP VESPASIAN to the same with VESPASIANVS, and the new form lasted until his accession as Augustus in 79. Titus' IOVIS CVSTOS reverse type was previously recorded only with obverse VESPASIANVS, so datable 76-79 AD; but RIC-863 and our coin with obverse VESPASIAN suggest that the type was introduced precisely in the year of the legend change, 76. RIC-863 cites two specimens of this denarius, in Berlin and in a private collection; we have seen a couple of others in trade or private collections over the past few years."

It's not everyday you come across a variant which can pin down the dating of a well known type! Not only is the coin rare, but the portrait on this example, in my opinion, is quite exceptional.
1 commentsVespasian7005/07/19 at 12:34Jay GT4: How did I miss this one? AAn important type!
T503.jpg
Titus RIC-50394 views Dupondius, 12.49g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in exergue; Roma std. l. on cuirass, with wreath and parazonium
RIC 503 (R). BMC 314. RPC 507. BNC 325.
Acquired from eBay, April 2019. Formerly in NGC holder 4680932-001, grade 'XF', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. Only one reverse is known for the dupondius, the Roma type seen on this coin.

Beautifully toned with an extraordinarily decadent portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton05/06/19 at 21:57Tracy Aiello: Very nice. Great write-up.
T503.jpg
Titus RIC-50394 views Dupondius, 12.49g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in exergue; Roma std. l. on cuirass, with wreath and parazonium
RIC 503 (R). BMC 314. RPC 507. BNC 325.
Acquired from eBay, April 2019. Formerly in NGC holder 4680932-001, grade 'XF', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. Only one reverse is known for the dupondius, the Roma type seen on this coin.

Beautifully toned with an extraordinarily decadent portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton05/06/19 at 09:28okidoki: excellent and stylistic
T503.jpg
Titus RIC-50394 views Dupondius, 12.49g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in exergue; Roma std. l. on cuirass, with wreath and parazonium
RIC 503 (R). BMC 314. RPC 507. BNC 325.
Acquired from eBay, April 2019. Formerly in NGC holder 4680932-001, grade 'XF', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. Only one reverse is known for the dupondius, the Roma type seen on this coin.

Beautifully toned with an extraordinarily decadent portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton05/06/19 at 02:40Britanikus: Nice ! this style is common for coins found in Bul...
T503.jpg
Titus RIC-50394 views Dupondius, 12.49g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in exergue; Roma std. l. on cuirass, with wreath and parazonium
RIC 503 (R). BMC 314. RPC 507. BNC 325.
Acquired from eBay, April 2019. Formerly in NGC holder 4680932-001, grade 'XF', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. Only one reverse is known for the dupondius, the Roma type seen on this coin.

Beautifully toned with an extraordinarily decadent portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton05/05/19 at 23:46Nemonater: That's an awesome coin, what a portrait!
T503.jpg
Titus RIC-50394 views Dupondius, 12.49g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in exergue; Roma std. l. on cuirass, with wreath and parazonium
RIC 503 (R). BMC 314. RPC 507. BNC 325.
Acquired from eBay, April 2019. Formerly in NGC holder 4680932-001, grade 'XF', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. Only one reverse is known for the dupondius, the Roma type seen on this coin.

Beautifully toned with an extraordinarily decadent portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton05/05/19 at 23:06Jay GT4: Oh baby! What a portrait
T503.jpg
Titus RIC-50394 views Dupondius, 12.49g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in exergue; Roma std. l. on cuirass, with wreath and parazonium
RIC 503 (R). BMC 314. RPC 507. BNC 325.
Acquired from eBay, April 2019. Formerly in NGC holder 4680932-001, grade 'XF', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. Only one reverse is known for the dupondius, the Roma type seen on this coin.

Beautifully toned with an extraordinarily decadent portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton05/05/19 at 22:14quadrans: Interesting piece..
T503.jpg
Titus RIC-50394 views Dupondius, 12.49g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in exergue; Roma std. l. on cuirass, with wreath and parazonium
RIC 503 (R). BMC 314. RPC 507. BNC 325.
Acquired from eBay, April 2019. Formerly in NGC holder 4680932-001, grade 'XF', strike 5/5, surface 3/5.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. Only one reverse is known for the dupondius, the Roma type seen on this coin.

Beautifully toned with an extraordinarily decadent portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton05/05/19 at 22:11Mat: A beautiful bronze
V444_(3).jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 44466 views As, 10.20g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP P TR P COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: FIDES PVBLICA; S C below; Hands clasped over caduceus and corn ears
RIC 444 (R). BMC 642. BNC 632.
Acquired from Gert Boersema, April 2019.

The clasped hands type had been introduced during Vespasian's great bronze issues of 71. It perhaps symbolises good faith in the corn supply (corn ears), trade (caduceus), and agricultural abundance. From the moment coins were issued in Titus Caesar's name in 72 he shared many of the reverses struck for his father, such as this clasped hands type. It must have contained a very important message for the regime since it was also produced in silver.

A fine early style portrait of the young prince with a dark greenish-grey patina.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/30/19 at 19:30quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
V444_(3).jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 44466 views As, 10.20g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP P TR P COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: FIDES PVBLICA; S C below; Hands clasped over caduceus and corn ears
RIC 444 (R). BMC 642. BNC 632.
Acquired from Gert Boersema, April 2019.

The clasped hands type had been introduced during Vespasian's great bronze issues of 71. It perhaps symbolises good faith in the corn supply (corn ears), trade (caduceus), and agricultural abundance. From the moment coins were issued in Titus Caesar's name in 72 he shared many of the reverses struck for his father, such as this clasped hands type. It must have contained a very important message for the regime since it was also produced in silver.

A fine early style portrait of the young prince with a dark greenish-grey patina.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/30/19 at 16:14Mat: Great addition
V444_(3).jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 44466 views As, 10.20g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP P TR P COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: FIDES PVBLICA; S C below; Hands clasped over caduceus and corn ears
RIC 444 (R). BMC 642. BNC 632.
Acquired from Gert Boersema, April 2019.

The clasped hands type had been introduced during Vespasian's great bronze issues of 71. It perhaps symbolises good faith in the corn supply (corn ears), trade (caduceus), and agricultural abundance. From the moment coins were issued in Titus Caesar's name in 72 he shared many of the reverses struck for his father, such as this clasped hands type. It must have contained a very important message for the regime since it was also produced in silver.

A fine early style portrait of the young prince with a dark greenish-grey patina.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/30/19 at 15:48Nemonater: Nice!
V444_(3).jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 44466 views As, 10.20g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP P TR P COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: FIDES PVBLICA; S C below; Hands clasped over caduceus and corn ears
RIC 444 (R). BMC 642. BNC 632.
Acquired from Gert Boersema, April 2019.

The clasped hands type had been introduced during Vespasian's great bronze issues of 71. It perhaps symbolises good faith in the corn supply (corn ears), trade (caduceus), and agricultural abundance. From the moment coins were issued in Titus Caesar's name in 72 he shared many of the reverses struck for his father, such as this clasped hands type. It must have contained a very important message for the regime since it was also produced in silver.

A fine early style portrait of the young prince with a dark greenish-grey patina.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/30/19 at 14:54Jay GT4: Sweet!
V444_(3).jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 44466 views As, 10.20g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP P TR P COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: FIDES PVBLICA; S C below; Hands clasped over caduceus and corn ears
RIC 444 (R). BMC 642. BNC 632.
Acquired from Gert Boersema, April 2019.

The clasped hands type had been introduced during Vespasian's great bronze issues of 71. It perhaps symbolises good faith in the corn supply (corn ears), trade (caduceus), and agricultural abundance. From the moment coins were issued in Titus Caesar's name in 72 he shared many of the reverses struck for his father, such as this clasped hands type. It must have contained a very important message for the regime since it was also produced in silver.

A fine early style portrait of the young prince with a dark greenish-grey patina.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/30/19 at 13:10Steve P: Sweet example, David
V444_(3).jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 44466 views As, 10.20g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP P TR P COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: FIDES PVBLICA; S C below; Hands clasped over caduceus and corn ears
RIC 444 (R). BMC 642. BNC 632.
Acquired from Gert Boersema, April 2019.

The clasped hands type had been introduced during Vespasian's great bronze issues of 71. It perhaps symbolises good faith in the corn supply (corn ears), trade (caduceus), and agricultural abundance. From the moment coins were issued in Titus Caesar's name in 72 he shared many of the reverses struck for his father, such as this clasped hands type. It must have contained a very important message for the regime since it was also produced in silver.

A fine early style portrait of the young prince with a dark greenish-grey patina.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/30/19 at 12:37okidoki: very nice
V444_(3).jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 44466 views As, 10.20g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP P TR P COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: FIDES PVBLICA; S C below; Hands clasped over caduceus and corn ears
RIC 444 (R). BMC 642. BNC 632.
Acquired from Gert Boersema, April 2019.

The clasped hands type had been introduced during Vespasian's great bronze issues of 71. It perhaps symbolises good faith in the corn supply (corn ears), trade (caduceus), and agricultural abundance. From the moment coins were issued in Titus Caesar's name in 72 he shared many of the reverses struck for his father, such as this clasped hands type. It must have contained a very important message for the regime since it was also produced in silver.

A fine early style portrait of the young prince with a dark greenish-grey patina.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/30/19 at 12:24FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example, different dies than mine.
V784.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 78474 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome mint, 75 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIAN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PONTIF TR P COS IIII; Securitas std.. l., head resting on raised arm
RIC 784 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection. Ex A. Lynn Collection.

This type is sometimes mistaken for Pax, which was a contemporary reverse. As a matter of fact, in my copy of RSC II the Pax reverse (162) actually shows a photograph of the Securitas type! The two can be easily distinguished by Securitas' raised right arm. This reverse is unlisted in both BMCRE and RSC. It was first published in the new RIC II.

As an added bonus the portrait is an above normal effort. Kudos to the die-engraver!
2 commentsDavid Atherton04/19/19 at 05:20orfew: Nice. Much better than mine.
V914lg.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 91461 views As, 11.03g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP COS V; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l. with flower
RIC 914 (R). BMC 728. BNC -.
Acquired from eBay, April 2019.

A small issue of bronze was struck by the Rome mint in 76. The asses of this issue were produced on larger than normal flans (27-28mm) and at a slightly heavier weight. Surprisingly, this Spes type from 76 struck for Titus Caesar is fairly rare with many specimens sharing this coin's die combination. Spes was a fairly common reverse type of the dynasty and was likely copied from a well known cult statue. As the goddess of hope, she is the perfect 'heir apparent' personification for a future emperor. As Mattingly put it in BMCRE II - 'The flower is an opening bud, she is raising her skirt in order to hasten forward.'

Although the patina has been largely stripped away, the piece has a pleasingly rich coppery hue.
3 commentsDavid Atherton04/18/19 at 16:20Vincent: Something about these portraits make them attracti...
V914lg.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 91461 views As, 11.03g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP COS V; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l. with flower
RIC 914 (R). BMC 728. BNC -.
Acquired from eBay, April 2019.

A small issue of bronze was struck by the Rome mint in 76. The asses of this issue were produced on larger than normal flans (27-28mm) and at a slightly heavier weight. Surprisingly, this Spes type from 76 struck for Titus Caesar is fairly rare with many specimens sharing this coin's die combination. Spes was a fairly common reverse type of the dynasty and was likely copied from a well known cult statue. As the goddess of hope, she is the perfect 'heir apparent' personification for a future emperor. As Mattingly put it in BMCRE II - 'The flower is an opening bud, she is raising her skirt in order to hasten forward.'

Although the patina has been largely stripped away, the piece has a pleasingly rich coppery hue.
3 commentsDavid Atherton04/18/19 at 11:04FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example, different dies than mine.
V914lg.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 91461 views As, 11.03g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP COS V; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l. with flower
RIC 914 (R). BMC 728. BNC -.
Acquired from eBay, April 2019.

A small issue of bronze was struck by the Rome mint in 76. The asses of this issue were produced on larger than normal flans (27-28mm) and at a slightly heavier weight. Surprisingly, this Spes type from 76 struck for Titus Caesar is fairly rare with many specimens sharing this coin's die combination. Spes was a fairly common reverse type of the dynasty and was likely copied from a well known cult statue. As the goddess of hope, she is the perfect 'heir apparent' personification for a future emperor. As Mattingly put it in BMCRE II - 'The flower is an opening bud, she is raising her skirt in order to hasten forward.'

Although the patina has been largely stripped away, the piece has a pleasingly rich coppery hue.
3 commentsDavid Atherton04/18/19 at 05:49quadrans: Nice piece..
V449asm_(3).jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 44959 views As, 10.92g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP P TR P COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Aquila between two standards
RIC 449 (R). BMC 644. BNC 635.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, April 2019. Ex Savoca Silver 30, 27 January 2019, lot 337.

The aquila between two standards type was struck early in Vespasian's reign to honour the loyalty of the legions, seen here on the reverse of this rare Titus as Caesar As. The aquila, which featured an eagle clutching a thunderbolt, was the most important standard of any legion. With the recent successful completion of the Civil War and Jewish rebellion Vespasian and Titus knew which side their bread was buttered on! The type was later revived under Titus and Domitian for their cistophori.

Solid portrait with a fetching dark patina.
6 commentsDavid Atherton04/12/19 at 06:34quadrans: Nice piece..
V449asm_(3).jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 44959 views As, 10.92g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP P TR P COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Aquila between two standards
RIC 449 (R). BMC 644. BNC 635.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, April 2019. Ex Savoca Silver 30, 27 January 2019, lot 337.

The aquila between two standards type was struck early in Vespasian's reign to honour the loyalty of the legions, seen here on the reverse of this rare Titus as Caesar As. The aquila, which featured an eagle clutching a thunderbolt, was the most important standard of any legion. With the recent successful completion of the Civil War and Jewish rebellion Vespasian and Titus knew which side their bread was buttered on! The type was later revived under Titus and Domitian for their cistophori.

Solid portrait with a fetching dark patina.
6 commentsDavid Atherton04/12/19 at 00:55Nemonater: Very nice catch!
V449asm_(3).jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 44959 views As, 10.92g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP P TR P COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Aquila between two standards
RIC 449 (R). BMC 644. BNC 635.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, April 2019. Ex Savoca Silver 30, 27 January 2019, lot 337.

The aquila between two standards type was struck early in Vespasian's reign to honour the loyalty of the legions, seen here on the reverse of this rare Titus as Caesar As. The aquila, which featured an eagle clutching a thunderbolt, was the most important standard of any legion. With the recent successful completion of the Civil War and Jewish rebellion Vespasian and Titus knew which side their bread was buttered on! The type was later revived under Titus and Domitian for their cistophori.

Solid portrait with a fetching dark patina.
6 commentsDavid Atherton04/11/19 at 16:07FlaviusDomitianus: Nice find, different dies than mine.
V449asm_(3).jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 44959 views As, 10.92g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP P TR P COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Aquila between two standards
RIC 449 (R). BMC 644. BNC 635.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, April 2019. Ex Savoca Silver 30, 27 January 2019, lot 337.

The aquila between two standards type was struck early in Vespasian's reign to honour the loyalty of the legions, seen here on the reverse of this rare Titus as Caesar As. The aquila, which featured an eagle clutching a thunderbolt, was the most important standard of any legion. With the recent successful completion of the Civil War and Jewish rebellion Vespasian and Titus knew which side their bread was buttered on! The type was later revived under Titus and Domitian for their cistophori.

Solid portrait with a fetching dark patina.
6 commentsDavid Atherton04/11/19 at 14:53Mat: Wonderful portrait and historical addition
V449asm_(3).jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 44959 views As, 10.92g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP P TR P COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Aquila between two standards
RIC 449 (R). BMC 644. BNC 635.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, April 2019. Ex Savoca Silver 30, 27 January 2019, lot 337.

The aquila between two standards type was struck early in Vespasian's reign to honour the loyalty of the legions, seen here on the reverse of this rare Titus as Caesar As. The aquila, which featured an eagle clutching a thunderbolt, was the most important standard of any legion. With the recent successful completion of the Civil War and Jewish rebellion Vespasian and Titus knew which side their bread was buttered on! The type was later revived under Titus and Domitian for their cistophori.

Solid portrait with a fetching dark patina.
6 commentsDavid Atherton04/11/19 at 13:43*Alex: Great coin.
V449asm_(3).jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 44959 views As, 10.92g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP P TR P COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Aquila between two standards
RIC 449 (R). BMC 644. BNC 635.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, April 2019. Ex Savoca Silver 30, 27 January 2019, lot 337.

The aquila between two standards type was struck early in Vespasian's reign to honour the loyalty of the legions, seen here on the reverse of this rare Titus as Caesar As. The aquila, which featured an eagle clutching a thunderbolt, was the most important standard of any legion. With the recent successful completion of the Civil War and Jewish rebellion Vespasian and Titus knew which side their bread was buttered on! The type was later revived under Titus and Domitian for their cistophori.

Solid portrait with a fetching dark patina.
6 commentsDavid Atherton04/11/19 at 12:59Jay GT4: Very nice
titus dolphin rev.JPG
Titus RIC-112499 viewsAR Denarius, 2.87g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 112 (C2). BMC 72. RSC 309. BNC 60.
Ex Harlan J Berk 143, 18 May 2005, lot 177.

Another in Titus' pulvinaria series commemorating the opening of the Colosseum.

Easily one of the best portraits of Titus I have ever seen. The condition of the obverse is excellent.
A coin I'm very proud to have.
11 commentsVespasian7004/11/19 at 07:50Ancient Aussie: Perfection !!!
V423.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 42353 views Sestertius, 23.43g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP PON TR POT COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVSTI; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 423 (C). BMC 633. BNC 619.
Ex Holding History, eBay, 16 March 2019.

After the recent Civil War and Jewish and Batavian rebellions this common Pax reverse type from 72 had special propaganda value for the new Flavian regime: peace and prosperity. It would be one of the more popular themes of Vespasian's coinage. Unsurprisingly, this Pax type is shared with Vespasian.

Worn, but in fine style with a nice dark chocolate patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/29/19 at 14:02Vincent: Like the coin! Titus is Dee MAN
V423.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 42353 views Sestertius, 23.43g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP PON TR POT COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVSTI; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 423 (C). BMC 633. BNC 619.
Ex Holding History, eBay, 16 March 2019.

After the recent Civil War and Jewish and Batavian rebellions this common Pax reverse type from 72 had special propaganda value for the new Flavian regime: peace and prosperity. It would be one of the more popular themes of Vespasian's coinage. Unsurprisingly, this Pax type is shared with Vespasian.

Worn, but in fine style with a nice dark chocolate patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/28/19 at 08:19Randygeki(h2): Awesome coin!
V423.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 42353 views Sestertius, 23.43g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP PON TR POT COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVSTI; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 423 (C). BMC 633. BNC 619.
Ex Holding History, eBay, 16 March 2019.

After the recent Civil War and Jewish and Batavian rebellions this common Pax reverse type from 72 had special propaganda value for the new Flavian regime: peace and prosperity. It would be one of the more popular themes of Vespasian's coinage. Unsurprisingly, this Pax type is shared with Vespasian.

Worn, but in fine style with a nice dark chocolate patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/27/19 at 12:07FlaviusDomitianus: Nice portrait on a scarce coin
V423.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 42353 views Sestertius, 23.43g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP PON TR POT COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVSTI; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 423 (C). BMC 633. BNC 619.
Ex Holding History, eBay, 16 March 2019.

After the recent Civil War and Jewish and Batavian rebellions this common Pax reverse type from 72 had special propaganda value for the new Flavian regime: peace and prosperity. It would be one of the more popular themes of Vespasian's coinage. Unsurprisingly, this Pax type is shared with Vespasian.

Worn, but in fine style with a nice dark chocolate patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/27/19 at 07:08quadrans: Nice piece..
V423.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 42353 views Sestertius, 23.43g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP PON TR POT COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVSTI; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 423 (C). BMC 633. BNC 619.
Ex Holding History, eBay, 16 March 2019.

After the recent Civil War and Jewish and Batavian rebellions this common Pax reverse type from 72 had special propaganda value for the new Flavian regime: peace and prosperity. It would be one of the more popular themes of Vespasian's coinage. Unsurprisingly, this Pax type is shared with Vespasian.

Worn, but in fine style with a nice dark chocolate patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/27/19 at 05:21Jay GT4: A lovely portrait and great patina
V1268sm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-126854 views As, 9.35g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP AVG F TR P COS VI CENSOR; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to r., Judaea std. r.; to l. of tree, arms
RIC 1268 (C2). BMC 862. BNC 872.
Acquired from GB Collection, March 2019.

The importance of the Jewish War to the Flavian dynasty cannot be overestimated. It provided much needed legitimacy for the imperial rule of 'new men'. This common as struck for Titus Caesar nearly eight years after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem is ample evidence of the dynasty's continued reliance on the propaganda value of 'Judaea Capta'. It would continue to be Titus' calling card even after he became emperor a year or so later. This coin was struck in Lugdunum (Lyon) in a fairly large issue that presumably addressed a shortage of bronze coinage in the Western provinces.

Good Lyon style with a fetching dark patina.
4 commentsDavid Atherton03/26/19 at 13:57Vincent: Man, those People must of been a tuff bunch to put...
V1268sm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-126854 views As, 9.35g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP AVG F TR P COS VI CENSOR; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to r., Judaea std. r.; to l. of tree, arms
RIC 1268 (C2). BMC 862. BNC 872.
Acquired from GB Collection, March 2019.

The importance of the Jewish War to the Flavian dynasty cannot be overestimated. It provided much needed legitimacy for the imperial rule of 'new men'. This common as struck for Titus Caesar nearly eight years after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem is ample evidence of the dynasty's continued reliance on the propaganda value of 'Judaea Capta'. It would continue to be Titus' calling card even after he became emperor a year or so later. This coin was struck in Lugdunum (Lyon) in a fairly large issue that presumably addressed a shortage of bronze coinage in the Western provinces.

Good Lyon style with a fetching dark patina.
4 commentsDavid Atherton03/25/19 at 22:00Nemonater: Really nice!
V1268sm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-126854 views As, 9.35g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP AVG F TR P COS VI CENSOR; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to r., Judaea std. r.; to l. of tree, arms
RIC 1268 (C2). BMC 862. BNC 872.
Acquired from GB Collection, March 2019.

The importance of the Jewish War to the Flavian dynasty cannot be overestimated. It provided much needed legitimacy for the imperial rule of 'new men'. This common as struck for Titus Caesar nearly eight years after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem is ample evidence of the dynasty's continued reliance on the propaganda value of 'Judaea Capta'. It would continue to be Titus' calling card even after he became emperor a year or so later. This coin was struck in Lugdunum (Lyon) in a fairly large issue that presumably addressed a shortage of bronze coinage in the Western provinces.

Good Lyon style with a fetching dark patina.
4 commentsDavid Atherton03/25/19 at 17:00FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition, congrats!
V1268sm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-126854 views As, 9.35g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP AVG F TR P COS VI CENSOR; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to r., Judaea std. r.; to l. of tree, arms
RIC 1268 (C2). BMC 862. BNC 872.
Acquired from GB Collection, March 2019.

The importance of the Jewish War to the Flavian dynasty cannot be overestimated. It provided much needed legitimacy for the imperial rule of 'new men'. This common as struck for Titus Caesar nearly eight years after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem is ample evidence of the dynasty's continued reliance on the propaganda value of 'Judaea Capta'. It would continue to be Titus' calling card even after he became emperor a year or so later. This coin was struck in Lugdunum (Lyon) in a fairly large issue that presumably addressed a shortage of bronze coinage in the Western provinces.

Good Lyon style with a fetching dark patina.
4 commentsDavid Atherton03/25/19 at 12:55Jay GT4: Iconic coin of the Flavian dynasty
V431.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 43176 views Sestertius, 25.13g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP PON TR POT COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in exergue; Titus stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
RIC 431 (R). BMC 636. BNC 625.
Acquired from Wallinmynt, February 2019.

In 71 AD Vespasian and Titus held a double triumph celebrating their victory in the recently concluded Judaean War. The spectacular triumph was held a few days after Titus' arrival from the East in June and could be viewed as his effective homecoming party. Mary Beard has shrewdly observed that the triumph served as 'the Flavian coronation, the official launch party and press night of the Flavian dynasty.' It was the first time after Vespasian's rise to the purple that the whole family could be seen together by the Roman populace. Vespasian and Titus were identically dressed riding in matching quadrigas while Domitian trotted alongside on a splendid mount. The procession included massive towering floats depicting various 'battles' (one wonders how the makeshift naval battle on the Sea of Galilee was rendered?) that were so enormous many onlookers feared they would topple over. Booty from the destroyed Temple (the famous Menorah for one) along with other Eastern flavoured treasures were on display. Much of these treasures were likely manufactured in Rome for the event - a lavish sham in other words. The war ravaged region really didn't have much to offer in the way of razzmatazz show pieces, even the Temple's coffers were likely depleted by war's end. Despite all this, it cannot be underestimated how important this manufactured spectacle was for the young dynasty. The legitimacy and prestige the triumph provided to the family was worth every propaganda penny the regime spent on it, allowing Vespasian to announce to the world that Titus was his chosen heir. By showcasing his eldest son on an equal footing in the procession, it left little doubt who would succeed after his death. Coins were struck in all metals to commemorate the event. Here is a rare sestertius struck for Titus Caesar in 72 showing him in triumphal dress riding in a triumphal quadriga, the type is more commonly seen in silver from Antioch. The same reverse was identically struck for Vespasian, clear numismatic evidence of Vespasian's intentions for his son. The piece itself serves as a superb memento of the 'Greatest Show on Earth' triumph put on by the Flavian regime in the late First century.

The fine style portrait on the obverse is quite impressive, unmarred by three punch marks from antiquity.
3 commentsDavid Atherton03/12/19 at 14:14FlaviusDomitianus: This type is always very attractive.
V431.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 43176 views Sestertius, 25.13g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP PON TR POT COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in exergue; Titus stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
RIC 431 (R). BMC 636. BNC 625.
Acquired from Wallinmynt, February 2019.

In 71 AD Vespasian and Titus held a double triumph celebrating their victory in the recently concluded Judaean War. The spectacular triumph was held a few days after Titus' arrival from the East in June and could be viewed as his effective homecoming party. Mary Beard has shrewdly observed that the triumph served as 'the Flavian coronation, the official launch party and press night of the Flavian dynasty.' It was the first time after Vespasian's rise to the purple that the whole family could be seen together by the Roman populace. Vespasian and Titus were identically dressed riding in matching quadrigas while Domitian trotted alongside on a splendid mount. The procession included massive towering floats depicting various 'battles' (one wonders how the makeshift naval battle on the Sea of Galilee was rendered?) that were so enormous many onlookers feared they would topple over. Booty from the destroyed Temple (the famous Menorah for one) along with other Eastern flavoured treasures were on display. Much of these treasures were likely manufactured in Rome for the event - a lavish sham in other words. The war ravaged region really didn't have much to offer in the way of razzmatazz show pieces, even the Temple's coffers were likely depleted by war's end. Despite all this, it cannot be underestimated how important this manufactured spectacle was for the young dynasty. The legitimacy and prestige the triumph provided to the family was worth every propaganda penny the regime spent on it, allowing Vespasian to announce to the world that Titus was his chosen heir. By showcasing his eldest son on an equal footing in the procession, it left little doubt who would succeed after his death. Coins were struck in all metals to commemorate the event. Here is a rare sestertius struck for Titus Caesar in 72 showing him in triumphal dress riding in a triumphal quadriga, the type is more commonly seen in silver from Antioch. The same reverse was identically struck for Vespasian, clear numismatic evidence of Vespasian's intentions for his son. The piece itself serves as a superb memento of the 'Greatest Show on Earth' triumph put on by the Flavian regime in the late First century.

The fine style portrait on the obverse is quite impressive, unmarred by three punch marks from antiquity.
3 commentsDavid Atherton03/12/19 at 13:58Jay GT4: Simply an impressive historical coin
V431.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 43176 views Sestertius, 25.13g
Rome mint, 72 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP PON TR POT COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in exergue; Titus stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
RIC 431 (R). BMC 636. BNC 625.
Acquired from Wallinmynt, February 2019.

In 71 AD Vespasian and Titus held a double triumph celebrating their victory in the recently concluded Judaean War. The spectacular triumph was held a few days after Titus' arrival from the East in June and could be viewed as his effective homecoming party. Mary Beard has shrewdly observed that the triumph served as 'the Flavian coronation, the official launch party and press night of the Flavian dynasty.' It was the first time after Vespasian's rise to the purple that the whole family could be seen together by the Roman populace. Vespasian and Titus were identically dressed riding in matching quadrigas while Domitian trotted alongside on a splendid mount. The procession included massive towering floats depicting various 'battles' (one wonders how the makeshift naval battle on the Sea of Galilee was rendered?) that were so enormous many onlookers feared they would topple over. Booty from the destroyed Temple (the famous Menorah for one) along with other Eastern flavoured treasures were on display. Much of these treasures were likely manufactured in Rome for the event - a lavish sham in other words. The war ravaged region really didn't have much to offer in the way of razzmatazz show pieces, even the Temple's coffers were likely depleted by war's end. Despite all this, it cannot be underestimated how important this manufactured spectacle was for the young dynasty. The legitimacy and prestige the triumph provided to the family was worth every propaganda penny the regime spent on it, allowing Vespasian to announce to the world that Titus was his chosen heir. By showcasing his eldest son on an equal footing in the procession, it left little doubt who would succeed after his death. Coins were struck in all metals to commemorate the event. Here is a rare sestertius struck for Titus Caesar in 72 showing him in triumphal dress riding in a triumphal quadriga, the type is more commonly seen in silver from Antioch. The same reverse was identically struck for Vespasian, clear numismatic evidence of Vespasian's intentions for his son. The piece itself serves as a superb memento of the 'Greatest Show on Earth' triumph put on by the Flavian regime in the late First century.

The fine style portrait on the obverse is quite impressive, unmarred by three punch marks from antiquity.
3 commentsDavid Atherton03/12/19 at 12:46Steve P: Wow, what a beauty (congrats David)
titus_as_caesar_pont_max.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC 554 Mule89 viewsAR Denarius, 3.08g
Rome Mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PONTIF MAXIM; Vespasian std. r. on curule chair, with sceptre and branch
RIC 554 (R). BMC 113. RSC 158. BNC 97.
Ex Lanz, eBay, 6 October 2008.

This rare denarius of 73 AD issued by Titus as Caesar, is a mule featuring a reverse intended for Vespasian. The reverse legend PONTIF MAXIM is the title of the chief priest, a position held only by the emperor.

A coin featuring a sturdy portrait of the young prince with his father as supreme priest on the reverse, a perfect mule.
1 commentsvespasian7002/16/19 at 13:43Jay GT4: How did I miss this one? Great coin
T155.jpg
Titus RIC-15560 views Sestertius, 22.74g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 155 (C). BMC 171. BNC 162.
Acquired from Marti Numismatics, January 2019.

Pax was a fairly common reverse type struck for Titus. This particular Pax with branch and cornucopiae is a carry-over from Vespasian's coinage. Apparently, the propaganda value of peace was quite limitless. Despite the wear, this coin features one of the most magnificent coin portraits of Titus I have come across in either silver or bronze. Truly the work of a master engraver! There is one peculiar thing I have noticed about Titus' bronze coinage, the left facing portraits tend to be in a finer style than the right facing ones. Perhaps a talented engraver at the mint preferred his portraits facing left?

Worn, but in exceptionally fine style with an appealing dark patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton01/22/19 at 22:25quadrans: Nice one
T155.jpg
Titus RIC-15560 views Sestertius, 22.74g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 155 (C). BMC 171. BNC 162.
Acquired from Marti Numismatics, January 2019.

Pax was a fairly common reverse type struck for Titus. This particular Pax with branch and cornucopiae is a carry-over from Vespasian's coinage. Apparently, the propaganda value of peace was quite limitless. Despite the wear, this coin features one of the most magnificent coin portraits of Titus I have come across in either silver or bronze. Truly the work of a master engraver! There is one peculiar thing I have noticed about Titus' bronze coinage, the left facing portraits tend to be in a finer style than the right facing ones. Perhaps a talented engraver at the mint preferred his portraits facing left?

Worn, but in exceptionally fine style with an appealing dark patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton01/22/19 at 21:20Jay GT4: Plump portrait. He looks like Vespasian even more...
T155.jpg
Titus RIC-15560 views Sestertius, 22.74g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 155 (C). BMC 171. BNC 162.
Acquired from Marti Numismatics, January 2019.

Pax was a fairly common reverse type struck for Titus. This particular Pax with branch and cornucopiae is a carry-over from Vespasian's coinage. Apparently, the propaganda value of peace was quite limitless. Despite the wear, this coin features one of the most magnificent coin portraits of Titus I have come across in either silver or bronze. Truly the work of a master engraver! There is one peculiar thing I have noticed about Titus' bronze coinage, the left facing portraits tend to be in a finer style than the right facing ones. Perhaps a talented engraver at the mint preferred his portraits facing left?

Worn, but in exceptionally fine style with an appealing dark patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton01/22/19 at 13:01FlaviusDomitianus: Solid example of the type.
T155.jpg
Titus RIC-15560 views Sestertius, 22.74g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 155 (C). BMC 171. BNC 162.
Acquired from Marti Numismatics, January 2019.

Pax was a fairly common reverse type struck for Titus. This particular Pax with branch and cornucopiae is a carry-over from Vespasian's coinage. Apparently, the propaganda value of peace was quite limitless. Despite the wear, this coin features one of the most magnificent coin portraits of Titus I have come across in either silver or bronze. Truly the work of a master engraver! There is one peculiar thing I have noticed about Titus' bronze coinage, the left facing portraits tend to be in a finer style than the right facing ones. Perhaps a talented engraver at the mint preferred his portraits facing left?

Worn, but in exceptionally fine style with an appealing dark patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton01/22/19 at 11:58Nemonater: Beautiful!
T499.jpg
Titus RIC-49973 views Sestertius, 24.63g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Mars, with cloak over shoulders, adv. r., with spear and trophy
RIC 499 (C). BMC 310. RPC 502. BNC 324.
Acquired from Ken Dorney, December 2018.

A remarkable sestertius from a truly mysterious issue of bronze that was struck under Titus in 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue, which in the main copied types from Rome. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign.

An appealing example with a beautiful sandy patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton01/22/19 at 06:21Randygeki(h2): Neat find
T155.jpg
Titus RIC-15560 views Sestertius, 22.74g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 155 (C). BMC 171. BNC 162.
Acquired from Marti Numismatics, January 2019.

Pax was a fairly common reverse type struck for Titus. This particular Pax with branch and cornucopiae is a carry-over from Vespasian's coinage. Apparently, the propaganda value of peace was quite limitless. Despite the wear, this coin features one of the most magnificent coin portraits of Titus I have come across in either silver or bronze. Truly the work of a master engraver! There is one peculiar thing I have noticed about Titus' bronze coinage, the left facing portraits tend to be in a finer style than the right facing ones. Perhaps a talented engraver at the mint preferred his portraits facing left?

Worn, but in exceptionally fine style with an appealing dark patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton01/22/19 at 06:19Randygeki(h2): Cool addition
T499.jpg
Titus RIC-49973 views Sestertius, 24.63g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Mars, with cloak over shoulders, adv. r., with spear and trophy
RIC 499 (C). BMC 310. RPC 502. BNC 324.
Acquired from Ken Dorney, December 2018.

A remarkable sestertius from a truly mysterious issue of bronze that was struck under Titus in 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue, which in the main copied types from Rome. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign.

An appealing example with a beautiful sandy patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton01/09/19 at 11:20FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition
T499.jpg
Titus RIC-49973 views Sestertius, 24.63g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Mars, with cloak over shoulders, adv. r., with spear and trophy
RIC 499 (C). BMC 310. RPC 502. BNC 324.
Acquired from Ken Dorney, December 2018.

A remarkable sestertius from a truly mysterious issue of bronze that was struck under Titus in 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue, which in the main copied types from Rome. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign.

An appealing example with a beautiful sandy patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton01/09/19 at 05:56Britanikus: Nice
T233.jpg
Titus RIC-23365 views As, 11.89g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 233 (R3). BMC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, December 2018. Ex Hirsch 317, 18 February 2016, lot 2027. Ex Hirsch 249, 6 February 2007, lot 1851.

The various stock Pax types struck for Titus are general carry-overs from Vespasian's reign and are normally seen on Titus' sestertii and asses. This as features a rare variant of the standing Pax type. She is seen here holding a cornucopiae instead of the much more common variant with caduceus. This reverse type with AVGVST instead of AVGVSTI is also extremely rare - only one specimen was known when the new RIC II.1 was published.

Fine style portrait and a pleasing coppery tone.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/02/19 at 23:03curtislclay: RIC 233 quotes your coin from the photofile of the...
T233.jpg
Titus RIC-23365 views As, 11.89g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 233 (R3). BMC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, December 2018. Ex Hirsch 317, 18 February 2016, lot 2027. Ex Hirsch 249, 6 February 2007, lot 1851.

The various stock Pax types struck for Titus are general carry-overs from Vespasian's reign and are normally seen on Titus' sestertii and asses. This as features a rare variant of the standing Pax type. She is seen here holding a cornucopiae instead of the much more common variant with caduceus. This reverse type with AVGVST instead of AVGVSTI is also extremely rare - only one specimen was known when the new RIC II.1 was published.

Fine style portrait and a pleasing coppery tone.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/02/19 at 18:20quadrans: Great piece .
T233.jpg
Titus RIC-23365 views As, 11.89g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 233 (R3). BMC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, December 2018. Ex Hirsch 317, 18 February 2016, lot 2027. Ex Hirsch 249, 6 February 2007, lot 1851.

The various stock Pax types struck for Titus are general carry-overs from Vespasian's reign and are normally seen on Titus' sestertii and asses. This as features a rare variant of the standing Pax type. She is seen here holding a cornucopiae instead of the much more common variant with caduceus. This reverse type with AVGVST instead of AVGVSTI is also extremely rare - only one specimen was known when the new RIC II.1 was published.

Fine style portrait and a pleasing coppery tone.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/02/19 at 13:25Jay GT4: Amazing
T233.jpg
Titus RIC-23365 views As, 11.89g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 233 (R3). BMC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, December 2018. Ex Hirsch 317, 18 February 2016, lot 2027. Ex Hirsch 249, 6 February 2007, lot 1851.

The various stock Pax types struck for Titus are general carry-overs from Vespasian's reign and are normally seen on Titus' sestertii and asses. This as features a rare variant of the standing Pax type. She is seen here holding a cornucopiae instead of the much more common variant with caduceus. This reverse type with AVGVST instead of AVGVSTI is also extremely rare - only one specimen was known when the new RIC II.1 was published.

Fine style portrait and a pleasing coppery tone.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/02/19 at 10:03FlaviusDomitianus: Congrats on acquiring such a great rarity!
T226.jpg
Titus RIC-226159 views As, 10.75g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: GENI P R; S C in field; Genius stg. l., with patera over altar and cornucopiae
RIC 226 (R). BMC 210. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, September 2018.

Genius - 'The spirit of the Roman people' is not a common motif in Flavian coinage. It occurs under Vespasian on rare Spanish military denarii struck early in his reign and briefly during the reign of Titus on asses struck in 80-81. Mattingly connects the type under Titus with 'the vows undertaken for the first five years of the new reign'. The coin is dated COS VIII which Titus held in 80 (he did not renew the consulship in 81). Unlike the parallel silver issue the bronze lack an IMP number and cannot be more precisely dated. Most likely they were struck in the first half of 80 along with the silver.

Neatly centred with a fantastic portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton12/20/18 at 20:25Josh H: The obverse is so amazing. The portrait is well de...
T168sm.jpg
Titus RIC-16894 views Sestertius, 23.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
RIC 168 (C2). BMC 168. BNC 499.
Ex Felicitas-Perpetua, eBay, 23 September 2018.

Spes is a common reverse type under Vespasian, connected to future dynastic hope and harmony. It continued to be struck by Titus and can be viewed as his hope for the future with his chosen heir Domitian. As Mattingly put it: '...the recurring types of Spes suggests that Titus gave Domitian full due as heir to the throne.' Suetonious would have us believe this public fraternal affection was a sham and Domitian did everything he could to plot against Titus. Dio goes so far as to say Domitian hastened Titus death by having him packed in ice! All of this can be dismissed as nothing more than post Domitianic gossip intended to blacken Domitian's name. The Flavian historian Brian Jones speculates the brother's relationship was one of 'mutual indifference and ignorance' due to their age and personality differences. Regardless, as the numismatic evidence shows, Titus looked upon Domitian as his legitimate heir until his natural death in mid September 81.

The reverse is quite worn, but no matter, the portrait makes up for any of the reverse's deficiencies. A wonderful coin in hand!
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/20/18 at 19:05Josh H: That portrait is phenomenal!
T226.jpg
Titus RIC-226159 views As, 10.75g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: GENI P R; S C in field; Genius stg. l., with patera over altar and cornucopiae
RIC 226 (R). BMC 210. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, September 2018.

Genius - 'The spirit of the Roman people' is not a common motif in Flavian coinage. It occurs under Vespasian on rare Spanish military denarii struck early in his reign and briefly during the reign of Titus on asses struck in 80-81. Mattingly connects the type under Titus with 'the vows undertaken for the first five years of the new reign'. The coin is dated COS VIII which Titus held in 80 (he did not renew the consulship in 81). Unlike the parallel silver issue the bronze lack an IMP number and cannot be more precisely dated. Most likely they were struck in the first half of 80 along with the silver.

Neatly centred with a fantastic portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton10/27/18 at 10:56ancientdave: Wowza!!
T168sm.jpg
Titus RIC-16894 views Sestertius, 23.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
RIC 168 (C2). BMC 168. BNC 499.
Ex Felicitas-Perpetua, eBay, 23 September 2018.

Spes is a common reverse type under Vespasian, connected to future dynastic hope and harmony. It continued to be struck by Titus and can be viewed as his hope for the future with his chosen heir Domitian. As Mattingly put it: '...the recurring types of Spes suggests that Titus gave Domitian full due as heir to the throne.' Suetonious would have us believe this public fraternal affection was a sham and Domitian did everything he could to plot against Titus. Dio goes so far as to say Domitian hastened Titus death by having him packed in ice! All of this can be dismissed as nothing more than post Domitianic gossip intended to blacken Domitian's name. The Flavian historian Brian Jones speculates the brother's relationship was one of 'mutual indifference and ignorance' due to their age and personality differences. Regardless, as the numismatic evidence shows, Titus looked upon Domitian as his legitimate heir until his natural death in mid September 81.

The reverse is quite worn, but no matter, the portrait makes up for any of the reverse's deficiencies. A wonderful coin in hand!
5 commentsDavid Atherton10/23/18 at 12:56quadrans: Nice one
T168sm.jpg
Titus RIC-16894 views Sestertius, 23.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
RIC 168 (C2). BMC 168. BNC 499.
Ex Felicitas-Perpetua, eBay, 23 September 2018.

Spes is a common reverse type under Vespasian, connected to future dynastic hope and harmony. It continued to be struck by Titus and can be viewed as his hope for the future with his chosen heir Domitian. As Mattingly put it: '...the recurring types of Spes suggests that Titus gave Domitian full due as heir to the throne.' Suetonious would have us believe this public fraternal affection was a sham and Domitian did everything he could to plot against Titus. Dio goes so far as to say Domitian hastened Titus death by having him packed in ice! All of this can be dismissed as nothing more than post Domitianic gossip intended to blacken Domitian's name. The Flavian historian Brian Jones speculates the brother's relationship was one of 'mutual indifference and ignorance' due to their age and personality differences. Regardless, as the numismatic evidence shows, Titus looked upon Domitian as his legitimate heir until his natural death in mid September 81.

The reverse is quite worn, but no matter, the portrait makes up for any of the reverse's deficiencies. A wonderful coin in hand!
5 commentsDavid Atherton10/10/18 at 09:45Randygeki(h2): sweet addition
T168sm.jpg
Titus RIC-16894 views Sestertius, 23.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
RIC 168 (C2). BMC 168. BNC 499.
Ex Felicitas-Perpetua, eBay, 23 September 2018.

Spes is a common reverse type under Vespasian, connected to future dynastic hope and harmony. It continued to be struck by Titus and can be viewed as his hope for the future with his chosen heir Domitian. As Mattingly put it: '...the recurring types of Spes suggests that Titus gave Domitian full due as heir to the throne.' Suetonious would have us believe this public fraternal affection was a sham and Domitian did everything he could to plot against Titus. Dio goes so far as to say Domitian hastened Titus death by having him packed in ice! All of this can be dismissed as nothing more than post Domitianic gossip intended to blacken Domitian's name. The Flavian historian Brian Jones speculates the brother's relationship was one of 'mutual indifference and ignorance' due to their age and personality differences. Regardless, as the numismatic evidence shows, Titus looked upon Domitian as his legitimate heir until his natural death in mid September 81.

The reverse is quite worn, but no matter, the portrait makes up for any of the reverse's deficiencies. A wonderful coin in hand!
5 commentsDavid Atherton10/09/18 at 09:47FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition, congrats!
T168sm.jpg
Titus RIC-16894 views Sestertius, 23.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
RIC 168 (C2). BMC 168. BNC 499.
Ex Felicitas-Perpetua, eBay, 23 September 2018.

Spes is a common reverse type under Vespasian, connected to future dynastic hope and harmony. It continued to be struck by Titus and can be viewed as his hope for the future with his chosen heir Domitian. As Mattingly put it: '...the recurring types of Spes suggests that Titus gave Domitian full due as heir to the throne.' Suetonious would have us believe this public fraternal affection was a sham and Domitian did everything he could to plot against Titus. Dio goes so far as to say Domitian hastened Titus death by having him packed in ice! All of this can be dismissed as nothing more than post Domitianic gossip intended to blacken Domitian's name. The Flavian historian Brian Jones speculates the brother's relationship was one of 'mutual indifference and ignorance' due to their age and personality differences. Regardless, as the numismatic evidence shows, Titus looked upon Domitian as his legitimate heir until his natural death in mid September 81.

The reverse is quite worn, but no matter, the portrait makes up for any of the reverse's deficiencies. A wonderful coin in hand!
5 commentsDavid Atherton10/09/18 at 06:24Mat: Great portrait
T226.jpg
Titus RIC-226159 views As, 10.75g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: GENI P R; S C in field; Genius stg. l., with patera over altar and cornucopiae
RIC 226 (R). BMC 210. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, September 2018.

Genius - 'The spirit of the Roman people' is not a common motif in Flavian coinage. It occurs under Vespasian on rare Spanish military denarii struck early in his reign and briefly during the reign of Titus on asses struck in 80-81. Mattingly connects the type under Titus with 'the vows undertaken for the first five years of the new reign'. The coin is dated COS VIII which Titus held in 80 (he did not renew the consulship in 81). Unlike the parallel silver issue the bronze lack an IMP number and cannot be more precisely dated. Most likely they were struck in the first half of 80 along with the silver.

Neatly centred with a fantastic portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton10/03/18 at 19:02okidoki: great example,
T226.jpg
Titus RIC-226159 views As, 10.75g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: GENI P R; S C in field; Genius stg. l., with patera over altar and cornucopiae
RIC 226 (R). BMC 210. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, September 2018.

Genius - 'The spirit of the Roman people' is not a common motif in Flavian coinage. It occurs under Vespasian on rare Spanish military denarii struck early in his reign and briefly during the reign of Titus on asses struck in 80-81. Mattingly connects the type under Titus with 'the vows undertaken for the first five years of the new reign'. The coin is dated COS VIII which Titus held in 80 (he did not renew the consulship in 81). Unlike the parallel silver issue the bronze lack an IMP number and cannot be more precisely dated. Most likely they were struck in the first half of 80 along with the silver.

Neatly centred with a fantastic portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton09/23/18 at 05:47Randygeki(h2): Excellent!
T226.jpg
Titus RIC-226159 views As, 10.75g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: GENI P R; S C in field; Genius stg. l., with patera over altar and cornucopiae
RIC 226 (R). BMC 210. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, September 2018.

Genius - 'The spirit of the Roman people' is not a common motif in Flavian coinage. It occurs under Vespasian on rare Spanish military denarii struck early in his reign and briefly during the reign of Titus on asses struck in 80-81. Mattingly connects the type under Titus with 'the vows undertaken for the first five years of the new reign'. The coin is dated COS VIII which Titus held in 80 (he did not renew the consulship in 81). Unlike the parallel silver issue the bronze lack an IMP number and cannot be more precisely dated. Most likely they were struck in the first half of 80 along with the silver.

Neatly centred with a fantastic portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton09/19/18 at 13:00FlaviusDomitianus: Fine example indeed!
T226.jpg
Titus RIC-226159 views As, 10.75g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: GENI P R; S C in field; Genius stg. l., with patera over altar and cornucopiae
RIC 226 (R). BMC 210. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, September 2018.

Genius - 'The spirit of the Roman people' is not a common motif in Flavian coinage. It occurs under Vespasian on rare Spanish military denarii struck early in his reign and briefly during the reign of Titus on asses struck in 80-81. Mattingly connects the type under Titus with 'the vows undertaken for the first five years of the new reign'. The coin is dated COS VIII which Titus held in 80 (he did not renew the consulship in 81). Unlike the parallel silver issue the bronze lack an IMP number and cannot be more precisely dated. Most likely they were struck in the first half of 80 along with the silver.

Neatly centred with a fantastic portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton09/19/18 at 03:50Jay GT4: Amazing
T226.jpg
Titus RIC-226159 views As, 10.75g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: GENI P R; S C in field; Genius stg. l., with patera over altar and cornucopiae
RIC 226 (R). BMC 210. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, September 2018.

Genius - 'The spirit of the Roman people' is not a common motif in Flavian coinage. It occurs under Vespasian on rare Spanish military denarii struck early in his reign and briefly during the reign of Titus on asses struck in 80-81. Mattingly connects the type under Titus with 'the vows undertaken for the first five years of the new reign'. The coin is dated COS VIII which Titus held in 80 (he did not renew the consulship in 81). Unlike the parallel silver issue the bronze lack an IMP number and cannot be more precisely dated. Most likely they were struck in the first half of 80 along with the silver.

Neatly centred with a fantastic portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton09/19/18 at 03:14orfew: Superb coin!
T226.jpg
Titus RIC-226159 views As, 10.75g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: GENI P R; S C in field; Genius stg. l., with patera over altar and cornucopiae
RIC 226 (R). BMC 210. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, September 2018.

Genius - 'The spirit of the Roman people' is not a common motif in Flavian coinage. It occurs under Vespasian on rare Spanish military denarii struck early in his reign and briefly during the reign of Titus on asses struck in 80-81. Mattingly connects the type under Titus with 'the vows undertaken for the first five years of the new reign'. The coin is dated COS VIII which Titus held in 80 (he did not renew the consulship in 81). Unlike the parallel silver issue the bronze lack an IMP number and cannot be more precisely dated. Most likely they were struck in the first half of 80 along with the silver.

Neatly centred with a fantastic portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton09/19/18 at 00:39Nemonater: Awesome style!
T226.jpg
Titus RIC-226159 views As, 10.75g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: GENI P R; S C in field; Genius stg. l., with patera over altar and cornucopiae
RIC 226 (R). BMC 210. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, September 2018.

Genius - 'The spirit of the Roman people' is not a common motif in Flavian coinage. It occurs under Vespasian on rare Spanish military denarii struck early in his reign and briefly during the reign of Titus on asses struck in 80-81. Mattingly connects the type under Titus with 'the vows undertaken for the first five years of the new reign'. The coin is dated COS VIII which Titus held in 80 (he did not renew the consulship in 81). Unlike the parallel silver issue the bronze lack an IMP number and cannot be more precisely dated. Most likely they were struck in the first half of 80 along with the silver.

Neatly centred with a fantastic portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton09/19/18 at 00:36Britanikus: NICE COIN
T226.jpg
Titus RIC-226159 views As, 10.75g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: GENI P R; S C in field; Genius stg. l., with patera over altar and cornucopiae
RIC 226 (R). BMC 210. BNC -.
Acquired from London Ancient Coins, September 2018.

Genius - 'The spirit of the Roman people' is not a common motif in Flavian coinage. It occurs under Vespasian on rare Spanish military denarii struck early in his reign and briefly during the reign of Titus on asses struck in 80-81. Mattingly connects the type under Titus with 'the vows undertaken for the first five years of the new reign'. The coin is dated COS VIII which Titus held in 80 (he did not renew the consulship in 81). Unlike the parallel silver issue the bronze lack an IMP number and cannot be more precisely dated. Most likely they were struck in the first half of 80 along with the silver.

Neatly centred with a fantastic portrait.
10 commentsDavid Atherton09/18/18 at 23:57Mat: Very nice!
T108aa.jpg
Titus RIC-108 (2)101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Curule chair; above, wreath
RIC 108 (C2). BMC 66. RSC 318. BNC 53.
Ex JW Harper Collection.

Most dies of this 'pulvinar' type depict the wreath sitting atop the chair unadorned. Here we see what appears to be some sort of semi-circular backing. Ben Damsky in his paper 'The Throne and Curule Chair types of Titus and Domitian' speculated the semicircle variant may be the result of a literal minded engraver who included the support device that held the wreath in place(!). I'm not quite sure what it is. Possibly it is just some sort added decoration. Regardless, it is a Rare variant of this common 'pulvinar' type. A quick scan of asearch.info turned up 80 specimens with an unadorned chair and only 7 with a semicircular 'frame'.

Well centred and good metal.
3 commentsDavid Atherton02/09/18 at 04:05quadrans: Interesting piece..
T108aa.jpg
Titus RIC-108 (2)101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Curule chair; above, wreath
RIC 108 (C2). BMC 66. RSC 318. BNC 53.
Ex JW Harper Collection.

Most dies of this 'pulvinar' type depict the wreath sitting atop the chair unadorned. Here we see what appears to be some sort of semi-circular backing. Ben Damsky in his paper 'The Throne and Curule Chair types of Titus and Domitian' speculated the semicircle variant may be the result of a literal minded engraver who included the support device that held the wreath in place(!). I'm not quite sure what it is. Possibly it is just some sort added decoration. Regardless, it is a Rare variant of this common 'pulvinar' type. A quick scan of asearch.info turned up 80 specimens with an unadorned chair and only 7 with a semicircular 'frame'.

Well centred and good metal.
3 commentsDavid Atherton02/01/18 at 11:20Jay GT4: Very nice David, mine also has the backing
T108aa.jpg
Titus RIC-108 (2)101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Curule chair; above, wreath
RIC 108 (C2). BMC 66. RSC 318. BNC 53.
Ex JW Harper Collection.

Most dies of this 'pulvinar' type depict the wreath sitting atop the chair unadorned. Here we see what appears to be some sort of semi-circular backing. Ben Damsky in his paper 'The Throne and Curule Chair types of Titus and Domitian' speculated the semicircle variant may be the result of a literal minded engraver who included the support device that held the wreath in place(!). I'm not quite sure what it is. Possibly it is just some sort added decoration. Regardless, it is a Rare variant of this common 'pulvinar' type. A quick scan of asearch.info turned up 80 specimens with an unadorned chair and only 7 with a semicircular 'frame'.

Well centred and good metal.
3 commentsDavid Atherton02/01/18 at 03:28Mat: Thats cool
T104a.jpg
Titus RIC-10481 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome Mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Captives, two, back to back, seated either side of trophy (man on l., woman on r.)
RIC 104(R). BMC 40. RSC 306a. BNC -.
Ex Lanz, eBay, October 2017.

Rare variant of the two captives type with the male and female captives swapping places. The reverse commemorates an Agricolan British victory, perhaps the occasion when his legions reached the river Tay garnering Titus his 15th imperial acclamation. Some scholars in the past have attributed the reverse as a 'Judaea Capta' type, this is incorrect. The two captives echoes a Gallic victory type struck for Julius Caesar. The shields, like those on Caesar's denarii, are Celtic not Judaean in form. Additionally, H. Mattingly in BMCRE II correctly proposed the reverse alluded to a British victory.


Even though the coin is a bit worn it still has good eye appeal. Even wear and well centred.
2 commentsDavid Atherton10/18/17 at 12:09Jay GT4: Very nice
T104a.jpg
Titus RIC-10481 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome Mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Captives, two, back to back, seated either side of trophy (man on l., woman on r.)
RIC 104(R). BMC 40. RSC 306a. BNC -.
Ex Lanz, eBay, October 2017.

Rare variant of the two captives type with the male and female captives swapping places. The reverse commemorates an Agricolan British victory, perhaps the occasion when his legions reached the river Tay garnering Titus his 15th imperial acclamation. Some scholars in the past have attributed the reverse as a 'Judaea Capta' type, this is incorrect. The two captives echoes a Gallic victory type struck for Julius Caesar. The shields, like those on Caesar's denarii, are Celtic not Judaean in form. Additionally, H. Mattingly in BMCRE II correctly proposed the reverse alluded to a British victory.


Even though the coin is a bit worn it still has good eye appeal. Even wear and well centred.
2 commentsDavid Atherton10/18/17 at 05:45Randygeki(h2): Very nice!
T516.jpg
Titus RIC-516147 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.55g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 516 (R). BMC 149. RSC 398. RPC 861 (4 spec.). BNC -.
Ex CNG E400, 28 June 2017, lot 609.

A small issue of Asian cistophori were struck under Titus in 80 or 81 AD. Style and the six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the likely mint. Two types were coined for Titus - Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and Aquila between two standards. These are the only coins of Titus that are identifiable as being struck after the fire of 80 since one of the types commemorates the restoration of the Capitoline Temple. The issue continued into Domitian's reign with the same two reverse types. The fact that Titus' cistophori are much rarer than those of Domitian may indicate they were struck near the end of Titus' reign in 81 rather than 80. The aquila between two standards copies similar reverse types from Nero's denarii and the bronze of Galba. The portraits on Titus' cistophori are in the same style as his pulvinaria denarii.

Struck in fine Roman style. Golden toned with hints of a rainbow hue.
11 commentsDavid Atherton07/28/17 at 08:10maridvnvm: Really great coin.
T516.jpg
Titus RIC-516147 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.55g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 516 (R). BMC 149. RSC 398. RPC 861 (4 spec.). BNC -.
Ex CNG E400, 28 June 2017, lot 609.

A small issue of Asian cistophori were struck under Titus in 80 or 81 AD. Style and the six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the likely mint. Two types were coined for Titus - Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and Aquila between two standards. These are the only coins of Titus that are identifiable as being struck after the fire of 80 since one of the types commemorates the restoration of the Capitoline Temple. The issue continued into Domitian's reign with the same two reverse types. The fact that Titus' cistophori are much rarer than those of Domitian may indicate they were struck near the end of Titus' reign in 81 rather than 80. The aquila between two standards copies similar reverse types from Nero's denarii and the bronze of Galba. The portraits on Titus' cistophori are in the same style as his pulvinaria denarii.

Struck in fine Roman style. Golden toned with hints of a rainbow hue.
11 commentsDavid Atherton07/25/17 at 23:12Nemonater: Ohhhhhhhh, Super Nice!
T124asm.jpg
Titus RIC-124A114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, triangular frame with five palmettes, lituus within triangle
RIC 124A (R3). BMC 61. RSC 313a. BNC 49.
Acquired from eBay, May 2017.

A rare variant of the common seat with triangular frame 'pulvinar' type showing a lituus within the triangle. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes that some specimens of the 3 and 9 palmettes variants show a lituus - with this coin we can now see the 5 palmettes variant does as well.

*Update - This type with lituus has been assigned its own unique RIC number - 124A.*

This denarius was struck possibly to commemorate the religious ceremonies connected to the opening games of the Colosseum.

Despite the wear, a good, solid denarius.
5 commentsDavid Atherton07/23/17 at 11:55David Atherton: Yes Jim, Domitian's first issue also has a the...
T124asm.jpg
Titus RIC-124A114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, triangular frame with five palmettes, lituus within triangle
RIC 124A (R3). BMC 61. RSC 313a. BNC 49.
Acquired from eBay, May 2017.

A rare variant of the common seat with triangular frame 'pulvinar' type showing a lituus within the triangle. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes that some specimens of the 3 and 9 palmettes variants show a lituus - with this coin we can now see the 5 palmettes variant does as well.

*Update - This type with lituus has been assigned its own unique RIC number - 124A.*

This denarius was struck possibly to commemorate the religious ceremonies connected to the opening games of the Colosseum.

Despite the wear, a good, solid denarius.
5 commentsDavid Atherton07/22/17 at 12:58Jim H: Fascinating!!! Has this been found in any of Domi...
T516.jpg
Titus RIC-516147 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.55g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 516 (R). BMC 149. RSC 398. RPC 861 (4 spec.). BNC -.
Ex CNG E400, 28 June 2017, lot 609.

A small issue of Asian cistophori were struck under Titus in 80 or 81 AD. Style and the six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the likely mint. Two types were coined for Titus - Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and Aquila between two standards. These are the only coins of Titus that are identifiable as being struck after the fire of 80 since one of the types commemorates the restoration of the Capitoline Temple. The issue continued into Domitian's reign with the same two reverse types. The fact that Titus' cistophori are much rarer than those of Domitian may indicate they were struck near the end of Titus' reign in 81 rather than 80. The aquila between two standards copies similar reverse types from Nero's denarii and the bronze of Galba. The portraits on Titus' cistophori are in the same style as his pulvinaria denarii.

Struck in fine Roman style. Golden toned with hints of a rainbow hue.
11 commentsDavid Atherton07/19/17 at 03:56ickster: Nice toning on a great example. Congrats!
T516.jpg
Titus RIC-516147 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.55g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 516 (R). BMC 149. RSC 398. RPC 861 (4 spec.). BNC -.
Ex CNG E400, 28 June 2017, lot 609.

A small issue of Asian cistophori were struck under Titus in 80 or 81 AD. Style and the six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the likely mint. Two types were coined for Titus - Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and Aquila between two standards. These are the only coins of Titus that are identifiable as being struck after the fire of 80 since one of the types commemorates the restoration of the Capitoline Temple. The issue continued into Domitian's reign with the same two reverse types. The fact that Titus' cistophori are much rarer than those of Domitian may indicate they were struck near the end of Titus' reign in 81 rather than 80. The aquila between two standards copies similar reverse types from Nero's denarii and the bronze of Galba. The portraits on Titus' cistophori are in the same style as his pulvinaria denarii.

Struck in fine Roman style. Golden toned with hints of a rainbow hue.
11 commentsDavid Atherton07/14/17 at 09:35*Alex: Great coin David.
T516.jpg
Titus RIC-516147 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.55g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 516 (R). BMC 149. RSC 398. RPC 861 (4 spec.). BNC -.
Ex CNG E400, 28 June 2017, lot 609.

A small issue of Asian cistophori were struck under Titus in 80 or 81 AD. Style and the six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the likely mint. Two types were coined for Titus - Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and Aquila between two standards. These are the only coins of Titus that are identifiable as being struck after the fire of 80 since one of the types commemorates the restoration of the Capitoline Temple. The issue continued into Domitian's reign with the same two reverse types. The fact that Titus' cistophori are much rarer than those of Domitian may indicate they were struck near the end of Titus' reign in 81 rather than 80. The aquila between two standards copies similar reverse types from Nero's denarii and the bronze of Galba. The portraits on Titus' cistophori are in the same style as his pulvinaria denarii.

Struck in fine Roman style. Golden toned with hints of a rainbow hue.
11 commentsDavid Atherton07/12/17 at 20:01quadrans: Ohh, nice addition
T516.jpg
Titus RIC-516147 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.55g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 516 (R). BMC 149. RSC 398. RPC 861 (4 spec.). BNC -.
Ex CNG E400, 28 June 2017, lot 609.

A small issue of Asian cistophori were struck under Titus in 80 or 81 AD. Style and the six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the likely mint. Two types were coined for Titus - Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and Aquila between two standards. These are the only coins of Titus that are identifiable as being struck after the fire of 80 since one of the types commemorates the restoration of the Capitoline Temple. The issue continued into Domitian's reign with the same two reverse types. The fact that Titus' cistophori are much rarer than those of Domitian may indicate they were struck near the end of Titus' reign in 81 rather than 80. The aquila between two standards copies similar reverse types from Nero's denarii and the bronze of Galba. The portraits on Titus' cistophori are in the same style as his pulvinaria denarii.

Struck in fine Roman style. Golden toned with hints of a rainbow hue.
11 commentsDavid Atherton07/12/17 at 06:36Randygeki(h2): Awesome coin
T516.jpg
Titus RIC-516147 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.55g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 516 (R). BMC 149. RSC 398. RPC 861 (4 spec.). BNC -.
Ex CNG E400, 28 June 2017, lot 609.

A small issue of Asian cistophori were struck under Titus in 80 or 81 AD. Style and the six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the likely mint. Two types were coined for Titus - Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and Aquila between two standards. These are the only coins of Titus that are identifiable as being struck after the fire of 80 since one of the types commemorates the restoration of the Capitoline Temple. The issue continued into Domitian's reign with the same two reverse types. The fact that Titus' cistophori are much rarer than those of Domitian may indicate they were struck near the end of Titus' reign in 81 rather than 80. The aquila between two standards copies similar reverse types from Nero's denarii and the bronze of Galba. The portraits on Titus' cistophori are in the same style as his pulvinaria denarii.

Struck in fine Roman style. Golden toned with hints of a rainbow hue.
11 commentsDavid Atherton07/12/17 at 06:26FlaviusDomitianus: Beautiful addition, congrats!
T516.jpg
Titus RIC-516147 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.55g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 516 (R). BMC 149. RSC 398. RPC 861 (4 spec.). BNC -.
Ex CNG E400, 28 June 2017, lot 609.

A small issue of Asian cistophori were struck under Titus in 80 or 81 AD. Style and the six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the likely mint. Two types were coined for Titus - Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and Aquila between two standards. These are the only coins of Titus that are identifiable as being struck after the fire of 80 since one of the types commemorates the restoration of the Capitoline Temple. The issue continued into Domitian's reign with the same two reverse types. The fact that Titus' cistophori are much rarer than those of Domitian may indicate they were struck near the end of Titus' reign in 81 rather than 80. The aquila between two standards copies similar reverse types from Nero's denarii and the bronze of Galba. The portraits on Titus' cistophori are in the same style as his pulvinaria denarii.

Struck in fine Roman style. Golden toned with hints of a rainbow hue.
11 commentsDavid Atherton07/12/17 at 05:10Canaan: Perfect!!!
T516.jpg
Titus RIC-516147 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.55g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 516 (R). BMC 149. RSC 398. RPC 861 (4 spec.). BNC -.
Ex CNG E400, 28 June 2017, lot 609.

A small issue of Asian cistophori were struck under Titus in 80 or 81 AD. Style and the six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the likely mint. Two types were coined for Titus - Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and Aquila between two standards. These are the only coins of Titus that are identifiable as being struck after the fire of 80 since one of the types commemorates the restoration of the Capitoline Temple. The issue continued into Domitian's reign with the same two reverse types. The fact that Titus' cistophori are much rarer than those of Domitian may indicate they were struck near the end of Titus' reign in 81 rather than 80. The aquila between two standards copies similar reverse types from Nero's denarii and the bronze of Galba. The portraits on Titus' cistophori are in the same style as his pulvinaria denarii.

Struck in fine Roman style. Golden toned with hints of a rainbow hue.
11 commentsDavid Atherton07/12/17 at 02:15ancientdave: A most excellent addition! Such a lovely portrait ...
T516.jpg
Titus RIC-516147 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.55g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 516 (R). BMC 149. RSC 398. RPC 861 (4 spec.). BNC -.
Ex CNG E400, 28 June 2017, lot 609.

A small issue of Asian cistophori were struck under Titus in 80 or 81 AD. Style and the six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the likely mint. Two types were coined for Titus - Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and Aquila between two standards. These are the only coins of Titus that are identifiable as being struck after the fire of 80 since one of the types commemorates the restoration of the Capitoline Temple. The issue continued into Domitian's reign with the same two reverse types. The fact that Titus' cistophori are much rarer than those of Domitian may indicate they were struck near the end of Titus' reign in 81 rather than 80. The aquila between two standards copies similar reverse types from Nero's denarii and the bronze of Galba. The portraits on Titus' cistophori are in the same style as his pulvinaria denarii.

Struck in fine Roman style. Golden toned with hints of a rainbow hue.
11 commentsDavid Atherton07/11/17 at 21:19Jay GT4: Amazing!
T516.jpg
Titus RIC-516147 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.55g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: Aquila between two standards, one surmounted by a banner, the other by a hand
RIC 516 (R). BMC 149. RSC 398. RPC 861 (4 spec.). BNC -.
Ex CNG E400, 28 June 2017, lot 609.

A small issue of Asian cistophori were struck under Titus in 80 or 81 AD. Style and the six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the likely mint. Two types were coined for Titus - Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and Aquila between two standards. These are the only coins of Titus that are identifiable as being struck after the fire of 80 since one of the types commemorates the restoration of the Capitoline Temple. The issue continued into Domitian's reign with the same two reverse types. The fact that Titus' cistophori are much rarer than those of Domitian may indicate they were struck near the end of Titus' reign in 81 rather than 80. The aquila between two standards copies similar reverse types from Nero's denarii and the bronze of Galba. The portraits on Titus' cistophori are in the same style as his pulvinaria denarii.

Struck in fine Roman style. Golden toned with hints of a rainbow hue.
11 commentsDavid Atherton07/11/17 at 20:57Mat: Very nice!
T91.jpg
Titus RIC 9194 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.55g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (clockwise, inwardly, from low l.); Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 91 (C). BMC 108. RSC 356. BNC 87.
Ex CNG E399, 14 June 2017, lot 486.

Titus struck a small undated issue of quinarii, most of which are fairly rare. This traditional Victory type is copied from quinarii minted by Vespasian.

Struck in a fine and neat style, typical of the mint during this period.
5 commentsDavid Atherton07/06/17 at 05:13ancientdave: Excellent example. So attractive!
T91.jpg
Titus RIC 9194 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.55g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (clockwise, inwardly, from low l.); Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 91 (C). BMC 108. RSC 356. BNC 87.
Ex CNG E399, 14 June 2017, lot 486.

Titus struck a small undated issue of quinarii, most of which are fairly rare. This traditional Victory type is copied from quinarii minted by Vespasian.

Struck in a fine and neat style, typical of the mint during this period.
5 commentsDavid Atherton07/05/17 at 04:31quadrans: Another great coin..
T91.jpg
Titus RIC 9194 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.55g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (clockwise, inwardly, from low l.); Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 91 (C). BMC 108. RSC 356. BNC 87.
Ex CNG E399, 14 June 2017, lot 486.

Titus struck a small undated issue of quinarii, most of which are fairly rare. This traditional Victory type is copied from quinarii minted by Vespasian.

Struck in a fine and neat style, typical of the mint during this period.
5 commentsDavid Atherton06/29/17 at 06:40FlaviusDomitianus: Another fine addition.
T91.jpg
Titus RIC 9194 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.55g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (clockwise, inwardly, from low l.); Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 91 (C). BMC 108. RSC 356. BNC 87.
Ex CNG E399, 14 June 2017, lot 486.

Titus struck a small undated issue of quinarii, most of which are fairly rare. This traditional Victory type is copied from quinarii minted by Vespasian.

Struck in a fine and neat style, typical of the mint during this period.
5 commentsDavid Atherton06/29/17 at 04:26Enodia: i like it!
T91.jpg
Titus RIC 9194 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.55g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (clockwise, inwardly, from low l.); Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 91 (C). BMC 108. RSC 356. BNC 87.
Ex CNG E399, 14 June 2017, lot 486.

Titus struck a small undated issue of quinarii, most of which are fairly rare. This traditional Victory type is copied from quinarii minted by Vespasian.

Struck in a fine and neat style, typical of the mint during this period.
5 commentsDavid Atherton06/29/17 at 01:45Jay GT4: Nice acquisition David
V861.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 861 (1)84 viewsAR Denarius, 3.33g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIAN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS V across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
RIC 861 (C). BMC 191. RSC 59. BNC 166.
Acquired from Sphinx Numismatics, May 2017.

The more uncommon variant of the type showing the eagle clutching a thunderbolt in its talons.

A decent denarius with the 'large head' portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/27/17 at 15:48socalcoins: Very nice!
V861.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 861 (1)84 viewsAR Denarius, 3.33g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIAN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS V across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
RIC 861 (C). BMC 191. RSC 59. BNC 166.
Acquired from Sphinx Numismatics, May 2017.

The more uncommon variant of the type showing the eagle clutching a thunderbolt in its talons.

A decent denarius with the 'large head' portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/25/17 at 23:39NORMAN K: very bold
V861.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 861 (1)84 viewsAR Denarius, 3.33g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIAN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS V across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
RIC 861 (C). BMC 191. RSC 59. BNC 166.
Acquired from Sphinx Numismatics, May 2017.

The more uncommon variant of the type showing the eagle clutching a thunderbolt in its talons.

A decent denarius with the 'large head' portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/17 at 07:59Randygeki(h2): An excellent addition!
V861.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 861 (1)84 viewsAR Denarius, 3.33g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIAN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS V across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
RIC 861 (C). BMC 191. RSC 59. BNC 166.
Acquired from Sphinx Numismatics, May 2017.

The more uncommon variant of the type showing the eagle clutching a thunderbolt in its talons.

A decent denarius with the 'large head' portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/17 at 02:10orfew: Beautiful toning and a great portrait!
V861.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 861 (1)84 viewsAR Denarius, 3.33g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIAN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS V across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
RIC 861 (C). BMC 191. RSC 59. BNC 166.
Acquired from Sphinx Numismatics, May 2017.

The more uncommon variant of the type showing the eagle clutching a thunderbolt in its talons.

A decent denarius with the 'large head' portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/17 at 02:01Mat: Lovely look to it
V861.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 861 (1)84 viewsAR Denarius, 3.33g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIAN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS V across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
RIC 861 (C). BMC 191. RSC 59. BNC 166.
Acquired from Sphinx Numismatics, May 2017.

The more uncommon variant of the type showing the eagle clutching a thunderbolt in its talons.

A decent denarius with the 'large head' portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/17 at 01:11Jay GT4: This was on my wish list. Nice one!
T124asm.jpg
Titus RIC-124A114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, triangular frame with five palmettes, lituus within triangle
RIC 124A (R3). BMC 61. RSC 313a. BNC 49.
Acquired from eBay, May 2017.

A rare variant of the common seat with triangular frame 'pulvinar' type showing a lituus within the triangle. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes that some specimens of the 3 and 9 palmettes variants show a lituus - with this coin we can now see the 5 palmettes variant does as well.

*Update - This type with lituus has been assigned its own unique RIC number - 124A.*

This denarius was struck possibly to commemorate the religious ceremonies connected to the opening games of the Colosseum.

Despite the wear, a good, solid denarius.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/19/17 at 20:28Jay GT4: Nice catch!
T124asm.jpg
Titus RIC-124A114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, triangular frame with five palmettes, lituus within triangle
RIC 124A (R3). BMC 61. RSC 313a. BNC 49.
Acquired from eBay, May 2017.

A rare variant of the common seat with triangular frame 'pulvinar' type showing a lituus within the triangle. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes that some specimens of the 3 and 9 palmettes variants show a lituus - with this coin we can now see the 5 palmettes variant does as well.

*Update - This type with lituus has been assigned its own unique RIC number - 124A.*

This denarius was struck possibly to commemorate the religious ceremonies connected to the opening games of the Colosseum.

Despite the wear, a good, solid denarius.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/19/17 at 13:30Vincent: Very attractive coin...the little wear makes it ev...
T124asm.jpg
Titus RIC-124A114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, triangular frame with five palmettes, lituus within triangle
RIC 124A (R3). BMC 61. RSC 313a. BNC 49.
Acquired from eBay, May 2017.

A rare variant of the common seat with triangular frame 'pulvinar' type showing a lituus within the triangle. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes that some specimens of the 3 and 9 palmettes variants show a lituus - with this coin we can now see the 5 palmettes variant does as well.

*Update - This type with lituus has been assigned its own unique RIC number - 124A.*

This denarius was struck possibly to commemorate the religious ceremonies connected to the opening games of the Colosseum.

Despite the wear, a good, solid denarius.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/19/17 at 06:28FlaviusDomitianus: Excellent eye
T124.jpg
Titus RIC-124c (2)86 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome Mint 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, triangular frame with nine palmettes, lituus within triangle
RIC 124c (C2). BMC 62. RSC 313a. BNC 50.
Acquired from M. Veissid & Co. (eBay), April 2017.

A rare variant of this common 'pulvinar' type showing a lituus within the triangle. Perhaps one in ten dies have this variant. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes that some specimens may show a lituus.

This denarius was struck possibly to commemorate the religious ceremonies connected to the opening games of the Colosseum.

Nice bull-necked portrait struck on a large flan and well centred. One of my favourite portrait types.
4 commentsDavid Atherton04/27/17 at 03:55Randygeki(h2): Neat find
T124.jpg
Titus RIC-124c (2)86 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome Mint 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, triangular frame with nine palmettes, lituus within triangle
RIC 124c (C2). BMC 62. RSC 313a. BNC 50.
Acquired from M. Veissid & Co. (eBay), April 2017.

A rare variant of this common 'pulvinar' type showing a lituus within the triangle. Perhaps one in ten dies have this variant. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes that some specimens may show a lituus.

This denarius was struck possibly to commemorate the religious ceremonies connected to the opening games of the Colosseum.

Nice bull-necked portrait struck on a large flan and well centred. One of my favourite portrait types.
4 commentsDavid Atherton04/25/17 at 11:05Jay GT4: Eagle eyed!
T124.jpg
Titus RIC-124c (2)86 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome Mint 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, triangular frame with nine palmettes, lituus within triangle
RIC 124c (C2). BMC 62. RSC 313a. BNC 50.
Acquired from M. Veissid & Co. (eBay), April 2017.

A rare variant of this common 'pulvinar' type showing a lituus within the triangle. Perhaps one in ten dies have this variant. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes that some specimens may show a lituus.

This denarius was struck possibly to commemorate the religious ceremonies connected to the opening games of the Colosseum.

Nice bull-necked portrait struck on a large flan and well centred. One of my favourite portrait types.
4 commentsDavid Atherton04/25/17 at 08:05FlaviusDomitianus: Nice and interesting
T124.jpg
Titus RIC-124c (2)86 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome Mint 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, triangular frame with nine palmettes, lituus within triangle
RIC 124c (C2). BMC 62. RSC 313a. BNC 50.
Acquired from M. Veissid & Co. (eBay), April 2017.

A rare variant of this common 'pulvinar' type showing a lituus within the triangle. Perhaps one in ten dies have this variant. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes that some specimens may show a lituus.

This denarius was struck possibly to commemorate the religious ceremonies connected to the opening games of the Colosseum.

Nice bull-necked portrait struck on a large flan and well centred. One of my favourite portrait types.
4 commentsDavid Atherton04/25/17 at 05:37okidoki: Nice
titus_as_caesar_concordia.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC-156096 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Antioch Mint, 72-73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESP PO-N TR POT; Bust of Titus, laureate, draped, bearded, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVGVSTI; Concordia std. l., with patera and cornucopiae
RIC 1560 (R2). BMC 514. RSC 44. RPC 1932 (5 spec.). BNC -.
Ex Lanz, eBay, 25 September 2008.

A rare early type of Titus as Caesar from Antioch copying a reverse of Vespasian. Peace and harmony is the theme on display here.

Aside from the off-center obverse, a decent coin from a mint well known for quality control issues at the time.
3 commentsvespasian7004/15/17 at 19:41Jay GT4: Great coin and thanks for pointing out the die mat...
titus_as_caesar_concordia.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC-156096 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Antioch Mint, 72-73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESP PO-N TR POT; Bust of Titus, laureate, draped, bearded, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVGVSTI; Concordia std. l., with patera and cornucopiae
RIC 1560 (R2). BMC 514. RSC 44. RPC 1932 (5 spec.). BNC -.
Ex Lanz, eBay, 25 September 2008.

A rare early type of Titus as Caesar from Antioch copying a reverse of Vespasian. Peace and harmony is the theme on display here.

Aside from the off-center obverse, a decent coin from a mint well known for quality control issues at the time.
3 commentsvespasian7004/15/17 at 19:38quadrans: Nice coin indeed..
T124bb.jpg
Titus RIC-124b71 viewsAR Denarius, 3.43g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, triangular frame with three palmettes
RIC 124b (C2). BMC 61. RSC 313a. BNC 49.

The triangular frame on square seat pulvinaria type comes in three different variants: RIC 124a with five palmettes, RIC 124b with three palmettes (the rarest of the three variants), and RIC 124c with nine palmettes. This 124b is a reverse die match with the RIC 125 plate coin, a left facing portrait variant of the type.

In good style with a neat and fine portrait.
2 commentsDavid Atherton04/11/17 at 07:26FlaviusDomitianus: Sharp eye, nice find.
T124bb.jpg
Titus RIC-124b71 viewsAR Denarius, 3.43g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, triangular frame with three palmettes
RIC 124b (C2). BMC 61. RSC 313a. BNC 49.

The triangular frame on square seat pulvinaria type comes in three different variants: RIC 124a with five palmettes, RIC 124b with three palmettes (the rarest of the three variants), and RIC 124c with nine palmettes. This 124b is a reverse die match with the RIC 125 plate coin, a left facing portrait variant of the type.

In good style with a neat and fine portrait.
2 commentsDavid Atherton04/11/17 at 02:00Jay GT4: Interesting variant
T119A.png
Titus RIC-119A89 viewsAR Denarius, 3.31g
Rome Mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, thunderbolt
RIC 119A. BMC 51 var. RSC 316. BNC 43 var.
Acquired from Yesterday's Change, March 2017.

In the new RIC II this type is described as having a 'winged thunderbolt' above the seat. However, it is sometimes seen with a 'wingless thunderbolt'. The upcoming RIC II Addenda takes note of this and has assigned the wingless type its own catalogue number - RIC 119A.

This denarius is part of a series that was struck for the lectisternium (religious ceremony) celebrating the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD. Each god had its own sacred couch, in Latin they are known as 'pulvinaria', brought out in pairs in the Forum or some such public space. The series commemorates these sacred couches which were set out with 'exuviae' (emblems) representing the gods. The above coin most likely shows the 'pulvinar' of Jupiter and Juno.

Struck slightly off-centre in average style with nice 'cabinet toning'.
2 commentsDavid Atherton04/05/17 at 06:13FlaviusDomitianus: Nice toning
T119A.png
Titus RIC-119A89 viewsAR Denarius, 3.31g
Rome Mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, thunderbolt
RIC 119A. BMC 51 var. RSC 316. BNC 43 var.
Acquired from Yesterday's Change, March 2017.

In the new RIC II this type is described as having a 'winged thunderbolt' above the seat. However, it is sometimes seen with a 'wingless thunderbolt'. The upcoming RIC II Addenda takes note of this and has assigned the wingless type its own catalogue number - RIC 119A.

This denarius is part of a series that was struck for the lectisternium (religious ceremony) celebrating the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD. Each god had its own sacred couch, in Latin they are known as 'pulvinaria', brought out in pairs in the Forum or some such public space. The series commemorates these sacred couches which were set out with 'exuviae' (emblems) representing the gods. The above coin most likely shows the 'pulvinar' of Jupiter and Juno.

Struck slightly off-centre in average style with nice 'cabinet toning'.
2 commentsDavid Atherton04/05/17 at 01:10Jay GT4: Great eye David
V1561.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1561 (2)85 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Antioch Mint, 72-73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT; Bust of Titus, laureate, draped, bearded, r.
Rev: NEP RED; Neptune stg. l., foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
RIC 1561 (C). BMC 516. RSC 122. RPC 1933 ( 14 spec.). BNC 321.
Acquired from Dr Busso Peus Nachfolger, March 2017.

The Neptune type was struck for Vespasian and Titus Caesar at both Rome and Antioch. Likely, it was commemorating their recent sea voyages and safe return to Rome.

I previously acquired a double struck specimen from Harry Sneh 7 years ago that has a few condition issues. Comparatively speaking, I think my new coin is a significant upgrade. Struck on a tight flan, but in good metal and fine style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton04/01/17 at 19:46socalcoins: Nice coin, David!
V1561.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1561 (2)85 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Antioch Mint, 72-73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT; Bust of Titus, laureate, draped, bearded, r.
Rev: NEP RED; Neptune stg. l., foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
RIC 1561 (C). BMC 516. RSC 122. RPC 1933 ( 14 spec.). BNC 321.
Acquired from Dr Busso Peus Nachfolger, March 2017.

The Neptune type was struck for Vespasian and Titus Caesar at both Rome and Antioch. Likely, it was commemorating their recent sea voyages and safe return to Rome.

I previously acquired a double struck specimen from Harry Sneh 7 years ago that has a few condition issues. Comparatively speaking, I think my new coin is a significant upgrade. Struck on a tight flan, but in good metal and fine style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton03/29/17 at 16:48Randygeki(h2): wonderful coin!
V1561.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1561 (2)85 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Antioch Mint, 72-73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT; Bust of Titus, laureate, draped, bearded, r.
Rev: NEP RED; Neptune stg. l., foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
RIC 1561 (C). BMC 516. RSC 122. RPC 1933 ( 14 spec.). BNC 321.
Acquired from Dr Busso Peus Nachfolger, March 2017.

The Neptune type was struck for Vespasian and Titus Caesar at both Rome and Antioch. Likely, it was commemorating their recent sea voyages and safe return to Rome.

I previously acquired a double struck specimen from Harry Sneh 7 years ago that has a few condition issues. Comparatively speaking, I think my new coin is a significant upgrade. Struck on a tight flan, but in good metal and fine style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton03/29/17 at 11:39FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example.
V1561.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1561 (2)85 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Antioch Mint, 72-73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT; Bust of Titus, laureate, draped, bearded, r.
Rev: NEP RED; Neptune stg. l., foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
RIC 1561 (C). BMC 516. RSC 122. RPC 1933 ( 14 spec.). BNC 321.
Acquired from Dr Busso Peus Nachfolger, March 2017.

The Neptune type was struck for Vespasian and Titus Caesar at both Rome and Antioch. Likely, it was commemorating their recent sea voyages and safe return to Rome.

I previously acquired a double struck specimen from Harry Sneh 7 years ago that has a few condition issues. Comparatively speaking, I think my new coin is a significant upgrade. Struck on a tight flan, but in good metal and fine style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton03/29/17 at 10:49Jay GT4: A respectable example. Nice upgrade
T35b.jpg
Titus RIC 35139 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, Laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Venus stg. r. leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 35 (R). BMC 11. RSC 268a. BNC -.
Ex CNG E358, 26 August 2015, lot 323.

Titus' 14th imperial acclamation dates between 1 July to at least before 8 September 79 as two documents indicate - one a letter Titus addressed to the city of Munigua on 7 September, and the other a military diploma dated 8 September, both still show him as IMP XIIII. Effectively, this coin was struck during the time of the Mount Vesuvius eruption on 24 August, although the traditional date of the disaster is now disputed and may possibly have been later in the year.

Left facing portraits of Titus are much rarer than right facing, perhaps to a ratio of 1:10. This left facing Venus type from the second issue after 1 July is extremely difficult to find. Listed simply as 'rare' by the new RIC, this is perhaps one of those types which might be a bit rarer than the rating indicates.

Somewhat worn, but nicely centered and in fine style. I've noticed over the years that those denarii of Titus with dots in the legend tend to be of a finer style, such as this coin.
8 commentsDavid Atherton03/18/17 at 12:10imperator: Great
titus_bull1a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 858109 viewsAR Denarius, 3.25g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIAN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS V (high in field); bull stg. r.
RIC 858 (R). BMC 186. RSC 52. BNC 163.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This denarius of Titus as Caesar from 76 AD obviously shows a bull (even those with a passing knowledge of farm animal anatomy can tell the difference) and not a cow, but the question is why was this type minted with both sexes portrayed, sometimes ambiguously?

The BMCRE proffers this type as a reference to the famous 'Cow of Myron' statue and the coin commemorates the placing of it in Vespasian's new Temple of Peace. If this is so, why do some of the types show a bull?

Perhaps the type is nothing more than an agricultural reference like so many of the other denarii the Flavians issued in the last half of Vespasian's reign.

Decent coin with good metal and a well rendered bull on the reverse.
1 commentsDavid Atherton02/09/17 at 01:28Jay GT4: Now that's a bull!
V873_var.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 873 (2)97 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome Mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: COS V across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
RIC 873 (R2). BMC p. 36 note. RSC 60. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2016.

The common eagle and altar type was struck for both Vespasian and Titus Caesar. Here is a very scarce left facing portrait example of the type. However, what interested me about this coin was the reverse, not the rare obverse. What isn't noted in the references and catalogues is the fact this type comes in two variants - one with eagle clutching a thunderbolt in its talons and the other without thunderbolt. Doug Smith proposes a possible third variant with eagle clutching branches. RIC generically describes the reverse as eagle with 'thunderbolt in claws', so this coin without thunderbolt should be regarded as a variant. I have another example of the type showing the eagle clutching a thunderbolt. The coins with plain altars actually seem to be more common.

Nicely toned and in good style.

Special thanks to Doug Smith.


4 commentsDavid Atherton12/20/16 at 17:06quadrans: Nice find..
V873_var.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 873 (2)97 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome Mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: COS V across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
RIC 873 (R2). BMC p. 36 note. RSC 60. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2016.

The common eagle and altar type was struck for both Vespasian and Titus Caesar. Here is a very scarce left facing portrait example of the type. However, what interested me about this coin was the reverse, not the rare obverse. What isn't noted in the references and catalogues is the fact this type comes in two variants - one with eagle clutching a thunderbolt in its talons and the other without thunderbolt. Doug Smith proposes a possible third variant with eagle clutching branches. RIC generically describes the reverse as eagle with 'thunderbolt in claws', so this coin without thunderbolt should be regarded as a variant. I have another example of the type showing the eagle clutching a thunderbolt. The coins with plain altars actually seem to be more common.

Nicely toned and in good style.

Special thanks to Doug Smith.


4 commentsDavid Atherton12/20/16 at 16:21Jay GT4: Always liked this type but never noticed the varia...
V873_var.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 873 (2)97 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome Mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: COS V across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
RIC 873 (R2). BMC p. 36 note. RSC 60. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2016.

The common eagle and altar type was struck for both Vespasian and Titus Caesar. Here is a very scarce left facing portrait example of the type. However, what interested me about this coin was the reverse, not the rare obverse. What isn't noted in the references and catalogues is the fact this type comes in two variants - one with eagle clutching a thunderbolt in its talons and the other without thunderbolt. Doug Smith proposes a possible third variant with eagle clutching branches. RIC generically describes the reverse as eagle with 'thunderbolt in claws', so this coin without thunderbolt should be regarded as a variant. I have another example of the type showing the eagle clutching a thunderbolt. The coins with plain altars actually seem to be more common.

Nicely toned and in good style.

Special thanks to Doug Smith.


4 commentsDavid Atherton12/20/16 at 11:59Nemonater: Sharp eyes to spot this variant, beautiful coin!
V873_var.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 873 (2)97 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome Mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: COS V across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
RIC 873 (R2). BMC p. 36 note. RSC 60. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2016.

The common eagle and altar type was struck for both Vespasian and Titus Caesar. Here is a very scarce left facing portrait example of the type. However, what interested me about this coin was the reverse, not the rare obverse. What isn't noted in the references and catalogues is the fact this type comes in two variants - one with eagle clutching a thunderbolt in its talons and the other without thunderbolt. Doug Smith proposes a possible third variant with eagle clutching branches. RIC generically describes the reverse as eagle with 'thunderbolt in claws', so this coin without thunderbolt should be regarded as a variant. I have another example of the type showing the eagle clutching a thunderbolt. The coins with plain altars actually seem to be more common.

Nicely toned and in good style.

Special thanks to Doug Smith.


4 commentsDavid Atherton12/20/16 at 11:16FlaviusDomitianus: Very interesting!
titus_as_caesar_l_eagle.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 873 (1)150 viewsAR Denarius, 3.39g
Rome Mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: COS V across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
RIC 873 (R2). BMC p. 36 note. RSC 60. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

A very rare (R2) left facing example of the type.

Both obverse and reverse are off-center, but both major designs are intact and it's a better example than the RIC plate coin. This portrait seems to portray an angry looking Titus, a not so usual occurrence!
2 commentsDavid Atherton12/20/16 at 05:18okidoki: indeed very Beautiful
T95.jpg
Titus RIC 95110 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.58g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (anti-clockwise, outwardly, from high l.); Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 95 (R2). BMC 111. RSC 370b. BNC -.
Ex Naville 27, 27 November 2016, lot 494. Ex E.E. Clain-Stefanelli Collection.

An exceedingly rare quinarius of Titus with left facing portrait. This is only the second specimen I've seen in trade.

Dark toning with a neat and fine portrait. Unusually, the two 'banker's marks' are on the reverse appear to have been repaired in antiquity using the same metal originally removed.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/19/16 at 04:51ancientdave: Very nice, a great addition!
T95.jpg
Titus RIC 95110 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.58g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (anti-clockwise, outwardly, from high l.); Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 95 (R2). BMC 111. RSC 370b. BNC -.
Ex Naville 27, 27 November 2016, lot 494. Ex E.E. Clain-Stefanelli Collection.

An exceedingly rare quinarius of Titus with left facing portrait. This is only the second specimen I've seen in trade.

Dark toning with a neat and fine portrait. Unusually, the two 'banker's marks' are on the reverse appear to have been repaired in antiquity using the same metal originally removed.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/15/16 at 22:08Jay GT4: Drool!
T95.jpg
Titus RIC 95110 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.58g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (anti-clockwise, outwardly, from high l.); Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 95 (R2). BMC 111. RSC 370b. BNC -.
Ex Naville 27, 27 November 2016, lot 494. Ex E.E. Clain-Stefanelli Collection.

An exceedingly rare quinarius of Titus with left facing portrait. This is only the second specimen I've seen in trade.

Dark toning with a neat and fine portrait. Unusually, the two 'banker's marks' are on the reverse appear to have been repaired in antiquity using the same metal originally removed.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/15/16 at 10:13Nemonater: I had no doubt this remarkable coin would end up i...
T95.jpg
Titus RIC 95110 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.58g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (anti-clockwise, outwardly, from high l.); Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 95 (R2). BMC 111. RSC 370b. BNC -.
Ex Naville 27, 27 November 2016, lot 494. Ex E.E. Clain-Stefanelli Collection.

An exceedingly rare quinarius of Titus with left facing portrait. This is only the second specimen I've seen in trade.

Dark toning with a neat and fine portrait. Unusually, the two 'banker's marks' are on the reverse appear to have been repaired in antiquity using the same metal originally removed.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/15/16 at 08:32FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition, congrats!
T95.jpg
Titus RIC 95110 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.58g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (anti-clockwise, outwardly, from high l.); Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 95 (R2). BMC 111. RSC 370b. BNC -.
Ex Naville 27, 27 November 2016, lot 494. Ex E.E. Clain-Stefanelli Collection.

An exceedingly rare quinarius of Titus with left facing portrait. This is only the second specimen I've seen in trade.

Dark toning with a neat and fine portrait. Unusually, the two 'banker's marks' are on the reverse appear to have been repaired in antiquity using the same metal originally removed.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/15/16 at 04:23Mat: Nice addition, love the tone
T47aa.jpg
Titus RIC 4788 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Rome Mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Rostral column, ornamented at sides with beaks of ships and surmounted by a statue, radiate, naked except for cloak, standing front, holding vertical spear in r. hand and parazonium at side in l.
RIC 47 (R). BMC 28. RSC 291. BNC 27.
Ex Heritage, eBay, November 2016. Formerly in NGC holder 4252958-018.

The reverse is a carry-over type from the last issue of Vespasian. Extremely rare with left facing portrait. This is the first specimen I've seen in trade in over 12 years.

Worn, but in good metal and fairly centred.
3 commentsDavid Atherton11/26/16 at 00:34Nemonater: A rare treasure!
T47aa.jpg
Titus RIC 4788 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Rome Mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Rostral column, ornamented at sides with beaks of ships and surmounted by a statue, radiate, naked except for cloak, standing front, holding vertical spear in r. hand and parazonium at side in l.
RIC 47 (R). BMC 28. RSC 291. BNC 27.
Ex Heritage, eBay, November 2016. Formerly in NGC holder 4252958-018.

The reverse is a carry-over type from the last issue of Vespasian. Extremely rare with left facing portrait. This is the first specimen I've seen in trade in over 12 years.

Worn, but in good metal and fairly centred.
3 commentsDavid Atherton11/25/16 at 19:30socalcoins: Love those left-facing portraits!
T47aa.jpg
Titus RIC 4788 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Rome Mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Rostral column, ornamented at sides with beaks of ships and surmounted by a statue, radiate, naked except for cloak, standing front, holding vertical spear in r. hand and parazonium at side in l.
RIC 47 (R). BMC 28. RSC 291. BNC 27.
Ex Heritage, eBay, November 2016. Formerly in NGC holder 4252958-018.

The reverse is a carry-over type from the last issue of Vespasian. Extremely rare with left facing portrait. This is the first specimen I've seen in trade in over 12 years.

Worn, but in good metal and fairly centred.
3 commentsDavid Atherton11/14/16 at 20:50Jay GT4: Great rarity!
V1485a.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC-148586 viewsAR Denarius 3.28g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: FIDES PVBL; Hands clasped over caduceus, two poppies and two corn ears
RIC 1485 (R). BMC p. 102 note. RSC 87. RPC 1459 (2 spec.). BNC 375.
Ex eBay, October 2016.

A rare type copied from Rome and struck presumably at Ephesus, although the identity of the mint is not certain. The issue is often wrought with mistakes in the form of blundered legends and mules. This denarius is happily correct!

Stylish portrait and nearly full legends.
3 commentsDavid Atherton11/03/16 at 03:20ancientdave: Very nice! Love that reverse.
V1485a.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC-148586 viewsAR Denarius 3.28g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: FIDES PVBL; Hands clasped over caduceus, two poppies and two corn ears
RIC 1485 (R). BMC p. 102 note. RSC 87. RPC 1459 (2 spec.). BNC 375.
Ex eBay, October 2016.

A rare type copied from Rome and struck presumably at Ephesus, although the identity of the mint is not certain. The issue is often wrought with mistakes in the form of blundered legends and mules. This denarius is happily correct!

Stylish portrait and nearly full legends.
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/18/16 at 18:15quadrans: Yes I like it
V1485a.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC-148586 viewsAR Denarius 3.28g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: FIDES PVBL; Hands clasped over caduceus, two poppies and two corn ears
RIC 1485 (R). BMC p. 102 note. RSC 87. RPC 1459 (2 spec.). BNC 375.
Ex eBay, October 2016.

A rare type copied from Rome and struck presumably at Ephesus, although the identity of the mint is not certain. The issue is often wrought with mistakes in the form of blundered legends and mules. This denarius is happily correct!

Stylish portrait and nearly full legends.
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/18/16 at 08:02FlaviusDomitianus: I like this mint!
titus_quin1.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 535114 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.60g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP P TR P CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 535 (R). BMC 92. RSC 374. BNC 79.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection, acquired from Tom Cederlind. Ex Baldwin's Auction 42, 26 September 2005, lot 288 (part). Ex William C. Boyd Collection, acquired from W.S. Lincoln, February 1896.

This fairly rare Titus as Caesar quinarius from 73 AD is my first quinarius, so I was quite thrilled to receive it.

Not only is the coin rare, but it has an interesting provenance. It came with a tag from the 19th century William C. Boyd (1840-1906) collection. As the tag indicates, he purchased the coin from W.S. Lincoln of Oxford St. in London. Roman history combined with a Victorian era numismatic souvenir, what more can you ask for?

In regards to the denomination itself, I'm not quite sure why quinarii were minted in the imperial era. Were they minted to make up required sums for imperial donatives as A Dictionary of Ancient Roman Coins states, or were they minted as presentation pieces to be given away at special occasions?
2 commentsDavid Atherton08/18/16 at 00:33Nemonater: A beautiful coin, great provenance! I just realize...
V532sm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 532110 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.40g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP P TR P CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 532 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from GB Collection, June 2016.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Titus Caesar in 73, the year of his joint censorship with Vespasian. What makes this coin notable is the spelling of 'AVGVST' in the reverse legend. The more common quinarii from the issue spell it 'AVGVSTI', although they too are rare. Apparently this is the second known specimen, the other is cited in the new RIC II and is held by the Museo Nazionale Romano in Rome.

For a quinarius, this is in fairly good condition. Well centred with an agreeable portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/26/16 at 22:05Nemonater: Perfectly centered, great portrait. Very nice!
V532sm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 532110 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.40g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP P TR P CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 532 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from GB Collection, June 2016.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Titus Caesar in 73, the year of his joint censorship with Vespasian. What makes this coin notable is the spelling of 'AVGVST' in the reverse legend. The more common quinarii from the issue spell it 'AVGVSTI', although they too are rare. Apparently this is the second known specimen, the other is cited in the new RIC II and is held by the Museo Nazionale Romano in Rome.

For a quinarius, this is in fairly good condition. Well centred with an agreeable portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/26/16 at 15:48Sam: Nice find.
V532sm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 532110 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.40g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP P TR P CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 532 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from GB Collection, June 2016.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Titus Caesar in 73, the year of his joint censorship with Vespasian. What makes this coin notable is the spelling of 'AVGVST' in the reverse legend. The more common quinarii from the issue spell it 'AVGVSTI', although they too are rare. Apparently this is the second known specimen, the other is cited in the new RIC II and is held by the Museo Nazionale Romano in Rome.

For a quinarius, this is in fairly good condition. Well centred with an agreeable portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/26/16 at 08:26FlaviusDomitianus: Great find, congrats!
V532sm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 532110 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.40g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP P TR P CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 532 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from GB Collection, June 2016.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Titus Caesar in 73, the year of his joint censorship with Vespasian. What makes this coin notable is the spelling of 'AVGVST' in the reverse legend. The more common quinarii from the issue spell it 'AVGVSTI', although they too are rare. Apparently this is the second known specimen, the other is cited in the new RIC II and is held by the Museo Nazionale Romano in Rome.

For a quinarius, this is in fairly good condition. Well centred with an agreeable portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/26/16 at 04:12quadrans: Great one...
V532sm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 532110 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.40g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP P TR P CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 532 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from GB Collection, June 2016.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Titus Caesar in 73, the year of his joint censorship with Vespasian. What makes this coin notable is the spelling of 'AVGVST' in the reverse legend. The more common quinarii from the issue spell it 'AVGVSTI', although they too are rare. Apparently this is the second known specimen, the other is cited in the new RIC II and is held by the Museo Nazionale Romano in Rome.

For a quinarius, this is in fairly good condition. Well centred with an agreeable portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/26/16 at 03:23Mat: Nice little capture
V532sm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 532110 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.40g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP P TR P CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 532 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from GB Collection, June 2016.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Titus Caesar in 73, the year of his joint censorship with Vespasian. What makes this coin notable is the spelling of 'AVGVST' in the reverse legend. The more common quinarii from the issue spell it 'AVGVSTI', although they too are rare. Apparently this is the second known specimen, the other is cited in the new RIC II and is held by the Museo Nazionale Romano in Rome.

For a quinarius, this is in fairly good condition. Well centred with an agreeable portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/26/16 at 01:36Jay GT4: Awesome!
V528A.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 528A99 viewsAR Denarius, 3.36g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: NEP RED; Neptune stg. l., r. foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
RIC 528A. BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 637. Ex Gorny & Mosch 122, 10 March 2003, lot 2043 = 113, 18 October 2001, lot 5729.

An unpublished Neptune type with CENS in the obverse legend. The coin will be 528A (under Vespasian) in the RIC II Addenda. It fits nicely alongside my unpublished V529A Salus from the same series. I think there are still a few other unknown types that will surface for this series - this Neptune reverse for the corresponding Vespasian issue is one that so far is awaiting discovery.

A beautiful denarius in hand with an amazing early portrait. The other two denarii I have from this series also have exemplary portraits. An issue style wise to take note of then.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/22/16 at 02:12Nemonater: A great portrait and fantastic provenance!
T23.JPG
Titus RIC 23114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.00g
Rome Mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 23 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.

This is the second known specimen of an extremely rare portrait left Ceres type. The only other known specimen was in the Harry Sneh collection and was sold in the Gemini IX sale, 8 January, lot 333 (RIC plate coin). My coin shares an obverse die. It's not often that a second specimen of a unique Flavian type turns up, especially for Titus!

Nicely toned with good eye appeal despite the wear and a few scratches.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/31/16 at 09:36Nemonater: An enviable coin!
T23.JPG
Titus RIC 23114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.00g
Rome Mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 23 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.

This is the second known specimen of an extremely rare portrait left Ceres type. The only other known specimen was in the Harry Sneh collection and was sold in the Gemini IX sale, 8 January, lot 333 (RIC plate coin). My coin shares an obverse die. It's not often that a second specimen of a unique Flavian type turns up, especially for Titus!

Nicely toned with good eye appeal despite the wear and a few scratches.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/30/16 at 19:47Jay GT4: Love left facing Flavians!
T23.JPG
Titus RIC 23114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.00g
Rome Mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 23 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.

This is the second known specimen of an extremely rare portrait left Ceres type. The only other known specimen was in the Harry Sneh collection and was sold in the Gemini IX sale, 8 January, lot 333 (RIC plate coin). My coin shares an obverse die. It's not often that a second specimen of a unique Flavian type turns up, especially for Titus!

Nicely toned with good eye appeal despite the wear and a few scratches.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/30/16 at 14:21HELEN S: Amazing and extra special with its rarity
T23.JPG
Titus RIC 23114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.00g
Rome Mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 23 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.

This is the second known specimen of an extremely rare portrait left Ceres type. The only other known specimen was in the Harry Sneh collection and was sold in the Gemini IX sale, 8 January, lot 333 (RIC plate coin). My coin shares an obverse die. It's not often that a second specimen of a unique Flavian type turns up, especially for Titus!

Nicely toned with good eye appeal despite the wear and a few scratches.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/30/16 at 12:04Mat: Nice find, congrats.
T23.JPG
Titus RIC 23114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.00g
Rome Mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 23 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.

This is the second known specimen of an extremely rare portrait left Ceres type. The only other known specimen was in the Harry Sneh collection and was sold in the Gemini IX sale, 8 January, lot 333 (RIC plate coin). My coin shares an obverse die. It's not often that a second specimen of a unique Flavian type turns up, especially for Titus!

Nicely toned with good eye appeal despite the wear and a few scratches.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/30/16 at 07:08FlaviusDomitianus: Excellent rarity.
T23.JPG
Titus RIC 23114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.00g
Rome Mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 23 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.

This is the second known specimen of an extremely rare portrait left Ceres type. The only other known specimen was in the Harry Sneh collection and was sold in the Gemini IX sale, 8 January, lot 333 (RIC plate coin). My coin shares an obverse die. It's not often that a second specimen of a unique Flavian type turns up, especially for Titus!

Nicely toned with good eye appeal despite the wear and a few scratches.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/30/16 at 04:24quadrans: Congratulation..
V556sm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 55664 viewsAR Denarius, 2.57g
Rome Mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PONTIF TRI POT; Titus std. r. on curule chair, with sceptre and branch
RIC 556 (C). BMC 116. RSC 169. BNC -.
Acquired from CGB, May 2016.

A reverse type which copies the famous 'Tribute Penny' reverse of Tiberius, but instead of a female figure we see Titus seated. The type was correspondingly struck for Vespasian which resulted in many rare mules. This denarius actually has the correct legends for Titus Caesar. Unusually for Rome it has a twelve o'clock die axis.

A nice early portrait struck on a large flan.
1 commentsDavid Atherton05/16/16 at 12:46Mat: Despite the wear its still a nice looking coin.
T515d.jpg
Titus RIC-515212 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.64g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 515 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1948. RSC -. RPC 860 (3 spec.). BNC 111.
Acquired from Calgary Coin, 30 November 2015. Ex MS collection. Ex Berk 124, 3 January 2002, lot 448.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. The temple being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. A cistophorus commemorating the rebuilding of the structure was struck for Domitian but it was not until 1948 with the discovery of this reverse type for Titus when the BM acquired a specimen was the type known to be minted for Titus. Needless to say it is extremely rare. Since 1948 seven other examples have surfaced, four of which are in public collections. A.M. Woodward speculates the type for Domitian is actually a hybrid struck from carry-over dies intended for Titus. This cistophorus was minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor. The style and die axis are similar to the denarii from Rome during the same period, firmly placing it to that mint. This coin is an obverse die match with Gemini IX, lot 458.

A wonderful 'chunky' coin in hand in good style.
12 commentsDavid Atherton12/13/15 at 19:40Randygeki(h2): Sweet coin!
T515d.jpg
Titus RIC-515212 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.64g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 515 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1948. RSC -. RPC 860 (3 spec.). BNC 111.
Acquired from Calgary Coin, 30 November 2015. Ex MS collection. Ex Berk 124, 3 January 2002, lot 448.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. The temple being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. A cistophorus commemorating the rebuilding of the structure was struck for Domitian but it was not until 1948 with the discovery of this reverse type for Titus when the BM acquired a specimen was the type known to be minted for Titus. Needless to say it is extremely rare. Since 1948 seven other examples have surfaced, four of which are in public collections. A.M. Woodward speculates the type for Domitian is actually a hybrid struck from carry-over dies intended for Titus. This cistophorus was minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor. The style and die axis are similar to the denarii from Rome during the same period, firmly placing it to that mint. This coin is an obverse die match with Gemini IX, lot 458.

A wonderful 'chunky' coin in hand in good style.
12 commentsDavid Atherton12/08/15 at 20:06ancientdave: Wow! What a find, David! Congrats!
T515d.jpg
Titus RIC-515212 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.64g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 515 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1948. RSC -. RPC 860 (3 spec.). BNC 111.
Acquired from Calgary Coin, 30 November 2015. Ex MS collection. Ex Berk 124, 3 January 2002, lot 448.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. The temple being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. A cistophorus commemorating the rebuilding of the structure was struck for Domitian but it was not until 1948 with the discovery of this reverse type for Titus when the BM acquired a specimen was the type known to be minted for Titus. Needless to say it is extremely rare. Since 1948 seven other examples have surfaced, four of which are in public collections. A.M. Woodward speculates the type for Domitian is actually a hybrid struck from carry-over dies intended for Titus. This cistophorus was minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor. The style and die axis are similar to the denarii from Rome during the same period, firmly placing it to that mint. This coin is an obverse die match with Gemini IX, lot 458.

A wonderful 'chunky' coin in hand in good style.
12 commentsDavid Atherton12/08/15 at 10:36Potator II: Most interesting coin, love the reverse.
T515d.jpg
Titus RIC-515212 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.64g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 515 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1948. RSC -. RPC 860 (3 spec.). BNC 111.
Acquired from Calgary Coin, 30 November 2015. Ex MS collection. Ex Berk 124, 3 January 2002, lot 448.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. The temple being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. A cistophorus commemorating the rebuilding of the structure was struck for Domitian but it was not until 1948 with the discovery of this reverse type for Titus when the BM acquired a specimen was the type known to be minted for Titus. Needless to say it is extremely rare. Since 1948 seven other examples have surfaced, four of which are in public collections. A.M. Woodward speculates the type for Domitian is actually a hybrid struck from carry-over dies intended for Titus. This cistophorus was minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor. The style and die axis are similar to the denarii from Rome during the same period, firmly placing it to that mint. This coin is an obverse die match with Gemini IX, lot 458.

A wonderful 'chunky' coin in hand in good style.
12 commentsDavid Atherton12/08/15 at 04:42n.igma: A top notch rarity - great!
T515d.jpg
Titus RIC-515212 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.64g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 515 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1948. RSC -. RPC 860 (3 spec.). BNC 111.
Acquired from Calgary Coin, 30 November 2015. Ex MS collection. Ex Berk 124, 3 January 2002, lot 448.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. The temple being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. A cistophorus commemorating the rebuilding of the structure was struck for Domitian but it was not until 1948 with the discovery of this reverse type for Titus when the BM acquired a specimen was the type known to be minted for Titus. Needless to say it is extremely rare. Since 1948 seven other examples have surfaced, four of which are in public collections. A.M. Woodward speculates the type for Domitian is actually a hybrid struck from carry-over dies intended for Titus. This cistophorus was minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor. The style and die axis are similar to the denarii from Rome during the same period, firmly placing it to that mint. This coin is an obverse die match with Gemini IX, lot 458.

A wonderful 'chunky' coin in hand in good style.
12 commentsDavid Atherton12/08/15 at 02:18ickster: Nice acquisition, and thanks for the informative d...
T515d.jpg
Titus RIC-515212 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.64g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 515 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1948. RSC -. RPC 860 (3 spec.). BNC 111.
Acquired from Calgary Coin, 30 November 2015. Ex MS collection. Ex Berk 124, 3 January 2002, lot 448.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. The temple being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. A cistophorus commemorating the rebuilding of the structure was struck for Domitian but it was not until 1948 with the discovery of this reverse type for Titus when the BM acquired a specimen was the type known to be minted for Titus. Needless to say it is extremely rare. Since 1948 seven other examples have surfaced, four of which are in public collections. A.M. Woodward speculates the type for Domitian is actually a hybrid struck from carry-over dies intended for Titus. This cistophorus was minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor. The style and die axis are similar to the denarii from Rome during the same period, firmly placing it to that mint. This coin is an obverse die match with Gemini IX, lot 458.

A wonderful 'chunky' coin in hand in good style.
12 commentsDavid Atherton12/07/15 at 20:50Jay GT4: Oh yeah! That's what I'm talking about!
T515d.jpg
Titus RIC-515212 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.64g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 515 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1948. RSC -. RPC 860 (3 spec.). BNC 111.
Acquired from Calgary Coin, 30 November 2015. Ex MS collection. Ex Berk 124, 3 January 2002, lot 448.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. The temple being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. A cistophorus commemorating the rebuilding of the structure was struck for Domitian but it was not until 1948 with the discovery of this reverse type for Titus when the BM acquired a specimen was the type known to be minted for Titus. Needless to say it is extremely rare. Since 1948 seven other examples have surfaced, four of which are in public collections. A.M. Woodward speculates the type for Domitian is actually a hybrid struck from carry-over dies intended for Titus. This cistophorus was minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor. The style and die axis are similar to the denarii from Rome during the same period, firmly placing it to that mint. This coin is an obverse die match with Gemini IX, lot 458.

A wonderful 'chunky' coin in hand in good style.
12 commentsDavid Atherton12/07/15 at 20:03Nemonater: Large, extremely rare and important! How can you b...
T515d.jpg
Titus RIC-515212 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.64g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 515 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1948. RSC -. RPC 860 (3 spec.). BNC 111.
Acquired from Calgary Coin, 30 November 2015. Ex MS collection. Ex Berk 124, 3 January 2002, lot 448.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. The temple being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. A cistophorus commemorating the rebuilding of the structure was struck for Domitian but it was not until 1948 with the discovery of this reverse type for Titus when the BM acquired a specimen was the type known to be minted for Titus. Needless to say it is extremely rare. Since 1948 seven other examples have surfaced, four of which are in public collections. A.M. Woodward speculates the type for Domitian is actually a hybrid struck from carry-over dies intended for Titus. This cistophorus was minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor. The style and die axis are similar to the denarii from Rome during the same period, firmly placing it to that mint. This coin is an obverse die match with Gemini IX, lot 458.

A wonderful 'chunky' coin in hand in good style.
12 commentsDavid Atherton12/07/15 at 19:11quadrans: Nice Cistophorus..
T515d.jpg
Titus RIC-515212 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.64g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 515 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1948. RSC -. RPC 860 (3 spec.). BNC 111.
Acquired from Calgary Coin, 30 November 2015. Ex MS collection. Ex Berk 124, 3 January 2002, lot 448.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. The temple being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. A cistophorus commemorating the rebuilding of the structure was struck for Domitian but it was not until 1948 with the discovery of this reverse type for Titus when the BM acquired a specimen was the type known to be minted for Titus. Needless to say it is extremely rare. Since 1948 seven other examples have surfaced, four of which are in public collections. A.M. Woodward speculates the type for Domitian is actually a hybrid struck from carry-over dies intended for Titus. This cistophorus was minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor. The style and die axis are similar to the denarii from Rome during the same period, firmly placing it to that mint. This coin is an obverse die match with Gemini IX, lot 458.

A wonderful 'chunky' coin in hand in good style.
12 commentsDavid Atherton12/07/15 at 18:09FlaviusDomitianus: It would make a nice pair with my Domitian
T515d.jpg
Titus RIC-515212 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.64g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 515 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1948. RSC -. RPC 860 (3 spec.). BNC 111.
Acquired from Calgary Coin, 30 November 2015. Ex MS collection. Ex Berk 124, 3 January 2002, lot 448.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. The temple being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. A cistophorus commemorating the rebuilding of the structure was struck for Domitian but it was not until 1948 with the discovery of this reverse type for Titus when the BM acquired a specimen was the type known to be minted for Titus. Needless to say it is extremely rare. Since 1948 seven other examples have surfaced, four of which are in public collections. A.M. Woodward speculates the type for Domitian is actually a hybrid struck from carry-over dies intended for Titus. This cistophorus was minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor. The style and die axis are similar to the denarii from Rome during the same period, firmly placing it to that mint. This coin is an obverse die match with Gemini IX, lot 458.

A wonderful 'chunky' coin in hand in good style.
12 commentsDavid Atherton12/07/15 at 14:05Mat: What a beauty, big portrait but the reverse, wow! ...
T515d.jpg
Titus RIC-515212 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.64g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 515 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1948. RSC -. RPC 860 (3 spec.). BNC 111.
Acquired from Calgary Coin, 30 November 2015. Ex MS collection. Ex Berk 124, 3 January 2002, lot 448.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. The temple being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. A cistophorus commemorating the rebuilding of the structure was struck for Domitian but it was not until 1948 with the discovery of this reverse type for Titus when the BM acquired a specimen was the type known to be minted for Titus. Needless to say it is extremely rare. Since 1948 seven other examples have surfaced, four of which are in public collections. A.M. Woodward speculates the type for Domitian is actually a hybrid struck from carry-over dies intended for Titus. This cistophorus was minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor. The style and die axis are similar to the denarii from Rome during the same period, firmly placing it to that mint. This coin is an obverse die match with Gemini IX, lot 458.

A wonderful 'chunky' coin in hand in good style.
12 commentsDavid Atherton12/07/15 at 13:07Molinari: Great coin that will only improve with toning!
T515d.jpg
Titus RIC-515212 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.64g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 515 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1948. RSC -. RPC 860 (3 spec.). BNC 111.
Acquired from Calgary Coin, 30 November 2015. Ex MS collection. Ex Berk 124, 3 January 2002, lot 448.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. The temple being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. A cistophorus commemorating the rebuilding of the structure was struck for Domitian but it was not until 1948 with the discovery of this reverse type for Titus when the BM acquired a specimen was the type known to be minted for Titus. Needless to say it is extremely rare. Since 1948 seven other examples have surfaced, four of which are in public collections. A.M. Woodward speculates the type for Domitian is actually a hybrid struck from carry-over dies intended for Titus. This cistophorus was minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor. The style and die axis are similar to the denarii from Rome during the same period, firmly placing it to that mint. This coin is an obverse die match with Gemini IX, lot 458.

A wonderful 'chunky' coin in hand in good style.
12 commentsDavid Atherton12/07/15 at 12:43mix_val: Love these "chunky" silver coins!
T35b.jpg
Titus RIC 35139 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, Laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Venus stg. r. leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 35 (R). BMC 11. RSC 268a. BNC -.
Ex CNG E358, 26 August 2015, lot 323.

Titus' 14th imperial acclamation dates between 1 July to at least before 8 September 79 as two documents indicate - one a letter Titus addressed to the city of Munigua on 7 September, and the other a military diploma dated 8 September, both still show him as IMP XIIII. Effectively, this coin was struck during the time of the Mount Vesuvius eruption on 24 August, although the traditional date of the disaster is now disputed and may possibly have been later in the year.

Left facing portraits of Titus are much rarer than right facing, perhaps to a ratio of 1:10. This left facing Venus type from the second issue after 1 July is extremely difficult to find. Listed simply as 'rare' by the new RIC, this is perhaps one of those types which might be a bit rarer than the rating indicates.

Somewhat worn, but nicely centered and in fine style. I've noticed over the years that those denarii of Titus with dots in the legend tend to be of a finer style, such as this coin.
8 commentsDavid Atherton09/04/15 at 04:38ancientdave: Very nice!
T35b.jpg
Titus RIC 35139 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, Laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Venus stg. r. leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 35 (R). BMC 11. RSC 268a. BNC -.
Ex CNG E358, 26 August 2015, lot 323.

Titus' 14th imperial acclamation dates between 1 July to at least before 8 September 79 as two documents indicate - one a letter Titus addressed to the city of Munigua on 7 September, and the other a military diploma dated 8 September, both still show him as IMP XIIII. Effectively, this coin was struck during the time of the Mount Vesuvius eruption on 24 August, although the traditional date of the disaster is now disputed and may possibly have been later in the year.

Left facing portraits of Titus are much rarer than right facing, perhaps to a ratio of 1:10. This left facing Venus type from the second issue after 1 July is extremely difficult to find. Listed simply as 'rare' by the new RIC, this is perhaps one of those types which might be a bit rarer than the rating indicates.

Somewhat worn, but nicely centered and in fine style. I've noticed over the years that those denarii of Titus with dots in the legend tend to be of a finer style, such as this coin.
8 commentsDavid Atherton09/02/15 at 10:03Lucas H: OUtstanding, and a good find for a scarce coin.
T35b.jpg
Titus RIC 35139 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, Laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Venus stg. r. leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 35 (R). BMC 11. RSC 268a. BNC -.
Ex CNG E358, 26 August 2015, lot 323.

Titus' 14th imperial acclamation dates between 1 July to at least before 8 September 79 as two documents indicate - one a letter Titus addressed to the city of Munigua on 7 September, and the other a military diploma dated 8 September, both still show him as IMP XIIII. Effectively, this coin was struck during the time of the Mount Vesuvius eruption on 24 August, although the traditional date of the disaster is now disputed and may possibly have been later in the year.

Left facing portraits of Titus are much rarer than right facing, perhaps to a ratio of 1:10. This left facing Venus type from the second issue after 1 July is extremely difficult to find. Listed simply as 'rare' by the new RIC, this is perhaps one of those types which might be a bit rarer than the rating indicates.

Somewhat worn, but nicely centered and in fine style. I've noticed over the years that those denarii of Titus with dots in the legend tend to be of a finer style, such as this coin.
8 commentsDavid Atherton09/01/15 at 15:38FlaviusDomitianus: Nice find, congrats!
T35b.jpg
Titus RIC 35139 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, Laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Venus stg. r. leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 35 (R). BMC 11. RSC 268a. BNC -.
Ex CNG E358, 26 August 2015, lot 323.

Titus' 14th imperial acclamation dates between 1 July to at least before 8 September 79 as two documents indicate - one a letter Titus addressed to the city of Munigua on 7 September, and the other a military diploma dated 8 September, both still show him as IMP XIIII. Effectively, this coin was struck during the time of the Mount Vesuvius eruption on 24 August, although the traditional date of the disaster is now disputed and may possibly have been later in the year.

Left facing portraits of Titus are much rarer than right facing, perhaps to a ratio of 1:10. This left facing Venus type from the second issue after 1 July is extremely difficult to find. Listed simply as 'rare' by the new RIC, this is perhaps one of those types which might be a bit rarer than the rating indicates.

Somewhat worn, but nicely centered and in fine style. I've noticed over the years that those denarii of Titus with dots in the legend tend to be of a finer style, such as this coin.
8 commentsDavid Atherton09/01/15 at 03:42Jay GT4: Excellent!. Congrats
T35b.jpg
Titus RIC 35139 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, Laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Venus stg. r. leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 35 (R). BMC 11. RSC 268a. BNC -.
Ex CNG E358, 26 August 2015, lot 323.

Titus' 14th imperial acclamation dates between 1 July to at least before 8 September 79 as two documents indicate - one a letter Titus addressed to the city of Munigua on 7 September, and the other a military diploma dated 8 September, both still show him as IMP XIIII. Effectively, this coin was struck during the time of the Mount Vesuvius eruption on 24 August, although the traditional date of the disaster is now disputed and may possibly have been later in the year.

Left facing portraits of Titus are much rarer than right facing, perhaps to a ratio of 1:10. This left facing Venus type from the second issue after 1 July is extremely difficult to find. Listed simply as 'rare' by the new RIC, this is perhaps one of those types which might be a bit rarer than the rating indicates.

Somewhat worn, but nicely centered and in fine style. I've noticed over the years that those denarii of Titus with dots in the legend tend to be of a finer style, such as this coin.
8 commentsDavid Atherton09/01/15 at 03:27Matt Inglima: A great coin - one of my favorite reverse types.
T35b.jpg
Titus RIC 35139 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, Laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Venus stg. r. leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 35 (R). BMC 11. RSC 268a. BNC -.
Ex CNG E358, 26 August 2015, lot 323.

Titus' 14th imperial acclamation dates between 1 July to at least before 8 September 79 as two documents indicate - one a letter Titus addressed to the city of Munigua on 7 September, and the other a military diploma dated 8 September, both still show him as IMP XIIII. Effectively, this coin was struck during the time of the Mount Vesuvius eruption on 24 August, although the traditional date of the disaster is now disputed and may possibly have been later in the year.

Left facing portraits of Titus are much rarer than right facing, perhaps to a ratio of 1:10. This left facing Venus type from the second issue after 1 July is extremely difficult to find. Listed simply as 'rare' by the new RIC, this is perhaps one of those types which might be a bit rarer than the rating indicates.

Somewhat worn, but nicely centered and in fine style. I've noticed over the years that those denarii of Titus with dots in the legend tend to be of a finer style, such as this coin.
8 commentsDavid Atherton09/01/15 at 02:14Nemonater: Awesome addition!
T35b.jpg
Titus RIC 35139 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, Laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Venus stg. r. leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 35 (R). BMC 11. RSC 268a. BNC -.
Ex CNG E358, 26 August 2015, lot 323.

Titus' 14th imperial acclamation dates between 1 July to at least before 8 September 79 as two documents indicate - one a letter Titus addressed to the city of Munigua on 7 September, and the other a military diploma dated 8 September, both still show him as IMP XIIII. Effectively, this coin was struck during the time of the Mount Vesuvius eruption on 24 August, although the traditional date of the disaster is now disputed and may possibly have been later in the year.

Left facing portraits of Titus are much rarer than right facing, perhaps to a ratio of 1:10. This left facing Venus type from the second issue after 1 July is extremely difficult to find. Listed simply as 'rare' by the new RIC, this is perhaps one of those types which might be a bit rarer than the rating indicates.

Somewhat worn, but nicely centered and in fine style. I've noticed over the years that those denarii of Titus with dots in the legend tend to be of a finer style, such as this coin.
8 commentsDavid Atherton09/01/15 at 01:50Mat: Wonderful portrait and special all around, congrat...
titus bonus eventus.jpg
Titus RIC 89217 viewsAR Denarius, 3.31g
Rome Mint, 79 - 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: BONVS EVEN-TVS AVGVSTI; Bonus Eventus, a naked youth, standing l., holding patera in extended r. hand and corn-ears and poppy in l.
RIC 89 (C). BMC 106. RSC 25. BNC 83.
Acquired from Apollo Numismatics, January 2006.

An undated reverse type with the meaning "good outcome". The BMCRE alludes that this may follow in a Neronian tradition.

A very difficult reverse type to find...I spent the best part of a year looking for a VF or better example in good style. This one fits the bill.
6 commentsVespasian7012/17/14 at 22:26sean c2: fantastic coin!
T2aPS.jpg
Titus RIC 02143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
RIC 2 (R2). BMC specimen acquired 1934. RSC -. BNC -.

The Annona reverse type struck for Titus Caesar is quite common and copies the same reverse struck contemporarily for Vespasian. It was also struck briefly for Titus after becoming emperor on 24 June, 79 AD. The type is very rare for him as Augustus, perhaps minted in the space of a week prior to the TR P VIIII dating on 1 July. Evidently the mint did not have new reverse types prepared for the new princeps and so recycled those struck for him as Caesar during that first week.

This is an extremely rare type for Titus as Augustus and certainly the rarest of the first issue. The new RIC cites three specimens (BM, Vienna, private collection), mine will make the fourth that I know of and it is a die match with the BM specimen.

Better in hand than the photo indicates.
9 commentsDavid Atherton12/11/14 at 08:41kc: these rare specimens are fascinating!
T2aPS.jpg
Titus RIC 02143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
RIC 2 (R2). BMC specimen acquired 1934. RSC -. BNC -.

The Annona reverse type struck for Titus Caesar is quite common and copies the same reverse struck contemporarily for Vespasian. It was also struck briefly for Titus after becoming emperor on 24 June, 79 AD. The type is very rare for him as Augustus, perhaps minted in the space of a week prior to the TR P VIIII dating on 1 July. Evidently the mint did not have new reverse types prepared for the new princeps and so recycled those struck for him as Caesar during that first week.

This is an extremely rare type for Titus as Augustus and certainly the rarest of the first issue. The new RIC cites three specimens (BM, Vienna, private collection), mine will make the fourth that I know of and it is a die match with the BM specimen.

Better in hand than the photo indicates.
9 commentsDavid Atherton11/30/14 at 03:59ancientdave: A truly awesome addition!
T2aPS.jpg
Titus RIC 02143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
RIC 2 (R2). BMC specimen acquired 1934. RSC -. BNC -.

The Annona reverse type struck for Titus Caesar is quite common and copies the same reverse struck contemporarily for Vespasian. It was also struck briefly for Titus after becoming emperor on 24 June, 79 AD. The type is very rare for him as Augustus, perhaps minted in the space of a week prior to the TR P VIIII dating on 1 July. Evidently the mint did not have new reverse types prepared for the new princeps and so recycled those struck for him as Caesar during that first week.

This is an extremely rare type for Titus as Augustus and certainly the rarest of the first issue. The new RIC cites three specimens (BM, Vienna, private collection), mine will make the fourth that I know of and it is a die match with the BM specimen.

Better in hand than the photo indicates.
9 commentsDavid Atherton11/27/14 at 19:06Nemonater: Fantastic coin.
T2aPS.jpg
Titus RIC 02143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
RIC 2 (R2). BMC specimen acquired 1934. RSC -. BNC -.

The Annona reverse type struck for Titus Caesar is quite common and copies the same reverse struck contemporarily for Vespasian. It was also struck briefly for Titus after becoming emperor on 24 June, 79 AD. The type is very rare for him as Augustus, perhaps minted in the space of a week prior to the TR P VIIII dating on 1 July. Evidently the mint did not have new reverse types prepared for the new princeps and so recycled those struck for him as Caesar during that first week.

This is an extremely rare type for Titus as Augustus and certainly the rarest of the first issue. The new RIC cites three specimens (BM, Vienna, private collection), mine will make the fourth that I know of and it is a die match with the BM specimen.

Better in hand than the photo indicates.
9 commentsDavid Atherton11/27/14 at 15:38Mat: Always a great feeling to find a rarity, congrats...
T2aPS.jpg
Titus RIC 02143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
RIC 2 (R2). BMC specimen acquired 1934. RSC -. BNC -.

The Annona reverse type struck for Titus Caesar is quite common and copies the same reverse struck contemporarily for Vespasian. It was also struck briefly for Titus after becoming emperor on 24 June, 79 AD. The type is very rare for him as Augustus, perhaps minted in the space of a week prior to the TR P VIIII dating on 1 July. Evidently the mint did not have new reverse types prepared for the new princeps and so recycled those struck for him as Caesar during that first week.

This is an extremely rare type for Titus as Augustus and certainly the rarest of the first issue. The new RIC cites three specimens (BM, Vienna, private collection), mine will make the fourth that I know of and it is a die match with the BM specimen.

Better in hand than the photo indicates.
9 commentsDavid Atherton11/27/14 at 15:08Jay GT4: Great rarity! Congrats
T2aPS.jpg
Titus RIC 02143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
RIC 2 (R2). BMC specimen acquired 1934. RSC -. BNC -.

The Annona reverse type struck for Titus Caesar is quite common and copies the same reverse struck contemporarily for Vespasian. It was also struck briefly for Titus after becoming emperor on 24 June, 79 AD. The type is very rare for him as Augustus, perhaps minted in the space of a week prior to the TR P VIIII dating on 1 July. Evidently the mint did not have new reverse types prepared for the new princeps and so recycled those struck for him as Caesar during that first week.

This is an extremely rare type for Titus as Augustus and certainly the rarest of the first issue. The new RIC cites three specimens (BM, Vienna, private collection), mine will make the fourth that I know of and it is a die match with the BM specimen.

Better in hand than the photo indicates.
9 commentsDavid Atherton11/27/14 at 14:56Sam: Great addition.
T2aPS.jpg
Titus RIC 02143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
RIC 2 (R2). BMC specimen acquired 1934. RSC -. BNC -.

The Annona reverse type struck for Titus Caesar is quite common and copies the same reverse struck contemporarily for Vespasian. It was also struck briefly for Titus after becoming emperor on 24 June, 79 AD. The type is very rare for him as Augustus, perhaps minted in the space of a week prior to the TR P VIIII dating on 1 July. Evidently the mint did not have new reverse types prepared for the new princeps and so recycled those struck for him as Caesar during that first week.

This is an extremely rare type for Titus as Augustus and certainly the rarest of the first issue. The new RIC cites three specimens (BM, Vienna, private collection), mine will make the fourth that I know of and it is a die match with the BM specimen.

Better in hand than the photo indicates.
9 commentsDavid Atherton11/27/14 at 07:23FlaviusDomitianus: Great catch, congrats!
T2aPS.jpg
Titus RIC 02143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
RIC 2 (R2). BMC specimen acquired 1934. RSC -. BNC -.

The Annona reverse type struck for Titus Caesar is quite common and copies the same reverse struck contemporarily for Vespasian. It was also struck briefly for Titus after becoming emperor on 24 June, 79 AD. The type is very rare for him as Augustus, perhaps minted in the space of a week prior to the TR P VIIII dating on 1 July. Evidently the mint did not have new reverse types prepared for the new princeps and so recycled those struck for him as Caesar during that first week.

This is an extremely rare type for Titus as Augustus and certainly the rarest of the first issue. The new RIC cites three specimens (BM, Vienna, private collection), mine will make the fourth that I know of and it is a die match with the BM specimen.

Better in hand than the photo indicates.
9 commentsDavid Atherton11/27/14 at 05:46labienus: That's a great find, David. Congrats.
T2aPS.jpg
Titus RIC 02143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
RIC 2 (R2). BMC specimen acquired 1934. RSC -. BNC -.

The Annona reverse type struck for Titus Caesar is quite common and copies the same reverse struck contemporarily for Vespasian. It was also struck briefly for Titus after becoming emperor on 24 June, 79 AD. The type is very rare for him as Augustus, perhaps minted in the space of a week prior to the TR P VIIII dating on 1 July. Evidently the mint did not have new reverse types prepared for the new princeps and so recycled those struck for him as Caesar during that first week.

This is an extremely rare type for Titus as Augustus and certainly the rarest of the first issue. The new RIC cites three specimens (BM, Vienna, private collection), mine will make the fourth that I know of and it is a die match with the BM specimen.

Better in hand than the photo indicates.
9 commentsDavid Atherton11/27/14 at 04:03quadrans: Good pick up...
066.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1486103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck off flan
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS V; Winged caduceus
RIC 1486 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. RPC 1460 (2 spec.). BNC -.
Ex Ancient Treasures, eBay, March 2011.

The small series this coin comes from is quite mysterious. The mint is not known for certain, although Ephesus is a prime suspect. The reason for the series being minted at all is not known either. The issue is full of blundered legends and mules, however, stylistically the coins are very pleasing.

7 commentsDavid Atherton03/30/14 at 00:53socalcoins: Great coin, David!
titus as caesar prince palm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1562121 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Antioch Mint, 72-73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT; Bust of Titus, laureate, draped, bearded, r.
Rev: Palm tree: to l., Titus stg. r. with spear and parazonium, foot on helmet; to r., Judaea std. r.
RIC 1562 (C). BMC 518. RSC 392. RPC 1934 (11 spec.). BNC 322.
Acquired from WCNC, March 2008.

A Judaea Capta type which copies a reverse from Rome.

Though rated as common in the RIC, it is a fairly difficult reverse type to find. I like the draped busts of this issue.
3 commentsVespasian7002/06/14 at 00:32Sam: Stunning and historical example.
tituslquadriga1.jpg
Titus RIC 2666 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Quadriga l., with corn ears
RIC 26 (R2). BMC p. 432. RSC 278a. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This is the only instance of obverse portrait left for the quadriga type Titus issued as Augustus.
Not a spectacular coin condition wise, but very rare. A decent bull-necked portrait combined with one of my favorite reverses.

1 commentsDavid Atherton10/06/13 at 21:09Sam: Extraordinary !
titus_as_caesar_quadrig_lg.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1073150 viewsAR Denarius, 2.46g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT VIII COS VII; Quadriga l., with basket of corn-ears
RIC 1073 (C). BMC 256. RSC 336. BNC 226.
Ex CNG E167, 27 June 2007, lot 139. Ex C. G. collection. Ex Stack's, 8 December 1988, lot 2197.

This denarius is not especially rare (rated as Common in RIC) but for some reason I had a somewhat difficult time finding a decent example of the type. Issued in 79 AD, the quadriga with a basket of corn-ears reverse possibly symbolizes the importance of Alexandria as the granary of Rome and echos an early reverse of Augustus (BMCRE II, p. xlii). Also of note, this issue is a break from earlier issues where Titus shared reverse types with Vespasian. This reverse along with the others minted for Titus as Caesar in 79 were not shared with Vespasian.

5 commentsvespasian7010/06/13 at 21:08Sam: Extraordinary !
titus venus reverse.JPG
Titus RIC 34155 viewsAR Denarius, 3.31g
Rome Mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, Laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Venus, seen half from behind, naked except for drapery round hips, standing r., resting l. elbow on column, holding helmet in extended r. hand and transverse spear in l.: shield rests against column
RIC 34 (C2). BMC 9. RSC 268. BNC 9.
Acquired from York Coins.

A nice VF with a well centred reverse and an almost complete beaded boarder.
3 commentsVespasian7008/31/13 at 01:24Sam: Amazing Art.
titus dolphin rev.JPG
Titus RIC-112499 viewsAR Denarius, 2.87g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 112 (C2). BMC 72. RSC 309. BNC 60.
Ex Harlan J Berk 143, 18 May 2005, lot 177.

Another in Titus' pulvinaria series commemorating the opening of the Colosseum.

Easily one of the best portraits of Titus I have ever seen. The condition of the obverse is excellent.
A coin I'm very proud to have.
11 commentsVespasian7008/24/13 at 20:09Sam: Superb.
2600469.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1442105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI - AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., EPHE
RIC 1442 (R). BMC 468. RSC 125. RPC 844 (5 spec.). BNC 361.
Ex CNG E260, 20 July 2011, lot 469. Ex Gorny and Mosch 170, 13 October 2008, lot 2068. Ex Gorny & Mosch 142, 10 October 2005, lot 2392.

The obverse is slightly off center but contains a wonderful portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton08/22/13 at 03:19ickster: Very nice indeed. Congrats! I love the detail on t...
titus as caesar eagle l. and base.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 872150 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome Mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS V across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
RIC 872 (C). BMC 192. RSC 60. BNC 168.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins April 2008.

I'm not quite certain what the meaning is behind the reverse (Vespasian also issued the type). The BMCRE hints that it might be a reference to the death of Mucianus which occurred around 76 AD. Mucianus was the governor of Syria who helped Vespasian rise to the purple. The interpretation here would be the eagle as a symbol of the after-life.
I've always had my doubts about Mattingly's reading of this reverse type.
the eagle when depicted on a funeral pyre or altar would represent an apotheosis type. Here there is no such pyre or altar. The eagle sits upon a garlanded base, clutching a thunderbolt (missing here), with no legend referring to the eagle specifically. The following are the three main symbolic meanings of the eagle in the Roman world: as an attribute of Jupiter, a symbol of the Roman legions, a funerary type. In the case of the above coin, my guess would be the eagle is in the guise of Jupiter since a thunderbolt is clutched. Variant version missing the thunderbolt.
2 commentsVespasian7005/28/13 at 12:33*Alex: Fantastic!
titus as caesar eagle l. and base.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 872150 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome Mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS V across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
RIC 872 (C). BMC 192. RSC 60. BNC 168.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins April 2008.

I'm not quite certain what the meaning is behind the reverse (Vespasian also issued the type). The BMCRE hints that it might be a reference to the death of Mucianus which occurred around 76 AD. Mucianus was the governor of Syria who helped Vespasian rise to the purple. The interpretation here would be the eagle as a symbol of the after-life.
I've always had my doubts about Mattingly's reading of this reverse type.
the eagle when depicted on a funeral pyre or altar would represent an apotheosis type. Here there is no such pyre or altar. The eagle sits upon a garlanded base, clutching a thunderbolt (missing here), with no legend referring to the eagle specifically. The following are the three main symbolic meanings of the eagle in the Roman world: as an attribute of Jupiter, a symbol of the Roman legions, a funerary type. In the case of the above coin, my guess would be the eagle is in the guise of Jupiter since a thunderbolt is clutched. Variant version missing the thunderbolt.
2 commentsVespasian7005/25/13 at 06:28Laurentius: Such a wonderful coin!
titus dolphin rev.JPG
Titus RIC-112499 viewsAR Denarius, 2.87g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 112 (C2). BMC 72. RSC 309. BNC 60.
Ex Harlan J Berk 143, 18 May 2005, lot 177.

Another in Titus' pulvinaria series commemorating the opening of the Colosseum.

Easily one of the best portraits of Titus I have ever seen. The condition of the obverse is excellent.
A coin I'm very proud to have.
11 commentsVespasian7002/05/13 at 07:52Lloyd T: This is truly one of great "eye appeal"!
titus dolphin rev.JPG
Titus RIC-112499 viewsAR Denarius, 2.87g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 112 (C2). BMC 72. RSC 309. BNC 60.
Ex Harlan J Berk 143, 18 May 2005, lot 177.

Another in Titus' pulvinaria series commemorating the opening of the Colosseum.

Easily one of the best portraits of Titus I have ever seen. The condition of the obverse is excellent.
A coin I'm very proud to have.
11 commentsVespasian7002/05/13 at 00:39carthago: beautiful and well balanced.
titus_as_caesar_star_prow1.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC 950151 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VI; Prow r.; above eight pointed star
RIC 950 (R). BMC 226. RSC 68. BNC 202.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This rare star and prow reverse is shared with Vespasian (not a very common one for him as well!) and is a copy of one issued by Marc Antony. Vespasian copied many types from the past, this is perhaps an odd choice for a reverse considering Antony was an enemy of Octavian. Why this particular type was chosen remains a mystery to me.

The BMC states the star and prow symbolizes the victorious admiral.

This denarius is rated R by the RIC, but as far as it's availability in the market place I would rate it R2! This was a most vexing coin for me to locate, again a friend who shares a common collecting niche as I came to the rescue and offered this one to me.

Quite a nice find. Not only a rare type, but also the portrait is wonderful, imho.

5 commentsvespasian7002/05/13 at 00:38carthago: Very cool coin. Interesting rev from Antony.
V528A.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 528A99 viewsAR Denarius, 3.36g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: NEP RED; Neptune stg. l., r. foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
RIC 528A. BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 637. Ex Gorny & Mosch 122, 10 March 2003, lot 2043 = 113, 18 October 2001, lot 5729.

An unpublished Neptune type with CENS in the obverse legend. The coin will be 528A (under Vespasian) in the RIC II Addenda. It fits nicely alongside my unpublished V529A Salus from the same series. I think there are still a few other unknown types that will surface for this series - this Neptune reverse for the corresponding Vespasian issue is one that so far is awaiting discovery.

A beautiful denarius in hand with an amazing early portrait. The other two denarii I have from this series also have exemplary portraits. An issue style wise to take note of then.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/31/13 at 21:22ancientdave: Unpublished and quite attractive, it doesn't g...
V528A.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 528A99 viewsAR Denarius, 3.36g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: NEP RED; Neptune stg. l., r. foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
RIC 528A. BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 637. Ex Gorny & Mosch 122, 10 March 2003, lot 2043 = 113, 18 October 2001, lot 5729.

An unpublished Neptune type with CENS in the obverse legend. The coin will be 528A (under Vespasian) in the RIC II Addenda. It fits nicely alongside my unpublished V529A Salus from the same series. I think there are still a few other unknown types that will surface for this series - this Neptune reverse for the corresponding Vespasian issue is one that so far is awaiting discovery.

A beautiful denarius in hand with an amazing early portrait. The other two denarii I have from this series also have exemplary portraits. An issue style wise to take note of then.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/31/13 at 11:13Lucas H: Outstanding as always. You have quite the unpubli...
V1440Amd.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1440A108 viewsAR Denarius, 2.69g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI E (sic); Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, EPHE
RIC 1440A. BMC 467 var. RSC 39 var. RPC 843 var. BNC 358 var.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N Sneh Collection, lot 742. Acquired from Ponterio, c. 2003.

This denarius features an engraver's error in the obverse legend. Instead of ending in the normal F the engraver mistakenly engraved an E. It is also an obverse die match to the unique British Museum aureus RIC V1437. A wonderful example of aurei and denarii sharing dies! The coin has been assigned by Carradice as V1440A (obv 2B) in the upcoming RIC II addenda.

Not only is this coin interesting for the engraver's error and die link - it's also in excellent style with an outstanding portrait. Truly a gorgeous coin.


6 commentsDavid Atherton01/31/13 at 04:34quadrans: Huhh .. fantastic !!!
V528A.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 528A99 viewsAR Denarius, 3.36g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: NEP RED; Neptune stg. l., r. foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
RIC 528A. BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 637. Ex Gorny & Mosch 122, 10 March 2003, lot 2043 = 113, 18 October 2001, lot 5729.

An unpublished Neptune type with CENS in the obverse legend. The coin will be 528A (under Vespasian) in the RIC II Addenda. It fits nicely alongside my unpublished V529A Salus from the same series. I think there are still a few other unknown types that will surface for this series - this Neptune reverse for the corresponding Vespasian issue is one that so far is awaiting discovery.

A beautiful denarius in hand with an amazing early portrait. The other two denarii I have from this series also have exemplary portraits. An issue style wise to take note of then.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/31/13 at 04:33quadrans: Nice pick up..congrats
V1440Amd.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1440A108 viewsAR Denarius, 2.69g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI E (sic); Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, EPHE
RIC 1440A. BMC 467 var. RSC 39 var. RPC 843 var. BNC 358 var.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N Sneh Collection, lot 742. Acquired from Ponterio, c. 2003.

This denarius features an engraver's error in the obverse legend. Instead of ending in the normal F the engraver mistakenly engraved an E. It is also an obverse die match to the unique British Museum aureus RIC V1437. A wonderful example of aurei and denarii sharing dies! The coin has been assigned by Carradice as V1440A (obv 2B) in the upcoming RIC II addenda.

Not only is this coin interesting for the engraver's error and die link - it's also in excellent style with an outstanding portrait. Truly a gorgeous coin.


6 commentsDavid Atherton01/30/13 at 14:56Lucas H: Stellar. Again, the unique Ephesus portrait.
V1440Amd.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1440A108 viewsAR Denarius, 2.69g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI E (sic); Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, EPHE
RIC 1440A. BMC 467 var. RSC 39 var. RPC 843 var. BNC 358 var.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N Sneh Collection, lot 742. Acquired from Ponterio, c. 2003.

This denarius features an engraver's error in the obverse legend. Instead of ending in the normal F the engraver mistakenly engraved an E. It is also an obverse die match to the unique British Museum aureus RIC V1437. A wonderful example of aurei and denarii sharing dies! The coin has been assigned by Carradice as V1440A (obv 2B) in the upcoming RIC II addenda.

Not only is this coin interesting for the engraver's error and die link - it's also in excellent style with an outstanding portrait. Truly a gorgeous coin.


6 commentsDavid Atherton01/30/13 at 05:15SPQR Coins: Fantastic example!
V1440Amd.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1440A108 viewsAR Denarius, 2.69g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI E (sic); Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, EPHE
RIC 1440A. BMC 467 var. RSC 39 var. RPC 843 var. BNC 358 var.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N Sneh Collection, lot 742. Acquired from Ponterio, c. 2003.

This denarius features an engraver's error in the obverse legend. Instead of ending in the normal F the engraver mistakenly engraved an E. It is also an obverse die match to the unique British Museum aureus RIC V1437. A wonderful example of aurei and denarii sharing dies! The coin has been assigned by Carradice as V1440A (obv 2B) in the upcoming RIC II addenda.

Not only is this coin interesting for the engraver's error and die link - it's also in excellent style with an outstanding portrait. Truly a gorgeous coin.


6 commentsDavid Atherton01/30/13 at 04:40ancientdave: Very attractive and interesting coin!
V1440Amd.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1440A108 viewsAR Denarius, 2.69g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI E (sic); Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, EPHE
RIC 1440A. BMC 467 var. RSC 39 var. RPC 843 var. BNC 358 var.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N Sneh Collection, lot 742. Acquired from Ponterio, c. 2003.

This denarius features an engraver's error in the obverse legend. Instead of ending in the normal F the engraver mistakenly engraved an E. It is also an obverse die match to the unique British Museum aureus RIC V1437. A wonderful example of aurei and denarii sharing dies! The coin has been assigned by Carradice as V1440A (obv 2B) in the upcoming RIC II addenda.

Not only is this coin interesting for the engraver's error and die link - it's also in excellent style with an outstanding portrait. Truly a gorgeous coin.


6 commentsDavid Atherton01/30/13 at 04:13kc: really outstanding portrait!
V1440Amd.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1440A108 viewsAR Denarius, 2.69g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI E (sic); Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, EPHE
RIC 1440A. BMC 467 var. RSC 39 var. RPC 843 var. BNC 358 var.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N Sneh Collection, lot 742. Acquired from Ponterio, c. 2003.

This denarius features an engraver's error in the obverse legend. Instead of ending in the normal F the engraver mistakenly engraved an E. It is also an obverse die match to the unique British Museum aureus RIC V1437. A wonderful example of aurei and denarii sharing dies! The coin has been assigned by Carradice as V1440A (obv 2B) in the upcoming RIC II addenda.

Not only is this coin interesting for the engraver's error and die link - it's also in excellent style with an outstanding portrait. Truly a gorgeous coin.


6 commentsDavid Atherton01/29/13 at 18:56Mat: Beautiful coin and a wonderful addition to your se...
V1440.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1440118 viewsAR Denarius, 3.27g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, EPHE
RIC 1440 (R). BMC 467. RSC 39. RPC 843 (4 spec.). BNC 358.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 741.

Another great portrait of the young Titus from this artistically pleasing mint. The reverse is one shared with Vespasian.
An obverse and reverse die match to the RIC plate coin, perhaps an indication of its rarity.
5 commentsDavid Atherton01/29/13 at 00:33carthago: Nice coin and great toning.
V1440.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1440118 viewsAR Denarius, 3.27g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, EPHE
RIC 1440 (R). BMC 467. RSC 39. RPC 843 (4 spec.). BNC 358.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 741.

Another great portrait of the young Titus from this artistically pleasing mint. The reverse is one shared with Vespasian.
An obverse and reverse die match to the RIC plate coin, perhaps an indication of its rarity.
5 commentsDavid Atherton01/28/13 at 18:38FlaviusDomitianus: Great coin overall.
V1440.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1440118 viewsAR Denarius, 3.27g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, EPHE
RIC 1440 (R). BMC 467. RSC 39. RPC 843 (4 spec.). BNC 358.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 741.

Another great portrait of the young Titus from this artistically pleasing mint. The reverse is one shared with Vespasian.
An obverse and reverse die match to the RIC plate coin, perhaps an indication of its rarity.
5 commentsDavid Atherton01/28/13 at 18:13ancientdave: A really great addition, such an attractive style!
V1440.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1440118 viewsAR Denarius, 3.27g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, EPHE
RIC 1440 (R). BMC 467. RSC 39. RPC 843 (4 spec.). BNC 358.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 741.

Another great portrait of the young Titus from this artistically pleasing mint. The reverse is one shared with Vespasian.
An obverse and reverse die match to the RIC plate coin, perhaps an indication of its rarity.
5 commentsDavid Atherton01/28/13 at 13:56Lucas H: definitely not a Rome mint portrait on that one.
V1440.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1440118 viewsAR Denarius, 3.27g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, EPHE
RIC 1440 (R). BMC 467. RSC 39. RPC 843 (4 spec.). BNC 358.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 741.

Another great portrait of the young Titus from this artistically pleasing mint. The reverse is one shared with Vespasian.
An obverse and reverse die match to the RIC plate coin, perhaps an indication of its rarity.
5 commentsDavid Atherton01/28/13 at 13:46Jay GT4: What a fantastic portrait and the reverse is simpl...
T368c-1.jpg
Titus RIC-368 Mule449 viewsAR Denarius, 3.30g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: EX S C across field; Victory adv. l., placing shield on trophy; below, Judaea std. l.
RIC 368 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.

A very interesting mule featuring an obverse of Titus as Augustus and a reverse intended for the deified Vespasian. Until this specimen surfaced only one other was known, it belonging to Curtis Clay, which is an obverse and reverse die match to my example. If I may be so bold, the following is what Curtis Clay wrote about his own specimen in 2005 which I cannot improve upon.

"This denarius is without doubt a mint mule, combining an obverse of Titus as Augustus with a reverse meant for Divus Vespasian. A normal denarius of Divus Vespasian with rev. STRUCK FROM THIS SAME DIE was in Rauch 67, part I, 26 Feb. 2001, 368 (I tried to acquire it too but was outbid!).
Does any list member possess a normal aureus or denarius of Titus struck from this same head-left obv. die, and if so, what is the reverse? It is a matter of some historical significance whether this obverse die belongs to 23 June-31 Dec. AD 79, the first six months of Titus' reign, COS VII on rev., or the next six months, AD 80 up to July 1, COS VIII on rev. (After that, perhaps because the mint burned down in the fire of 80, no more aurei or denarii were produced at Rome until the accession of Domitian in Sept. 81.)
Being able to date this obv. die would more or less solve a vexing question, namely when was Vespasian consecrated?
T.V. Buttrey, following H. Mattingly, believes that the consecration must have been postponed until 80, since all coins of Domitian as COS VI (79), plus a few as COS VII (80), call him simply AVG F, Son of the Augustus. Only when new aureus and denarius rev. types were introduced for Domitian early in 80 was his filiation changed to DIVI F, Son of the Consecrated Emperor.
I however think Vespasian was probably consecrated immediately after he died on 23 June 79. The persistence of AVG F for Domitian into 80 is odd and I cannot explain it, but I think this fact is outweighed by two other considerations.
First, it was natural, indeed inevitable, that the status of a deceased emperor, deification or condemnation, should be decided by the Senate immediately after his death. Immediate consecration or condemnation is explicitly attested for a number of other emperors before and after Vespasian. Delay could occur when the successor wanted consecration to enhance his own prestige but the Senate thirsted for revenge by condemnation, as in the cases of Tiberius and Hadrian, but there was no such disagreement about Vespasian: both Titus and the Senate surely favored his consecration. So it is impossible to explain why his consecration should have been postponed for six or more months after his death.
Second, the mint was striking aurei and denarii for Vespasian in four rev. types during the final six months of his life, Jan.-June 79.
When Vespasian died, three of these types were taken over by Titus as Augustus and, judging from the numbers in the Reka Devnia hoard, were struck in about the same volume until the end of 79 as the three types of Titus as Caesar in 79 which he also continued as Augustus. The aureus and denarius type of Domitian as Caesar in 79 also did not change when Vespasian died. In other words seven of the eight common aureus and denarius types of 79, three of Vespasian which were carried on by Titus, three of Titus himself first Caesar then Augustus, and one of Domitian Caesar, were without doubt struck continuously from beginning to end of the year.
But what about the fourth common precious-metal type of Vespasian alive in 79, Victory placing shield on Trophy? This type was not struck for Titus as Augustus, instead we find it with obverse of DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, and with the titles of Vesp. on reverse changed to EX SC to convert it into a consecration type! This type was about as common in the Reka Devnia hoard as the six denarius types of Titus as Augustus in the second half of 79.
I find it impossible to believe that this type was revived for Divus Vespasian after his alleged delayed consecration early in 80. It sticks out like a sore thumb among the other precious metal types of Divus Vespasian, as the only one to merely repeat a type of the living Vespasian instead of advertising the new honors that had been decreed with his consecration. No: obviously the type belongs to the second half of 79, contemporaneous with the other three types of the living Vespasian which Titus had taken over for himself, proving that Vespasian was consecrated immediately after he died!
This is the same rev. type of Divus Vespasian that was wrongly coupled with an obv. die of Titus as Augustus on the denarius reproduced here. If my chronology is correct, this will have been an obv. die of AD 79 and will also have been coupled with correct reverses of Titus dated COS VII not COS VIII, if such coins have survived and can be found!
I have searched without success for this obv. die in coinarchives, wildwinds, several photofiles compiled from printed sale catalogues and lists, and the major published museum catalogues."

Interestingly enough, earlier this year an obverse die match was found with an appropriate Titus reverse (Tripod and dolphin) dating to 80 AD.
5 commentsDavid Atherton01/26/13 at 23:42Nemonater: Outstanding! What an exceptional coin.
066.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1486103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck off flan
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS V; Winged caduceus
RIC 1486 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. RPC 1460 (2 spec.). BNC -.
Ex Ancient Treasures, eBay, March 2011.

The small series this coin comes from is quite mysterious. The mint is not known for certain, although Ephesus is a prime suspect. The reason for the series being minted at all is not known either. The issue is full of blundered legends and mules, however, stylistically the coins are very pleasing.

7 commentsDavid Atherton01/25/13 at 13:37Lucas H: HBJ says two known specimins- Berlin and ANS. I g...
Titus Denarius captive.JPG
Titus RIC 01389 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome Mint, 24 June-1 July 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT VIII COS VII; Male captive kneeling r., hands bound behind back, in front of trophy, consisting of helmet, cuirass, crossed swords (?), and round shield
RIC 1 (R). BMC 1. RSC 334a. BNC -.
Acquired from Hail Cesare, August 2004.

This reverse may be commemorating a British victory or another reminder of the Judaean one.
The coin was minted during the first week of Titus' reign, needless to say its a rare type.

Definitely one of my favourite coins in the collection. The condition alone is enough to take your breath away.
9 commentsVespasian7001/20/13 at 17:44Nemonater: Amazing. I would love to see it in hand!
Z7928LG.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-144199 viewsAR Denarius, 3.23g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, bare, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., EPHE
RIC 1441 (R2). BMC p. 98 note. RSC 124. RPC 838 (1 spec.). BNC 360.
Acquired from Beast Coins, August 2010.

A most rare denarius from Ephesus with a bare headed portrait.

The entire series itself is rare, but the bare headed portraits are even scarcer. I'm not sure what the rarity ratio is between the two types....10 to 1? At any rate, this coin is both an obverse and reverse die match with the RIC plate coin.
5 commentsDavid Atherton01/14/13 at 13:05SPQR Coins: Great portrait, brings to mind images of Marc Anto...
T40.JPG
Titus RIC 4076 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 40 (C). BMC 23. RSC 287. BNC 19.

The common seated Ceres reverse from the third issue of 79. Coins from this issue are somewhat rarer than those from the previous two.

A solid example of the type, struck in good metal and decent style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/15/12 at 23:25ancientdave: Great looking Titus!
T6.JPG
Titus RIC 06109 viewsAR Denarius, 2.80g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 6 (R2). BMC p. 432. RSC 270a. BNC 1.
Acquired from Marc Walter, eBay, 25 August 2012.

Minted in 79 AD after 1 July, this is an early denarius, indicated by the absence of P P (Pater Patriae) in the reverse legend.
The Ceres reverse is a carry-over type struck by Vespasian in 79 before his death and adopted by Titus after he donned the purple.

A type that is quite rare and hard to come by in trade. A reverse die match with the RIC plate coin.
7 commentsDavid Atherton11/14/12 at 08:06quadrans: Hmmm.. good pick up
T40.JPG
Titus RIC 4076 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 40 (C). BMC 23. RSC 287. BNC 19.

The common seated Ceres reverse from the third issue of 79. Coins from this issue are somewhat rarer than those from the previous two.

A solid example of the type, struck in good metal and decent style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/14/12 at 08:04quadrans: Again a nice coin
T40.JPG
Titus RIC 4076 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 40 (C). BMC 23. RSC 287. BNC 19.

The common seated Ceres reverse from the third issue of 79. Coins from this issue are somewhat rarer than those from the previous two.

A solid example of the type, struck in good metal and decent style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/13/12 at 20:38Kained but Able: A classic Titus! Pleasing details all round.
T40.JPG
Titus RIC 4076 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 40 (C). BMC 23. RSC 287. BNC 19.

The common seated Ceres reverse from the third issue of 79. Coins from this issue are somewhat rarer than those from the previous two.

A solid example of the type, struck in good metal and decent style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/13/12 at 19:54FlaviusDomitianus: Agreed, nice one.
T40.JPG
Titus RIC 4076 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 40 (C). BMC 23. RSC 287. BNC 19.

The common seated Ceres reverse from the third issue of 79. Coins from this issue are somewhat rarer than those from the previous two.

A solid example of the type, struck in good metal and decent style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/13/12 at 19:33Jay GT4: Very pleasing coin.
Titus_as_Caesar_east_eagle.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1481117 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck off flan
Rev: COS V across field;Eagle stg. facing on garlanded altar, wings open, head r.
RIC 1481 (R). BMC 485. RSC 61. RPC 1457 (4 spec.). BNC 373.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

Ephesus stopped minting Imperial denarii in 74 AD. Mysteriously, a series of denarii were minted in 76 in Asia Minor with no apparent purpose. The mint is thought to be Ephesus as well. However, previously the mint had excellent quality control...the 76 series lacks all of that and then some! Mules, muddled titles (PON MAX for Titus!), and reverse types mixed between Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian. A truly odd series. Most likely minted for local use.

This Titus denarius from the series has no blundered mistakes. A fabulous portrait, different in style from the previous Ephesus series but still artistic, IMHO.

3 commentsDavid Atherton10/09/12 at 06:20David Atherton: LOL! I was wondering the same Brett.
Titus_as_Caesar_east_eagle.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1481117 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck off flan
Rev: COS V across field;Eagle stg. facing on garlanded altar, wings open, head r.
RIC 1481 (R). BMC 485. RSC 61. RPC 1457 (4 spec.). BNC 373.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

Ephesus stopped minting Imperial denarii in 74 AD. Mysteriously, a series of denarii were minted in 76 in Asia Minor with no apparent purpose. The mint is thought to be Ephesus as well. However, previously the mint had excellent quality control...the 76 series lacks all of that and then some! Mules, muddled titles (PON MAX for Titus!), and reverse types mixed between Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian. A truly odd series. Most likely minted for local use.

This Titus denarius from the series has no blundered mistakes. A fabulous portrait, different in style from the previous Ephesus series but still artistic, IMHO.

3 commentsDavid Atherton10/07/12 at 23:26socalcoins: Another nice o-mint denarius! I wonder how many t...
titus_l_elephant1.jpg
Titus RIC-116231 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Elephant, stg. l.
RIC 116 (C). BMC 47. RSC 304. BNC 41.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

Not a particularly rare type...but not very common either with portrait left. I believe these were minted near a ratio of 1:10 compared to the right facing type.

Elephants were featured in those first games and Martial in his book On the Spectacles actually mentions an elephant, who after dispatching a bull in the arena, knelt before the emperor! Perhaps a neat trick the trainer had taught it.

A really nice portrait with a fantastic elephant on the reverse.
10 commentsDavid Atherton09/25/12 at 00:20Lloyd T: Exceptional example.
T6.JPG
Titus RIC 06109 viewsAR Denarius, 2.80g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 6 (R2). BMC p. 432. RSC 270a. BNC 1.
Acquired from Marc Walter, eBay, 25 August 2012.

Minted in 79 AD after 1 July, this is an early denarius, indicated by the absence of P P (Pater Patriae) in the reverse legend.
The Ceres reverse is a carry-over type struck by Vespasian in 79 before his death and adopted by Titus after he donned the purple.

A type that is quite rare and hard to come by in trade. A reverse die match with the RIC plate coin.
7 commentsDavid Atherton09/24/12 at 21:21SPQR Coins: A rarity indeed, congrats!
T6.JPG
Titus RIC 06109 viewsAR Denarius, 2.80g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 6 (R2). BMC p. 432. RSC 270a. BNC 1.
Acquired from Marc Walter, eBay, 25 August 2012.

Minted in 79 AD after 1 July, this is an early denarius, indicated by the absence of P P (Pater Patriae) in the reverse legend.
The Ceres reverse is a carry-over type struck by Vespasian in 79 before his death and adopted by Titus after he donned the purple.

A type that is quite rare and hard to come by in trade. A reverse die match with the RIC plate coin.
7 commentsDavid Atherton09/14/12 at 11:06Lucas H: Excellent.
T6.JPG
Titus RIC 06109 viewsAR Denarius, 2.80g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 6 (R2). BMC p. 432. RSC 270a. BNC 1.
Acquired from Marc Walter, eBay, 25 August 2012.

Minted in 79 AD after 1 July, this is an early denarius, indicated by the absence of P P (Pater Patriae) in the reverse legend.
The Ceres reverse is a carry-over type struck by Vespasian in 79 before his death and adopted by Titus after he donned the purple.

A type that is quite rare and hard to come by in trade. A reverse die match with the RIC plate coin.
7 commentsDavid Atherton09/06/12 at 05:16FlaviusDomitianus: Nice catch!
T6.JPG
Titus RIC 06109 viewsAR Denarius, 2.80g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 6 (R2). BMC p. 432. RSC 270a. BNC 1.
Acquired from Marc Walter, eBay, 25 August 2012.

Minted in 79 AD after 1 July, this is an early denarius, indicated by the absence of P P (Pater Patriae) in the reverse legend.
The Ceres reverse is a carry-over type struck by Vespasian in 79 before his death and adopted by Titus after he donned the purple.

A type that is quite rare and hard to come by in trade. A reverse die match with the RIC plate coin.
7 commentsDavid Atherton09/06/12 at 05:10Randygeki(h2): Very nice portrait
T6.JPG
Titus RIC 06109 viewsAR Denarius, 2.80g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 6 (R2). BMC p. 432. RSC 270a. BNC 1.
Acquired from Marc Walter, eBay, 25 August 2012.

Minted in 79 AD after 1 July, this is an early denarius, indicated by the absence of P P (Pater Patriae) in the reverse legend.
The Ceres reverse is a carry-over type struck by Vespasian in 79 before his death and adopted by Titus after he donned the purple.

A type that is quite rare and hard to come by in trade. A reverse die match with the RIC plate coin.
7 commentsDavid Atherton09/06/12 at 03:44Mat: An interesting piece.
T41.jpg
Titus RIC 4189 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 41 (R2). BMC p. 227 note. RSC 287a. BNC -.
Acquired from CGB, August 2012.

This is a rare portrait left of this IMP XV Ceres reverse type. It is foot noted in BMCRE and only one specimen is cited in RIC from Belgrade (not pictured in plates).

All the coins from this series are a bit rarer than other series minted by Titus, and those with left facing portraits are even scarcer! A good coin in decent metal and style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/05/12 at 07:20Randygeki(h2): Great portrait!
T41.jpg
Titus RIC 4189 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 41 (R2). BMC p. 227 note. RSC 287a. BNC -.
Acquired from CGB, August 2012.

This is a rare portrait left of this IMP XV Ceres reverse type. It is foot noted in BMCRE and only one specimen is cited in RIC from Belgrade (not pictured in plates).

All the coins from this series are a bit rarer than other series minted by Titus, and those with left facing portraits are even scarcer! A good coin in decent metal and style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/03/12 at 15:00quadrans: I like it
T41.jpg
Titus RIC 4189 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 41 (R2). BMC p. 227 note. RSC 287a. BNC -.
Acquired from CGB, August 2012.

This is a rare portrait left of this IMP XV Ceres reverse type. It is foot noted in BMCRE and only one specimen is cited in RIC from Belgrade (not pictured in plates).

All the coins from this series are a bit rarer than other series minted by Titus, and those with left facing portraits are even scarcer! A good coin in decent metal and style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/03/12 at 14:00Mat: Really really cool & special. Great addition.
T41.jpg
Titus RIC 4189 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 41 (R2). BMC p. 227 note. RSC 287a. BNC -.
Acquired from CGB, August 2012.

This is a rare portrait left of this IMP XV Ceres reverse type. It is foot noted in BMCRE and only one specimen is cited in RIC from Belgrade (not pictured in plates).

All the coins from this series are a bit rarer than other series minted by Titus, and those with left facing portraits are even scarcer! A good coin in decent metal and style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/03/12 at 13:33FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition.
T41.jpg
Titus RIC 4189 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
RIC 41 (R2). BMC p. 227 note. RSC 287a. BNC -.
Acquired from CGB, August 2012.

This is a rare portrait left of this IMP XV Ceres reverse type. It is foot noted in BMCRE and only one specimen is cited in RIC from Belgrade (not pictured in plates).

All the coins from this series are a bit rarer than other series minted by Titus, and those with left facing portraits are even scarcer! A good coin in decent metal and style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/03/12 at 13:05SPQR Coins: Nice one! Excellent portrait.
t54-1.jpg
Titus RIC 54120 viewsAR Denarius, 3.03g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Venus stg. r., leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 54 (R2). BMC 25. RSC 286. BNC -.

Another very rare Titus as Augustus denarius. What makes this rare is the obverse portrait left married to this reverse type with IMP XV. Neither I or a fellow Flavian specialist have seen another in trade. This coin is an obverse and reverse die match for the RIC plate coin.

A bit on the rough side, but better than the picture shows.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/25/12 at 04:24SPQR Coins: Outstanding, a great coin!
T132_obv.jpg
Titus RIC-132433 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Tripod, with fillets streaming out l. and r., on which are ravens r. and l., and in the center, dolphin over wreath
RIC 132 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This type is extremely rare with left facing portrait. In all the years I've collected Flavian denarii this is the only one I've ever been offered or seen for sale. RIC cites only an ebay specimen, where are the others? The rarity is woefully underrated in RIC.

Despite the scratches and worn condition this is a wonderful coin, IMHO.
7 commentsDavid Atherton08/23/12 at 06:14Potator II: Every collection needs some cornerstones. This is ...
T132_obv.jpg
Titus RIC-132433 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Tripod, with fillets streaming out l. and r., on which are ravens r. and l., and in the center, dolphin over wreath
RIC 132 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This type is extremely rare with left facing portrait. In all the years I've collected Flavian denarii this is the only one I've ever been offered or seen for sale. RIC cites only an ebay specimen, where are the others? The rarity is woefully underrated in RIC.

Despite the scratches and worn condition this is a wonderful coin, IMHO.
7 commentsDavid Atherton08/22/12 at 21:09Randygeki(h2): nice
titus_as_caesar_cad_cos_III_edited1.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC 70695 viewsAR Denarius, 3.50g
Rome Mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIAN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PONTIF TR P COS III; Caduceus, winged
RIC 706 (R). BMC 151. RSC 160. BNC 124.

A rare type that took a bit of patience for me to find. This specimen is cut in a fine style with a lot of the detail surviving the intervening 2000 years...even the beard can clearly be seen.
3 commentsvespasian7008/22/12 at 21:08Randygeki(h2): Great coin
T132_obv.jpg
Titus RIC-132433 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Tripod, with fillets streaming out l. and r., on which are ravens r. and l., and in the center, dolphin over wreath
RIC 132 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This type is extremely rare with left facing portrait. In all the years I've collected Flavian denarii this is the only one I've ever been offered or seen for sale. RIC cites only an ebay specimen, where are the others? The rarity is woefully underrated in RIC.

Despite the scratches and worn condition this is a wonderful coin, IMHO.
7 commentsDavid Atherton08/19/12 at 23:33Bud Stewart: I love it!
T368c-1.jpg
Titus RIC-368 Mule449 viewsAR Denarius, 3.30g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: EX S C across field; Victory adv. l., placing shield on trophy; below, Judaea std. l.
RIC 368 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.

A very interesting mule featuring an obverse of Titus as Augustus and a reverse intended for the deified Vespasian. Until this specimen surfaced only one other was known, it belonging to Curtis Clay, which is an obverse and reverse die match to my example. If I may be so bold, the following is what Curtis Clay wrote about his own specimen in 2005 which I cannot improve upon.

"This denarius is without doubt a mint mule, combining an obverse of Titus as Augustus with a reverse meant for Divus Vespasian. A normal denarius of Divus Vespasian with rev. STRUCK FROM THIS SAME DIE was in Rauch 67, part I, 26 Feb. 2001, 368 (I tried to acquire it too but was outbid!).
Does any list member possess a normal aureus or denarius of Titus struck from this same head-left obv. die, and if so, what is the reverse? It is a matter of some historical significance whether this obverse die belongs to 23 June-31 Dec. AD 79, the first six months of Titus' reign, COS VII on rev., or the next six months, AD 80 up to July 1, COS VIII on rev. (After that, perhaps because the mint burned down in the fire of 80, no more aurei or denarii were produced at Rome until the accession of Domitian in Sept. 81.)
Being able to date this obv. die would more or less solve a vexing question, namely when was Vespasian consecrated?
T.V. Buttrey, following H. Mattingly, believes that the consecration must have been postponed until 80, since all coins of Domitian as COS VI (79), plus a few as COS VII (80), call him simply AVG F, Son of the Augustus. Only when new aureus and denarius rev. types were introduced for Domitian early in 80 was his filiation changed to DIVI F, Son of the Consecrated Emperor.
I however think Vespasian was probably consecrated immediately after he died on 23 June 79. The persistence of AVG F for Domitian into 80 is odd and I cannot explain it, but I think this fact is outweighed by two other considerations.
First, it was natural, indeed inevitable, that the status of a deceased emperor, deification or condemnation, should be decided by the Senate immediately after his death. Immediate consecration or condemnation is explicitly attested for a number of other emperors before and after Vespasian. Delay could occur when the successor wanted consecration to enhance his own prestige but the Senate thirsted for revenge by condemnation, as in the cases of Tiberius and Hadrian, but there was no such disagreement about Vespasian: both Titus and the Senate surely favored his consecration. So it is impossible to explain why his consecration should have been postponed for six or more months after his death.
Second, the mint was striking aurei and denarii for Vespasian in four rev. types during the final six months of his life, Jan.-June 79.
When Vespasian died, three of these types were taken over by Titus as Augustus and, judging from the numbers in the Reka Devnia hoard, were struck in about the same volume until the end of 79 as the three types of Titus as Caesar in 79 which he also continued as Augustus. The aureus and denarius type of Domitian as Caesar in 79 also did not change when Vespasian died. In other words seven of the eight common aureus and denarius types of 79, three of Vespasian which were carried on by Titus, three of Titus himself first Caesar then Augustus, and one of Domitian Caesar, were without doubt struck continuously from beginning to end of the year.
But what about the fourth common precious-metal type of Vespasian alive in 79, Victory placing shield on Trophy? This type was not struck for Titus as Augustus, instead we find it with obverse of DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, and with the titles of Vesp. on reverse changed to EX SC to convert it into a consecration type! This type was about as common in the Reka Devnia hoard as the six denarius types of Titus as Augustus in the second half of 79.
I find it impossible to believe that this type was revived for Divus Vespasian after his alleged delayed consecration early in 80. It sticks out like a sore thumb among the other precious metal types of Divus Vespasian, as the only one to merely repeat a type of the living Vespasian instead of advertising the new honors that had been decreed with his consecration. No: obviously the type belongs to the second half of 79, contemporaneous with the other three types of the living Vespasian which Titus had taken over for himself, proving that Vespasian was consecrated immediately after he died!
This is the same rev. type of Divus Vespasian that was wrongly coupled with an obv. die of Titus as Augustus on the denarius reproduced here. If my chronology is correct, this will have been an obv. die of AD 79 and will also have been coupled with correct reverses of Titus dated COS VII not COS VIII, if such coins have survived and can be found!
I have searched without success for this obv. die in coinarchives, wildwinds, several photofiles compiled from printed sale catalogues and lists, and the major published museum catalogues."

Interestingly enough, earlier this year an obverse die match was found with an appropriate Titus reverse (Tripod and dolphin) dating to 80 AD.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/16/12 at 17:16SPQR Coins: Fascinating coin and history. Congrats on a wonde...
T132_obv.jpg
Titus RIC-132433 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Tripod, with fillets streaming out l. and r., on which are ravens r. and l., and in the center, dolphin over wreath
RIC 132 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This type is extremely rare with left facing portrait. In all the years I've collected Flavian denarii this is the only one I've ever been offered or seen for sale. RIC cites only an ebay specimen, where are the others? The rarity is woefully underrated in RIC.

Despite the scratches and worn condition this is a wonderful coin, IMHO.
7 commentsDavid Atherton08/15/12 at 04:39kc: the great rarity makes this piece fascinating!
T132_obv.jpg
Titus RIC-132433 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Tripod, with fillets streaming out l. and r., on which are ravens r. and l., and in the center, dolphin over wreath
RIC 132 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This type is extremely rare with left facing portrait. In all the years I've collected Flavian denarii this is the only one I've ever been offered or seen for sale. RIC cites only an ebay specimen, where are the others? The rarity is woefully underrated in RIC.

Despite the scratches and worn condition this is a wonderful coin, IMHO.
7 commentsDavid Atherton08/13/12 at 20:16Lloyd T: Never seen one before - great catch!
T132_obv.jpg
Titus RIC-132433 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Tripod, with fillets streaming out l. and r., on which are ravens r. and l., and in the center, dolphin over wreath
RIC 132 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This type is extremely rare with left facing portrait. In all the years I've collected Flavian denarii this is the only one I've ever been offered or seen for sale. RIC cites only an ebay specimen, where are the others? The rarity is woefully underrated in RIC.

Despite the scratches and worn condition this is a wonderful coin, IMHO.
7 commentsDavid Atherton08/13/12 at 13:17quadrans: nice coin
T132_obv.jpg
Titus RIC-132433 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Tripod, with fillets streaming out l. and r., on which are ravens r. and l., and in the center, dolphin over wreath
RIC 132 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This type is extremely rare with left facing portrait. In all the years I've collected Flavian denarii this is the only one I've ever been offered or seen for sale. RIC cites only an ebay specimen, where are the others? The rarity is woefully underrated in RIC.

Despite the scratches and worn condition this is a wonderful coin, IMHO.
7 commentsDavid Atherton08/13/12 at 12:40Lucas H: Outstanding! You have a knack for finding the rar...
T368c-1.jpg
Titus RIC-368 Mule449 viewsAR Denarius, 3.30g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: EX S C across field; Victory adv. l., placing shield on trophy; below, Judaea std. l.
RIC 368 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.

A very interesting mule featuring an obverse of Titus as Augustus and a reverse intended for the deified Vespasian. Until this specimen surfaced only one other was known, it belonging to Curtis Clay, which is an obverse and reverse die match to my example. If I may be so bold, the following is what Curtis Clay wrote about his own specimen in 2005 which I cannot improve upon.

"This denarius is without doubt a mint mule, combining an obverse of Titus as Augustus with a reverse meant for Divus Vespasian. A normal denarius of Divus Vespasian with rev. STRUCK FROM THIS SAME DIE was in Rauch 67, part I, 26 Feb. 2001, 368 (I tried to acquire it too but was outbid!).
Does any list member possess a normal aureus or denarius of Titus struck from this same head-left obv. die, and if so, what is the reverse? It is a matter of some historical significance whether this obverse die belongs to 23 June-31 Dec. AD 79, the first six months of Titus' reign, COS VII on rev., or the next six months, AD 80 up to July 1, COS VIII on rev. (After that, perhaps because the mint burned down in the fire of 80, no more aurei or denarii were produced at Rome until the accession of Domitian in Sept. 81.)
Being able to date this obv. die would more or less solve a vexing question, namely when was Vespasian consecrated?
T.V. Buttrey, following H. Mattingly, believes that the consecration must have been postponed until 80, since all coins of Domitian as COS VI (79), plus a few as COS VII (80), call him simply AVG F, Son of the Augustus. Only when new aureus and denarius rev. types were introduced for Domitian early in 80 was his filiation changed to DIVI F, Son of the Consecrated Emperor.
I however think Vespasian was probably consecrated immediately after he died on 23 June 79. The persistence of AVG F for Domitian into 80 is odd and I cannot explain it, but I think this fact is outweighed by two other considerations.
First, it was natural, indeed inevitable, that the status of a deceased emperor, deification or condemnation, should be decided by the Senate immediately after his death. Immediate consecration or condemnation is explicitly attested for a number of other emperors before and after Vespasian. Delay could occur when the successor wanted consecration to enhance his own prestige but the Senate thirsted for revenge by condemnation, as in the cases of Tiberius and Hadrian, but there was no such disagreement about Vespasian: both Titus and the Senate surely favored his consecration. So it is impossible to explain why his consecration should have been postponed for six or more months after his death.
Second, the mint was striking aurei and denarii for Vespasian in four rev. types during the final six months of his life, Jan.-June 79.
When Vespasian died, three of these types were taken over by Titus as Augustus and, judging from the numbers in the Reka Devnia hoard, were struck in about the same volume until the end of 79 as the three types of Titus as Caesar in 79 which he also continued as Augustus. The aureus and denarius type of Domitian as Caesar in 79 also did not change when Vespasian died. In other words seven of the eight common aureus and denarius types of 79, three of Vespasian which were carried on by Titus, three of Titus himself first Caesar then Augustus, and one of Domitian Caesar, were without doubt struck continuously from beginning to end of the year.
But what about the fourth common precious-metal type of Vespasian alive in 79, Victory placing shield on Trophy? This type was not struck for Titus as Augustus, instead we find it with obverse of DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, and with the titles of Vesp. on reverse changed to EX SC to convert it into a consecration type! This type was about as common in the Reka Devnia hoard as the six denarius types of Titus as Augustus in the second half of 79.
I find it impossible to believe that this type was revived for Divus Vespasian after his alleged delayed consecration early in 80. It sticks out like a sore thumb among the other precious metal types of Divus Vespasian, as the only one to merely repeat a type of the living Vespasian instead of advertising the new honors that had been decreed with his consecration. No: obviously the type belongs to the second half of 79, contemporaneous with the other three types of the living Vespasian which Titus had taken over for himself, proving that Vespasian was consecrated immediately after he died!
This is the same rev. type of Divus Vespasian that was wrongly coupled with an obv. die of Titus as Augustus on the denarius reproduced here. If my chronology is correct, this will have been an obv. die of AD 79 and will also have been coupled with correct reverses of Titus dated COS VII not COS VIII, if such coins have survived and can be found!
I have searched without success for this obv. die in coinarchives, wildwinds, several photofiles compiled from printed sale catalogues and lists, and the major published museum catalogues."

Interestingly enough, earlier this year an obverse die match was found with an appropriate Titus reverse (Tripod and dolphin) dating to 80 AD.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/02/12 at 05:07FlaviusDomitianus: Very interesting type!
T368c-1.jpg
Titus RIC-368 Mule449 viewsAR Denarius, 3.30g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: EX S C across field; Victory adv. l., placing shield on trophy; below, Judaea std. l.
RIC 368 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.

A very interesting mule featuring an obverse of Titus as Augustus and a reverse intended for the deified Vespasian. Until this specimen surfaced only one other was known, it belonging to Curtis Clay, which is an obverse and reverse die match to my example. If I may be so bold, the following is what Curtis Clay wrote about his own specimen in 2005 which I cannot improve upon.

"This denarius is without doubt a mint mule, combining an obverse of Titus as Augustus with a reverse meant for Divus Vespasian. A normal denarius of Divus Vespasian with rev. STRUCK FROM THIS SAME DIE was in Rauch 67, part I, 26 Feb. 2001, 368 (I tried to acquire it too but was outbid!).
Does any list member possess a normal aureus or denarius of Titus struck from this same head-left obv. die, and if so, what is the reverse? It is a matter of some historical significance whether this obverse die belongs to 23 June-31 Dec. AD 79, the first six months of Titus' reign, COS VII on rev., or the next six months, AD 80 up to July 1, COS VIII on rev. (After that, perhaps because the mint burned down in the fire of 80, no more aurei or denarii were produced at Rome until the accession of Domitian in Sept. 81.)
Being able to date this obv. die would more or less solve a vexing question, namely when was Vespasian consecrated?
T.V. Buttrey, following H. Mattingly, believes that the consecration must have been postponed until 80, since all coins of Domitian as COS VI (79), plus a few as COS VII (80), call him simply AVG F, Son of the Augustus. Only when new aureus and denarius rev. types were introduced for Domitian early in 80 was his filiation changed to DIVI F, Son of the Consecrated Emperor.
I however think Vespasian was probably consecrated immediately after he died on 23 June 79. The persistence of AVG F for Domitian into 80 is odd and I cannot explain it, but I think this fact is outweighed by two other considerations.
First, it was natural, indeed inevitable, that the status of a deceased emperor, deification or condemnation, should be decided by the Senate immediately after his death. Immediate consecration or condemnation is explicitly attested for a number of other emperors before and after Vespasian. Delay could occur when the successor wanted consecration to enhance his own prestige but the Senate thirsted for revenge by condemnation, as in the cases of Tiberius and Hadrian, but there was no such disagreement about Vespasian: both Titus and the Senate surely favored his consecration. So it is impossible to explain why his consecration should have been postponed for six or more months after his death.
Second, the mint was striking aurei and denarii for Vespasian in four rev. types during the final six months of his life, Jan.-June 79.
When Vespasian died, three of these types were taken over by Titus as Augustus and, judging from the numbers in the Reka Devnia hoard, were struck in about the same volume until the end of 79 as the three types of Titus as Caesar in 79 which he also continued as Augustus. The aureus and denarius type of Domitian as Caesar in 79 also did not change when Vespasian died. In other words seven of the eight common aureus and denarius types of 79, three of Vespasian which were carried on by Titus, three of Titus himself first Caesar then Augustus, and one of Domitian Caesar, were without doubt struck continuously from beginning to end of the year.
But what about the fourth common precious-metal type of Vespasian alive in 79, Victory placing shield on Trophy? This type was not struck for Titus as Augustus, instead we find it with obverse of DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, and with the titles of Vesp. on reverse changed to EX SC to convert it into a consecration type! This type was about as common in the Reka Devnia hoard as the six denarius types of Titus as Augustus in the second half of 79.
I find it impossible to believe that this type was revived for Divus Vespasian after his alleged delayed consecration early in 80. It sticks out like a sore thumb among the other precious metal types of Divus Vespasian, as the only one to merely repeat a type of the living Vespasian instead of advertising the new honors that had been decreed with his consecration. No: obviously the type belongs to the second half of 79, contemporaneous with the other three types of the living Vespasian which Titus had taken over for himself, proving that Vespasian was consecrated immediately after he died!
This is the same rev. type of Divus Vespasian that was wrongly coupled with an obv. die of Titus as Augustus on the denarius reproduced here. If my chronology is correct, this will have been an obv. die of AD 79 and will also have been coupled with correct reverses of Titus dated COS VII not COS VIII, if such coins have survived and can be found!
I have searched without success for this obv. die in coinarchives, wildwinds, several photofiles compiled from printed sale catalogues and lists, and the major published museum catalogues."

Interestingly enough, earlier this year an obverse die match was found with an appropriate Titus reverse (Tripod and dolphin) dating to 80 AD.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/01/12 at 00:56Steve E: Great find! I agree with Lloyd
T368c-1.jpg
Titus RIC-368 Mule449 viewsAR Denarius, 3.30g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: EX S C across field; Victory adv. l., placing shield on trophy; below, Judaea std. l.
RIC 368 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.

A very interesting mule featuring an obverse of Titus as Augustus and a reverse intended for the deified Vespasian. Until this specimen surfaced only one other was known, it belonging to Curtis Clay, which is an obverse and reverse die match to my example. If I may be so bold, the following is what Curtis Clay wrote about his own specimen in 2005 which I cannot improve upon.

"This denarius is without doubt a mint mule, combining an obverse of Titus as Augustus with a reverse meant for Divus Vespasian. A normal denarius of Divus Vespasian with rev. STRUCK FROM THIS SAME DIE was in Rauch 67, part I, 26 Feb. 2001, 368 (I tried to acquire it too but was outbid!).
Does any list member possess a normal aureus or denarius of Titus struck from this same head-left obv. die, and if so, what is the reverse? It is a matter of some historical significance whether this obverse die belongs to 23 June-31 Dec. AD 79, the first six months of Titus' reign, COS VII on rev., or the next six months, AD 80 up to July 1, COS VIII on rev. (After that, perhaps because the mint burned down in the fire of 80, no more aurei or denarii were produced at Rome until the accession of Domitian in Sept. 81.)
Being able to date this obv. die would more or less solve a vexing question, namely when was Vespasian consecrated?
T.V. Buttrey, following H. Mattingly, believes that the consecration must have been postponed until 80, since all coins of Domitian as COS VI (79), plus a few as COS VII (80), call him simply AVG F, Son of the Augustus. Only when new aureus and denarius rev. types were introduced for Domitian early in 80 was his filiation changed to DIVI F, Son of the Consecrated Emperor.
I however think Vespasian was probably consecrated immediately after he died on 23 June 79. The persistence of AVG F for Domitian into 80 is odd and I cannot explain it, but I think this fact is outweighed by two other considerations.
First, it was natural, indeed inevitable, that the status of a deceased emperor, deification or condemnation, should be decided by the Senate immediately after his death. Immediate consecration or condemnation is explicitly attested for a number of other emperors before and after Vespasian. Delay could occur when the successor wanted consecration to enhance his own prestige but the Senate thirsted for revenge by condemnation, as in the cases of Tiberius and Hadrian, but there was no such disagreement about Vespasian: both Titus and the Senate surely favored his consecration. So it is impossible to explain why his consecration should have been postponed for six or more months after his death.
Second, the mint was striking aurei and denarii for Vespasian in four rev. types during the final six months of his life, Jan.-June 79.
When Vespasian died, three of these types were taken over by Titus as Augustus and, judging from the numbers in the Reka Devnia hoard, were struck in about the same volume until the end of 79 as the three types of Titus as Caesar in 79 which he also continued as Augustus. The aureus and denarius type of Domitian as Caesar in 79 also did not change when Vespasian died. In other words seven of the eight common aureus and denarius types of 79, three of Vespasian which were carried on by Titus, three of Titus himself first Caesar then Augustus, and one of Domitian Caesar, were without doubt struck continuously from beginning to end of the year.
But what about the fourth common precious-metal type of Vespasian alive in 79, Victory placing shield on Trophy? This type was not struck for Titus as Augustus, instead we find it with obverse of DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, and with the titles of Vesp. on reverse changed to EX SC to convert it into a consecration type! This type was about as common in the Reka Devnia hoard as the six denarius types of Titus as Augustus in the second half of 79.
I find it impossible to believe that this type was revived for Divus Vespasian after his alleged delayed consecration early in 80. It sticks out like a sore thumb among the other precious metal types of Divus Vespasian, as the only one to merely repeat a type of the living Vespasian instead of advertising the new honors that had been decreed with his consecration. No: obviously the type belongs to the second half of 79, contemporaneous with the other three types of the living Vespasian which Titus had taken over for himself, proving that Vespasian was consecrated immediately after he died!
This is the same rev. type of Divus Vespasian that was wrongly coupled with an obv. die of Titus as Augustus on the denarius reproduced here. If my chronology is correct, this will have been an obv. die of AD 79 and will also have been coupled with correct reverses of Titus dated COS VII not COS VIII, if such coins have survived and can be found!
I have searched without success for this obv. die in coinarchives, wildwinds, several photofiles compiled from printed sale catalogues and lists, and the major published museum catalogues."

Interestingly enough, earlier this year an obverse die match was found with an appropriate Titus reverse (Tripod and dolphin) dating to 80 AD.
5 commentsDavid Atherton07/31/12 at 21:16Lloyd T: A very interesting coin accompanied by a great wri...
titus1.JPG
Titus RIC 37112 viewsAR Denarius, 3.33g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Capricorn l., below, globe
RIC 37 (R). BMC 35. RSC 294. BNC 32.

This denarius is part of the 3rd issue minted by Titus in 79 after September when he was awarded IMP XV. This same type was reportedly found in the ruins of Pompeii casting doubt on the traditional dating of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius to August*. The same reverse type was minted by Vespasian just before his death and is itself a copy of a type minted by Augustus. Denarii from the 3rd issue seem to be rarer than those of the 2nd issue.

Reasonably centered in good metal with a typical "bull necked" portrait of Titus. Both an obverse and reverse die match to the RIC plate coin.

*Dr. Richard Abdy of the British Museum has examined the coin in question and concluded the reading is actually IMP XIIII.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/22/12 at 17:43Randygeki(h2): sweet addition
titus1.JPG
Titus RIC 37112 viewsAR Denarius, 3.33g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Capricorn l., below, globe
RIC 37 (R). BMC 35. RSC 294. BNC 32.

This denarius is part of the 3rd issue minted by Titus in 79 after September when he was awarded IMP XV. This same type was reportedly found in the ruins of Pompeii casting doubt on the traditional dating of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius to August*. The same reverse type was minted by Vespasian just before his death and is itself a copy of a type minted by Augustus. Denarii from the 3rd issue seem to be rarer than those of the 2nd issue.

Reasonably centered in good metal with a typical "bull necked" portrait of Titus. Both an obverse and reverse die match to the RIC plate coin.

*Dr. Richard Abdy of the British Museum has examined the coin in question and concluded the reading is actually IMP XIIII.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/21/12 at 21:48Jay GT4: Excellent!
titus1.JPG
Titus RIC 37112 viewsAR Denarius, 3.33g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Capricorn l., below, globe
RIC 37 (R). BMC 35. RSC 294. BNC 32.

This denarius is part of the 3rd issue minted by Titus in 79 after September when he was awarded IMP XV. This same type was reportedly found in the ruins of Pompeii casting doubt on the traditional dating of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius to August*. The same reverse type was minted by Vespasian just before his death and is itself a copy of a type minted by Augustus. Denarii from the 3rd issue seem to be rarer than those of the 2nd issue.

Reasonably centered in good metal with a typical "bull necked" portrait of Titus. Both an obverse and reverse die match to the RIC plate coin.

*Dr. Richard Abdy of the British Museum has examined the coin in question and concluded the reading is actually IMP XIIII.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/21/12 at 21:41Mat: I watched this and it went for moon money, glad to...
titus1.JPG
Titus RIC 37112 viewsAR Denarius, 3.33g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Capricorn l., below, globe
RIC 37 (R). BMC 35. RSC 294. BNC 32.

This denarius is part of the 3rd issue minted by Titus in 79 after September when he was awarded IMP XV. This same type was reportedly found in the ruins of Pompeii casting doubt on the traditional dating of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius to August*. The same reverse type was minted by Vespasian just before his death and is itself a copy of a type minted by Augustus. Denarii from the 3rd issue seem to be rarer than those of the 2nd issue.

Reasonably centered in good metal with a typical "bull necked" portrait of Titus. Both an obverse and reverse die match to the RIC plate coin.

*Dr. Richard Abdy of the British Museum has examined the coin in question and concluded the reading is actually IMP XIIII.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/21/12 at 21:16Mark Z: An elegant coin of great historical significance! ...
titus1.JPG
Titus RIC 37112 viewsAR Denarius, 3.33g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Capricorn l., below, globe
RIC 37 (R). BMC 35. RSC 294. BNC 32.

This denarius is part of the 3rd issue minted by Titus in 79 after September when he was awarded IMP XV. This same type was reportedly found in the ruins of Pompeii casting doubt on the traditional dating of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius to August*. The same reverse type was minted by Vespasian just before his death and is itself a copy of a type minted by Augustus. Denarii from the 3rd issue seem to be rarer than those of the 2nd issue.

Reasonably centered in good metal with a typical "bull necked" portrait of Titus. Both an obverse and reverse die match to the RIC plate coin.

*Dr. Richard Abdy of the British Museum has examined the coin in question and concluded the reading is actually IMP XIIII.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/21/12 at 21:10FlaviusDomitianus: Me too I wanted to bid on this, but spanish auctio...
t54-1.jpg
Titus RIC 54120 viewsAR Denarius, 3.03g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Venus stg. r., leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 54 (R2). BMC 25. RSC 286. BNC -.

Another very rare Titus as Augustus denarius. What makes this rare is the obverse portrait left married to this reverse type with IMP XV. Neither I or a fellow Flavian specialist have seen another in trade. This coin is an obverse and reverse die match for the RIC plate coin.

A bit on the rough side, but better than the picture shows.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/17/12 at 14:47SkySoldier: Impressive.
Titus_RIC_0985[vesp].jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 985 178 viewsAR Denarius, 3.53g
Rome Mint, July 77 AD - December 78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIII in exergue; Goatherd std. l., milking goat l.
RIC 985 (R). BMC 230. RSC 103. BNC 204.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This type had been one of my 'dream coins' since I started collecting Flavian denarii. A very tough coin to find and one I couldn't resist. Puzzling enough, it is listed as R by the RIC, as is the more common Vespasian version of the goatherd type. I think the Titus is a bit rarer.

It is quite obvious that this reverse is part of an agrarian propaganda series. Unlike the goat referring to Jupiter as seen on a denarius of Domitian as Caesar (RIC 267 (Titus), this type has rustic overtones.

I love this reverse, well centered and fairly clear. Unfortunately, I only have the old dealer's pic.
5 commentsVespasian7002/04/12 at 15:37Randygeki(h2): great coin
Titus Denarius captive.JPG
Titus RIC 01389 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome Mint, 24 June-1 July 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT VIII COS VII; Male captive kneeling r., hands bound behind back, in front of trophy, consisting of helmet, cuirass, crossed swords (?), and round shield
RIC 1 (R). BMC 1. RSC 334a. BNC -.
Acquired from Hail Cesare, August 2004.

This reverse may be commemorating a British victory or another reminder of the Judaean one.
The coin was minted during the first week of Titus' reign, needless to say its a rare type.

Definitely one of my favourite coins in the collection. The condition alone is enough to take your breath away.
9 commentsVespasian7002/04/12 at 15:37Randygeki(h2): not much I can say but wow!
cc16689a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1459 91 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMP T CAESAR COS III; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: AVG and star in oak wreath
RIC 1459 (R2). BMC plate 17.6. RSC 21. RPC 855 (2 spec.). BNC 369.
Ex Gemini IX, 8 January 2012, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 428. Acquired from Freeman and Sear, 2010 (A. Lynn Collection). Ex Gorny and Mosch 126, 14 October 2003, lot 2353.

According to the Gemini catalog listing of this coin, one of only 5 known specimens, so very rare indeed. Same dies as the BMC plate coin and same obverse die as my V1460.

Another wonderful portrait from the artistically pleasing Ephesus mint. Titus here exhibits a slight heavenward gaze.
7 commentsDavid Atherton01/19/12 at 01:13Jay GT4: Excellent!
cc16690a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-146993 viewsAR Denarius, 2.74g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMP T CAESAR COS III; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r., annulet at tip of bust
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; below throne, annulet; in exergue, star
RIC 1469 (R2). BMC 477. RSC -. RPC 856 var. BNC -.
Ex Gemini IX, 8 January 2012, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 429

The annulet before the obverse bust is an important distinction, it may signify a new series for Ephesus. For now it is cataloged with Ephesus group 9. The annulet is barely visible in hand.

In wonderful condition with a pleasing style. There seems to be no end to the high quality output from this mint!
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/19/12 at 01:12Jay GT4: Nice plump portrait
cc16689a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1459 91 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMP T CAESAR COS III; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: AVG and star in oak wreath
RIC 1459 (R2). BMC plate 17.6. RSC 21. RPC 855 (2 spec.). BNC 369.
Ex Gemini IX, 8 January 2012, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 428. Acquired from Freeman and Sear, 2010 (A. Lynn Collection). Ex Gorny and Mosch 126, 14 October 2003, lot 2353.

According to the Gemini catalog listing of this coin, one of only 5 known specimens, so very rare indeed. Same dies as the BMC plate coin and same obverse die as my V1460.

Another wonderful portrait from the artistically pleasing Ephesus mint. Titus here exhibits a slight heavenward gaze.
7 commentsDavid Atherton01/18/12 at 21:24ancientdave: Great looking coin!
cc16689a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1459 91 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMP T CAESAR COS III; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: AVG and star in oak wreath
RIC 1459 (R2). BMC plate 17.6. RSC 21. RPC 855 (2 spec.). BNC 369.
Ex Gemini IX, 8 January 2012, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 428. Acquired from Freeman and Sear, 2010 (A. Lynn Collection). Ex Gorny and Mosch 126, 14 October 2003, lot 2353.

According to the Gemini catalog listing of this coin, one of only 5 known specimens, so very rare indeed. Same dies as the BMC plate coin and same obverse die as my V1460.

Another wonderful portrait from the artistically pleasing Ephesus mint. Titus here exhibits a slight heavenward gaze.
7 commentsDavid Atherton01/18/12 at 19:26quadrans: Hmm yes it is really nice one of my favour it
cc16690a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-146993 viewsAR Denarius, 2.74g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMP T CAESAR COS III; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r., annulet at tip of bust
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; below throne, annulet; in exergue, star
RIC 1469 (R2). BMC 477. RSC -. RPC 856 var. BNC -.
Ex Gemini IX, 8 January 2012, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 429

The annulet before the obverse bust is an important distinction, it may signify a new series for Ephesus. For now it is cataloged with Ephesus group 9. The annulet is barely visible in hand.

In wonderful condition with a pleasing style. There seems to be no end to the high quality output from this mint!
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/18/12 at 19:24quadrans: congrat
cc16690a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-146993 viewsAR Denarius, 2.74g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMP T CAESAR COS III; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r., annulet at tip of bust
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; below throne, annulet; in exergue, star
RIC 1469 (R2). BMC 477. RSC -. RPC 856 var. BNC -.
Ex Gemini IX, 8 January 2012, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 429

The annulet before the obverse bust is an important distinction, it may signify a new series for Ephesus. For now it is cataloged with Ephesus group 9. The annulet is barely visible in hand.

In wonderful condition with a pleasing style. There seems to be no end to the high quality output from this mint!
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/18/12 at 13:36Mat: Excellent one Dave.
cc16689a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1459 91 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMP T CAESAR COS III; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: AVG and star in oak wreath
RIC 1459 (R2). BMC plate 17.6. RSC 21. RPC 855 (2 spec.). BNC 369.
Ex Gemini IX, 8 January 2012, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 428. Acquired from Freeman and Sear, 2010 (A. Lynn Collection). Ex Gorny and Mosch 126, 14 October 2003, lot 2353.

According to the Gemini catalog listing of this coin, one of only 5 known specimens, so very rare indeed. Same dies as the BMC plate coin and same obverse die as my V1460.

Another wonderful portrait from the artistically pleasing Ephesus mint. Titus here exhibits a slight heavenward gaze.
7 commentsDavid Atherton01/18/12 at 06:06FlaviusDomitianus: Very nice coin!
cc16690a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-146993 viewsAR Denarius, 2.74g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMP T CAESAR COS III; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r., annulet at tip of bust
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; below throne, annulet; in exergue, star
RIC 1469 (R2). BMC 477. RSC -. RPC 856 var. BNC -.
Ex Gemini IX, 8 January 2012, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 429

The annulet before the obverse bust is an important distinction, it may signify a new series for Ephesus. For now it is cataloged with Ephesus group 9. The annulet is barely visible in hand.

In wonderful condition with a pleasing style. There seems to be no end to the high quality output from this mint!
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/18/12 at 04:19Randygeki(h2): another awesome coin!
cc16689a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1459 91 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMP T CAESAR COS III; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: AVG and star in oak wreath
RIC 1459 (R2). BMC plate 17.6. RSC 21. RPC 855 (2 spec.). BNC 369.
Ex Gemini IX, 8 January 2012, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 428. Acquired from Freeman and Sear, 2010 (A. Lynn Collection). Ex Gorny and Mosch 126, 14 October 2003, lot 2353.

According to the Gemini catalog listing of this coin, one of only 5 known specimens, so very rare indeed. Same dies as the BMC plate coin and same obverse die as my V1460.

Another wonderful portrait from the artistically pleasing Ephesus mint. Titus here exhibits a slight heavenward gaze.
7 commentsDavid Atherton01/18/12 at 01:00SPQR Coins: A fascinating coin!
cc16689a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1459 91 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMP T CAESAR COS III; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: AVG and star in oak wreath
RIC 1459 (R2). BMC plate 17.6. RSC 21. RPC 855 (2 spec.). BNC 369.
Ex Gemini IX, 8 January 2012, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 428. Acquired from Freeman and Sear, 2010 (A. Lynn Collection). Ex Gorny and Mosch 126, 14 October 2003, lot 2353.

According to the Gemini catalog listing of this coin, one of only 5 known specimens, so very rare indeed. Same dies as the BMC plate coin and same obverse die as my V1460.

Another wonderful portrait from the artistically pleasing Ephesus mint. Titus here exhibits a slight heavenward gaze.
7 commentsDavid Atherton01/17/12 at 20:37Mat: Wow, beautiful piece. Not often you can see beard ...
cc16689a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1459 91 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMP T CAESAR COS III; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: AVG and star in oak wreath
RIC 1459 (R2). BMC plate 17.6. RSC 21. RPC 855 (2 spec.). BNC 369.
Ex Gemini IX, 8 January 2012, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 428. Acquired from Freeman and Sear, 2010 (A. Lynn Collection). Ex Gorny and Mosch 126, 14 October 2003, lot 2353.

According to the Gemini catalog listing of this coin, one of only 5 known specimens, so very rare indeed. Same dies as the BMC plate coin and same obverse die as my V1460.

Another wonderful portrait from the artistically pleasing Ephesus mint. Titus here exhibits a slight heavenward gaze.
7 commentsDavid Atherton01/17/12 at 20:33Randygeki(h2): Wow! A very nice, and rare, coin! Congrats
titus_as_caesar_star_prow1.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC 950151 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VI; Prow r.; above eight pointed star
RIC 950 (R). BMC 226. RSC 68. BNC 202.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This rare star and prow reverse is shared with Vespasian (not a very common one for him as well!) and is a copy of one issued by Marc Antony. Vespasian copied many types from the past, this is perhaps an odd choice for a reverse considering Antony was an enemy of Octavian. Why this particular type was chosen remains a mystery to me.

The BMC states the star and prow symbolizes the victorious admiral.

This denarius is rated R by the RIC, but as far as it's availability in the market place I would rate it R2! This was a most vexing coin for me to locate, again a friend who shares a common collecting niche as I came to the rescue and offered this one to me.

Quite a nice find. Not only a rare type, but also the portrait is wonderful, imho.

5 commentsvespasian7001/16/12 at 09:54labienus: Agree with the difficulty of getting this coin (I ...
V529a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 529A153 viewsAR Denarius, 3.48g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: SALVS AVG; Salus std., l., with patera
RIC 529A (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection. Ex Dr. Busso Peus Nachfolger, Auction 404, 2 November 2011, lot 2570.

This Titus as Caesar denarius with the Salus reverse type coupled with the obverse legend on the present coin is unlisted in all the major references, including the new RIC II. The coin comes from a series minted in 73 AD in which the Salus type was known for Vespasian but not for Titus until this present denarius surfaced. Ian Carradice has given this new type the number 529A (under Vespasian) in the RIC II Addenda. Also, this coin is an obverse die match for the RIC V531 plate coin.

What to my eyes makes this COTD worthy is not the rarity but the bold portrait which was described by the eminent Flavian collector Harry Sneh as 'striking'. I tend to agree. The reverse is weakly struck (worn die?) but well centered.

Struck on a huge flan and weighing 3.48g. This coin is a true beauty in hand.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/09/11 at 23:13Noah: sensational portrait on a fetching coin!
Titus_RIC_0985[vesp].jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 985 178 viewsAR Denarius, 3.53g
Rome Mint, July 77 AD - December 78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIII in exergue; Goatherd std. l., milking goat l.
RIC 985 (R). BMC 230. RSC 103. BNC 204.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This type had been one of my 'dream coins' since I started collecting Flavian denarii. A very tough coin to find and one I couldn't resist. Puzzling enough, it is listed as R by the RIC, as is the more common Vespasian version of the goatherd type. I think the Titus is a bit rarer.

It is quite obvious that this reverse is part of an agrarian propaganda series. Unlike the goat referring to Jupiter as seen on a denarius of Domitian as Caesar (RIC 267 (Titus), this type has rustic overtones.

I love this reverse, well centered and fairly clear. Unfortunately, I only have the old dealer's pic.
5 commentsVespasian7012/09/11 at 03:10yavor8310: Beautiful Bravo
V529a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 529A153 viewsAR Denarius, 3.48g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: SALVS AVG; Salus std., l., with patera
RIC 529A (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection. Ex Dr. Busso Peus Nachfolger, Auction 404, 2 November 2011, lot 2570.

This Titus as Caesar denarius with the Salus reverse type coupled with the obverse legend on the present coin is unlisted in all the major references, including the new RIC II. The coin comes from a series minted in 73 AD in which the Salus type was known for Vespasian but not for Titus until this present denarius surfaced. Ian Carradice has given this new type the number 529A (under Vespasian) in the RIC II Addenda. Also, this coin is an obverse die match for the RIC V531 plate coin.

What to my eyes makes this COTD worthy is not the rarity but the bold portrait which was described by the eminent Flavian collector Harry Sneh as 'striking'. I tend to agree. The reverse is weakly struck (worn die?) but well centered.

Struck on a huge flan and weighing 3.48g. This coin is a true beauty in hand.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/08/11 at 07:35Randygeki(h2): Very nice!
V529a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 529A153 viewsAR Denarius, 3.48g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: SALVS AVG; Salus std., l., with patera
RIC 529A (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection. Ex Dr. Busso Peus Nachfolger, Auction 404, 2 November 2011, lot 2570.

This Titus as Caesar denarius with the Salus reverse type coupled with the obverse legend on the present coin is unlisted in all the major references, including the new RIC II. The coin comes from a series minted in 73 AD in which the Salus type was known for Vespasian but not for Titus until this present denarius surfaced. Ian Carradice has given this new type the number 529A (under Vespasian) in the RIC II Addenda. Also, this coin is an obverse die match for the RIC V531 plate coin.

What to my eyes makes this COTD worthy is not the rarity but the bold portrait which was described by the eminent Flavian collector Harry Sneh as 'striking'. I tend to agree. The reverse is weakly struck (worn die?) but well centered.

Struck on a huge flan and weighing 3.48g. This coin is a true beauty in hand.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/07/11 at 10:39FlaviusDomitianus: I love it!
V529a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 529A153 viewsAR Denarius, 3.48g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: SALVS AVG; Salus std., l., with patera
RIC 529A (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection. Ex Dr. Busso Peus Nachfolger, Auction 404, 2 November 2011, lot 2570.

This Titus as Caesar denarius with the Salus reverse type coupled with the obverse legend on the present coin is unlisted in all the major references, including the new RIC II. The coin comes from a series minted in 73 AD in which the Salus type was known for Vespasian but not for Titus until this present denarius surfaced. Ian Carradice has given this new type the number 529A (under Vespasian) in the RIC II Addenda. Also, this coin is an obverse die match for the RIC V531 plate coin.

What to my eyes makes this COTD worthy is not the rarity but the bold portrait which was described by the eminent Flavian collector Harry Sneh as 'striking'. I tend to agree. The reverse is weakly struck (worn die?) but well centered.

Struck on a huge flan and weighing 3.48g. This coin is a true beauty in hand.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/07/11 at 06:49maridvnvm: A fantastic coin.
t54-1.jpg
Titus RIC 54120 viewsAR Denarius, 3.03g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Venus stg. r., leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 54 (R2). BMC 25. RSC 286. BNC -.

Another very rare Titus as Augustus denarius. What makes this rare is the obverse portrait left married to this reverse type with IMP XV. Neither I or a fellow Flavian specialist have seen another in trade. This coin is an obverse and reverse die match for the RIC plate coin.

A bit on the rough side, but better than the picture shows.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/06/11 at 23:16Steve E: I also appreciate rarities, in any condition
V529a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 529A153 viewsAR Denarius, 3.48g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: SALVS AVG; Salus std., l., with patera
RIC 529A (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection. Ex Dr. Busso Peus Nachfolger, Auction 404, 2 November 2011, lot 2570.

This Titus as Caesar denarius with the Salus reverse type coupled with the obverse legend on the present coin is unlisted in all the major references, including the new RIC II. The coin comes from a series minted in 73 AD in which the Salus type was known for Vespasian but not for Titus until this present denarius surfaced. Ian Carradice has given this new type the number 529A (under Vespasian) in the RIC II Addenda. Also, this coin is an obverse die match for the RIC V531 plate coin.

What to my eyes makes this COTD worthy is not the rarity but the bold portrait which was described by the eminent Flavian collector Harry Sneh as 'striking'. I tend to agree. The reverse is weakly struck (worn die?) but well centered.

Struck on a huge flan and weighing 3.48g. This coin is a true beauty in hand.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/06/11 at 23:13Steve E: I agree, a very striking, expressive portrait! Nic...
t54-1.jpg
Titus RIC 54120 viewsAR Denarius, 3.03g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Venus stg. r., leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 54 (R2). BMC 25. RSC 286. BNC -.

Another very rare Titus as Augustus denarius. What makes this rare is the obverse portrait left married to this reverse type with IMP XV. Neither I or a fellow Flavian specialist have seen another in trade. This coin is an obverse and reverse die match for the RIC plate coin.

A bit on the rough side, but better than the picture shows.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/28/11 at 18:33FlaviusDomitianus: Great catch, congrats!
t54-1.jpg
Titus RIC 54120 viewsAR Denarius, 3.03g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Venus stg. r., leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 54 (R2). BMC 25. RSC 286. BNC -.

Another very rare Titus as Augustus denarius. What makes this rare is the obverse portrait left married to this reverse type with IMP XV. Neither I or a fellow Flavian specialist have seen another in trade. This coin is an obverse and reverse die match for the RIC plate coin.

A bit on the rough side, but better than the picture shows.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/28/11 at 15:00Randygeki(h2): Great addition!
titus throne reverse.JPG
Titus RIC-124c (1)169 viewsAR Denarius, 3.60g
Rome Mint 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, triangular frame with nine palmettes
RIC 124c (C2). BMC 62. RSC 313a. BNC 50.
Acquired from Old Roman Coins, December 2003.

A reverse, which according to the BMCRE, may commemorate the pulvinar of Apollo and Diana (and possibly Ceres) for the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD. This issue was interrupted by the fire in Rome later in the same year and was continued again by Domitian upon the mints reopening in 81.

A denarius that looks quite spectacular in hand, despite the brightness.
3 commentsVespasian7011/22/11 at 10:52David Atherton: No, the coin is not fake, the picture is horrible....
titus throne reverse.JPG
Titus RIC-124c (1)169 viewsAR Denarius, 3.60g
Rome Mint 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, triangular frame with nine palmettes
RIC 124c (C2). BMC 62. RSC 313a. BNC 50.
Acquired from Old Roman Coins, December 2003.

A reverse, which according to the BMCRE, may commemorate the pulvinar of Apollo and Diana (and possibly Ceres) for the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD. This issue was interrupted by the fire in Rome later in the same year and was continued again by Domitian upon the mints reopening in 81.

A denarius that looks quite spectacular in hand, despite the brightness.
3 commentsVespasian7011/20/11 at 09:28Cayo Julio Csar: fake????!!
titusmars2jpg_.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC 94955 viewsAR Denarius, 3.08g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VI; Mars stg. l., with spear and trophy; and to r., corn ear
RIC 949 (C). BMC 222. RSC 66. BNC 196.

Yet another reverse that is shared with Vespasian. Although the type with Mars and corn ear is listed in RIC as "common", this is the first example I've seen in trade. The condition is not the greatest but beggars can't be choosers. Needless to say the thrill of receiving this denarius far outweighs the eye appeal!
2 commentsDavid Atherton11/01/11 at 02:18Noah: super expression on Titus and nice high relief on ...
titusmars2jpg_.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC 94955 viewsAR Denarius, 3.08g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VI; Mars stg. l., with spear and trophy; and to r., corn ear
RIC 949 (C). BMC 222. RSC 66. BNC 196.

Yet another reverse that is shared with Vespasian. Although the type with Mars and corn ear is listed in RIC as "common", this is the first example I've seen in trade. The condition is not the greatest but beggars can't be choosers. Needless to say the thrill of receiving this denarius far outweighs the eye appeal!
2 commentsDavid Atherton10/31/11 at 19:29Randygeki(h2): nice
titus37a.jpg
Titus RIC 3879 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Capricorn l., below, globe
RIC 38 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Numismeo, September 2011.

A very rare left facing example of this type from one of Titus' rarer issues minted in the fall of 79 AD. According to BMCRE II and Cohen, London and Paris do not have the type.

Deeply toned with a thick patina and nice portrait.
1 commentsDavid Atherton10/03/11 at 20:56Randygeki(h2): Congrats, very nice addition!
Titus_RIC_0985[vesp].jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 985 178 viewsAR Denarius, 3.53g
Rome Mint, July 77 AD - December 78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIII in exergue; Goatherd std. l., milking goat l.
RIC 985 (R). BMC 230. RSC 103. BNC 204.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This type had been one of my 'dream coins' since I started collecting Flavian denarii. A very tough coin to find and one I couldn't resist. Puzzling enough, it is listed as R by the RIC, as is the more common Vespasian version of the goatherd type. I think the Titus is a bit rarer.

It is quite obvious that this reverse is part of an agrarian propaganda series. Unlike the goat referring to Jupiter as seen on a denarius of Domitian as Caesar (RIC 267 (Titus), this type has rustic overtones.

I love this reverse, well centered and fairly clear. Unfortunately, I only have the old dealer's pic.
5 commentsVespasian7009/05/11 at 01:07Legatus: Great coin
Titus Denarius captive.JPG
Titus RIC 01389 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome Mint, 24 June-1 July 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT VIII COS VII; Male captive kneeling r., hands bound behind back, in front of trophy, consisting of helmet, cuirass, crossed swords (?), and round shield
RIC 1 (R). BMC 1. RSC 334a. BNC -.
Acquired from Hail Cesare, August 2004.

This reverse may be commemorating a British victory or another reminder of the Judaean one.
The coin was minted during the first week of Titus' reign, needless to say its a rare type.

Definitely one of my favourite coins in the collection. The condition alone is enough to take your breath away.
9 commentsVespasian7009/05/11 at 01:06Legatus: Great coin!! I want one
titus_as_caesar_cap_and_trophy.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC-1076102 viewsAR Denarius, 2.89g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT VIII COS VII; Trophy, below, captive kneeling r.
RIC 1076(C). BMC 258. RSC 334. BNC 229.

Variously this reverse has been attributed to an Agricola victory in Britain or a 'Judaea Capta' type. It seems more likely to be a 'Judaea Capta' type because Titus does not share the type with Vespasian. One would think a British victory would have been celebrated on both coinages. It seems more likely to be a type that reminds the Roman populace of the young Prince's role in the Jewish War nine years before.

A very decent example of the type with a better than average portrait.
2 commentsDavid Atherton08/21/11 at 12:27Jay GT4: Liked yours so much I got my own!
2600469.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1442105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI - AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., EPHE
RIC 1442 (R). BMC 468. RSC 125. RPC 844 (5 spec.). BNC 361.
Ex CNG E260, 20 July 2011, lot 469. Ex Gorny and Mosch 170, 13 October 2008, lot 2068. Ex Gorny & Mosch 142, 10 October 2005, lot 2392.

The obverse is slightly off center but contains a wonderful portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton08/01/11 at 20:29Potator II: Exceptional
2600469.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1442105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI - AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., EPHE
RIC 1442 (R). BMC 468. RSC 125. RPC 844 (5 spec.). BNC 361.
Ex CNG E260, 20 July 2011, lot 469. Ex Gorny and Mosch 170, 13 October 2008, lot 2068. Ex Gorny & Mosch 142, 10 October 2005, lot 2392.

The obverse is slightly off center but contains a wonderful portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton08/01/11 at 17:12Pscipio: That is a fantastic coin!
2600469.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1442105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI - AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., EPHE
RIC 1442 (R). BMC 468. RSC 125. RPC 844 (5 spec.). BNC 361.
Ex CNG E260, 20 July 2011, lot 469. Ex Gorny and Mosch 170, 13 October 2008, lot 2068. Ex Gorny & Mosch 142, 10 October 2005, lot 2392.

The obverse is slightly off center but contains a wonderful portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton07/31/11 at 23:42Bruno V.: Nice reverse too, with a diaphanous Victory. What ...
2600469.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1442105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI - AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., EPHE
RIC 1442 (R). BMC 468. RSC 125. RPC 844 (5 spec.). BNC 361.
Ex CNG E260, 20 July 2011, lot 469. Ex Gorny and Mosch 170, 13 October 2008, lot 2068. Ex Gorny & Mosch 142, 10 October 2005, lot 2392.

The obverse is slightly off center but contains a wonderful portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton07/31/11 at 21:51Marsman: Beautiful portrait indeed!
2600469.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1442105 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI - AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., EPHE
RIC 1442 (R). BMC 468. RSC 125. RPC 844 (5 spec.). BNC 361.
Ex CNG E260, 20 July 2011, lot 469. Ex Gorny and Mosch 170, 13 October 2008, lot 2068. Ex Gorny & Mosch 142, 10 October 2005, lot 2392.

The obverse is slightly off center but contains a wonderful portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton07/31/11 at 21:32Randygeki(h2): Nice!
Titus_RIC_0985[vesp].jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 985 178 viewsAR Denarius, 3.53g
Rome Mint, July 77 AD - December 78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIII in exergue; Goatherd std. l., milking goat l.
RIC 985 (R). BMC 230. RSC 103. BNC 204.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This type had been one of my 'dream coins' since I started collecting Flavian denarii. A very tough coin to find and one I couldn't resist. Puzzling enough, it is listed as R by the RIC, as is the more common Vespasian version of the goatherd type. I think the Titus is a bit rarer.

It is quite obvious that this reverse is part of an agrarian propaganda series. Unlike the goat referring to Jupiter as seen on a denarius of Domitian as Caesar (RIC 267 (Titus), this type has rustic overtones.

I love this reverse, well centered and fairly clear. Unfortunately, I only have the old dealer's pic.
5 commentsVespasian7006/07/11 at 23:50Noah: yes, a pastoral scene is hardly glamorous...I love...
Titus Denarius captive.JPG
Titus RIC 01389 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome Mint, 24 June-1 July 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT VIII COS VII; Male captive kneeling r., hands bound behind back, in front of trophy, consisting of helmet, cuirass, crossed swords (?), and round shield
RIC 1 (R). BMC 1. RSC 334a. BNC -.
Acquired from Hail Cesare, August 2004.

This reverse may be commemorating a British victory or another reminder of the Judaean one.
The coin was minted during the first week of Titus' reign, needless to say its a rare type.

Definitely one of my favourite coins in the collection. The condition alone is enough to take your breath away.
9 commentsVespasian7006/07/11 at 23:49Noah: very nice!
titus_as_caesar_concordia.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC-156096 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Antioch Mint, 72-73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESP PO-N TR POT; Bust of Titus, laureate, draped, bearded, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVGVSTI; Concordia std. l., with patera and cornucopiae
RIC 1560 (R2). BMC 514. RSC 44. RPC 1932 (5 spec.). BNC -.
Ex Lanz, eBay, 25 September 2008.

A rare early type of Titus as Caesar from Antioch copying a reverse of Vespasian. Peace and harmony is the theme on display here.

Aside from the off-center obverse, a decent coin from a mint well known for quality control issues at the time.
3 commentsvespasian7005/31/11 at 13:37rexesq: Interesting draped bust on this example, and quite...
titus as caesar cadeceus.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 69482 viewsAR Denarius, 3.57g
Rome Mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESP; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PONTIF TR POT; Winged caduceus, upright
RIC 694 (R2). BMC p. 29, *. RSC 167. BNC 130.
Acquired from A. G. & S. Gillis, April 2007.

A reverse type Titus Caesar shared with Vespasian. The caduceus symbolises commercial prosperity and may be associated with the censorship. (BMCRE p. xxxvii)

Not in the BM's collection, but noted in the catalog. A fairly rare variant of the type. Good metal, wonderful early portrait, and in good condition (Titus' beard is visible).
1 commentsVespasian7005/31/11 at 13:36rexesq: Very nice, one of my favorite reverse types used b...
titusfidessm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 528138 viewsAR Denarius, 3.12g
Rome Mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: FIDES PVBL; Hands clasped over caduceus, two poppies and two corn-ears
RIC 528 (R). BMC 91a. RSC 87b. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This Fides type was issued under Vespasian in 73 AD and possibly is a reference to the grain supply. A very rare coin, this type is one I have not seen in trade. Harry Sneh said he has only seen two for sale ... this example he sold to me and his own specimen. The RIC plate coin would be a third we both know of. The BMCRE cites a specimen from the March 6, 1925 Recamier sale (p. 17).

A large flan and classic portrait makes for a coin with excellent eye appeal.
2 commentsDavid Atherton05/31/11 at 13:32rexesq: Very interesting portrait, and a great reverse.......
a16.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 69094 viewsAR Denarius, 2.71g
Rome mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESP; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS III across field; Laurel trees, two upright
RIC 690 (R2). BMC p. 28 note. RSC 47. BNC 122.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

A rare denarius which is somewhat rare for Vespasian and extremely rare for Titus. The reverse is a restoration of of a similar type minted by Augustus. The two laurel trees represent the two planted at Augustus' door.
2 commentsDavid Atherton05/31/11 at 13:25rexesq: Very nice portrait! This is another reverse type I...
066.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1486103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck off flan
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS V; Winged caduceus
RIC 1486 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. RPC 1460 (2 spec.). BNC -.
Ex Ancient Treasures, eBay, March 2011.

The small series this coin comes from is quite mysterious. The mint is not known for certain, although Ephesus is a prime suspect. The reason for the series being minted at all is not known either. The issue is full of blundered legends and mules, however, stylistically the coins are very pleasing.

7 commentsDavid Atherton05/31/11 at 13:20rexesq: Very nice portrait of the Emperor. Very pleasing.
15562dentLG.jpg
Titus RIC 2862 viewsAR Denarius, 3.44g
Rome Mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Statue of radiate male figure with spear and parazonium on rostral column
RIC 28 (C). BMC 13. RSC 272. BNC 11.
Acquired from Herakles Numismatics, May 2011.

The reverse is a carry-over type from Vespasian's last issue before his death. Mattingly speculates the reverse depicts the 120 ft high Colossus erected by Nero for his Golden House (BMCRE p. xlii). According to Dio, the enormous statue was moved by Vespasian in his sixth consulship and set up on the Scared Way. However, it is far more likely to be an imitative design copying a similar type struck for Octavian (BMCRE i, 103, 633).

A decent, well centred example of this common type.
1 commentsDavid Atherton05/24/11 at 01:26Jay GT4: May be a common type but difficult to find nice. ...
Titus Denarius captive.JPG
Titus RIC 01389 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome Mint, 24 June-1 July 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT VIII COS VII; Male captive kneeling r., hands bound behind back, in front of trophy, consisting of helmet, cuirass, crossed swords (?), and round shield
RIC 1 (R). BMC 1. RSC 334a. BNC -.
Acquired from Hail Cesare, August 2004.

This reverse may be commemorating a British victory or another reminder of the Judaean one.
The coin was minted during the first week of Titus' reign, needless to say its a rare type.

Definitely one of my favourite coins in the collection. The condition alone is enough to take your breath away.
9 commentsVespasian7005/21/11 at 12:02Joe Sermarini: WOW!
titus as caesar prince palm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1562121 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Antioch Mint, 72-73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT; Bust of Titus, laureate, draped, bearded, r.
Rev: Palm tree: to l., Titus stg. r. with spear and parazonium, foot on helmet; to r., Judaea std. r.
RIC 1562 (C). BMC 518. RSC 392. RPC 1934 (11 spec.). BNC 322.
Acquired from WCNC, March 2008.

A Judaea Capta type which copies a reverse from Rome.

Though rated as common in the RIC, it is a fairly difficult reverse type to find. I like the draped busts of this issue.
3 commentsVespasian7005/03/11 at 03:37SPQR Coins: These are great coins, I'd love to have one!
titus_as_caesar_RIC_0160[vesp].jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 369142 viewsAR Denarius, 3.13g
Rome Mint, 72-73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT; Head of Titus, bearded, laureate, r.
Rev: No legend. Jewess (as type of Judaea), draped, veiled, seated r. under palm-tree, in attitude of dejection, knees drawn up, head resting on l. hand, l. arm propped on knee; behind palm, prince in military dress, standing r., r. foot on helmet, holding vertical spear in r. hand and parazonium in l.
RIC 369 (R2). BMC 85. RSC 392var. BNC -.
EX CNG E42, 12 November 2001, lot 64980.

The type was issued to commemorate the end of the Jewish War of 66-70 AD. Both Titus and Vespasian minted this same reverse in Antioch and Rome. Here we have the much scarcer Rome mint example issued by Titus, it is more commonly seen as an aureus.

A pleasing portrait with, sadly, a well worn reverse. The scarcity of the coin makes up for the state of preservation.
1 commentsvespasian7005/03/11 at 01:46Jay GT4: Loving this one!
titus as caesar prince palm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1562121 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Antioch Mint, 72-73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT; Bust of Titus, laureate, draped, bearded, r.
Rev: Palm tree: to l., Titus stg. r. with spear and parazonium, foot on helmet; to r., Judaea std. r.
RIC 1562 (C). BMC 518. RSC 392. RPC 1934 (11 spec.). BNC 322.
Acquired from WCNC, March 2008.

A Judaea Capta type which copies a reverse from Rome.

Though rated as common in the RIC, it is a fairly difficult reverse type to find. I like the draped busts of this issue.
3 commentsVespasian7005/02/11 at 23:15casata137ec: Fantastic!
V1444_no_mm_obv.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1426(5A)484 viewsAR Denarius, 2.78g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r., no mint mark
RIC 1426(5A)4. BMC -. RSC -. RPC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This coin should have the EPHE mint mark on the lower left of the reverse, however it is clearly not there. This is the second coin from the series I have seen which has no mint mark. It has been added to the Flavian RIC II Addenda.

Better in hand than the photo suggests.
1 commentsDavid Atherton04/25/11 at 15:14rexesq: Nice example of this rare type from a less than co...
V1074a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-107475 viewsAR Denarius, 3.19g
Rome mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR POT VIII COS VII; Quadriga l., with flower
RIC 1074 (R). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 228.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This type is very rare with the left facing portrait. RIC only lists it as 'rare', although this is the only one I've ever seen in trade. The reverse type was carried over when Titus became Augustus and it too is rare with a left facing portrait.

Condition wise there is a lot to be desired, but the main devices are visible. Not much better looking than the RIC plate coin from Paris (BNC 228).
1 commentsDavid Atherton04/25/11 at 14:23rexesq: Nice example of a rare type.
V870.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 87068 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS V across field; Eagle head r. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
RIC 870 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

What makes this example rare is the eagle facing right instead of the much more common left. This coin's reverse is a die match for the RIC plate coin. As a side note, although most descriptions of this type describe a "thunderbolt" in the eagle's claws, I'm hard pressed to see one here. So, a variant missing the thunderbolt.

I had a rough go of it locating this type. A decent example with a pleasing portrait.
2 commentsDavid Atherton04/25/11 at 14:11rexesq: Very nice! I have wanted a Flavian with this rever...
V870.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 87068 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS V across field; Eagle head r. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
RIC 870 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

What makes this example rare is the eagle facing right instead of the much more common left. This coin's reverse is a die match for the RIC plate coin. As a side note, although most descriptions of this type describe a "thunderbolt" in the eagle's claws, I'm hard pressed to see one here. So, a variant missing the thunderbolt.

I had a rough go of it locating this type. A decent example with a pleasing portrait.
2 commentsDavid Atherton04/24/11 at 17:42Randygeki(h2): cool addition
V517a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 51785 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CEN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: SALVS AVG; Salus std. l., with patera
RIC 517 (R). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

An early rare denarius of Titus as Caesar minted in 76 AD. Titus shared the Salus type with Vespasian whom it was struck for in much larger quantities. This was the norm, the two often shared reverse types to clearly demonstrate that Titus was indeed Vespasian's successor, although the types are much rarer for Titus, as is this case with the present coin. Why Salus was chosen for a type in 73 remains a mystery; perhaps a reference to the emperor recovering from an illness or for escaping an assassination plot.

RIC only cites the Hunterian Museum, which is odd considering it is given a 'rare' rating. I've only seen this one in trade. IMHO it is just as rare as the RIC V518 salus (CENS) I have with a frequency rating of R2.

A humble portrait with fairly clear legends on a nicely toned flan.
3 commentsDavid Atherton04/23/11 at 06:39Domitianus: A nice coin with a lovely toning. I've had a l...
V517a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 51785 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CEN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: SALVS AVG; Salus std. l., with patera
RIC 517 (R). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

An early rare denarius of Titus as Caesar minted in 76 AD. Titus shared the Salus type with Vespasian whom it was struck for in much larger quantities. This was the norm, the two often shared reverse types to clearly demonstrate that Titus was indeed Vespasian's successor, although the types are much rarer for Titus, as is this case with the present coin. Why Salus was chosen for a type in 73 remains a mystery; perhaps a reference to the emperor recovering from an illness or for escaping an assassination plot.

RIC only cites the Hunterian Museum, which is odd considering it is given a 'rare' rating. I've only seen this one in trade. IMHO it is just as rare as the RIC V518 salus (CENS) I have with a frequency rating of R2.

A humble portrait with fairly clear legends on a nicely toned flan.
3 commentsDavid Atherton04/22/11 at 16:18Randygeki(h2): I like the portrait on this one, nice addition!
V517a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 51785 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CEN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: SALVS AVG; Salus std. l., with patera
RIC 517 (R). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

An early rare denarius of Titus as Caesar minted in 76 AD. Titus shared the Salus type with Vespasian whom it was struck for in much larger quantities. This was the norm, the two often shared reverse types to clearly demonstrate that Titus was indeed Vespasian's successor, although the types are much rarer for Titus, as is this case with the present coin. Why Salus was chosen for a type in 73 remains a mystery; perhaps a reference to the emperor recovering from an illness or for escaping an assassination plot.

RIC only cites the Hunterian Museum, which is odd considering it is given a 'rare' rating. I've only seen this one in trade. IMHO it is just as rare as the RIC V518 salus (CENS) I have with a frequency rating of R2.

A humble portrait with fairly clear legends on a nicely toned flan.
3 commentsDavid Atherton04/22/11 at 11:06Kained but Able: A real beauty with a very expressive portrait of T...
T3a.jpg
Titus RIC 0376 viewsAR Denarius, 3.16g
Rome mint, 24 June - July 1, 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CERES AVGVST; Ceres stg. l., with corn ears and poppy and sceptre
RIC 3 (R). BMC 105. RSC 31a. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This denarius of Titus was minted in the first week (or perhaps a bit longer) of his reign in June of 79 AD. The reverse type of Ceres standing is a carry-over from Titus as Caesar under Vespasian. Many of the reverse types minted for Titus as Caesar were continued into his reign until the mint adjusted for a new series. The type is not rare under Vespasian, but is extremely rare under Titus as Augustus. RIC gives a rarity rating of 'rare', which to me seems a bit off. I've only seen three of these in trade in 7 years. Perhaps the representation of the type in major collections is overdone?

At any rate, this specimen is a fine example of a very early coin of Titus as Augustus.
2 commentsDavid Atherton03/14/11 at 22:10Jay GT4: You got one!
T3a.jpg
Titus RIC 0376 viewsAR Denarius, 3.16g
Rome mint, 24 June - July 1, 79 AD
Obv: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CERES AVGVST; Ceres stg. l., with corn ears and poppy and sceptre
RIC 3 (R). BMC 105. RSC 31a. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This denarius of Titus was minted in the first week (or perhaps a bit longer) of his reign in June of 79 AD. The reverse type of Ceres standing is a carry-over from Titus as Caesar under Vespasian. Many of the reverse types minted for Titus as Caesar were continued into his reign until the mint adjusted for a new series. The type is not rare under Vespasian, but is extremely rare under Titus as Augustus. RIC gives a rarity rating of 'rare', which to me seems a bit off. I've only seen three of these in trade in 7 years. Perhaps the representation of the type in major collections is overdone?

At any rate, this specimen is a fine example of a very early coin of Titus as Augustus.
2 commentsDavid Atherton03/14/11 at 21:15Randygeki(h2): Sweet!
066.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1486103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck off flan
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS V; Winged caduceus
RIC 1486 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. RPC 1460 (2 spec.). BNC -.
Ex Ancient Treasures, eBay, March 2011.

The small series this coin comes from is quite mysterious. The mint is not known for certain, although Ephesus is a prime suspect. The reason for the series being minted at all is not known either. The issue is full of blundered legends and mules, however, stylistically the coins are very pleasing.

7 commentsDavid Atherton03/08/11 at 01:55Noah: lovely
3003LG.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 553 Mule71 viewsAR, Denarius, 3.25g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP - VESP CEN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PONTIF MAXIM; Vespasian std. r. on curule chair, with sceptre and branch
RIC 553 (R). BMC 112. RSC 158. BNC -.

This denarius of Titus as Caesar is quite interesting because of the reverse legend, PONTIF MAXIM, obviously inappropriate for Titus in 73 AD! However this mule was minted in such quantities as to be assigned it's own catalog number in the major references. The type was also issued with obverse legend ending in CENS.

The portrait is very pleasing as well.
1 commentsDavid Atherton03/08/11 at 01:05Randygeki(h2): nice portrait
066.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1486103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck off flan
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS V; Winged caduceus
RIC 1486 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. RPC 1460 (2 spec.). BNC -.
Ex Ancient Treasures, eBay, March 2011.

The small series this coin comes from is quite mysterious. The mint is not known for certain, although Ephesus is a prime suspect. The reason for the series being minted at all is not known either. The issue is full of blundered legends and mules, however, stylistically the coins are very pleasing.

7 commentsDavid Atherton03/08/11 at 01:03Randygeki(h2): Great addition!
066.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1486103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck off flan
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS V; Winged caduceus
RIC 1486 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. RPC 1460 (2 spec.). BNC -.
Ex Ancient Treasures, eBay, March 2011.

The small series this coin comes from is quite mysterious. The mint is not known for certain, although Ephesus is a prime suspect. The reason for the series being minted at all is not known either. The issue is full of blundered legends and mules, however, stylistically the coins are very pleasing.

7 commentsDavid Atherton03/08/11 at 00:57Jay GT4: Good eye to see the T!
066.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1486103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck off flan
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS V; Winged caduceus
RIC 1486 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. RPC 1460 (2 spec.). BNC -.
Ex Ancient Treasures, eBay, March 2011.

The small series this coin comes from is quite mysterious. The mint is not known for certain, although Ephesus is a prime suspect. The reason for the series being minted at all is not known either. The issue is full of blundered legends and mules, however, stylistically the coins are very pleasing.

7 commentsDavid Atherton03/07/11 at 23:36Bud Stewart: Very impressive. Great acquisition.
T43sm.jpg
Titus RIC 43103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Quadriga l., with corn ears
RIC 43 (R). BMC 34. RSC 293. BNC 30.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

The reverse type of a quadriga with corn ears is itself not rare, the type was minted for Titus both as Caesar and Augustus, but it is rare with IMP XV. The denarii of this series seems to have been minted in much smaller quantities than the previous issues with IMP XIIII. I was only able to acquire this one from a private collector. Sharp and with a good portrait.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/02/11 at 05:29Antonivs Protti: Amazing Titus!
T43sm.jpg
Titus RIC 43103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Quadriga l., with corn ears
RIC 43 (R). BMC 34. RSC 293. BNC 30.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

The reverse type of a quadriga with corn ears is itself not rare, the type was minted for Titus both as Caesar and Augustus, but it is rare with IMP XV. The denarii of this series seems to have been minted in much smaller quantities than the previous issues with IMP XIIII. I was only able to acquire this one from a private collector. Sharp and with a good portrait.
5 commentsDavid Atherton03/01/11 at 08:14Potator II: Great reverse type
T43sm.jpg
Titus RIC 43103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Quadriga l., with corn ears
RIC 43 (R). BMC 34. RSC 293. BNC 30.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

The reverse type of a quadriga with corn ears is itself not rare, the type was minted for Titus both as Caesar and Augustus, but it is rare with IMP XV. The denarii of this series seems to have been minted in much smaller quantities than the previous issues with IMP XIIII. I was only able to acquire this one from a private collector. Sharp and with a good portrait.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/28/11 at 21:26Randygeki(h2): another to my want list
T43sm.jpg
Titus RIC 43103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Quadriga l., with corn ears
RIC 43 (R). BMC 34. RSC 293. BNC 30.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

The reverse type of a quadriga with corn ears is itself not rare, the type was minted for Titus both as Caesar and Augustus, but it is rare with IMP XV. The denarii of this series seems to have been minted in much smaller quantities than the previous issues with IMP XIIII. I was only able to acquire this one from a private collector. Sharp and with a good portrait.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/28/11 at 20:57Jay GT4: As always...fantastic!
T43sm.jpg
Titus RIC 43103 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Quadriga l., with corn ears
RIC 43 (R). BMC 34. RSC 293. BNC 30.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

The reverse type of a quadriga with corn ears is itself not rare, the type was minted for Titus both as Caesar and Augustus, but it is rare with IMP XV. The denarii of this series seems to have been minted in much smaller quantities than the previous issues with IMP XIIII. I was only able to acquire this one from a private collector. Sharp and with a good portrait.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/28/11 at 20:49Lucas H: I have Titus envy. Love this type of the Judaea C...
titus_l_elephant1.jpg
Titus RIC-116231 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Elephant, stg. l.
RIC 116 (C). BMC 47. RSC 304. BNC 41.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

Not a particularly rare type...but not very common either with portrait left. I believe these were minted near a ratio of 1:10 compared to the right facing type.

Elephants were featured in those first games and Martial in his book On the Spectacles actually mentions an elephant, who after dispatching a bull in the arena, knelt before the emperor! Perhaps a neat trick the trainer had taught it.

A really nice portrait with a fantastic elephant on the reverse.
10 commentsDavid Atherton02/12/11 at 12:37Antonivs Protti: Wonderful coin! I wonder if this extint species of...
titus_l_elephant1.jpg
Titus RIC-116231 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Elephant, stg. l.
RIC 116 (C). BMC 47. RSC 304. BNC 41.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

Not a particularly rare type...but not very common either with portrait left. I believe these were minted near a ratio of 1:10 compared to the right facing type.

Elephants were featured in those first games and Martial in his book On the Spectacles actually mentions an elephant, who after dispatching a bull in the arena, knelt before the emperor! Perhaps a neat trick the trainer had taught it.

A really nice portrait with a fantastic elephant on the reverse.
10 commentsDavid Atherton02/11/11 at 23:29Soxfan: great coin!
Z7928LG.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-144199 viewsAR Denarius, 3.23g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, bare, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., EPHE
RIC 1441 (R2). BMC p. 98 note. RSC 124. RPC 838 (1 spec.). BNC 360.
Acquired from Beast Coins, August 2010.

A most rare denarius from Ephesus with a bare headed portrait.

The entire series itself is rare, but the bare headed portraits are even scarcer. I'm not sure what the rarity ratio is between the two types....10 to 1? At any rate, this coin is both an obverse and reverse die match with the RIC plate coin.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/12/10 at 14:44Potator II: Congrats on a very good find, lovely !
Z7928LG.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-144199 viewsAR Denarius, 3.23g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, bare, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., EPHE
RIC 1441 (R2). BMC p. 98 note. RSC 124. RPC 838 (1 spec.). BNC 360.
Acquired from Beast Coins, August 2010.

A most rare denarius from Ephesus with a bare headed portrait.

The entire series itself is rare, but the bare headed portraits are even scarcer. I'm not sure what the rarity ratio is between the two types....10 to 1? At any rate, this coin is both an obverse and reverse die match with the RIC plate coin.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/12/10 at 14:26Tibsi: Great coin!
Z7928LG.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-144199 viewsAR Denarius, 3.23g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, bare, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., EPHE
RIC 1441 (R2). BMC p. 98 note. RSC 124. RPC 838 (1 spec.). BNC 360.
Acquired from Beast Coins, August 2010.

A most rare denarius from Ephesus with a bare headed portrait.

The entire series itself is rare, but the bare headed portraits are even scarcer. I'm not sure what the rarity ratio is between the two types....10 to 1? At any rate, this coin is both an obverse and reverse die match with the RIC plate coin.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/11/10 at 00:46Randygeki(h2): nice
Z7928LG.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-144199 viewsAR Denarius, 3.23g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, bare, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., EPHE
RIC 1441 (R2). BMC p. 98 note. RSC 124. RPC 838 (1 spec.). BNC 360.
Acquired from Beast Coins, August 2010.

A most rare denarius from Ephesus with a bare headed portrait.

The entire series itself is rare, but the bare headed portraits are even scarcer. I'm not sure what the rarity ratio is between the two types....10 to 1? At any rate, this coin is both an obverse and reverse die match with the RIC plate coin.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/11/10 at 00:17Jay GT4: Love these eastern Flavians!
titus_quin1.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 535114 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.60g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP P TR P CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 535 (R). BMC 92. RSC 374. BNC 79.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection, acquired from Tom Cederlind. Ex Baldwin's Auction 42, 26 September 2005, lot 288 (part). Ex William C. Boyd Collection, acquired from W.S. Lincoln, February 1896.

This fairly rare Titus as Caesar quinarius from 73 AD is my first quinarius, so I was quite thrilled to receive it.

Not only is the coin rare, but it has an interesting provenance. It came with a tag from the 19th century William C. Boyd (1840-1906) collection. As the tag indicates, he purchased the coin from W.S. Lincoln of Oxford St. in London. Roman history combined with a Victorian era numismatic souvenir, what more can you ask for?

In regards to the denomination itself, I'm not quite sure why quinarii were minted in the imperial era. Were they minted to make up required sums for imperial donatives as A Dictionary of Ancient Roman Coins states, or were they minted as presentation pieces to be given away at special occasions?
2 commentsDavid Atherton05/19/10 at 23:53Jay GT4: Nice one David congrats!
tpl1722LG.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1444128 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r; below EPHE
RIC 1444 (R2). BMC p. 98 note. RSC 127. RPC 845 (0 spec.). BNC -.
Acquired from Ephesus Numismatics, April 2010.

The reverse features a turreted female bust, most likely Tyche with the attributes of a City Goddess. Here she is symbolic of the world peace Vespasian has inaugurated after the recent Civil War and revolts in Judaea and Batavia. The type was also struck for Vespasian and Domitian as Caesar and is one of the more fascinating reverses minted at Ephesus.

8 commentsDavid Atherton05/04/10 at 12:49maridvnvm: a stunner
tpl1722LG.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1444128 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r; below EPHE
RIC 1444 (R2). BMC p. 98 note. RSC 127. RPC 845 (0 spec.). BNC -.
Acquired from Ephesus Numismatics, April 2010.

The reverse features a turreted female bust, most likely Tyche with the attributes of a City Goddess. Here she is symbolic of the world peace Vespasian has inaugurated after the recent Civil War and revolts in Judaea and Batavia. The type was also struck for Vespasian and Domitian as Caesar and is one of the more fascinating reverses minted at Ephesus.

8 commentsDavid Atherton05/04/10 at 04:47Potator II: Wow !!
tpl1722LG.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1444128 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r; below EPHE
RIC 1444 (R2). BMC p. 98 note. RSC 127. RPC 845 (0 spec.). BNC -.
Acquired from Ephesus Numismatics, April 2010.

The reverse features a turreted female bust, most likely Tyche with the attributes of a City Goddess. Here she is symbolic of the world peace Vespasian has inaugurated after the recent Civil War and revolts in Judaea and Batavia. The type was also struck for Vespasian and Domitian as Caesar and is one of the more fascinating reverses minted at Ephesus.

8 commentsDavid Atherton05/03/10 at 23:15Jay GT4: Best Titus Ever!
tpl1722LG.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1444128 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r; below EPHE
RIC 1444 (R2). BMC p. 98 note. RSC 127. RPC 845 (0 spec.). BNC -.
Acquired from Ephesus Numismatics, April 2010.

The reverse features a turreted female bust, most likely Tyche with the attributes of a City Goddess. Here she is symbolic of the world peace Vespasian has inaugurated after the recent Civil War and revolts in Judaea and Batavia. The type was also struck for Vespasian and Domitian as Caesar and is one of the more fascinating reverses minted at Ephesus.

8 commentsDavid Atherton05/03/10 at 21:20Jochen: I love the rev.
tpl1722LG.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1444128 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r; below EPHE
RIC 1444 (R2). BMC p. 98 note. RSC 127. RPC 845 (0 spec.). BNC -.
Acquired from Ephesus Numismatics, April 2010.

The reverse features a turreted female bust, most likely Tyche with the attributes of a City Goddess. Here she is symbolic of the world peace Vespasian has inaugurated after the recent Civil War and revolts in Judaea and Batavia. The type was also struck for Vespasian and Domitian as Caesar and is one of the more fascinating reverses minted at Ephesus.

8 commentsDavid Atherton05/03/10 at 21:18Randygeki(h2): Nice one
tpl1722LG.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1444128 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r; below EPHE
RIC 1444 (R2). BMC p. 98 note. RSC 127. RPC 845 (0 spec.). BNC -.
Acquired from Ephesus Numismatics, April 2010.

The reverse features a turreted female bust, most likely Tyche with the attributes of a City Goddess. Here she is symbolic of the world peace Vespasian has inaugurated after the recent Civil War and revolts in Judaea and Batavia. The type was also struck for Vespasian and Domitian as Caesar and is one of the more fascinating reverses minted at Ephesus.

8 commentsDavid Atherton05/03/10 at 20:29Marsman: You've done it again! Really beautiful reverse...
tpl1722LG.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1444128 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r; below EPHE
RIC 1444 (R2). BMC p. 98 note. RSC 127. RPC 845 (0 spec.). BNC -.
Acquired from Ephesus Numismatics, April 2010.

The reverse features a turreted female bust, most likely Tyche with the attributes of a City Goddess. Here she is symbolic of the world peace Vespasian has inaugurated after the recent Civil War and revolts in Judaea and Batavia. The type was also struck for Vespasian and Domitian as Caesar and is one of the more fascinating reverses minted at Ephesus.

8 commentsDavid Atherton05/03/10 at 20:22areich: Looks like Titus in drag.
tpl1722LG.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1444128 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: IMPERATOR T CAESAR AVGVSTI F; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r; below EPHE
RIC 1444 (R2). BMC p. 98 note. RSC 127. RPC 845 (0 spec.). BNC -.
Acquired from Ephesus Numismatics, April 2010.

The reverse features a turreted female bust, most likely Tyche with the attributes of a City Goddess. Here she is symbolic of the world peace Vespasian has inaugurated after the recent Civil War and revolts in Judaea and Batavia. The type was also struck for Vespasian and Domitian as Caesar and is one of the more fascinating reverses minted at Ephesus.

8 commentsDavid Atherton05/03/10 at 19:51Tibsi: Wow! Wonderful woman portrait!
a16.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 69094 viewsAR Denarius, 2.71g
Rome mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESP; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS III across field; Laurel trees, two upright
RIC 690 (R2). BMC p. 28 note. RSC 47. BNC 122.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

A rare denarius which is somewhat rare for Vespasian and extremely rare for Titus. The reverse is a restoration of of a similar type minted by Augustus. The two laurel trees represent the two planted at Augustus' door.
2 commentsDavid Atherton04/20/10 at 03:37srukke: Nice.
T12a.JPG
Titus RIC 12113 viewsAR Denarius, 3.41g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Trophy; below, captive kneeling r.
RIC 12 (R). BMC 5. RSC 274a. BNC 4.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

Minted in 79 AD as Augustus, the captive and trophy type is a carry-over from Titus' last issue as Caesar under Vespasian and is a reminder of his part in defeating the Jews nine years before.

The portrait is one of the more skillfully rendered ones from the series and almost excuses the off-center strike.
3 commentsDavid Atherton04/02/10 at 20:06Tibsi: Great portrait!
titus_venus1.JPG
Titus RIC 53107 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Venus stg. r. leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 53 (R). BMC 25. RSC 286. BNC 20.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

Venus is an ironic choice for a reverse for Titus in light of his tragic romance with the Jewish Queen Berenice, who he had to banish because of her unpopularity with the Roman people. The BMCRE instead speculates the reverse echoes the classic reverses issued by Julius Caesar and Augustus, thus aligning Titus to an imperial tradition.

The coin itself is in excellent condition and features a classic portrait. Even the Venus is rendered wonderfully well.

2 commentsDavid Atherton03/30/10 at 18:48Tibsi: Amazing!
cc67515a.jpg
Titus RIC 08130 viewsAR Denarius, 3.46g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Quadriga l., with corn ears
RIC 8 (R). BMC p. 224 note. RSC 276. BNC 5.
Ex Harlan J. Berk 168, 16 March 2010, lot 243.

This denarius of Titus as Augustus was struck very early in his reign. Part of a rare issue, the reverse legend lacks the normal P P (Pater Patriae or 'Father of his country') found on later issues.

The quadriga reverse is a carry-over type from Titus' last series minted under Vespasian.

I really like this portrait, a classic example of what his mint workers were capable of.

5 commentsDavid Atherton03/29/10 at 17:50Marsman: Lovely horses and a great portrait!
T12a.JPG
Titus RIC 12113 viewsAR Denarius, 3.41g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Trophy; below, captive kneeling r.
RIC 12 (R). BMC 5. RSC 274a. BNC 4.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

Minted in 79 AD as Augustus, the captive and trophy type is a carry-over from Titus' last issue as Caesar under Vespasian and is a reminder of his part in defeating the Jews nine years before.

The portrait is one of the more skillfully rendered ones from the series and almost excuses the off-center strike.
3 commentsDavid Atherton03/22/10 at 20:14Jay GT4: I've been looking for one of these for a while...
titus_venus1.JPG
Titus RIC 53107 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P; Venus stg. r. leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 53 (R). BMC 25. RSC 286. BNC 20.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

Venus is an ironic choice for a reverse for Titus in light of his tragic romance with the Jewish Queen Berenice, who he had to banish because of her unpopularity with the Roman people. The BMCRE instead speculates the reverse echoes the classic reverses issued by Julius Caesar and Augustus, thus aligning Titus to an imperial tradition.

The coin itself is in excellent condition and features a classic portrait. Even the Venus is rendered wonderfully well.

2 commentsDavid Atherton03/22/10 at 19:41Randygeki(h2): nice
T12a.JPG
Titus RIC 12113 viewsAR Denarius, 3.41g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Trophy; below, captive kneeling r.
RIC 12 (R). BMC 5. RSC 274a. BNC 4.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

Minted in 79 AD as Augustus, the captive and trophy type is a carry-over from Titus' last issue as Caesar under Vespasian and is a reminder of his part in defeating the Jews nine years before.

The portrait is one of the more skillfully rendered ones from the series and almost excuses the off-center strike.
3 commentsDavid Atherton03/22/10 at 19:40Randygeki(h2): nice portrait
TitusV518a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 518127 viewsAR Denarius, 2.56g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: SALVS AVG; Salus std. l., with patera
RIC 518 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

The coin was minted in 73 AD when Titus shared the censorship with Vespasian, as evidenced by the CENS in the obverse legend. The reverse features Salus, which might be an allusion to the emperor Vespasian's health. The reverse type is rare for Titus and extremely rare with the obverse legend ending in CENS. Unlisted in the major catalogs until the new Flavian RIC II was published, it cites 2 examples - one in Vienna, the other in the Walter Holt collection.

A decent coin in good metal featuring an excellent early portrait.
2 commentsDavid Atherton03/09/10 at 15:49Noah: super face on the obverse!
TitusV518a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 518127 viewsAR Denarius, 2.56g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: SALVS AVG; Salus std. l., with patera
RIC 518 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

The coin was minted in 73 AD when Titus shared the censorship with Vespasian, as evidenced by the CENS in the obverse legend. The reverse features Salus, which might be an allusion to the emperor Vespasian's health. The reverse type is rare for Titus and extremely rare with the obverse legend ending in CENS. Unlisted in the major catalogs until the new Flavian RIC II was published, it cites 2 examples - one in Vienna, the other in the Walter Holt collection.

A decent coin in good metal featuring an excellent early portrait.
2 commentsDavid Atherton03/09/10 at 14:24Jay GT4: Great coin for a great collection
V784.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 78474 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome mint, 75 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIAN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PONTIF TR P COS IIII; Securitas std.. l., head resting on raised arm
RIC 784 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection. Ex A. Lynn Collection.

This type is sometimes mistaken for Pax, which was a contemporary reverse. As a matter of fact, in my copy of RSC II the Pax reverse (162) actually shows a photograph of the Securitas type! The two can be easily distinguished by Securitas' raised right arm. This reverse is unlisted in both BMCRE and RSC. It was first published in the new RIC II.

As an added bonus the portrait is an above normal effort. Kudos to the die-engraver!
2 commentsDavid Atherton03/02/10 at 02:52Jay GT4: Congrats! A worthy addition for sure!
cc67515a.jpg
Titus RIC 08130 viewsAR Denarius, 3.46g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Quadriga l., with corn ears
RIC 8 (R). BMC p. 224 note. RSC 276. BNC 5.
Ex Harlan J. Berk 168, 16 March 2010, lot 243.

This denarius of Titus as Augustus was struck very early in his reign. Part of a rare issue, the reverse legend lacks the normal P P (Pater Patriae or 'Father of his country') found on later issues.

The quadriga reverse is a carry-over type from Titus' last series minted under Vespasian.

I really like this portrait, a classic example of what his mint workers were capable of.

5 commentsDavid Atherton02/17/10 at 13:14Tibsi: Great portrait, nice coin!
cc67515a.jpg
Titus RIC 08130 viewsAR Denarius, 3.46g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Quadriga l., with corn ears
RIC 8 (R). BMC p. 224 note. RSC 276. BNC 5.
Ex Harlan J. Berk 168, 16 March 2010, lot 243.

This denarius of Titus as Augustus was struck very early in his reign. Part of a rare issue, the reverse legend lacks the normal P P (Pater Patriae or 'Father of his country') found on later issues.

The quadriga reverse is a carry-over type from Titus' last series minted under Vespasian.

I really like this portrait, a classic example of what his mint workers were capable of.

5 commentsDavid Atherton02/16/10 at 03:34Randygeki(h2): very nice!
cc67515a.jpg
Titus RIC 08130 viewsAR Denarius, 3.46g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Quadriga l., with corn ears
RIC 8 (R). BMC p. 224 note. RSC 276. BNC 5.
Ex Harlan J. Berk 168, 16 March 2010, lot 243.

This denarius of Titus as Augustus was struck very early in his reign. Part of a rare issue, the reverse legend lacks the normal P P (Pater Patriae or 'Father of his country') found on later issues.

The quadriga reverse is a carry-over type from Titus' last series minted under Vespasian.

I really like this portrait, a classic example of what his mint workers were capable of.

5 commentsDavid Atherton02/16/10 at 01:54Jay GT4: Love the full name and the raised legs of the Quad...
cc67515a.jpg
Titus RIC 08130 viewsAR Denarius, 3.46g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Quadriga l., with corn ears
RIC 8 (R). BMC p. 224 note. RSC 276. BNC 5.
Ex Harlan J. Berk 168, 16 March 2010, lot 243.

This denarius of Titus as Augustus was struck very early in his reign. Part of a rare issue, the reverse legend lacks the normal P P (Pater Patriae or 'Father of his country') found on later issues.

The quadriga reverse is a carry-over type from Titus' last series minted under Vespasian.

I really like this portrait, a classic example of what his mint workers were capable of.

5 commentsDavid Atherton02/16/10 at 01:26Noah: wonderful coin!!
36624.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-107886 viewsAR Denarius, 3.30g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT VIII COS VII; Venus stg. r., leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 1078 (C). BMC 255. RSC 332. BNC 223.
Acquired from Mnzhandlung Ritter, January 2010.

Minted during the first half of 79 AD, this reverse carried over to Titus' issues as Augustus after Vespasian's death in June.

This coin features the classic 'small head' portrait. The style carried over to the early issues of Domitian's reign.
2 commentsDavid Atherton02/02/10 at 02:15Randygeki(h2): I really like this one
titus_l_elephant1.jpg
Titus RIC-116231 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Elephant, stg. l.
RIC 116 (C). BMC 47. RSC 304. BNC 41.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

Not a particularly rare type...but not very common either with portrait left. I believe these were minted near a ratio of 1:10 compared to the right facing type.

Elephants were featured in those first games and Martial in his book On the Spectacles actually mentions an elephant, who after dispatching a bull in the arena, knelt before the emperor! Perhaps a neat trick the trainer had taught it.

A really nice portrait with a fantastic elephant on the reverse.
10 commentsDavid Atherton01/28/10 at 19:24Bud Stewart: Nice specimen David. Coins like this are the reas...
titus_l_elephant1.jpg
Titus RIC-116231 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Elephant, stg. l.
RIC 116 (C). BMC 47. RSC 304. BNC 41.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

Not a particularly rare type...but not very common either with portrait left. I believe these were minted near a ratio of 1:10 compared to the right facing type.

Elephants were featured in those first games and Martial in his book On the Spectacles actually mentions an elephant, who after dispatching a bull in the arena, knelt before the emperor! Perhaps a neat trick the trainer had taught it.

A really nice portrait with a fantastic elephant on the reverse.
10 commentsDavid Atherton01/26/10 at 07:49Tibsi: Great!
36624.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-107886 viewsAR Denarius, 3.30g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT VIII COS VII; Venus stg. r., leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 1078 (C). BMC 255. RSC 332. BNC 223.
Acquired from Mnzhandlung Ritter, January 2010.

Minted during the first half of 79 AD, this reverse carried over to Titus' issues as Augustus after Vespasian's death in June.

This coin features the classic 'small head' portrait. The style carried over to the early issues of Domitian's reign.
2 commentsDavid Atherton01/23/10 at 08:13ancientdave: Nice example, portrait is in fine style
titus dolphin rev.JPG
Titus RIC-112499 viewsAR Denarius, 2.87g
Rome mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 112 (C2). BMC 72. RSC 309. BNC 60.
Ex Harlan J Berk 143, 18 May 2005, lot 177.

Another in Titus' pulvinaria series commemorating the opening of the Colosseum.

Easily one of the best portraits of Titus I have ever seen. The condition of the obverse is excellent.
A coin I'm very proud to have.
11 commentsVespasian7001/05/10 at 19:09Tibsi: Amazing portrait!
titus_l_chair1.jpg
Titus RIC-12394 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome Mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, semicircular frame with three crescents
RIC 123 (C). BMC 60. RSC 311. BNC 51.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This type is a bit harder to find with the left facing portrait, but is by no means scarce.

I love this portrait. Some may see it as nondescript, perhaps even boring, but to me this is a perfect example of what I like about Titus' portraits from Rome. The strong Roman nose, the curls in the hair, even the expression on Titus' face all add up to a truly great portrait. There are several other examples in my galleries of this type of work, this coin is one of the better ones.
1 commentsDavid Atherton01/02/10 at 23:49Noah: amazingly realistic portrait...and second to none ...
titus elephant reverse.JPG
Titus RIC-115312 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome Mint, 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Elephant, stg. l.
RIC 115 (C2). BMC 43. RSC 303. BNC 37.
Acquired from Old Roman Coins, May 2003.

A reverse type that records the opening games of the Flavian Amphitheater.

The coin looks much better in hand than the pic shows. Some very nice toning is starting to develop on both the obv and rev.
5 commentsVespasian7001/02/10 at 23:48Noah: WOW
titus_as_caesar_quadrig_lg.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1073150 viewsAR Denarius, 2.46g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT VIII COS VII; Quadriga l., with basket of corn-ears
RIC 1073 (C). BMC 256. RSC 336. BNC 226.
Ex CNG E167, 27 June 2007, lot 139. Ex C. G. collection. Ex Stack's, 8 December 1988, lot 2197.

This denarius is not especially rare (rated as Common in RIC) but for some reason I had a somewhat difficult time finding a decent example of the type. Issued in 79 AD, the quadriga with a basket of corn-ears reverse possibly symbolizes the importance of Alexandria as the granary of Rome and echos an early reverse of Augustus (BMCRE II, p. xlii). Also of note, this issue is a break from earlier issues where Titus shared reverse types with Vespasian. This reverse along with the others minted for Titus as Caesar in 79 were not shared with Vespasian.

5 commentsvespasian7001/02/10 at 23:47Noah: another outstanding coin...too many to be able to ...
titus_as_caesar_cad_cos_III_edited1.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC 70695 viewsAR Denarius, 3.50g
Rome Mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIAN; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PONTIF TR P COS III; Caduceus, winged
RIC 706 (R). BMC 151. RSC 160. BNC 124.

A rare type that took a bit of patience for me to find. This specimen is cut in a fine style with a lot of the detail surviving the intervening 2000 years...even the beard can clearly be seen.
3 commentsvespasian7001/02/10 at 23:46Noah: beautiful coin overall
titusfidessm.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC