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Last comments - Imperial Coinage of Vespasian
V1153.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-115334 viewsÆ Dupondius, 12.79g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1153 (C). BMC 806.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: S C in field; Victory flying l., with shield inscribed SPQR
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 157. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

A somewhat common Victory type unique to Lyon for Vespasian struck during his massive bronze issue of 71. It copies an earlier Lyon type produced for Nero. The coin is characterised by the mint's distinctive style in both the portraiture and the majestic, sweeping Victory on the reverse.

This is another coin from the Fritz Reusing Collection. Being a portrait painter, I would like to think Herr Reusing was was attracted to the coin's fantastic portrait.
2 commentsDavid Atherton06/09/19 at 00:12Jay GT4: Amazing
V1153.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-115334 viewsÆ Dupondius, 12.79g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1153 (C). BMC 806.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: S C in field; Victory flying l., with shield inscribed SPQR
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 157. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

A somewhat common Victory type unique to Lyon for Vespasian struck during his massive bronze issue of 71. It copies an earlier Lyon type produced for Nero. The coin is characterised by the mint's distinctive style in both the portraiture and the majestic, sweeping Victory on the reverse.

This is another coin from the Fritz Reusing Collection. Being a portrait painter, I would like to think Herr Reusing was was attracted to the coin's fantastic portrait.
2 commentsDavid Atherton06/08/19 at 21:58Nemonater: Wonderful!
V315a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-31541 viewsÆ As, 9.84g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 315 (R). BMC - .
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PROVIDEN in exergue; S C in field; Altar
Acquired from Dr. Claus W. Hild, May 2019.

Originally, Tiberius struck the Provident altar type for Divus Augustus. The altar depicted is dedicated to Providentia, the personification of the emperor's divine providence. Although the type is commonly described as an altar, Marvin Tameanko has convincingly argued it is actually a sacellum, or small shrine. This popular type was later revived during the Civil War by Galba and Vitellius. Vespasian began striking it early in his reign both at Rome and Lyon, confining the type to the as issues. This example is the rare Rome mint variant with the unique abbreviated 'PROVIDEN' legend struck during the great bronze issue of 71. It is missing from the BM's extensive collection. The variant spellings can range the gamut from 'PROVID' to 'PROVIDENT'.

Well centred with a nice dark coppery patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton06/05/19 at 21:26David Atherton: Thank you for your observations Curtis. On mine th...
V315a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-31541 viewsÆ As, 9.84g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 315 (R). BMC - .
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PROVIDEN in exergue; S C in field; Altar
Acquired from Dr. Claus W. Hild, May 2019.

Originally, Tiberius struck the Provident altar type for Divus Augustus. The altar depicted is dedicated to Providentia, the personification of the emperor's divine providence. Although the type is commonly described as an altar, Marvin Tameanko has convincingly argued it is actually a sacellum, or small shrine. This popular type was later revived during the Civil War by Galba and Vitellius. Vespasian began striking it early in his reign both at Rome and Lyon, confining the type to the as issues. This example is the rare Rome mint variant with the unique abbreviated 'PROVIDEN' legend struck during the great bronze issue of 71. It is missing from the BM's extensive collection. The variant spellings can range the gamut from 'PROVID' to 'PROVIDENT'.

Well centred with a nice dark coppery patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton06/02/19 at 21:56curtislclay: PROVIDEN, error PROVIDET, and PROVIDENT seem certa...
V315a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-31541 viewsÆ As, 9.84g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 315 (R). BMC - .
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PROVIDEN in exergue; S C in field; Altar
Acquired from Dr. Claus W. Hild, May 2019.

Originally, Tiberius struck the Provident altar type for Divus Augustus. The altar depicted is dedicated to Providentia, the personification of the emperor's divine providence. Although the type is commonly described as an altar, Marvin Tameanko has convincingly argued it is actually a sacellum, or small shrine. This popular type was later revived during the Civil War by Galba and Vitellius. Vespasian began striking it early in his reign both at Rome and Lyon, confining the type to the as issues. This example is the rare Rome mint variant with the unique abbreviated 'PROVIDEN' legend struck during the great bronze issue of 71. It is missing from the BM's extensive collection. The variant spellings can range the gamut from 'PROVID' to 'PROVIDENT'.

Well centred with a nice dark coppery patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton06/02/19 at 13:38FlaviusDomitianus: Nice find
V1200_(2).jpg
Vespasian-RIC-120037 viewsÆ As, 11.19g
Lyon mint, 72 AD
RIC 1200 (C). BMC 820.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: PROVIDENT in exergue; S C in field; Altar
Ex Museum Surplus, May 2019.

Originally, Tiberius struck the Provident altar type for Divus Augustus. The altar depicted is dedicated to Providentia, the personification of the emperor's divine providence. Although the type is commonly described as an altar, Marvin Tameanko has convincingly argued it is actually a sacellum, or small shrine. This popular type was later revived during the Civil War by Galba and Vitellius. Vespasian began striking it early in his reign both at Rome and Lyon. This common example is from the latter mint, struck in 72.

Solid example with a rich dark brown patina.
2 commentsDavid Atherton05/25/19 at 08:45Nemonater: Nice Marlon Brando portrait!
V1200_(2).jpg
Vespasian-RIC-120037 viewsÆ As, 11.19g
Lyon mint, 72 AD
RIC 1200 (C). BMC 820.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: PROVIDENT in exergue; S C in field; Altar
Ex Museum Surplus, May 2019.

Originally, Tiberius struck the Provident altar type for Divus Augustus. The altar depicted is dedicated to Providentia, the personification of the emperor's divine providence. Although the type is commonly described as an altar, Marvin Tameanko has convincingly argued it is actually a sacellum, or small shrine. This popular type was later revived during the Civil War by Galba and Vitellius. Vespasian began striking it early in his reign both at Rome and Lyon. This common example is from the latter mint, struck in 72.

Solid example with a rich dark brown patina.
2 commentsDavid Atherton05/25/19 at 07:20Ancient Aussie: Great coin David.
V351.jpg
Vespasian RIC-35141 viewsÆ Quadrans, 2.54g
Rome Mint, 71 AD
RIC 351 (R). BMC 618.
Obv: IMP VESPASIAN AVG; Palm tree
Rev: P M TR PPP COS III; S C in field; Vexillum
Acquired from numis-kimel, eBay, May 2019.

During Vespasian's great bronze issue of 71 the Rome mint produced a series of quadrantes. Their rarity today is likely a result of them being of low value and typically not hoarded. Mimicking the larger bronze, the Jewish War victory was celebrated on them as well. Because of the small flan size brevity is called for: a palm representing Judaea on the obverse, and a Vexillum symbolising military victory on the reverse - straight and to the point! Ironically, despite their rarity today, more of the plebeian population would have seen these quadrantes than their more famous 'Judaea Capta' silver cousins.

Struck with full legends and sporting a fetching 'Tiber' patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton05/20/19 at 21:21Gary W2: I want one!
V351.jpg
Vespasian RIC-35141 viewsÆ Quadrans, 2.54g
Rome Mint, 71 AD
RIC 351 (R). BMC 618.
Obv: IMP VESPASIAN AVG; Palm tree
Rev: P M TR PPP COS III; S C in field; Vexillum
Acquired from numis-kimel, eBay, May 2019.

During Vespasian's great bronze issue of 71 the Rome mint produced a series of quadrantes. Their rarity today is likely a result of them being of low value and typically not hoarded. Mimicking the larger bronze, the Jewish War victory was celebrated on them as well. Because of the small flan size brevity is called for: a palm representing Judaea on the obverse, and a Vexillum symbolising military victory on the reverse - straight and to the point! Ironically, despite their rarity today, more of the plebeian population would have seen these quadrantes than their more famous 'Judaea Capta' silver cousins.

Struck with full legends and sporting a fetching 'Tiber' patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton05/20/19 at 16:03quadrans: Nice piece..
V238aa.jpg
Vespasian RIC-23843 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.68g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 238 (C). BMC 552.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: MARS VICTOR; S C in field; Mars, armoured, adv. l., with Victory and trophy
Ex CNG E443, 1 May 2019, lot 530.

A sestertius struck in Vespasian's great bronze issue of 71. The reverse features the first Mars type coined for the new emperor, copied from one previously struck for Vitellius. Mars is seen here in full military dress instead of the heroic nude he is normally depicted as on the contemporary denarii. This MARS VICTOR type pays proper respect to the god of war for granting Flavian success in the recently concluded Jewish War (an open display of celebration for defeating Vitellius would be taboo on the coinage). The portraits from this aes issue can be quite extraordinary. C.H.V. Sutherland in his book Roman Coins writes: 'Vespasian's aes, however, and not merely the sestertii, developed a full magnificence of portraiture ... The beauty of this work lay in it's realism, strong in authority and yet delicate in execution ...' (p. 189). Perhaps, a portrait such as this is what Sutherland had in mind when he wrote that passage.

The minor porosity does not detract from the superb veristic portrait and beautiful dark brown patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/20/19 at 07:52maridvnvm: Gorgeous. It's a type I have always admired.
V351.jpg
Vespasian RIC-35141 viewsÆ Quadrans, 2.54g
Rome Mint, 71 AD
RIC 351 (R). BMC 618.
Obv: IMP VESPASIAN AVG; Palm tree
Rev: P M TR PPP COS III; S C in field; Vexillum
Acquired from numis-kimel, eBay, May 2019.

During Vespasian's great bronze issue of 71 the Rome mint produced a series of quadrantes. Their rarity today is likely a result of them being of low value and typically not hoarded. Mimicking the larger bronze, the Jewish War victory was celebrated on them as well. Because of the small flan size brevity is called for: a palm representing Judaea on the obverse, and a Vexillum symbolising military victory on the reverse - straight and to the point! Ironically, despite their rarity today, more of the plebeian population would have seen these quadrantes than their more famous 'Judaea Capta' silver cousins.

Struck with full legends and sporting a fetching 'Tiber' patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton05/20/19 at 00:13Jay GT4: Nice find David!
V238aa.jpg
Vespasian RIC-23843 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.68g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 238 (C). BMC 552.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: MARS VICTOR; S C in field; Mars, armoured, adv. l., with Victory and trophy
Ex CNG E443, 1 May 2019, lot 530.

A sestertius struck in Vespasian's great bronze issue of 71. The reverse features the first Mars type coined for the new emperor, copied from one previously struck for Vitellius. Mars is seen here in full military dress instead of the heroic nude he is normally depicted as on the contemporary denarii. This MARS VICTOR type pays proper respect to the god of war for granting Flavian success in the recently concluded Jewish War (an open display of celebration for defeating Vitellius would be taboo on the coinage). The portraits from this aes issue can be quite extraordinary. C.H.V. Sutherland in his book Roman Coins writes: 'Vespasian's aes, however, and not merely the sestertii, developed a full magnificence of portraiture ... The beauty of this work lay in it's realism, strong in authority and yet delicate in execution ...' (p. 189). Perhaps, a portrait such as this is what Sutherland had in mind when he wrote that passage.

The minor porosity does not detract from the superb veristic portrait and beautiful dark brown patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/16/19 at 14:01okidoki: Nice David
V238aa.jpg
Vespasian RIC-23843 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.68g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 238 (C). BMC 552.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: MARS VICTOR; S C in field; Mars, armoured, adv. l., with Victory and trophy
Ex CNG E443, 1 May 2019, lot 530.

A sestertius struck in Vespasian's great bronze issue of 71. The reverse features the first Mars type coined for the new emperor, copied from one previously struck for Vitellius. Mars is seen here in full military dress instead of the heroic nude he is normally depicted as on the contemporary denarii. This MARS VICTOR type pays proper respect to the god of war for granting Flavian success in the recently concluded Jewish War (an open display of celebration for defeating Vitellius would be taboo on the coinage). The portraits from this aes issue can be quite extraordinary. C.H.V. Sutherland in his book Roman Coins writes: 'Vespasian's aes, however, and not merely the sestertii, developed a full magnificence of portraiture ... The beauty of this work lay in it's realism, strong in authority and yet delicate in execution ...' (p. 189). Perhaps, a portrait such as this is what Sutherland had in mind when he wrote that passage.

The minor porosity does not detract from the superb veristic portrait and beautiful dark brown patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/11/19 at 02:54Jay GT4: Wonderful
V238aa.jpg
Vespasian RIC-23843 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.68g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 238 (C). BMC 552.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: MARS VICTOR; S C in field; Mars, armoured, adv. l., with Victory and trophy
Ex CNG E443, 1 May 2019, lot 530.

A sestertius struck in Vespasian's great bronze issue of 71. The reverse features the first Mars type coined for the new emperor, copied from one previously struck for Vitellius. Mars is seen here in full military dress instead of the heroic nude he is normally depicted as on the contemporary denarii. This MARS VICTOR type pays proper respect to the god of war for granting Flavian success in the recently concluded Jewish War (an open display of celebration for defeating Vitellius would be taboo on the coinage). The portraits from this aes issue can be quite extraordinary. C.H.V. Sutherland in his book Roman Coins writes: 'Vespasian's aes, however, and not merely the sestertii, developed a full magnificence of portraiture ... The beauty of this work lay in it's realism, strong in authority and yet delicate in execution ...' (p. 189). Perhaps, a portrait such as this is what Sutherland had in mind when he wrote that passage.

The minor porosity does not detract from the superb veristic portrait and beautiful dark brown patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/10/19 at 21:01Nemonater: Great coin and write up!
V238aa.jpg
Vespasian RIC-23843 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.68g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 238 (C). BMC 552.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: MARS VICTOR; S C in field; Mars, armoured, adv. l., with Victory and trophy
Ex CNG E443, 1 May 2019, lot 530.

A sestertius struck in Vespasian's great bronze issue of 71. The reverse features the first Mars type coined for the new emperor, copied from one previously struck for Vitellius. Mars is seen here in full military dress instead of the heroic nude he is normally depicted as on the contemporary denarii. This MARS VICTOR type pays proper respect to the god of war for granting Flavian success in the recently concluded Jewish War (an open display of celebration for defeating Vitellius would be taboo on the coinage). The portraits from this aes issue can be quite extraordinary. C.H.V. Sutherland in his book Roman Coins writes: 'Vespasian's aes, however, and not merely the sestertii, developed a full magnificence of portraiture ... The beauty of this work lay in it's realism, strong in authority and yet delicate in execution ...' (p. 189). Perhaps, a portrait such as this is what Sutherland had in mind when he wrote that passage.

The minor porosity does not detract from the superb veristic portrait and beautiful dark brown patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton05/10/19 at 18:43quadrans: Wow, great piece..
V989bestsm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-98988 viewsÆ Sestertius, 21.45g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 989 (R3). BMC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN COS VIII; Head of Vespasian, laurerate, l.
Rev: ANNONA AVGVST; S C in field; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
Ex eBay, 13 April 2019.

The bronze issue of 77-78 struck at Rome was quite small, all the sestertii from it are considered rare. The 'IMP CAESAR' left facing obverse portrait with Annona reverse is listed in RIC as unique with one specimen cited from the Paris collection. None are listed in the RIC II Addenda. This then is the second known specimen, a double die match with the Paris coin.

A classic severe portrait (B. Levick called them 'straining' portraits) combined with a beautiful dark olive green patina.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/30/19 at 15:55Molinari: Very nice, congrats.
V989bestsm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-98988 viewsÆ Sestertius, 21.45g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 989 (R3). BMC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN COS VIII; Head of Vespasian, laurerate, l.
Rev: ANNONA AVGVST; S C in field; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
Ex eBay, 13 April 2019.

The bronze issue of 77-78 struck at Rome was quite small, all the sestertii from it are considered rare. The 'IMP CAESAR' left facing obverse portrait with Annona reverse is listed in RIC as unique with one specimen cited from the Paris collection. None are listed in the RIC II Addenda. This then is the second known specimen, a double die match with the Paris coin.

A classic severe portrait (B. Levick called them 'straining' portraits) combined with a beautiful dark olive green patina.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/24/19 at 23:19curtislclay: Vespasian's standard COS VIII sestertius obv. ...
V989bestsm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-98988 viewsÆ Sestertius, 21.45g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 989 (R3). BMC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN COS VIII; Head of Vespasian, laurerate, l.
Rev: ANNONA AVGVST; S C in field; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
Ex eBay, 13 April 2019.

The bronze issue of 77-78 struck at Rome was quite small, all the sestertii from it are considered rare. The 'IMP CAESAR' left facing obverse portrait with Annona reverse is listed in RIC as unique with one specimen cited from the Paris collection. None are listed in the RIC II Addenda. This then is the second known specimen, a double die match with the Paris coin.

A classic severe portrait (B. Levick called them 'straining' portraits) combined with a beautiful dark olive green patina.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/24/19 at 16:17Vincent: So cool to find and identify such a rare issue...L...
V989bestsm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-98988 viewsÆ Sestertius, 21.45g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 989 (R3). BMC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN COS VIII; Head of Vespasian, laurerate, l.
Rev: ANNONA AVGVST; S C in field; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
Ex eBay, 13 April 2019.

The bronze issue of 77-78 struck at Rome was quite small, all the sestertii from it are considered rare. The 'IMP CAESAR' left facing obverse portrait with Annona reverse is listed in RIC as unique with one specimen cited from the Paris collection. None are listed in the RIC II Addenda. This then is the second known specimen, a double die match with the Paris coin.

A classic severe portrait (B. Levick called them 'straining' portraits) combined with a beautiful dark olive green patina.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/24/19 at 12:04Jay GT4: Sweetness
V989bestsm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-98988 viewsÆ Sestertius, 21.45g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 989 (R3). BMC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN COS VIII; Head of Vespasian, laurerate, l.
Rev: ANNONA AVGVST; S C in field; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
Ex eBay, 13 April 2019.

The bronze issue of 77-78 struck at Rome was quite small, all the sestertii from it are considered rare. The 'IMP CAESAR' left facing obverse portrait with Annona reverse is listed in RIC as unique with one specimen cited from the Paris collection. None are listed in the RIC II Addenda. This then is the second known specimen, a double die match with the Paris coin.

A classic severe portrait (B. Levick called them 'straining' portraits) combined with a beautiful dark olive green patina.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/24/19 at 10:40Nemonater: Beautiful
V989bestsm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-98988 viewsÆ Sestertius, 21.45g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 989 (R3). BMC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN COS VIII; Head of Vespasian, laurerate, l.
Rev: ANNONA AVGVST; S C in field; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
Ex eBay, 13 April 2019.

The bronze issue of 77-78 struck at Rome was quite small, all the sestertii from it are considered rare. The 'IMP CAESAR' left facing obverse portrait with Annona reverse is listed in RIC as unique with one specimen cited from the Paris collection. None are listed in the RIC II Addenda. This then is the second known specimen, a double die match with the Paris coin.

A classic severe portrait (B. Levick called them 'straining' portraits) combined with a beautiful dark olive green patina.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/24/19 at 09:08FlaviusDomitianus: Good catch, congrats!
V989bestsm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-98988 viewsÆ Sestertius, 21.45g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 989 (R3). BMC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN COS VIII; Head of Vespasian, laurerate, l.
Rev: ANNONA AVGVST; S C in field; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
Ex eBay, 13 April 2019.

The bronze issue of 77-78 struck at Rome was quite small, all the sestertii from it are considered rare. The 'IMP CAESAR' left facing obverse portrait with Annona reverse is listed in RIC as unique with one specimen cited from the Paris collection. None are listed in the RIC II Addenda. This then is the second known specimen, a double die match with the Paris coin.

A classic severe portrait (B. Levick called them 'straining' portraits) combined with a beautiful dark olive green patina.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/24/19 at 05:20quadrans: Interesting piece..
V1015_best.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-101580 viewsÆ Quadrans, 2.31g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1015 (R). BMC 740A.
Obv: IMP VESPASIAN AVG; Rudder on globe
Rev: P M TR P P P COS VIII; S C in field; Caduceus, winged
Acquired from Numismatica Prada, April 2019.

The quadrans in the early imperial period typically lacked an imperial portrait. Possibly the denomination was deemed so lowly by mint officials that a portrait was considered improper. They were struck haphazardly and functioned primarily as an urban low value coinage in Rome and central Italy. The quadrans was the typical fee for entry into the baths, a urinal, or for a tryst in a cheap brothel. Being of rather low value quadrantes were not typically hoarded and thus are relatively scarce today. The rudder over globe suggests Vespasian's continued steady hand guiding the empire.

Nicely centred and well preserved for the type.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/14/19 at 09:41Vincent: Like them myself and have a few in my collection, ...
V1015_best.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-101580 viewsÆ Quadrans, 2.31g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1015 (R). BMC 740A.
Obv: IMP VESPASIAN AVG; Rudder on globe
Rev: P M TR P P P COS VIII; S C in field; Caduceus, winged
Acquired from Numismatica Prada, April 2019.

The quadrans in the early imperial period typically lacked an imperial portrait. Possibly the denomination was deemed so lowly by mint officials that a portrait was considered improper. They were struck haphazardly and functioned primarily as an urban low value coinage in Rome and central Italy. The quadrans was the typical fee for entry into the baths, a urinal, or for a tryst in a cheap brothel. Being of rather low value quadrantes were not typically hoarded and thus are relatively scarce today. The rudder over globe suggests Vespasian's continued steady hand guiding the empire.

Nicely centred and well preserved for the type.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/14/19 at 07:16quadrans: Nice one
V1015_best.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-101580 viewsÆ Quadrans, 2.31g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1015 (R). BMC 740A.
Obv: IMP VESPASIAN AVG; Rudder on globe
Rev: P M TR P P P COS VIII; S C in field; Caduceus, winged
Acquired from Numismatica Prada, April 2019.

The quadrans in the early imperial period typically lacked an imperial portrait. Possibly the denomination was deemed so lowly by mint officials that a portrait was considered improper. They were struck haphazardly and functioned primarily as an urban low value coinage in Rome and central Italy. The quadrans was the typical fee for entry into the baths, a urinal, or for a tryst in a cheap brothel. Being of rather low value quadrantes were not typically hoarded and thus are relatively scarce today. The rudder over globe suggests Vespasian's continued steady hand guiding the empire.

Nicely centred and well preserved for the type.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/14/19 at 00:10orfew: Very nice.
V1015_best.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-101580 viewsÆ Quadrans, 2.31g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1015 (R). BMC 740A.
Obv: IMP VESPASIAN AVG; Rudder on globe
Rev: P M TR P P P COS VIII; S C in field; Caduceus, winged
Acquired from Numismatica Prada, April 2019.

The quadrans in the early imperial period typically lacked an imperial portrait. Possibly the denomination was deemed so lowly by mint officials that a portrait was considered improper. They were struck haphazardly and functioned primarily as an urban low value coinage in Rome and central Italy. The quadrans was the typical fee for entry into the baths, a urinal, or for a tryst in a cheap brothel. Being of rather low value quadrantes were not typically hoarded and thus are relatively scarce today. The rudder over globe suggests Vespasian's continued steady hand guiding the empire.

Nicely centred and well preserved for the type.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/13/19 at 21:35Jay GT4: Very nice small change
V1015_best.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-101580 viewsÆ Quadrans, 2.31g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1015 (R). BMC 740A.
Obv: IMP VESPASIAN AVG; Rudder on globe
Rev: P M TR P P P COS VIII; S C in field; Caduceus, winged
Acquired from Numismatica Prada, April 2019.

The quadrans in the early imperial period typically lacked an imperial portrait. Possibly the denomination was deemed so lowly by mint officials that a portrait was considered improper. They were struck haphazardly and functioned primarily as an urban low value coinage in Rome and central Italy. The quadrans was the typical fee for entry into the baths, a urinal, or for a tryst in a cheap brothel. Being of rather low value quadrantes were not typically hoarded and thus are relatively scarce today. The rudder over globe suggests Vespasian's continued steady hand guiding the empire.

Nicely centred and well preserved for the type.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/13/19 at 21:02Mat: A fine addition
V1211aaa.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-121150 viewsÆ Dupondius, 13.42g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1211 (R). BMC 831.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: FIDES PVBLICA; S C in field; Fides stg. l., with patera and cornucopiae
Ex eBay, 23 March 2019.

FIDES PVBLICA, the good faith of the state, was a common personification on Vespasian's coinage. The figure on the reverse is likely based on a cult statue of the goddess whose annual sacrifice occurred on 1 October. Important documents of state and treaties were store in her temple for safe keeping. The Fides type came into common imperial use during the Flavian era and was an important part of Vespasian's numismatic propaganda. This dupondius was struck at the Lyon mint in 77-78 in a fairly large issue that presumably addressed a shortage of bronze coinage in the Western provinces. Oddly enough, dupondii are more commonly encountered in this issue with a laureate bust instead of the usual radiate one as seen here.

Well centred with a fetching dark chocolate patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/03/19 at 13:51Vincent: Love the coin...thanks for the write-up too
V1211aaa.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-121150 viewsÆ Dupondius, 13.42g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1211 (R). BMC 831.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: FIDES PVBLICA; S C in field; Fides stg. l., with patera and cornucopiae
Ex eBay, 23 March 2019.

FIDES PVBLICA, the good faith of the state, was a common personification on Vespasian's coinage. The figure on the reverse is likely based on a cult statue of the goddess whose annual sacrifice occurred on 1 October. Important documents of state and treaties were store in her temple for safe keeping. The Fides type came into common imperial use during the Flavian era and was an important part of Vespasian's numismatic propaganda. This dupondius was struck at the Lyon mint in 77-78 in a fairly large issue that presumably addressed a shortage of bronze coinage in the Western provinces. Oddly enough, dupondii are more commonly encountered in this issue with a laureate bust instead of the usual radiate one as seen here.

Well centred with a fetching dark chocolate patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/03/19 at 05:24quadrans: Nice piece..
V1211aaa.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-121150 viewsÆ Dupondius, 13.42g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1211 (R). BMC 831.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: FIDES PVBLICA; S C in field; Fides stg. l., with patera and cornucopiae
Ex eBay, 23 March 2019.

FIDES PVBLICA, the good faith of the state, was a common personification on Vespasian's coinage. The figure on the reverse is likely based on a cult statue of the goddess whose annual sacrifice occurred on 1 October. Important documents of state and treaties were store in her temple for safe keeping. The Fides type came into common imperial use during the Flavian era and was an important part of Vespasian's numismatic propaganda. This dupondius was struck at the Lyon mint in 77-78 in a fairly large issue that presumably addressed a shortage of bronze coinage in the Western provinces. Oddly enough, dupondii are more commonly encountered in this issue with a laureate bust instead of the usual radiate one as seen here.

Well centred with a fetching dark chocolate patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/02/19 at 13:40Steve P: Not too shabby, congrats David
V1211aaa.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-121150 viewsÆ Dupondius, 13.42g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1211 (R). BMC 831.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: FIDES PVBLICA; S C in field; Fides stg. l., with patera and cornucopiae
Ex eBay, 23 March 2019.

FIDES PVBLICA, the good faith of the state, was a common personification on Vespasian's coinage. The figure on the reverse is likely based on a cult statue of the goddess whose annual sacrifice occurred on 1 October. Important documents of state and treaties were store in her temple for safe keeping. The Fides type came into common imperial use during the Flavian era and was an important part of Vespasian's numismatic propaganda. This dupondius was struck at the Lyon mint in 77-78 in a fairly large issue that presumably addressed a shortage of bronze coinage in the Western provinces. Oddly enough, dupondii are more commonly encountered in this issue with a laureate bust instead of the usual radiate one as seen here.

Well centred with a fetching dark chocolate patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/02/19 at 12:16Jay GT4: A strong example with a nice portrait
V1211aaa.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-121150 viewsÆ Dupondius, 13.42g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1211 (R). BMC 831.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: FIDES PVBLICA; S C in field; Fides stg. l., with patera and cornucopiae
Ex eBay, 23 March 2019.

FIDES PVBLICA, the good faith of the state, was a common personification on Vespasian's coinage. The figure on the reverse is likely based on a cult statue of the goddess whose annual sacrifice occurred on 1 October. Important documents of state and treaties were store in her temple for safe keeping. The Fides type came into common imperial use during the Flavian era and was an important part of Vespasian's numismatic propaganda. This dupondius was struck at the Lyon mint in 77-78 in a fairly large issue that presumably addressed a shortage of bronze coinage in the Western provinces. Oddly enough, dupondii are more commonly encountered in this issue with a laureate bust instead of the usual radiate one as seen here.

Well centred with a fetching dark chocolate patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/02/19 at 09:22FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example with a strong portrait.
T260.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-26050 viewsÆ Sestertius, 27.35g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
RIC 260 (R2). BMC 224.
Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESP; Deified Vespasian std. l., with branch and sceptre
Rev: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; S C, large, in centre
Ex eBay, 21 February 2019. Ex Tom Cederlind, 1996.

The funeral Titus held for his father Vespasian in the early summer of 79 was a lavish affair. Suetonius says it reportedly cost 10 million sestertii! B. Levick in her Vespasian biography speculates the procession was closely modelled on the one held for Divus Augustus by Tiberius. Vespasian's body was borne by leading senators on a funerary couch of ivory and gold with the body hidden from view, instead onlookers saw a wax image of Vespasian in triumphal gear. A cult statue of the dead emperor was also displayed in a triumphal chariot - the same statue of Vespasian that is likely commemorated on the obverse of this rare sestertius struck by Titus for the deified Vespasian. Two variants of the obverse legend occur: one with 'VESPASIAN' (seated on a curule chair) and this coin's 'VESP' - which seems to be slightly rarer. Only one obverse die has been recorded for this variant.
The seated emperor with branch and sceptre was also struck for Divus Augustus in a restoration issue by Titus. Minting the same type for both Divus Augustus and Divus Vespasian was a way to stress a parallel between the two emperors, a parallel that Vespasian had earlier emphasised with his own coinage. The date with Titus as COS VIII places the coin between 80-81, at least a full six months after Vespasian's death on 24 June 79 (assuming the coins were produced contemporaneously with Vespasian's deification). Epigraphic evidence shows Vespasian had been deified sometime before 29 May 80. Why they were struck so late remains a mystery. Perhaps the delay for deification was an attempt on Titus' part to avoid his father becoming a court joke as Claudius had become, or so B. Levick has asserted. She believes the famous 'Woe's me ...' quip attributed to Vespasian is likely a later cruel jest parodying Claudius' last utterance 'Woe's me, I think I've messed myself'. Regardless, the political expediency of having a deified father likely overruled any such qualms.

Beautiful dark brown patina. A fine piece in hand!
4 commentsDavid Atherton02/28/19 at 00:36Jay GT4: Amazing coin
T260.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-26050 viewsÆ Sestertius, 27.35g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
RIC 260 (R2). BMC 224.
Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESP; Deified Vespasian std. l., with branch and sceptre
Rev: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; S C, large, in centre
Ex eBay, 21 February 2019. Ex Tom Cederlind, 1996.

The funeral Titus held for his father Vespasian in the early summer of 79 was a lavish affair. Suetonius says it reportedly cost 10 million sestertii! B. Levick in her Vespasian biography speculates the procession was closely modelled on the one held for Divus Augustus by Tiberius. Vespasian's body was borne by leading senators on a funerary couch of ivory and gold with the body hidden from view, instead onlookers saw a wax image of Vespasian in triumphal gear. A cult statue of the dead emperor was also displayed in a triumphal chariot - the same statue of Vespasian that is likely commemorated on the obverse of this rare sestertius struck by Titus for the deified Vespasian. Two variants of the obverse legend occur: one with 'VESPASIAN' (seated on a curule chair) and this coin's 'VESP' - which seems to be slightly rarer. Only one obverse die has been recorded for this variant.
The seated emperor with branch and sceptre was also struck for Divus Augustus in a restoration issue by Titus. Minting the same type for both Divus Augustus and Divus Vespasian was a way to stress a parallel between the two emperors, a parallel that Vespasian had earlier emphasised with his own coinage. The date with Titus as COS VIII places the coin between 80-81, at least a full six months after Vespasian's death on 24 June 79 (assuming the coins were produced contemporaneously with Vespasian's deification). Epigraphic evidence shows Vespasian had been deified sometime before 29 May 80. Why they were struck so late remains a mystery. Perhaps the delay for deification was an attempt on Titus' part to avoid his father becoming a court joke as Claudius had become, or so B. Levick has asserted. She believes the famous 'Woe's me ...' quip attributed to Vespasian is likely a later cruel jest parodying Claudius' last utterance 'Woe's me, I think I've messed myself'. Regardless, the political expediency of having a deified father likely overruled any such qualms.

Beautiful dark brown patina. A fine piece in hand!
4 commentsDavid Atherton02/27/19 at 18:36quadrans: Great find
T260.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-26050 viewsÆ Sestertius, 27.35g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
RIC 260 (R2). BMC 224.
Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESP; Deified Vespasian std. l., with branch and sceptre
Rev: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; S C, large, in centre
Ex eBay, 21 February 2019. Ex Tom Cederlind, 1996.

The funeral Titus held for his father Vespasian in the early summer of 79 was a lavish affair. Suetonius says it reportedly cost 10 million sestertii! B. Levick in her Vespasian biography speculates the procession was closely modelled on the one held for Divus Augustus by Tiberius. Vespasian's body was borne by leading senators on a funerary couch of ivory and gold with the body hidden from view, instead onlookers saw a wax image of Vespasian in triumphal gear. A cult statue of the dead emperor was also displayed in a triumphal chariot - the same statue of Vespasian that is likely commemorated on the obverse of this rare sestertius struck by Titus for the deified Vespasian. Two variants of the obverse legend occur: one with 'VESPASIAN' (seated on a curule chair) and this coin's 'VESP' - which seems to be slightly rarer. Only one obverse die has been recorded for this variant.
The seated emperor with branch and sceptre was also struck for Divus Augustus in a restoration issue by Titus. Minting the same type for both Divus Augustus and Divus Vespasian was a way to stress a parallel between the two emperors, a parallel that Vespasian had earlier emphasised with his own coinage. The date with Titus as COS VIII places the coin between 80-81, at least a full six months after Vespasian's death on 24 June 79 (assuming the coins were produced contemporaneously with Vespasian's deification). Epigraphic evidence shows Vespasian had been deified sometime before 29 May 80. Why they were struck so late remains a mystery. Perhaps the delay for deification was an attempt on Titus' part to avoid his father becoming a court joke as Claudius had become, or so B. Levick has asserted. She believes the famous 'Woe's me ...' quip attributed to Vespasian is likely a later cruel jest parodying Claudius' last utterance 'Woe's me, I think I've messed myself'. Regardless, the political expediency of having a deified father likely overruled any such qualms.

Beautiful dark brown patina. A fine piece in hand!
4 commentsDavid Atherton02/27/19 at 12:50*Alex: Nice coin, excellent commentary.
T260.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-26050 viewsÆ Sestertius, 27.35g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
RIC 260 (R2). BMC 224.
Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESP; Deified Vespasian std. l., with branch and sceptre
Rev: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; S C, large, in centre
Ex eBay, 21 February 2019. Ex Tom Cederlind, 1996.

The funeral Titus held for his father Vespasian in the early summer of 79 was a lavish affair. Suetonius says it reportedly cost 10 million sestertii! B. Levick in her Vespasian biography speculates the procession was closely modelled on the one held for Divus Augustus by Tiberius. Vespasian's body was borne by leading senators on a funerary couch of ivory and gold with the body hidden from view, instead onlookers saw a wax image of Vespasian in triumphal gear. A cult statue of the dead emperor was also displayed in a triumphal chariot - the same statue of Vespasian that is likely commemorated on the obverse of this rare sestertius struck by Titus for the deified Vespasian. Two variants of the obverse legend occur: one with 'VESPASIAN' (seated on a curule chair) and this coin's 'VESP' - which seems to be slightly rarer. Only one obverse die has been recorded for this variant.
The seated emperor with branch and sceptre was also struck for Divus Augustus in a restoration issue by Titus. Minting the same type for both Divus Augustus and Divus Vespasian was a way to stress a parallel between the two emperors, a parallel that Vespasian had earlier emphasised with his own coinage. The date with Titus as COS VIII places the coin between 80-81, at least a full six months after Vespasian's death on 24 June 79 (assuming the coins were produced contemporaneously with Vespasian's deification). Epigraphic evidence shows Vespasian had been deified sometime before 29 May 80. Why they were struck so late remains a mystery. Perhaps the delay for deification was an attempt on Titus' part to avoid his father becoming a court joke as Claudius had become, or so B. Levick has asserted. She believes the famous 'Woe's me ...' quip attributed to Vespasian is likely a later cruel jest parodying Claudius' last utterance 'Woe's me, I think I've messed myself'. Regardless, the political expediency of having a deified father likely overruled any such qualms.

Beautiful dark brown patina. A fine piece in hand!
4 commentsDavid Atherton02/27/19 at 12:39FlaviusDomitianus: Attractive coin, congrats!
V1170var_.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1170 Engraver's Error81 viewsÆ As, 8.58g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1170 var. BMC 811 var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: Retrograde S C in field; Eagle stg. front on globe, wings outstretched, head r.
Ex Ibercoin 25, 30 January 2019, lot 385.

The reverse is the main attraction here. The 'S C' is mistakenly struck retrograde, a major error on the engraver's part. I wonder how many of these were struck until the mistake was noticed? It's the first one I've come across. Errors like this are quite rare in the Flavian era, which would probably indicate there aren't many examples of this reverse die that survived. This As was struck in 71 when both Rome and Lyon produced a massive issue of bronze, which may somewhat excuse the error. Rare even without the retrograde 'S C'. Also of note, the 'S C' on this type is normally placed on either side of the eagle's wings, here it is on either side of its claws.

Rough, but the all important reverse is decently struck and nicely centred.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/16/19 at 12:23Frans Diederik: I like these small, but very interesting variant! ...
V1170var_.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1170 Engraver's Error81 viewsÆ As, 8.58g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1170 var. BMC 811 var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: Retrograde S C in field; Eagle stg. front on globe, wings outstretched, head r.
Ex Ibercoin 25, 30 January 2019, lot 385.

The reverse is the main attraction here. The 'S C' is mistakenly struck retrograde, a major error on the engraver's part. I wonder how many of these were struck until the mistake was noticed? It's the first one I've come across. Errors like this are quite rare in the Flavian era, which would probably indicate there aren't many examples of this reverse die that survived. This As was struck in 71 when both Rome and Lyon produced a massive issue of bronze, which may somewhat excuse the error. Rare even without the retrograde 'S C'. Also of note, the 'S C' on this type is normally placed on either side of the eagle's wings, here it is on either side of its claws.

Rough, but the all important reverse is decently struck and nicely centred.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/14/19 at 19:58FlaviusDomitianus: Interesting
V1170var_.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1170 Engraver's Error81 viewsÆ As, 8.58g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1170 var. BMC 811 var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: Retrograde S C in field; Eagle stg. front on globe, wings outstretched, head r.
Ex Ibercoin 25, 30 January 2019, lot 385.

The reverse is the main attraction here. The 'S C' is mistakenly struck retrograde, a major error on the engraver's part. I wonder how many of these were struck until the mistake was noticed? It's the first one I've come across. Errors like this are quite rare in the Flavian era, which would probably indicate there aren't many examples of this reverse die that survived. This As was struck in 71 when both Rome and Lyon produced a massive issue of bronze, which may somewhat excuse the error. Rare even without the retrograde 'S C'. Also of note, the 'S C' on this type is normally placed on either side of the eagle's wings, here it is on either side of its claws.

Rough, but the all important reverse is decently struck and nicely centred.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/14/19 at 14:47okidoki: Congrats very nice
V1170var_.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1170 Engraver's Error81 viewsÆ As, 8.58g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1170 var. BMC 811 var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: Retrograde S C in field; Eagle stg. front on globe, wings outstretched, head r.
Ex Ibercoin 25, 30 January 2019, lot 385.

The reverse is the main attraction here. The 'S C' is mistakenly struck retrograde, a major error on the engraver's part. I wonder how many of these were struck until the mistake was noticed? It's the first one I've come across. Errors like this are quite rare in the Flavian era, which would probably indicate there aren't many examples of this reverse die that survived. This As was struck in 71 when both Rome and Lyon produced a massive issue of bronze, which may somewhat excuse the error. Rare even without the retrograde 'S C'. Also of note, the 'S C' on this type is normally placed on either side of the eagle's wings, here it is on either side of its claws.

Rough, but the all important reverse is decently struck and nicely centred.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/14/19 at 11:55Vincent: Interesting oddity and attractive coin
V1170var_.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1170 Engraver's Error81 viewsÆ As, 8.58g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1170 var. BMC 811 var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: Retrograde S C in field; Eagle stg. front on globe, wings outstretched, head r.
Ex Ibercoin 25, 30 January 2019, lot 385.

The reverse is the main attraction here. The 'S C' is mistakenly struck retrograde, a major error on the engraver's part. I wonder how many of these were struck until the mistake was noticed? It's the first one I've come across. Errors like this are quite rare in the Flavian era, which would probably indicate there aren't many examples of this reverse die that survived. This As was struck in 71 when both Rome and Lyon produced a massive issue of bronze, which may somewhat excuse the error. Rare even without the retrograde 'S C'. Also of note, the 'S C' on this type is normally placed on either side of the eagle's wings, here it is on either side of its claws.

Rough, but the all important reverse is decently struck and nicely centred.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/14/19 at 05:47quadrans: Nice piece..
V1170var_.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1170 Engraver's Error81 viewsÆ As, 8.58g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1170 var. BMC 811 var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: Retrograde S C in field; Eagle stg. front on globe, wings outstretched, head r.
Ex Ibercoin 25, 30 January 2019, lot 385.

The reverse is the main attraction here. The 'S C' is mistakenly struck retrograde, a major error on the engraver's part. I wonder how many of these were struck until the mistake was noticed? It's the first one I've come across. Errors like this are quite rare in the Flavian era, which would probably indicate there aren't many examples of this reverse die that survived. This As was struck in 71 when both Rome and Lyon produced a massive issue of bronze, which may somewhat excuse the error. Rare even without the retrograde 'S C'. Also of note, the 'S C' on this type is normally placed on either side of the eagle's wings, here it is on either side of its claws.

Rough, but the all important reverse is decently struck and nicely centred.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/14/19 at 04:13Jay GT4: Cool find.
V1565.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-156565 viewsÆ As, 6.57g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 1565 (C2). BMC 894. RPC 1984 (20 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: S • C in laurel wreath
Acquired from Ephesus Numismatics, January 2019.

In 74 AD the Rome mint produced an extraordinary issue of bronze coinage of dupondii, asses, semisses, and quadrantes with a somewhat Eastern theme. Previously, these coins had been attributed to either Commagene (BMCRE) or Syria (RPC, and doubtfully so in RIC), but more recent scholarship has shown they actually were struck in Rome. The circulation pattern confirms this - out of a total of 112 of the smaller denominations cited by RPC, all but 4 were found in Western Europe. Ted Buttrey confirms 'The Eastern finds appear to be simply the débris of Mediterranean circulation.' But why was this series produced in such a fashion? Buttrey proffers a plausible theory - 'There is nothing like this series in the whole of Roman imperial coinage. It is a deliberate act of Orientalism, imposing the flavour of the East on a Western coinage. The key to its understanding is the reverse type of the dupondius, two crossed cornuacopiae with a winged caduceus between. It replicates the type of an obscure issue of the Galilean city of Sepphoris, an issue which had been, astonishingly, signed by Vespasian himself (ΕΠΙ ΟΥΕCΠΑCΙΑΝΟΥ, “on the authority of…”) when on duty there in the last days of Nero. The dupondius-sized bronze was accompanied by a half-unit with the type of a large, central S C – again signed by Vespasian, and now imitated on the As of the orichalcum series with the wreath of the As of Antioch (RPC I 4849-50). The whole of this series memorializes not Vespasian the conquering general (IVDAEA CAPTA, VICTORIA AVGVSTI), but the man. His re-use of earlier coin types is well-known; here he re-uses his own, harking back to his career just prior to his final success in seizing the empire. And the series was struck in 74 A.D., co-terminous with the celebration of Vespasian’s first quinquennium.' So, in essence, a very personally important issue for Vespasian.

Curtis Clay has a few objections for Buttrey's theory why the issue was struck. 'As far as I am aware, there is nothing "astonishing" about Vespasian's "signing" of the two coins of Sepphoris. EΠI followed by the governor's name appeared frequently on Roman provincial coins, meaning simply, "Struck while the man named was governor". So there was no evident reason for Vespasian to consider it extraordinary that he had been named as governor of Syria on coins of Sepphoris struck for Nero near the end of his reign (Year 14), and no evident reason why he should have referred to the Sepphoris coins in his orichalcum issue struck at Rome five years later. It seems quite probable that Vespasian never even noticed his name on the coins of Sepphoris, and certainly very few Romans in the West will ever have seen such a coin, though Buttrey thinks the orichalcum coins were struck for circulation in the West in 74 in order to recall precisely those Sepphoris coins with their reference to Vespasian some months before his accession. Why waste coin types on references that were inconsequential, and that nobody was likely to comprehend?

If the orichalcum issue was meant to recall those two coins of Sepphoris, shouldn't it have been struck for Vespasian only, and using only those two rev. types, caduceus between crossed cornucopias and large SC? But that was not the case. Both the caduceus between crossed cornucopias type and the large SC type were struck not only for Vespasian, but also for Titus and Domitian as Caesars. Moreover those were not the only two rev. types of the issue: other coins showed a bust of Antioch with legend ANTIOCHIA , and (on small coins only) the same winged caduceus as on the crossed cornucopias dupondii, but without the cornucopias (see images below). It seems to me highly unlikely that the three main types of this issue, all struck for Titus and Domitian as well as Vespasian, were inspired by and meant to recall the far simpler issue of Sepphoris, using just two changing types (obv. types in this case) and of course naming Vespasian only.'

If Buttrey's argument is wrong it brings us back to the original question - why was an Eastern flavoured coinage struck for circulation in the West? Perhaps the issue may be nothing more than Vespasian paying homage to the part of the world that elevated him.

This As is a fine example of the smaller denomination, nicely centred with a beautiful emerald green patina.
2 commentsDavid Atherton02/12/19 at 11:51Jay GT4: Not common to find these with green patina
V1565.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-156565 viewsÆ As, 6.57g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 1565 (C2). BMC 894. RPC 1984 (20 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: S • C in laurel wreath
Acquired from Ephesus Numismatics, January 2019.

In 74 AD the Rome mint produced an extraordinary issue of bronze coinage of dupondii, asses, semisses, and quadrantes with a somewhat Eastern theme. Previously, these coins had been attributed to either Commagene (BMCRE) or Syria (RPC, and doubtfully so in RIC), but more recent scholarship has shown they actually were struck in Rome. The circulation pattern confirms this - out of a total of 112 of the smaller denominations cited by RPC, all but 4 were found in Western Europe. Ted Buttrey confirms 'The Eastern finds appear to be simply the débris of Mediterranean circulation.' But why was this series produced in such a fashion? Buttrey proffers a plausible theory - 'There is nothing like this series in the whole of Roman imperial coinage. It is a deliberate act of Orientalism, imposing the flavour of the East on a Western coinage. The key to its understanding is the reverse type of the dupondius, two crossed cornuacopiae with a winged caduceus between. It replicates the type of an obscure issue of the Galilean city of Sepphoris, an issue which had been, astonishingly, signed by Vespasian himself (ΕΠΙ ΟΥΕCΠΑCΙΑΝΟΥ, “on the authority of…”) when on duty there in the last days of Nero. The dupondius-sized bronze was accompanied by a half-unit with the type of a large, central S C – again signed by Vespasian, and now imitated on the As of the orichalcum series with the wreath of the As of Antioch (RPC I 4849-50). The whole of this series memorializes not Vespasian the conquering general (IVDAEA CAPTA, VICTORIA AVGVSTI), but the man. His re-use of earlier coin types is well-known; here he re-uses his own, harking back to his career just prior to his final success in seizing the empire. And the series was struck in 74 A.D., co-terminous with the celebration of Vespasian’s first quinquennium.' So, in essence, a very personally important issue for Vespasian.

Curtis Clay has a few objections for Buttrey's theory why the issue was struck. 'As far as I am aware, there is nothing "astonishing" about Vespasian's "signing" of the two coins of Sepphoris. EΠI followed by the governor's name appeared frequently on Roman provincial coins, meaning simply, "Struck while the man named was governor". So there was no evident reason for Vespasian to consider it extraordinary that he had been named as governor of Syria on coins of Sepphoris struck for Nero near the end of his reign (Year 14), and no evident reason why he should have referred to the Sepphoris coins in his orichalcum issue struck at Rome five years later. It seems quite probable that Vespasian never even noticed his name on the coins of Sepphoris, and certainly very few Romans in the West will ever have seen such a coin, though Buttrey thinks the orichalcum coins were struck for circulation in the West in 74 in order to recall precisely those Sepphoris coins with their reference to Vespasian some months before his accession. Why waste coin types on references that were inconsequential, and that nobody was likely to comprehend?

If the orichalcum issue was meant to recall those two coins of Sepphoris, shouldn't it have been struck for Vespasian only, and using only those two rev. types, caduceus between crossed cornucopias and large SC? But that was not the case. Both the caduceus between crossed cornucopias type and the large SC type were struck not only for Vespasian, but also for Titus and Domitian as Caesars. Moreover those were not the only two rev. types of the issue: other coins showed a bust of Antioch with legend ANTIOCHIA , and (on small coins only) the same winged caduceus as on the crossed cornucopias dupondii, but without the cornucopias (see images below). It seems to me highly unlikely that the three main types of this issue, all struck for Titus and Domitian as well as Vespasian, were inspired by and meant to recall the far simpler issue of Sepphoris, using just two changing types (obv. types in this case) and of course naming Vespasian only.'

If Buttrey's argument is wrong it brings us back to the original question - why was an Eastern flavoured coinage struck for circulation in the West? Perhaps the issue may be nothing more than Vespasian paying homage to the part of the world that elevated him.

This As is a fine example of the smaller denomination, nicely centred with a beautiful emerald green patina.
2 commentsDavid Atherton02/12/19 at 10:04FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition.
V1215.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-121566 viewsÆ Dupondius, 12.97g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1215 (C3). BMC 833.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: FORTVNAE REDVCI; S C in field; Fortuna stg. l., with rudder on globe and cornucopiae
Acquired from GB Collection, January 2019.

A possible shortage of bronze coinage in the Western provinces late in Vespasian's reign likely prompted the Lyon mint to temporarily reopen in 77-78 and strike a fairly substantial issue of coinage. Curiously, as seen here, the dupondii are commonly unradiated but can be told apart from the asses by their heavier weight. The reverses are standard types copied from Rome. This common Fortuna REDVCI reverse featuring her with a steady hand steering the rudder of the world was a familiar propaganda type both at Rome and Lyon that continued to commemorated the safe return of Vespasian and Titus from the East at the beginning of the reign.

A fantastic high relief portrait in distinctive Lyonnais style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/29/19 at 19:06quadrans: Nice piece..
V1215.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-121566 viewsÆ Dupondius, 12.97g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1215 (C3). BMC 833.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: FORTVNAE REDVCI; S C in field; Fortuna stg. l., with rudder on globe and cornucopiae
Acquired from GB Collection, January 2019.

A possible shortage of bronze coinage in the Western provinces late in Vespasian's reign likely prompted the Lyon mint to temporarily reopen in 77-78 and strike a fairly substantial issue of coinage. Curiously, as seen here, the dupondii are commonly unradiated but can be told apart from the asses by their heavier weight. The reverses are standard types copied from Rome. This common Fortuna REDVCI reverse featuring her with a steady hand steering the rudder of the world was a familiar propaganda type both at Rome and Lyon that continued to commemorated the safe return of Vespasian and Titus from the East at the beginning of the reign.

A fantastic high relief portrait in distinctive Lyonnais style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/29/19 at 19:00Jay GT4: Love the "full" portrait
V1215.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-121566 viewsÆ Dupondius, 12.97g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1215 (C3). BMC 833.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: FORTVNAE REDVCI; S C in field; Fortuna stg. l., with rudder on globe and cornucopiae
Acquired from GB Collection, January 2019.

A possible shortage of bronze coinage in the Western provinces late in Vespasian's reign likely prompted the Lyon mint to temporarily reopen in 77-78 and strike a fairly substantial issue of coinage. Curiously, as seen here, the dupondii are commonly unradiated but can be told apart from the asses by their heavier weight. The reverses are standard types copied from Rome. This common Fortuna REDVCI reverse featuring her with a steady hand steering the rudder of the world was a familiar propaganda type both at Rome and Lyon that continued to commemorated the safe return of Vespasian and Titus from the East at the beginning of the reign.

A fantastic high relief portrait in distinctive Lyonnais style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/29/19 at 14:08FlaviusDomitianus: Nice coin. Lugdunum style on dupondii is immediate...
V1215.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-121566 viewsÆ Dupondius, 12.97g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1215 (C3). BMC 833.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: FORTVNAE REDVCI; S C in field; Fortuna stg. l., with rudder on globe and cornucopiae
Acquired from GB Collection, January 2019.

A possible shortage of bronze coinage in the Western provinces late in Vespasian's reign likely prompted the Lyon mint to temporarily reopen in 77-78 and strike a fairly substantial issue of coinage. Curiously, as seen here, the dupondii are commonly unradiated but can be told apart from the asses by their heavier weight. The reverses are standard types copied from Rome. This common Fortuna REDVCI reverse featuring her with a steady hand steering the rudder of the world was a familiar propaganda type both at Rome and Lyon that continued to commemorated the safe return of Vespasian and Titus from the East at the beginning of the reign.

A fantastic high relief portrait in distinctive Lyonnais style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton01/29/19 at 11:24okidoki: wow great looks David
V322b_(2).jpg
Vespasian RIC-32264 viewsÆ As, 10.55g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 322 (R). BMC 612.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: S C in field; Eagle stg. facing on globe, wings open, head r.
Ex eBay, 20 November 2018. Ex Heritage.

The eagle on globe type was sparingly struck at Rome on the As issues. Introduced during the great bronze mintage of 71, the type harkens back to a similar reverse struck for Divus Augustus under Tiberius and symbolises Vespasian as Augustus' worthy successor. The type was struck much more frequently at Lugdunum.

Strong Roman portrait with a lovely olive green patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/20/18 at 20:10quadrans: Nice piece..
V322b_(2).jpg
Vespasian RIC-32264 viewsÆ As, 10.55g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 322 (R). BMC 612.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: S C in field; Eagle stg. facing on globe, wings open, head r.
Ex eBay, 20 November 2018. Ex Heritage.

The eagle on globe type was sparingly struck at Rome on the As issues. Introduced during the great bronze mintage of 71, the type harkens back to a similar reverse struck for Divus Augustus under Tiberius and symbolises Vespasian as Augustus' worthy successor. The type was struck much more frequently at Lugdunum.

Strong Roman portrait with a lovely olive green patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/18/18 at 16:26Mat: Great addition
V322b_(2).jpg
Vespasian RIC-32264 viewsÆ As, 10.55g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 322 (R). BMC 612.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: S C in field; Eagle stg. facing on globe, wings open, head r.
Ex eBay, 20 November 2018. Ex Heritage.

The eagle on globe type was sparingly struck at Rome on the As issues. Introduced during the great bronze mintage of 71, the type harkens back to a similar reverse struck for Divus Augustus under Tiberius and symbolises Vespasian as Augustus' worthy successor. The type was struck much more frequently at Lugdunum.

Strong Roman portrait with a lovely olive green patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/18/18 at 12:22Jay GT4: Eagles wings are rendered really nicely
V322b_(2).jpg
Vespasian RIC-32264 viewsÆ As, 10.55g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 322 (R). BMC 612.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: S C in field; Eagle stg. facing on globe, wings open, head r.
Ex eBay, 20 November 2018. Ex Heritage.

The eagle on globe type was sparingly struck at Rome on the As issues. Introduced during the great bronze mintage of 71, the type harkens back to a similar reverse struck for Divus Augustus under Tiberius and symbolises Vespasian as Augustus' worthy successor. The type was struck much more frequently at Lugdunum.

Strong Roman portrait with a lovely olive green patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/18/18 at 11:41*Alex: Great eagle. I like that type.
V322b_(2).jpg
Vespasian RIC-32264 viewsÆ As, 10.55g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 322 (R). BMC 612.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: S C in field; Eagle stg. facing on globe, wings open, head r.
Ex eBay, 20 November 2018. Ex Heritage.

The eagle on globe type was sparingly struck at Rome on the As issues. Introduced during the great bronze mintage of 71, the type harkens back to a similar reverse struck for Divus Augustus under Tiberius and symbolises Vespasian as Augustus' worthy successor. The type was struck much more frequently at Lugdunum.

Strong Roman portrait with a lovely olive green patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/18/18 at 11:27FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition.
V167sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-167122 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.60g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 167 (C3). BMC 543.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to l., Vespasian stg. r. with spear and parazonium, foot on helmet; to r., Judaea std. r. on cuirass
Acquired from Denarius, December 2018.

The Jewish War was an important event for the fledgling Flavian dynasty - in essence it gave them the legitimacy to rule. The ensuing propaganda onslaught after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem in August of 70 is awe inspiring. We have Josephus' description of the joint triumph of 71 held for Vespasian and Titus in book 7 of his 'Jewish War', the buildings and monuments erected by the regime, and more importantly for our purposes we have the coins. Judaea Capta types were struck in all metals for almost as long as the dynasty ruled. The first flurry of these came in 71, presumably in conjunction with the triumph, amidst a great issue of bronze coinage that same year. One of the most iconic Judaea Capta types is this sestertius' reverse featuring a triumphal Vespasian with a defeated Judaea at his feet, not surprisingly one of the more common types from the issue. Vespasian is seen proudly standing holding a spear and parazonium (a triangular sword) with his foot on an enemy helmet, while Judaea is sitting on a captured cuirass in abject despair - take note of their size discrepancy. The iconography on display here strongly hints at what the spectators of the triumph likely witnessed. The slight of hand the Flavian regime devised which transformed defeated rebel provincials into a foreign menace is truly amazing.

'Ambition sighed: she found it vain to trust
The faithless column and the crumbling bust;
Huge moles, whose shadow stretched from shore to shore,
Their ruins perished, and their place no more!
Convinced, she now contracts her vast design,
And all her triumphs shrink into a coin.
A narrow orb each crowded conquest keeps,
Beneath her palm here sad Judea weeps.' -
Alexander Pope, To Mr. Addison, Occasioned by his Dialogues on Medals II. 19-26

Honest wear with some minor cleaning scratches.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/12/18 at 14:33Steve P: Cha-fricken-ching! (congrats, David)
V167sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-167122 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.60g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 167 (C3). BMC 543.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to l., Vespasian stg. r. with spear and parazonium, foot on helmet; to r., Judaea std. r. on cuirass
Acquired from Denarius, December 2018.

The Jewish War was an important event for the fledgling Flavian dynasty - in essence it gave them the legitimacy to rule. The ensuing propaganda onslaught after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem in August of 70 is awe inspiring. We have Josephus' description of the joint triumph of 71 held for Vespasian and Titus in book 7 of his 'Jewish War', the buildings and monuments erected by the regime, and more importantly for our purposes we have the coins. Judaea Capta types were struck in all metals for almost as long as the dynasty ruled. The first flurry of these came in 71, presumably in conjunction with the triumph, amidst a great issue of bronze coinage that same year. One of the most iconic Judaea Capta types is this sestertius' reverse featuring a triumphal Vespasian with a defeated Judaea at his feet, not surprisingly one of the more common types from the issue. Vespasian is seen proudly standing holding a spear and parazonium (a triangular sword) with his foot on an enemy helmet, while Judaea is sitting on a captured cuirass in abject despair - take note of their size discrepancy. The iconography on display here strongly hints at what the spectators of the triumph likely witnessed. The slight of hand the Flavian regime devised which transformed defeated rebel provincials into a foreign menace is truly amazing.

'Ambition sighed: she found it vain to trust
The faithless column and the crumbling bust;
Huge moles, whose shadow stretched from shore to shore,
Their ruins perished, and their place no more!
Convinced, she now contracts her vast design,
And all her triumphs shrink into a coin.
A narrow orb each crowded conquest keeps,
Beneath her palm here sad Judea weeps.' -
Alexander Pope, To Mr. Addison, Occasioned by his Dialogues on Medals II. 19-26

Honest wear with some minor cleaning scratches.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/12/18 at 11:39Molinari: I love it.
V167sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-167122 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.60g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 167 (C3). BMC 543.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to l., Vespasian stg. r. with spear and parazonium, foot on helmet; to r., Judaea std. r. on cuirass
Acquired from Denarius, December 2018.

The Jewish War was an important event for the fledgling Flavian dynasty - in essence it gave them the legitimacy to rule. The ensuing propaganda onslaught after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem in August of 70 is awe inspiring. We have Josephus' description of the joint triumph of 71 held for Vespasian and Titus in book 7 of his 'Jewish War', the buildings and monuments erected by the regime, and more importantly for our purposes we have the coins. Judaea Capta types were struck in all metals for almost as long as the dynasty ruled. The first flurry of these came in 71, presumably in conjunction with the triumph, amidst a great issue of bronze coinage that same year. One of the most iconic Judaea Capta types is this sestertius' reverse featuring a triumphal Vespasian with a defeated Judaea at his feet, not surprisingly one of the more common types from the issue. Vespasian is seen proudly standing holding a spear and parazonium (a triangular sword) with his foot on an enemy helmet, while Judaea is sitting on a captured cuirass in abject despair - take note of their size discrepancy. The iconography on display here strongly hints at what the spectators of the triumph likely witnessed. The slight of hand the Flavian regime devised which transformed defeated rebel provincials into a foreign menace is truly amazing.

'Ambition sighed: she found it vain to trust
The faithless column and the crumbling bust;
Huge moles, whose shadow stretched from shore to shore,
Their ruins perished, and their place no more!
Convinced, she now contracts her vast design,
And all her triumphs shrink into a coin.
A narrow orb each crowded conquest keeps,
Beneath her palm here sad Judea weeps.' -
Alexander Pope, To Mr. Addison, Occasioned by his Dialogues on Medals II. 19-26

Honest wear with some minor cleaning scratches.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/11/18 at 10:45Nemonater: Great type with the giant Vespasian!
V167sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-167122 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.60g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 167 (C3). BMC 543.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to l., Vespasian stg. r. with spear and parazonium, foot on helmet; to r., Judaea std. r. on cuirass
Acquired from Denarius, December 2018.

The Jewish War was an important event for the fledgling Flavian dynasty - in essence it gave them the legitimacy to rule. The ensuing propaganda onslaught after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem in August of 70 is awe inspiring. We have Josephus' description of the joint triumph of 71 held for Vespasian and Titus in book 7 of his 'Jewish War', the buildings and monuments erected by the regime, and more importantly for our purposes we have the coins. Judaea Capta types were struck in all metals for almost as long as the dynasty ruled. The first flurry of these came in 71, presumably in conjunction with the triumph, amidst a great issue of bronze coinage that same year. One of the most iconic Judaea Capta types is this sestertius' reverse featuring a triumphal Vespasian with a defeated Judaea at his feet, not surprisingly one of the more common types from the issue. Vespasian is seen proudly standing holding a spear and parazonium (a triangular sword) with his foot on an enemy helmet, while Judaea is sitting on a captured cuirass in abject despair - take note of their size discrepancy. The iconography on display here strongly hints at what the spectators of the triumph likely witnessed. The slight of hand the Flavian regime devised which transformed defeated rebel provincials into a foreign menace is truly amazing.

'Ambition sighed: she found it vain to trust
The faithless column and the crumbling bust;
Huge moles, whose shadow stretched from shore to shore,
Their ruins perished, and their place no more!
Convinced, she now contracts her vast design,
And all her triumphs shrink into a coin.
A narrow orb each crowded conquest keeps,
Beneath her palm here sad Judea weeps.' -
Alexander Pope, To Mr. Addison, Occasioned by his Dialogues on Medals II. 19-26

Honest wear with some minor cleaning scratches.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/11/18 at 05:53Randygeki(h2): Cool find'
V167sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-167122 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.60g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 167 (C3). BMC 543.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to l., Vespasian stg. r. with spear and parazonium, foot on helmet; to r., Judaea std. r. on cuirass
Acquired from Denarius, December 2018.

The Jewish War was an important event for the fledgling Flavian dynasty - in essence it gave them the legitimacy to rule. The ensuing propaganda onslaught after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem in August of 70 is awe inspiring. We have Josephus' description of the joint triumph of 71 held for Vespasian and Titus in book 7 of his 'Jewish War', the buildings and monuments erected by the regime, and more importantly for our purposes we have the coins. Judaea Capta types were struck in all metals for almost as long as the dynasty ruled. The first flurry of these came in 71, presumably in conjunction with the triumph, amidst a great issue of bronze coinage that same year. One of the most iconic Judaea Capta types is this sestertius' reverse featuring a triumphal Vespasian with a defeated Judaea at his feet, not surprisingly one of the more common types from the issue. Vespasian is seen proudly standing holding a spear and parazonium (a triangular sword) with his foot on an enemy helmet, while Judaea is sitting on a captured cuirass in abject despair - take note of their size discrepancy. The iconography on display here strongly hints at what the spectators of the triumph likely witnessed. The slight of hand the Flavian regime devised which transformed defeated rebel provincials into a foreign menace is truly amazing.

'Ambition sighed: she found it vain to trust
The faithless column and the crumbling bust;
Huge moles, whose shadow stretched from shore to shore,
Their ruins perished, and their place no more!
Convinced, she now contracts her vast design,
And all her triumphs shrink into a coin.
A narrow orb each crowded conquest keeps,
Beneath her palm here sad Judea weeps.' -
Alexander Pope, To Mr. Addison, Occasioned by his Dialogues on Medals II. 19-26

Honest wear with some minor cleaning scratches.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/11/18 at 05:17quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
V167sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-167122 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.60g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 167 (C3). BMC 543.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to l., Vespasian stg. r. with spear and parazonium, foot on helmet; to r., Judaea std. r. on cuirass
Acquired from Denarius, December 2018.

The Jewish War was an important event for the fledgling Flavian dynasty - in essence it gave them the legitimacy to rule. The ensuing propaganda onslaught after the 'Gotterdammerung' fall of Jerusalem in August of 70 is awe inspiring. We have Josephus' description of the joint triumph of 71 held for Vespasian and Titus in book 7 of his 'Jewish War', the buildings and monuments erected by the regime, and more importantly for our purposes we have the coins. Judaea Capta types were struck in all metals for almost as long as the dynasty ruled. The first flurry of these came in 71, presumably in conjunction with the triumph, amidst a great issue of bronze coinage that same year. One of the most iconic Judaea Capta types is this sestertius' reverse featuring a triumphal Vespasian with a defeated Judaea at his feet, not surprisingly one of the more common types from the issue. Vespasian is seen proudly standing holding a spear and parazonium (a triangular sword) with his foot on an enemy helmet, while Judaea is sitting on a captured cuirass in abject despair - take note of their size discrepancy. The iconography on display here strongly hints at what the spectators of the triumph likely witnessed. The slight of hand the Flavian regime devised which transformed defeated rebel provincials into a foreign menace is truly amazing.

'Ambition sighed: she found it vain to trust
The faithless column and the crumbling bust;
Huge moles, whose shadow stretched from shore to shore,
Their ruins perished, and their place no more!
Convinced, she now contracts her vast design,
And all her triumphs shrink into a coin.
A narrow orb each crowded conquest keeps,
Beneath her palm here sad Judea weeps.' -
Alexander Pope, To Mr. Addison, Occasioned by his Dialogues on Medals II. 19-26

Honest wear with some minor cleaning scratches.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/11/18 at 04:51Jay GT4: Iconic! A must have, not only for Flavian collect...
V190aa_(2).jpg
Vespasian RIC-19081 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.22g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 190 (C3). BMC 560.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in field; Roma stg. l., with Victory and spear
Ex Pegasi 39, 13 November 2018, lot 467. Ex Bonhams, 11 June 2018, group lot 3. Ex Superior 2-3 June 1998, The J. B. Parker Collection, lot 7023.

In 71 AD the Rome and Lugdunum mints struck a massive iconic issue of aes coinage for Vespasian, setting the tone for the bronze coinage for the remainder of the reign. One of the commonest sestertius types struck for the issue was Roma holding Victory. Roma is depicted in the guise of an Amazon warrior, a typical attribute for her on the coinage during the Flavian era.

Fantastic portrait in good style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/03/18 at 16:26okidoki: great reverse
V190aa_(2).jpg
Vespasian RIC-19081 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.22g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 190 (C3). BMC 560.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in field; Roma stg. l., with Victory and spear
Ex Pegasi 39, 13 November 2018, lot 467. Ex Bonhams, 11 June 2018, group lot 3. Ex Superior 2-3 June 1998, The J. B. Parker Collection, lot 7023.

In 71 AD the Rome and Lugdunum mints struck a massive iconic issue of aes coinage for Vespasian, setting the tone for the bronze coinage for the remainder of the reign. One of the commonest sestertius types struck for the issue was Roma holding Victory. Roma is depicted in the guise of an Amazon warrior, a typical attribute for her on the coinage during the Flavian era.

Fantastic portrait in good style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/01/18 at 13:31Nemonater: Beautiful bronze!
V190aa_(2).jpg
Vespasian RIC-19081 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.22g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 190 (C3). BMC 560.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in field; Roma stg. l., with Victory and spear
Ex Pegasi 39, 13 November 2018, lot 467. Ex Bonhams, 11 June 2018, group lot 3. Ex Superior 2-3 June 1998, The J. B. Parker Collection, lot 7023.

In 71 AD the Rome and Lugdunum mints struck a massive iconic issue of aes coinage for Vespasian, setting the tone for the bronze coinage for the remainder of the reign. One of the commonest sestertius types struck for the issue was Roma holding Victory. Roma is depicted in the guise of an Amazon warrior, a typical attribute for her on the coinage during the Flavian era.

Fantastic portrait in good style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/29/18 at 12:31NORMAN K: very nice! well centered and great strike
V190aa_(2).jpg
Vespasian RIC-19081 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.22g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 190 (C3). BMC 560.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in field; Roma stg. l., with Victory and spear
Ex Pegasi 39, 13 November 2018, lot 467. Ex Bonhams, 11 June 2018, group lot 3. Ex Superior 2-3 June 1998, The J. B. Parker Collection, lot 7023.

In 71 AD the Rome and Lugdunum mints struck a massive iconic issue of aes coinage for Vespasian, setting the tone for the bronze coinage for the remainder of the reign. One of the commonest sestertius types struck for the issue was Roma holding Victory. Roma is depicted in the guise of an Amazon warrior, a typical attribute for her on the coinage during the Flavian era.

Fantastic portrait in good style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/29/18 at 06:54quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
V190aa_(2).jpg
Vespasian RIC-19081 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.22g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 190 (C3). BMC 560.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in field; Roma stg. l., with Victory and spear
Ex Pegasi 39, 13 November 2018, lot 467. Ex Bonhams, 11 June 2018, group lot 3. Ex Superior 2-3 June 1998, The J. B. Parker Collection, lot 7023.

In 71 AD the Rome and Lugdunum mints struck a massive iconic issue of aes coinage for Vespasian, setting the tone for the bronze coinage for the remainder of the reign. One of the commonest sestertius types struck for the issue was Roma holding Victory. Roma is depicted in the guise of an Amazon warrior, a typical attribute for her on the coinage during the Flavian era.

Fantastic portrait in good style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/27/18 at 11:35Jay GT4: Great style
V1202.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-120279 viewsÆ As, 10.37g
Lyon mint, 72 AD
RIC 1202 (C2). BMC 822.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: S C in field; Eagle stg. front on globe, wings outstretched, head r.
Acquired from Felicitas Perpetua, October 2018.

This iconic eagle on globe type copies a similar reverse struck under Tiberius for Divus Augustus. The connection to Augustus demonstrates Vespasian's worthiness as his successor. The type is fairly rare at Rome and more commonly found from the mint at Lugdunum (Lyon). It is almost exclusively reserved for the As issues at both mints.

A wonderful early portrait from Lyon, highlighted by a beautiful dark brown patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/21/18 at 05:05Randygeki(h2): Awesome example !
V1202.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-120279 viewsÆ As, 10.37g
Lyon mint, 72 AD
RIC 1202 (C2). BMC 822.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: S C in field; Eagle stg. front on globe, wings outstretched, head r.
Acquired from Felicitas Perpetua, October 2018.

This iconic eagle on globe type copies a similar reverse struck under Tiberius for Divus Augustus. The connection to Augustus demonstrates Vespasian's worthiness as his successor. The type is fairly rare at Rome and more commonly found from the mint at Lugdunum (Lyon). It is almost exclusively reserved for the As issues at both mints.

A wonderful early portrait from Lyon, highlighted by a beautiful dark brown patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/20/18 at 18:32quadrans: Great coin , and details,
V1202.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-120279 viewsÆ As, 10.37g
Lyon mint, 72 AD
RIC 1202 (C2). BMC 822.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: S C in field; Eagle stg. front on globe, wings outstretched, head r.
Acquired from Felicitas Perpetua, October 2018.

This iconic eagle on globe type copies a similar reverse struck under Tiberius for Divus Augustus. The connection to Augustus demonstrates Vespasian's worthiness as his successor. The type is fairly rare at Rome and more commonly found from the mint at Lugdunum (Lyon). It is almost exclusively reserved for the As issues at both mints.

A wonderful early portrait from Lyon, highlighted by a beautiful dark brown patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/20/18 at 13:53Mat: Wonderful portrait
V1202.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-120279 viewsÆ As, 10.37g
Lyon mint, 72 AD
RIC 1202 (C2). BMC 822.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: S C in field; Eagle stg. front on globe, wings outstretched, head r.
Acquired from Felicitas Perpetua, October 2018.

This iconic eagle on globe type copies a similar reverse struck under Tiberius for Divus Augustus. The connection to Augustus demonstrates Vespasian's worthiness as his successor. The type is fairly rare at Rome and more commonly found from the mint at Lugdunum (Lyon). It is almost exclusively reserved for the As issues at both mints.

A wonderful early portrait from Lyon, highlighted by a beautiful dark brown patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/20/18 at 13:50FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition, powerful portrait.
V1202.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-120279 viewsÆ As, 10.37g
Lyon mint, 72 AD
RIC 1202 (C2). BMC 822.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: S C in field; Eagle stg. front on globe, wings outstretched, head r.
Acquired from Felicitas Perpetua, October 2018.

This iconic eagle on globe type copies a similar reverse struck under Tiberius for Divus Augustus. The connection to Augustus demonstrates Vespasian's worthiness as his successor. The type is fairly rare at Rome and more commonly found from the mint at Lugdunum (Lyon). It is almost exclusively reserved for the As issues at both mints.

A wonderful early portrait from Lyon, highlighted by a beautiful dark brown patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/20/18 at 11:48Jay GT4: Beautiful chocolate patina
V897sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-89771 viewsÆ As, 9.85g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 897 (R). BMC p. 169 note.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS VII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
Ex eBay, 30 October 2018.

This As is part of a small bronze issue struck during the middle part of the Vespasian's reign and features the perennial favourite reverse of Victory on prow, a type more commonly found on the As issues at Rome. Unlike the VICTORIA NAVALIS type which likely celebrated a minor naval victory from the Jewish War, this Victory can be viewed in more generic terms. A similar type was also struck in silver on the denarii the previous year.

Strong middle-period portrait with pleasing dark chocolate patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/16/18 at 18:31okidoki: very nice
V897sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-89771 viewsÆ As, 9.85g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 897 (R). BMC p. 169 note.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS VII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
Ex eBay, 30 October 2018.

This As is part of a small bronze issue struck during the middle part of the Vespasian's reign and features the perennial favourite reverse of Victory on prow, a type more commonly found on the As issues at Rome. Unlike the VICTORIA NAVALIS type which likely celebrated a minor naval victory from the Jewish War, this Victory can be viewed in more generic terms. A similar type was also struck in silver on the denarii the previous year.

Strong middle-period portrait with pleasing dark chocolate patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/13/18 at 16:19FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition, congrats!
V897sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-89771 viewsÆ As, 9.85g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 897 (R). BMC p. 169 note.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS VII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
Ex eBay, 30 October 2018.

This As is part of a small bronze issue struck during the middle part of the Vespasian's reign and features the perennial favourite reverse of Victory on prow, a type more commonly found on the As issues at Rome. Unlike the VICTORIA NAVALIS type which likely celebrated a minor naval victory from the Jewish War, this Victory can be viewed in more generic terms. A similar type was also struck in silver on the denarii the previous year.

Strong middle-period portrait with pleasing dark chocolate patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/13/18 at 14:07Vincent: Love the Victory depiction...so cool
V897sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-89771 viewsÆ As, 9.85g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 897 (R). BMC p. 169 note.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS VII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
Ex eBay, 30 October 2018.

This As is part of a small bronze issue struck during the middle part of the Vespasian's reign and features the perennial favourite reverse of Victory on prow, a type more commonly found on the As issues at Rome. Unlike the VICTORIA NAVALIS type which likely celebrated a minor naval victory from the Jewish War, this Victory can be viewed in more generic terms. A similar type was also struck in silver on the denarii the previous year.

Strong middle-period portrait with pleasing dark chocolate patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/13/18 at 13:42Mat: Very nice bronze
V897sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-89771 viewsÆ As, 9.85g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 897 (R). BMC p. 169 note.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS VII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
Ex eBay, 30 October 2018.

This As is part of a small bronze issue struck during the middle part of the Vespasian's reign and features the perennial favourite reverse of Victory on prow, a type more commonly found on the As issues at Rome. Unlike the VICTORIA NAVALIS type which likely celebrated a minor naval victory from the Jewish War, this Victory can be viewed in more generic terms. A similar type was also struck in silver on the denarii the previous year.

Strong middle-period portrait with pleasing dark chocolate patina.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/13/18 at 11:23Jay GT4: Nice depiction of Victory
V1233aa.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1233104 viewsÆ As, 9.19g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1233 (C). BMC 845.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to r., Judaea std. r.; to l. of tree, arms
Acquired from Zuzim, October 2018.

The amount of propaganda the Flavian regime was able to squeeze out of the Jewish War is astounding. Here we have an As struck seven or eight years after the fall of Jerusalem still touting the Jewish defeat. It was the singular event that more than anything else gave the dynasty its prestige. It would have been unseemly to celebrate the defeat of fellow Romans after the end of the Civil War, but quite appropriate to do so over an eastern people, despite the fact they were within the boundaries of the Roman empire. This As was struck in a fairly large issue from the Lyon mint, presumably to address a shortage of bronze coinage in the western provinces late in Vespasian's reign.

Distinctive Lyon portrait, struck on a bent flan.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/09/18 at 05:29quadrans: Interesting piece..
V1233aa.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1233104 viewsÆ As, 9.19g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1233 (C). BMC 845.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to r., Judaea std. r.; to l. of tree, arms
Acquired from Zuzim, October 2018.

The amount of propaganda the Flavian regime was able to squeeze out of the Jewish War is astounding. Here we have an As struck seven or eight years after the fall of Jerusalem still touting the Jewish defeat. It was the singular event that more than anything else gave the dynasty its prestige. It would have been unseemly to celebrate the defeat of fellow Romans after the end of the Civil War, but quite appropriate to do so over an eastern people, despite the fact they were within the boundaries of the Roman empire. This As was struck in a fairly large issue from the Lyon mint, presumably to address a shortage of bronze coinage in the western provinces late in Vespasian's reign.

Distinctive Lyon portrait, struck on a bent flan.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/09/18 at 04:36Randygeki(h2): Nice!
V1233aa.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1233104 viewsÆ As, 9.19g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1233 (C). BMC 845.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to r., Judaea std. r.; to l. of tree, arms
Acquired from Zuzim, October 2018.

The amount of propaganda the Flavian regime was able to squeeze out of the Jewish War is astounding. Here we have an As struck seven or eight years after the fall of Jerusalem still touting the Jewish defeat. It was the singular event that more than anything else gave the dynasty its prestige. It would have been unseemly to celebrate the defeat of fellow Romans after the end of the Civil War, but quite appropriate to do so over an eastern people, despite the fact they were within the boundaries of the Roman empire. This As was struck in a fairly large issue from the Lyon mint, presumably to address a shortage of bronze coinage in the western provinces late in Vespasian's reign.

Distinctive Lyon portrait, struck on a bent flan.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/09/18 at 00:04Jay GT4: Honest coin
V1233aa.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1233104 viewsÆ As, 9.19g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1233 (C). BMC 845.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to r., Judaea std. r.; to l. of tree, arms
Acquired from Zuzim, October 2018.

The amount of propaganda the Flavian regime was able to squeeze out of the Jewish War is astounding. Here we have an As struck seven or eight years after the fall of Jerusalem still touting the Jewish defeat. It was the singular event that more than anything else gave the dynasty its prestige. It would have been unseemly to celebrate the defeat of fellow Romans after the end of the Civil War, but quite appropriate to do so over an eastern people, despite the fact they were within the boundaries of the Roman empire. This As was struck in a fairly large issue from the Lyon mint, presumably to address a shortage of bronze coinage in the western provinces late in Vespasian's reign.

Distinctive Lyon portrait, struck on a bent flan.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/08/18 at 20:30Nemonater: Awesome type!
V1233aa.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1233104 viewsÆ As, 9.19g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1233 (C). BMC 845.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: IVDAEA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Palm tree; to r., Judaea std. r.; to l. of tree, arms
Acquired from Zuzim, October 2018.

The amount of propaganda the Flavian regime was able to squeeze out of the Jewish War is astounding. Here we have an As struck seven or eight years after the fall of Jerusalem still touting the Jewish defeat. It was the singular event that more than anything else gave the dynasty its prestige. It would have been unseemly to celebrate the defeat of fellow Romans after the end of the Civil War, but quite appropriate to do so over an eastern people, despite the fact they were within the boundaries of the Roman empire. This As was struck in a fairly large issue from the Lyon mint, presumably to address a shortage of bronze coinage in the western provinces late in Vespasian's reign.

Distinctive Lyon portrait, struck on a bent flan.
5 commentsDavid Atherton11/08/18 at 19:46orfew: A great piece.
V1556.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-155688 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1556 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VESTA; Vesta stg. l., with simpulum and sceptre
Ex Numismatic Naumann 70, 7 October 2018, lot 411.

Second known example of the Antioch RIC group 5 Vesta. A double die match with the other published specimen, CNG 61, 25 September 2002, lot 1689, and an obverse die match with the extremely rare AVGVR TRI POT and VICTORIA AVGVSTI types from the same issue. All of these copy common contemporaneous reverse types from Rome.

Slightly off centre in good Antiochene style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton10/31/18 at 00:58quadrans: Nice piece..
V1556.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-155688 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1556 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VESTA; Vesta stg. l., with simpulum and sceptre
Ex Numismatic Naumann 70, 7 October 2018, lot 411.

Second known example of the Antioch RIC group 5 Vesta. A double die match with the other published specimen, CNG 61, 25 September 2002, lot 1689, and an obverse die match with the extremely rare AVGVR TRI POT and VICTORIA AVGVSTI types from the same issue. All of these copy common contemporaneous reverse types from Rome.

Slightly off centre in good Antiochene style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton10/30/18 at 21:06okidoki: excellent David
V1556.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-155688 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1556 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VESTA; Vesta stg. l., with simpulum and sceptre
Ex Numismatic Naumann 70, 7 October 2018, lot 411.

Second known example of the Antioch RIC group 5 Vesta. A double die match with the other published specimen, CNG 61, 25 September 2002, lot 1689, and an obverse die match with the extremely rare AVGVR TRI POT and VICTORIA AVGVSTI types from the same issue. All of these copy common contemporaneous reverse types from Rome.

Slightly off centre in good Antiochene style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton10/30/18 at 16:15Jay GT4: Very subtle differences. Great catch
V1556.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-155688 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1556 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VESTA; Vesta stg. l., with simpulum and sceptre
Ex Numismatic Naumann 70, 7 October 2018, lot 411.

Second known example of the Antioch RIC group 5 Vesta. A double die match with the other published specimen, CNG 61, 25 September 2002, lot 1689, and an obverse die match with the extremely rare AVGVR TRI POT and VICTORIA AVGVSTI types from the same issue. All of these copy common contemporaneous reverse types from Rome.

Slightly off centre in good Antiochene style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton10/30/18 at 14:00Mat: Love the portrait, great find
V1556.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-155688 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1556 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VESTA; Vesta stg. l., with simpulum and sceptre
Ex Numismatic Naumann 70, 7 October 2018, lot 411.

Second known example of the Antioch RIC group 5 Vesta. A double die match with the other published specimen, CNG 61, 25 September 2002, lot 1689, and an obverse die match with the extremely rare AVGVR TRI POT and VICTORIA AVGVSTI types from the same issue. All of these copy common contemporaneous reverse types from Rome.

Slightly off centre in good Antiochene style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton10/30/18 at 11:25FlaviusDomitianus: Good eye, indeed!
V759a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-759112 viewsÆ Dupondius, 14.46g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 759 (C). BMC p. 219 note. RPC 1983 (6 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: PON•MAX•TR•POT•P•P•COS•V CENS; Winged caduceus between crossed cornuacopiae
Ex eBay, 16 October 2018. Ex Klassische Münzen.

Traditionally, the issue this rather strange dupondius is from has been attributed to various different mints over the years. Ted Buttrey writing in the RIC II.1 Addenda commented extensively on it. Because both the Addenda has yet to see the light of day and T. Buttrey's thoughts on the subject are important (and indeed likely correct), I have largely quoted it in full here with some minor editing.

'RIC 756-767 are irregular Dupondii, which should be taken together with Asses, semisses and quadrantes (RIC 1564-1581), forming together a single extraordinary issue in four denominations, distinct in typology and metal, as well as overall character from the regular coinage of the year. Although Eastern in aspect and reverse type, the circulation area of the dupondii is almost exclusively Gaul, Germany, Italy – i.e. the West, with scarcely any penetration of the East. Finds of the smaller denominations are rarely attested anywhere, East or West. The Eastern finds appear to be simply the débris of Mediterranean circulation.

Previously the series had been attributed to Commagene (BMCRE II, pp.217-222), then as a likelihood to Antioch (e.g. RPC II 1982-2005). The correct attribution to Rome is proved by mules of the dupondii with regular issues (Buttrey, “Vespasian’s Roman Orichalcum: An Unrecognized Celebratory Coinage” in David M. Jacobson and Nikos Kokkinos, Judaea and Rome in Coins, 65 CBE – 135 CE (2012). The series had nothing to do with Syria or with the East at all, yet it was purposefully designed to appear non-Roman: the suppression of the traditional reverse sub-inscription S C throughout; the suppression of the radiate crown of the Dupondius; the shifting of the consular dating from the obv. to the rev.; the striking of all four denominations in orichalcum; and most obviously the selection of rev. dies which reek of the East.

There is nothing like this series in the whole of Roman imperial coinage. It is a deliberate act of Orientalism, imposing the flavour of the East on a Western coinage. The key to its understanding is the reverse type of the dupondius, two crossed cornuacopiae with a winged caduceus between. It replicates the type of an obscure issue of the Galilean city of Sepphoris, an issue which had been, astonishingly, signed by Vespasian himself (ΕΠΙ ΟΥΕCΠΑCΙΑΝΟΥ, “on the authority of…”) when on duty there in the last days of Nero. The dupondius-sized bronze was accompanied by a half-unit with the type of a large, central S C – again signed by Vespasian, and now imitated on the As of the orichalcum series with the wreath of the As of Antioch (RPC I 4849-50).
The whole of this series memorializes not Vespasian the conquering general (IVDAEA CAPTA, VICTORIA AVGVSTI), but the man. His re-use of earlier coin types is well-known; here he re-uses his own, harking back to his career just prior to his final success in seizing the empire. And the series was struck in 74 A.D., co-terminous with the celebration of Vespasian’s first quinquennium.'

The coin itself is a superb example in very fine style. Beautiful dark golden patina with highlights of emerald green.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/27/18 at 12:45okidoki: excellent and stylistic
V759a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-759112 viewsÆ Dupondius, 14.46g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 759 (C). BMC p. 219 note. RPC 1983 (6 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: PON•MAX•TR•POT•P•P•COS•V CENS; Winged caduceus between crossed cornuacopiae
Ex eBay, 16 October 2018. Ex Klassische Münzen.

Traditionally, the issue this rather strange dupondius is from has been attributed to various different mints over the years. Ted Buttrey writing in the RIC II.1 Addenda commented extensively on it. Because both the Addenda has yet to see the light of day and T. Buttrey's thoughts on the subject are important (and indeed likely correct), I have largely quoted it in full here with some minor editing.

'RIC 756-767 are irregular Dupondii, which should be taken together with Asses, semisses and quadrantes (RIC 1564-1581), forming together a single extraordinary issue in four denominations, distinct in typology and metal, as well as overall character from the regular coinage of the year. Although Eastern in aspect and reverse type, the circulation area of the dupondii is almost exclusively Gaul, Germany, Italy – i.e. the West, with scarcely any penetration of the East. Finds of the smaller denominations are rarely attested anywhere, East or West. The Eastern finds appear to be simply the débris of Mediterranean circulation.

Previously the series had been attributed to Commagene (BMCRE II, pp.217-222), then as a likelihood to Antioch (e.g. RPC II 1982-2005). The correct attribution to Rome is proved by mules of the dupondii with regular issues (Buttrey, “Vespasian’s Roman Orichalcum: An Unrecognized Celebratory Coinage” in David M. Jacobson and Nikos Kokkinos, Judaea and Rome in Coins, 65 CBE – 135 CE (2012). The series had nothing to do with Syria or with the East at all, yet it was purposefully designed to appear non-Roman: the suppression of the traditional reverse sub-inscription S C throughout; the suppression of the radiate crown of the Dupondius; the shifting of the consular dating from the obv. to the rev.; the striking of all four denominations in orichalcum; and most obviously the selection of rev. dies which reek of the East.

There is nothing like this series in the whole of Roman imperial coinage. It is a deliberate act of Orientalism, imposing the flavour of the East on a Western coinage. The key to its understanding is the reverse type of the dupondius, two crossed cornuacopiae with a winged caduceus between. It replicates the type of an obscure issue of the Galilean city of Sepphoris, an issue which had been, astonishingly, signed by Vespasian himself (ΕΠΙ ΟΥΕCΠΑCΙΑΝΟΥ, “on the authority of…”) when on duty there in the last days of Nero. The dupondius-sized bronze was accompanied by a half-unit with the type of a large, central S C – again signed by Vespasian, and now imitated on the As of the orichalcum series with the wreath of the As of Antioch (RPC I 4849-50).
The whole of this series memorializes not Vespasian the conquering general (IVDAEA CAPTA, VICTORIA AVGVSTI), but the man. His re-use of earlier coin types is well-known; here he re-uses his own, harking back to his career just prior to his final success in seizing the empire. And the series was struck in 74 A.D., co-terminous with the celebration of Vespasian’s first quinquennium.'

The coin itself is a superb example in very fine style. Beautiful dark golden patina with highlights of emerald green.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/27/18 at 10:00ancientdave: Nice one!
V759a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-759112 viewsÆ Dupondius, 14.46g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 759 (C). BMC p. 219 note. RPC 1983 (6 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: PON•MAX•TR•POT•P•P•COS•V CENS; Winged caduceus between crossed cornuacopiae
Ex eBay, 16 October 2018. Ex Klassische Münzen.

Traditionally, the issue this rather strange dupondius is from has been attributed to various different mints over the years. Ted Buttrey writing in the RIC II.1 Addenda commented extensively on it. Because both the Addenda has yet to see the light of day and T. Buttrey's thoughts on the subject are important (and indeed likely correct), I have largely quoted it in full here with some minor editing.

'RIC 756-767 are irregular Dupondii, which should be taken together with Asses, semisses and quadrantes (RIC 1564-1581), forming together a single extraordinary issue in four denominations, distinct in typology and metal, as well as overall character from the regular coinage of the year. Although Eastern in aspect and reverse type, the circulation area of the dupondii is almost exclusively Gaul, Germany, Italy – i.e. the West, with scarcely any penetration of the East. Finds of the smaller denominations are rarely attested anywhere, East or West. The Eastern finds appear to be simply the débris of Mediterranean circulation.

Previously the series had been attributed to Commagene (BMCRE II, pp.217-222), then as a likelihood to Antioch (e.g. RPC II 1982-2005). The correct attribution to Rome is proved by mules of the dupondii with regular issues (Buttrey, “Vespasian’s Roman Orichalcum: An Unrecognized Celebratory Coinage” in David M. Jacobson and Nikos Kokkinos, Judaea and Rome in Coins, 65 CBE – 135 CE (2012). The series had nothing to do with Syria or with the East at all, yet it was purposefully designed to appear non-Roman: the suppression of the traditional reverse sub-inscription S C throughout; the suppression of the radiate crown of the Dupondius; the shifting of the consular dating from the obv. to the rev.; the striking of all four denominations in orichalcum; and most obviously the selection of rev. dies which reek of the East.

There is nothing like this series in the whole of Roman imperial coinage. It is a deliberate act of Orientalism, imposing the flavour of the East on a Western coinage. The key to its understanding is the reverse type of the dupondius, two crossed cornuacopiae with a winged caduceus between. It replicates the type of an obscure issue of the Galilean city of Sepphoris, an issue which had been, astonishingly, signed by Vespasian himself (ΕΠΙ ΟΥΕCΠΑCΙΑΝΟΥ, “on the authority of…”) when on duty there in the last days of Nero. The dupondius-sized bronze was accompanied by a half-unit with the type of a large, central S C – again signed by Vespasian, and now imitated on the As of the orichalcum series with the wreath of the As of Antioch (RPC I 4849-50).
The whole of this series memorializes not Vespasian the conquering general (IVDAEA CAPTA, VICTORIA AVGVSTI), but the man. His re-use of earlier coin types is well-known; here he re-uses his own, harking back to his career just prior to his final success in seizing the empire. And the series was struck in 74 A.D., co-terminous with the celebration of Vespasian’s first quinquennium.'

The coin itself is a superb example in very fine style. Beautiful dark golden patina with highlights of emerald green.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/24/18 at 11:04Pharsalos: Great coin, beautiful and very honest surfaces.
V759a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-759112 viewsÆ Dupondius, 14.46g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 759 (C). BMC p. 219 note. RPC 1983 (6 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: PON•MAX•TR•POT•P•P•COS•V CENS; Winged caduceus between crossed cornuacopiae
Ex eBay, 16 October 2018. Ex Klassische Münzen.

Traditionally, the issue this rather strange dupondius is from has been attributed to various different mints over the years. Ted Buttrey writing in the RIC II.1 Addenda commented extensively on it. Because both the Addenda has yet to see the light of day and T. Buttrey's thoughts on the subject are important (and indeed likely correct), I have largely quoted it in full here with some minor editing.

'RIC 756-767 are irregular Dupondii, which should be taken together with Asses, semisses and quadrantes (RIC 1564-1581), forming together a single extraordinary issue in four denominations, distinct in typology and metal, as well as overall character from the regular coinage of the year. Although Eastern in aspect and reverse type, the circulation area of the dupondii is almost exclusively Gaul, Germany, Italy – i.e. the West, with scarcely any penetration of the East. Finds of the smaller denominations are rarely attested anywhere, East or West. The Eastern finds appear to be simply the débris of Mediterranean circulation.

Previously the series had been attributed to Commagene (BMCRE II, pp.217-222), then as a likelihood to Antioch (e.g. RPC II 1982-2005). The correct attribution to Rome is proved by mules of the dupondii with regular issues (Buttrey, “Vespasian’s Roman Orichalcum: An Unrecognized Celebratory Coinage” in David M. Jacobson and Nikos Kokkinos, Judaea and Rome in Coins, 65 CBE – 135 CE (2012). The series had nothing to do with Syria or with the East at all, yet it was purposefully designed to appear non-Roman: the suppression of the traditional reverse sub-inscription S C throughout; the suppression of the radiate crown of the Dupondius; the shifting of the consular dating from the obv. to the rev.; the striking of all four denominations in orichalcum; and most obviously the selection of rev. dies which reek of the East.

There is nothing like this series in the whole of Roman imperial coinage. It is a deliberate act of Orientalism, imposing the flavour of the East on a Western coinage. The key to its understanding is the reverse type of the dupondius, two crossed cornuacopiae with a winged caduceus between. It replicates the type of an obscure issue of the Galilean city of Sepphoris, an issue which had been, astonishingly, signed by Vespasian himself (ΕΠΙ ΟΥΕCΠΑCΙΑΝΟΥ, “on the authority of…”) when on duty there in the last days of Nero. The dupondius-sized bronze was accompanied by a half-unit with the type of a large, central S C – again signed by Vespasian, and now imitated on the As of the orichalcum series with the wreath of the As of Antioch (RPC I 4849-50).
The whole of this series memorializes not Vespasian the conquering general (IVDAEA CAPTA, VICTORIA AVGVSTI), but the man. His re-use of earlier coin types is well-known; here he re-uses his own, harking back to his career just prior to his final success in seizing the empire. And the series was struck in 74 A.D., co-terminous with the celebration of Vespasian’s first quinquennium.'

The coin itself is a superb example in very fine style. Beautiful dark golden patina with highlights of emerald green.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/24/18 at 05:33Randygeki(h2): Congrats. Neat addition!
V759a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-759112 viewsÆ Dupondius, 14.46g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 759 (C). BMC p. 219 note. RPC 1983 (6 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: PON•MAX•TR•POT•P•P•COS•V CENS; Winged caduceus between crossed cornuacopiae
Ex eBay, 16 October 2018. Ex Klassische Münzen.

Traditionally, the issue this rather strange dupondius is from has been attributed to various different mints over the years. Ted Buttrey writing in the RIC II.1 Addenda commented extensively on it. Because both the Addenda has yet to see the light of day and T. Buttrey's thoughts on the subject are important (and indeed likely correct), I have largely quoted it in full here with some minor editing.

'RIC 756-767 are irregular Dupondii, which should be taken together with Asses, semisses and quadrantes (RIC 1564-1581), forming together a single extraordinary issue in four denominations, distinct in typology and metal, as well as overall character from the regular coinage of the year. Although Eastern in aspect and reverse type, the circulation area of the dupondii is almost exclusively Gaul, Germany, Italy – i.e. the West, with scarcely any penetration of the East. Finds of the smaller denominations are rarely attested anywhere, East or West. The Eastern finds appear to be simply the débris of Mediterranean circulation.

Previously the series had been attributed to Commagene (BMCRE II, pp.217-222), then as a likelihood to Antioch (e.g. RPC II 1982-2005). The correct attribution to Rome is proved by mules of the dupondii with regular issues (Buttrey, “Vespasian’s Roman Orichalcum: An Unrecognized Celebratory Coinage” in David M. Jacobson and Nikos Kokkinos, Judaea and Rome in Coins, 65 CBE – 135 CE (2012). The series had nothing to do with Syria or with the East at all, yet it was purposefully designed to appear non-Roman: the suppression of the traditional reverse sub-inscription S C throughout; the suppression of the radiate crown of the Dupondius; the shifting of the consular dating from the obv. to the rev.; the striking of all four denominations in orichalcum; and most obviously the selection of rev. dies which reek of the East.

There is nothing like this series in the whole of Roman imperial coinage. It is a deliberate act of Orientalism, imposing the flavour of the East on a Western coinage. The key to its understanding is the reverse type of the dupondius, two crossed cornuacopiae with a winged caduceus between. It replicates the type of an obscure issue of the Galilean city of Sepphoris, an issue which had been, astonishingly, signed by Vespasian himself (ΕΠΙ ΟΥΕCΠΑCΙΑΝΟΥ, “on the authority of…”) when on duty there in the last days of Nero. The dupondius-sized bronze was accompanied by a half-unit with the type of a large, central S C – again signed by Vespasian, and now imitated on the As of the orichalcum series with the wreath of the As of Antioch (RPC I 4849-50).
The whole of this series memorializes not Vespasian the conquering general (IVDAEA CAPTA, VICTORIA AVGVSTI), but the man. His re-use of earlier coin types is well-known; here he re-uses his own, harking back to his career just prior to his final success in seizing the empire. And the series was struck in 74 A.D., co-terminous with the celebration of Vespasian’s first quinquennium.'

The coin itself is a superb example in very fine style. Beautiful dark golden patina with highlights of emerald green.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/24/18 at 01:56Nemonater: Beautiful
V759a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-759112 viewsÆ Dupondius, 14.46g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 759 (C). BMC p. 219 note. RPC 1983 (6 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: PON•MAX•TR•POT•P•P•COS•V CENS; Winged caduceus between crossed cornuacopiae
Ex eBay, 16 October 2018. Ex Klassische Münzen.

Traditionally, the issue this rather strange dupondius is from has been attributed to various different mints over the years. Ted Buttrey writing in the RIC II.1 Addenda commented extensively on it. Because both the Addenda has yet to see the light of day and T. Buttrey's thoughts on the subject are important (and indeed likely correct), I have largely quoted it in full here with some minor editing.

'RIC 756-767 are irregular Dupondii, which should be taken together with Asses, semisses and quadrantes (RIC 1564-1581), forming together a single extraordinary issue in four denominations, distinct in typology and metal, as well as overall character from the regular coinage of the year. Although Eastern in aspect and reverse type, the circulation area of the dupondii is almost exclusively Gaul, Germany, Italy – i.e. the West, with scarcely any penetration of the East. Finds of the smaller denominations are rarely attested anywhere, East or West. The Eastern finds appear to be simply the débris of Mediterranean circulation.

Previously the series had been attributed to Commagene (BMCRE II, pp.217-222), then as a likelihood to Antioch (e.g. RPC II 1982-2005). The correct attribution to Rome is proved by mules of the dupondii with regular issues (Buttrey, “Vespasian’s Roman Orichalcum: An Unrecognized Celebratory Coinage” in David M. Jacobson and Nikos Kokkinos, Judaea and Rome in Coins, 65 CBE – 135 CE (2012). The series had nothing to do with Syria or with the East at all, yet it was purposefully designed to appear non-Roman: the suppression of the traditional reverse sub-inscription S C throughout; the suppression of the radiate crown of the Dupondius; the shifting of the consular dating from the obv. to the rev.; the striking of all four denominations in orichalcum; and most obviously the selection of rev. dies which reek of the East.

There is nothing like this series in the whole of Roman imperial coinage. It is a deliberate act of Orientalism, imposing the flavour of the East on a Western coinage. The key to its understanding is the reverse type of the dupondius, two crossed cornuacopiae with a winged caduceus between. It replicates the type of an obscure issue of the Galilean city of Sepphoris, an issue which had been, astonishingly, signed by Vespasian himself (ΕΠΙ ΟΥΕCΠΑCΙΑΝΟΥ, “on the authority of…”) when on duty there in the last days of Nero. The dupondius-sized bronze was accompanied by a half-unit with the type of a large, central S C – again signed by Vespasian, and now imitated on the As of the orichalcum series with the wreath of the As of Antioch (RPC I 4849-50).
The whole of this series memorializes not Vespasian the conquering general (IVDAEA CAPTA, VICTORIA AVGVSTI), but the man. His re-use of earlier coin types is well-known; here he re-uses his own, harking back to his career just prior to his final success in seizing the empire. And the series was struck in 74 A.D., co-terminous with the celebration of Vespasian’s first quinquennium.'

The coin itself is a superb example in very fine style. Beautiful dark golden patina with highlights of emerald green.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/23/18 at 14:15Mat: Lovely bronze
V1160.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-116088 viewsÆ Dupondius, 11.14g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1160 (R2). BMC 809.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: VICTORIA NAVALIS; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
Acquired from Victor's Imperial Coins, September 2018.

The Victory on prow type is traditionally attributed to the naval victory Vespasian won on Lake Gennesaret (Sea of Galilee) during the Jewish War. By any definition it is a most bizarre 'naval' battle indeed. Near the close of the Galilean campaign, Vespasian and Titus marched to Lake Gennesaret in order to secure the cities along its coastline. Tiberias fell without much resistance, but the neighbouring city of Taricheae was a tougher nut to crack. Home to many of the Jewish rebels who had fled Tiberias, they put up a small fight on the plain outside the city and were quickly defeated by Titus' troops who then stormed the city and began slaughtering the inhabitants. Many of the rebels took flight to waiting boats they had previously commandeered on the lake. These were likely local fishing or ferry vessels not intended for use in war. Vespasian ordered the legionaries to construct large rafts in order to pursue the rebel's makeshift flotilla. With the coastline guarded by Roman horsemen the legionaries launched their rafts and sailed out in a large line toward the enemy. The Jewish boats were no match for the heavily armoured Roman rafts. The legionaries easily picked off the Jewish rebels who had no means of escape. The slaughter was intense, so much so that Josephus claims 6,500 Jews were killed. Several years later during Vespasian and Titus' Jewish War Triumph in Rome, ships were displayed to commemorate the battle. Were the Victoria Navalis coins struck with the same event in mind? As unlikely as it seems, the impromptu 'naval' battle at Lake Gennesaret is the best candidate for Vespasian striking this Actium-lite reverse type. The connection to Augustus would not have been lost on his contemporaries. Flavian propaganda at its most exaggerated.

This Victoria Navalis dupondius struck at Lugdunum (Lyon) is much rarer than the Rome mint variants, which are more commonly seen on the As issues. The 'severe' portrait along with the globe at the base of the neck help to distinguish them from their Rome mint counterparts.
5 commentsDavid Atherton10/23/18 at 11:58quadrans: Nice piece..
V759a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-759112 viewsÆ Dupondius, 14.46g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 759 (C). BMC p. 219 note. RPC 1983 (6 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: PON•MAX•TR•POT•P•P•COS•V CENS; Winged caduceus between crossed cornuacopiae
Ex eBay, 16 October 2018. Ex Klassische Münzen.

Traditionally, the issue this rather strange dupondius is from has been attributed to various different mints over the years. Ted Buttrey writing in the RIC II.1 Addenda commented extensively on it. Because both the Addenda has yet to see the light of day and T. Buttrey's thoughts on the subject are important (and indeed likely correct), I have largely quoted it in full here with some minor editing.

'RIC 756-767 are irregular Dupondii, which should be taken together with Asses, semisses and quadrantes (RIC 1564-1581), forming together a single extraordinary issue in four denominations, distinct in typology and metal, as well as overall character from the regular coinage of the year. Although Eastern in aspect and reverse type, the circulation area of the dupondii is almost exclusively Gaul, Germany, Italy – i.e. the West, with scarcely any penetration of the East. Finds of the smaller denominations are rarely attested anywhere, East or West. The Eastern finds appear to be simply the débris of Mediterranean circulation.

Previously the series had been attributed to Commagene (BMCRE II, pp.217-222), then as a likelihood to Antioch (e.g. RPC II 1982-2005). The correct attribution to Rome is proved by mules of the dupondii with regular issues (Buttrey, “Vespasian’s Roman Orichalcum: An Unrecognized Celebratory Coinage” in David M. Jacobson and Nikos Kokkinos, Judaea and Rome in Coins, 65 CBE – 135 CE (2012). The series had nothing to do with Syria or with the East at all, yet it was purposefully designed to appear non-Roman: the suppression of the traditional reverse sub-inscription S C throughout; the suppression of the radiate crown of the Dupondius; the shifting of the consular dating from the obv. to the rev.; the striking of all four denominations in orichalcum; and most obviously the selection of rev. dies which reek of the East.

There is nothing like this series in the whole of Roman imperial coinage. It is a deliberate act of Orientalism, imposing the flavour of the East on a Western coinage. The key to its understanding is the reverse type of the dupondius, two crossed cornuacopiae with a winged caduceus between. It replicates the type of an obscure issue of the Galilean city of Sepphoris, an issue which had been, astonishingly, signed by Vespasian himself (ΕΠΙ ΟΥΕCΠΑCΙΑΝΟΥ, “on the authority of…”) when on duty there in the last days of Nero. The dupondius-sized bronze was accompanied by a half-unit with the type of a large, central S C – again signed by Vespasian, and now imitated on the As of the orichalcum series with the wreath of the As of Antioch (RPC I 4849-50).
The whole of this series memorializes not Vespasian the conquering general (IVDAEA CAPTA, VICTORIA AVGVSTI), but the man. His re-use of earlier coin types is well-known; here he re-uses his own, harking back to his career just prior to his final success in seizing the empire. And the series was struck in 74 A.D., co-terminous with the celebration of Vespasian’s first quinquennium.'

The coin itself is a superb example in very fine style. Beautiful dark golden patina with highlights of emerald green.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/23/18 at 11:25Jay GT4: Great coin and an interesting write up. I'll ...
V759a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-759112 viewsÆ Dupondius, 14.46g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 759 (C). BMC p. 219 note. RPC 1983 (6 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: PON•MAX•TR•POT•P•P•COS•V CENS; Winged caduceus between crossed cornuacopiae
Ex eBay, 16 October 2018. Ex Klassische Münzen.

Traditionally, the issue this rather strange dupondius is from has been attributed to various different mints over the years. Ted Buttrey writing in the RIC II.1 Addenda commented extensively on it. Because both the Addenda has yet to see the light of day and T. Buttrey's thoughts on the subject are important (and indeed likely correct), I have largely quoted it in full here with some minor editing.

'RIC 756-767 are irregular Dupondii, which should be taken together with Asses, semisses and quadrantes (RIC 1564-1581), forming together a single extraordinary issue in four denominations, distinct in typology and metal, as well as overall character from the regular coinage of the year. Although Eastern in aspect and reverse type, the circulation area of the dupondii is almost exclusively Gaul, Germany, Italy – i.e. the West, with scarcely any penetration of the East. Finds of the smaller denominations are rarely attested anywhere, East or West. The Eastern finds appear to be simply the débris of Mediterranean circulation.

Previously the series had been attributed to Commagene (BMCRE II, pp.217-222), then as a likelihood to Antioch (e.g. RPC II 1982-2005). The correct attribution to Rome is proved by mules of the dupondii with regular issues (Buttrey, “Vespasian’s Roman Orichalcum: An Unrecognized Celebratory Coinage” in David M. Jacobson and Nikos Kokkinos, Judaea and Rome in Coins, 65 CBE – 135 CE (2012). The series had nothing to do with Syria or with the East at all, yet it was purposefully designed to appear non-Roman: the suppression of the traditional reverse sub-inscription S C throughout; the suppression of the radiate crown of the Dupondius; the shifting of the consular dating from the obv. to the rev.; the striking of all four denominations in orichalcum; and most obviously the selection of rev. dies which reek of the East.

There is nothing like this series in the whole of Roman imperial coinage. It is a deliberate act of Orientalism, imposing the flavour of the East on a Western coinage. The key to its understanding is the reverse type of the dupondius, two crossed cornuacopiae with a winged caduceus between. It replicates the type of an obscure issue of the Galilean city of Sepphoris, an issue which had been, astonishingly, signed by Vespasian himself (ΕΠΙ ΟΥΕCΠΑCΙΑΝΟΥ, “on the authority of…”) when on duty there in the last days of Nero. The dupondius-sized bronze was accompanied by a half-unit with the type of a large, central S C – again signed by Vespasian, and now imitated on the As of the orichalcum series with the wreath of the As of Antioch (RPC I 4849-50).
The whole of this series memorializes not Vespasian the conquering general (IVDAEA CAPTA, VICTORIA AVGVSTI), but the man. His re-use of earlier coin types is well-known; here he re-uses his own, harking back to his career just prior to his final success in seizing the empire. And the series was struck in 74 A.D., co-terminous with the celebration of Vespasian’s first quinquennium.'

The coin itself is a superb example in very fine style. Beautiful dark golden patina with highlights of emerald green.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/23/18 at 11:20quadrans: Great coin , and details,
V1368sm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1368124 viewsAR Denarius, 3.60g
Uncertain mint, 69-71 AD
RIC 1368 (R2). BMC 419. RSC 221.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IMPER below; Vespasian riding l., r. hand raised
Ex Künker 304, 19 March 2018, lot 1085.

Fascinating coins often come out of civil war. In late October 69 the Second Battle of Cremona was fought between the legions of Vitellius and Vespasian. It resulted in the utter defeat of the Vitellian side and their slow retreat towards Rome. Not long afterwards the Spanish legions went openly for Vespasian, which up until that point had only been neutrally friendly toward him. Coins were quickly struck for Vespasian in the newly won province. Most of these are attributed to Tarraco and an unknown Spanish mint. Intriguingly, a small military issue was contemporaneously struck at an uncertain mint somewhere in the western empire - Mattingly thought perhaps Aquileia. The issue contains some stylistic affinities with the Spanish series, but more importantly, recent metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting show the silver content is almost identical to that of the Spanish coins. It is very likely these early military denarii were also struck in Spain in late 69 soon after the province went over to Vespasian.

Here we have an extremely rare denarius from that uncertain military issue showing Vespasian in military dress riding left in the act of addressing his troops. Clearly, this is a propaganda type that was produced to help consolidate the legions in a newly won province. The type occurs no where else and is unique to the series. The portrait bears no resemblance to Vespasian, which is further evidence of the coin's early mintage, perhaps pre-dating the other Spanish issues.

Struck in high relief on a large flan.
9 commentsDavid Atherton10/22/18 at 20:31orfew: Wow, great portrait
V2aa_(2).jpg
Vespasian RIC 02 (2)101 viewsAR Denarius, 2.80g
Rome Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 2 (C2). BMC 35. RSC 226.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA in ex.; Jewess (as type of Judaea), draped and veiled, seated r. on ground in attitude of mourning, legs extended, head resting on l. hand, which is propped on knees, r. arm on lap; behind, trophy, consisting of helmet, cuirass, oblong and round shield, greaves, and two round shields
Acquired from eBay, August 2018.

My second example of the common Judaea Capta denarius. Here Judaea's legs are extended instead of the more common 'knees drawn up'. Mattingly notes the distinction in the BMCRE II catalogue, it is largely uncommented upon elsewhere. Most likely these denarii commemorating the defeat of the Jews in the Judaean War were struck after news had reached Rome of Titus' capture of Jerusalem in late August 70. The portraits still do not resemble Vespasian, who arrived in Rome in October 70. Vespasian had to have been very proud of his Judaean victory because this Capta denarius type was one of the first struck in Rome in such vast quantities. The Flavian propaganda resulting from this war proved to be very valuable in legitimising the dynasty's reign. Although a very common type, these command premium prices in trade because of the Judaean War connection.

This portrait features a lean Vespasian with short, stubbly hair.

4 commentsDavid Atherton10/09/18 at 11:26okidoki: Congrats very nice
V730asm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-73071 viewsÆ As, 10.91g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 730 (C). BMC 703.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS V CENS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
Acquired from Roman Coin Shop, September 2018. Ex Künker eLive Auction 40, 18 May 2016, lot 7566.

Spes is a common reverse type struck repeatedly throughout the Flavian era, she is mostly associated with Domitian in both silver and bronze. Here Spes represents Vespasian's hope for a happy dynastic future. The depiction of Spes raising skirt and holding a flower likely copies a familiar cult statue of the goddess.

Bold portrait in good metal. A very attractive coin in hand.
4 commentsDavid Atherton10/03/18 at 04:52Randygeki(h2): Very nice!
V730asm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-73071 viewsÆ As, 10.91g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 730 (C). BMC 703.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS V CENS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
Acquired from Roman Coin Shop, September 2018. Ex Künker eLive Auction 40, 18 May 2016, lot 7566.

Spes is a common reverse type struck repeatedly throughout the Flavian era, she is mostly associated with Domitian in both silver and bronze. Here Spes represents Vespasian's hope for a happy dynastic future. The depiction of Spes raising skirt and holding a flower likely copies a familiar cult statue of the goddess.

Bold portrait in good metal. A very attractive coin in hand.
4 commentsDavid Atherton10/02/18 at 15:39Mat: Great portrait
V730asm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-73071 viewsÆ As, 10.91g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 730 (C). BMC 703.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS V CENS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
Acquired from Roman Coin Shop, September 2018. Ex Künker eLive Auction 40, 18 May 2016, lot 7566.

Spes is a common reverse type struck repeatedly throughout the Flavian era, she is mostly associated with Domitian in both silver and bronze. Here Spes represents Vespasian's hope for a happy dynastic future. The depiction of Spes raising skirt and holding a flower likely copies a familiar cult statue of the goddess.

Bold portrait in good metal. A very attractive coin in hand.
4 commentsDavid Atherton10/02/18 at 10:26FlaviusDomitianus: Nice, I have one from different dies.
V730asm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-73071 viewsÆ As, 10.91g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 730 (C). BMC 703.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS V CENS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
Acquired from Roman Coin Shop, September 2018. Ex Künker eLive Auction 40, 18 May 2016, lot 7566.

Spes is a common reverse type struck repeatedly throughout the Flavian era, she is mostly associated with Domitian in both silver and bronze. Here Spes represents Vespasian's hope for a happy dynastic future. The depiction of Spes raising skirt and holding a flower likely copies a familiar cult statue of the goddess.

Bold portrait in good metal. A very attractive coin in hand.
4 commentsDavid Atherton10/02/18 at 04:12Jay GT4: Lovely
V715b.jpg
Vespasian RIC-71593 viewsÆ Dupondius, 10.55g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 715 (C2). BMC 696.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M T P COS V CENS; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.
Rev: FELICITAS PVBLICA; S C in field; Felicitas stg. l., with caduceus and cornucopiae
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, August 2018.

A decently sized bronze coinage was struck for Vespasian in 74. The Felicitas on the reverse symbolises the prosperity and abundance Vespasian has brought to the empire. It is easily one of the commonest reverse types of the issue.

Well centred with a few marks on the reverse.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/23/18 at 04:47Randygeki(h2): Great patina on this
V1160.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-116088 viewsÆ Dupondius, 11.14g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1160 (R2). BMC 809.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: VICTORIA NAVALIS; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
Acquired from Victor's Imperial Coins, September 2018.

The Victory on prow type is traditionally attributed to the naval victory Vespasian won on Lake Gennesaret (Sea of Galilee) during the Jewish War. By any definition it is a most bizarre 'naval' battle indeed. Near the close of the Galilean campaign, Vespasian and Titus marched to Lake Gennesaret in order to secure the cities along its coastline. Tiberias fell without much resistance, but the neighbouring city of Taricheae was a tougher nut to crack. Home to many of the Jewish rebels who had fled Tiberias, they put up a small fight on the plain outside the city and were quickly defeated by Titus' troops who then stormed the city and began slaughtering the inhabitants. Many of the rebels took flight to waiting boats they had previously commandeered on the lake. These were likely local fishing or ferry vessels not intended for use in war. Vespasian ordered the legionaries to construct large rafts in order to pursue the rebel's makeshift flotilla. With the coastline guarded by Roman horsemen the legionaries launched their rafts and sailed out in a large line toward the enemy. The Jewish boats were no match for the heavily armoured Roman rafts. The legionaries easily picked off the Jewish rebels who had no means of escape. The slaughter was intense, so much so that Josephus claims 6,500 Jews were killed. Several years later during Vespasian and Titus' Jewish War Triumph in Rome, ships were displayed to commemorate the battle. Were the Victoria Navalis coins struck with the same event in mind? As unlikely as it seems, the impromptu 'naval' battle at Lake Gennesaret is the best candidate for Vespasian striking this Actium-lite reverse type. The connection to Augustus would not have been lost on his contemporaries. Flavian propaganda at its most exaggerated.

This Victoria Navalis dupondius struck at Lugdunum (Lyon) is much rarer than the Rome mint variants, which are more commonly seen on the As issues. The 'severe' portrait along with the globe at the base of the neck help to distinguish them from their Rome mint counterparts.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/22/18 at 06:00ancientdave: Another nice bronze!
V1160.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-116088 viewsÆ Dupondius, 11.14g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1160 (R2). BMC 809.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: VICTORIA NAVALIS; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
Acquired from Victor's Imperial Coins, September 2018.

The Victory on prow type is traditionally attributed to the naval victory Vespasian won on Lake Gennesaret (Sea of Galilee) during the Jewish War. By any definition it is a most bizarre 'naval' battle indeed. Near the close of the Galilean campaign, Vespasian and Titus marched to Lake Gennesaret in order to secure the cities along its coastline. Tiberias fell without much resistance, but the neighbouring city of Taricheae was a tougher nut to crack. Home to many of the Jewish rebels who had fled Tiberias, they put up a small fight on the plain outside the city and were quickly defeated by Titus' troops who then stormed the city and began slaughtering the inhabitants. Many of the rebels took flight to waiting boats they had previously commandeered on the lake. These were likely local fishing or ferry vessels not intended for use in war. Vespasian ordered the legionaries to construct large rafts in order to pursue the rebel's makeshift flotilla. With the coastline guarded by Roman horsemen the legionaries launched their rafts and sailed out in a large line toward the enemy. The Jewish boats were no match for the heavily armoured Roman rafts. The legionaries easily picked off the Jewish rebels who had no means of escape. The slaughter was intense, so much so that Josephus claims 6,500 Jews were killed. Several years later during Vespasian and Titus' Jewish War Triumph in Rome, ships were displayed to commemorate the battle. Were the Victoria Navalis coins struck with the same event in mind? As unlikely as it seems, the impromptu 'naval' battle at Lake Gennesaret is the best candidate for Vespasian striking this Actium-lite reverse type. The connection to Augustus would not have been lost on his contemporaries. Flavian propaganda at its most exaggerated.

This Victoria Navalis dupondius struck at Lugdunum (Lyon) is much rarer than the Rome mint variants, which are more commonly seen on the As issues. The 'severe' portrait along with the globe at the base of the neck help to distinguish them from their Rome mint counterparts.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/13/18 at 13:53Carausius: Interesting coin and story.
V1160.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-116088 viewsÆ Dupondius, 11.14g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1160 (R2). BMC 809.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: VICTORIA NAVALIS; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
Acquired from Victor's Imperial Coins, September 2018.

The Victory on prow type is traditionally attributed to the naval victory Vespasian won on Lake Gennesaret (Sea of Galilee) during the Jewish War. By any definition it is a most bizarre 'naval' battle indeed. Near the close of the Galilean campaign, Vespasian and Titus marched to Lake Gennesaret in order to secure the cities along its coastline. Tiberias fell without much resistance, but the neighbouring city of Taricheae was a tougher nut to crack. Home to many of the Jewish rebels who had fled Tiberias, they put up a small fight on the plain outside the city and were quickly defeated by Titus' troops who then stormed the city and began slaughtering the inhabitants. Many of the rebels took flight to waiting boats they had previously commandeered on the lake. These were likely local fishing or ferry vessels not intended for use in war. Vespasian ordered the legionaries to construct large rafts in order to pursue the rebel's makeshift flotilla. With the coastline guarded by Roman horsemen the legionaries launched their rafts and sailed out in a large line toward the enemy. The Jewish boats were no match for the heavily armoured Roman rafts. The legionaries easily picked off the Jewish rebels who had no means of escape. The slaughter was intense, so much so that Josephus claims 6,500 Jews were killed. Several years later during Vespasian and Titus' Jewish War Triumph in Rome, ships were displayed to commemorate the battle. Were the Victoria Navalis coins struck with the same event in mind? As unlikely as it seems, the impromptu 'naval' battle at Lake Gennesaret is the best candidate for Vespasian striking this Actium-lite reverse type. The connection to Augustus would not have been lost on his contemporaries. Flavian propaganda at its most exaggerated.

This Victoria Navalis dupondius struck at Lugdunum (Lyon) is much rarer than the Rome mint variants, which are more commonly seen on the As issues. The 'severe' portrait along with the globe at the base of the neck help to distinguish them from their Rome mint counterparts.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/13/18 at 04:08Britanikus: Nice
V1160.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-116088 viewsÆ Dupondius, 11.14g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1160 (R2). BMC 809.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS III; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: VICTORIA NAVALIS; S C in field; Victory stg. r. on prow, with wreath and palm
Acquired from Victor's Imperial Coins, September 2018.

The Victory on prow type is traditionally attributed to the naval victory Vespasian won on Lake Gennesaret (Sea of Galilee) during the Jewish War. By any definition it is a most bizarre 'naval' battle indeed. Near the close of the Galilean campaign, Vespasian and Titus marched to Lake Gennesaret in order to secure the cities along its coastline. Tiberias fell without much resistance, but the neighbouring city of Taricheae was a tougher nut to crack. Home to many of the Jewish rebels who had fled Tiberias, they put up a small fight on the plain outside the city and were quickly defeated by Titus' troops who then stormed the city and began slaughtering the inhabitants. Many of the rebels took flight to waiting boats they had previously commandeered on the lake. These were likely local fishing or ferry vessels not intended for use in war. Vespasian ordered the legionaries to construct large rafts in order to pursue the rebel's makeshift flotilla. With the coastline guarded by Roman horsemen the legionaries launched their rafts and sailed out in a large line toward the enemy. The Jewish boats were no match for the heavily armoured Roman rafts. The legionaries easily picked off the Jewish rebels who had no means of escape. The slaughter was intense, so much so that Josephus claims 6,500 Jews were killed. Several years later during Vespasian and Titus' Jewish War Triumph in Rome, ships were displayed to commemorate the battle. Were the Victoria Navalis coins struck with the same event in mind? As unlikely as it seems, the impromptu 'naval' battle at Lake Gennesaret is the best candidate for Vespasian striking this Actium-lite reverse type. The connection to Augustus would not have been lost on his contemporaries. Flavian propaganda at its most exaggerated.

This Victoria Navalis dupondius struck at Lugdunum (Lyon) is much rarer than the Rome mint variants, which are more commonly seen on the As issues. The 'severe' portrait along with the globe at the base of the neck help to distinguish them from their Rome mint counterparts.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/12/18 at 07:44FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example, I like it.
V2aa_(2).jpg
Vespasian RIC 02 (2)101 viewsAR Denarius, 2.80g
Rome Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 2 (C2). BMC 35. RSC 226.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA in ex.; Jewess (as type of Judaea), draped and veiled, seated r. on ground in attitude of mourning, legs extended, head resting on l. hand, which is propped on knees, r. arm on lap; behind, trophy, consisting of helmet, cuirass, oblong and round shield, greaves, and two round shields
Acquired from eBay, August 2018.

My second example of the common Judaea Capta denarius. Here Judaea's legs are extended instead of the more common 'knees drawn up'. Mattingly notes the distinction in the BMCRE II catalogue, it is largely uncommented upon elsewhere. Most likely these denarii commemorating the defeat of the Jews in the Judaean War were struck after news had reached Rome of Titus' capture of Jerusalem in late August 70. The portraits still do not resemble Vespasian, who arrived in Rome in October 70. Vespasian had to have been very proud of his Judaean victory because this Capta denarius type was one of the first struck in Rome in such vast quantities. The Flavian propaganda resulting from this war proved to be very valuable in legitimising the dynasty's reign. Although a very common type, these command premium prices in trade because of the Judaean War connection.

This portrait features a lean Vespasian with short, stubbly hair.

4 commentsDavid Atherton09/08/18 at 01:50Jay GT4: Nice
vespasian annona.jpg
Vespasian RIC-964132 viewsAR Denarius, 3.60g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 964 (C2). BMC 295. RSC 28.
Obv: CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona, draped, seated l. on throne, adorned with corn-ears, feet on stool, holding on her lap a sack or corn-ears open, the ties, looped at one end, in her hands

This reverse possibly belongs to a series of coins that outlineD an agricultural programme of the reign. Many other denarii were issued at the same time with a similar 'country' feel to them, notably: the modius reverse, Ceres either seated or standing, sow with piglets, goat-herd milking a she-goat, bull, and the two oxen reverse.

A wonderful coin in excellent condition. The obverse detail is so crisp, I'm inclined to believe that the die was used for aureii too.
2 commentsVespasian7009/02/18 at 23:54Britanikus: Nice sharp Coin
vesp pax75.JPG
Vespasian RIC-772124 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome Mint, 75 AD
RIC 772 (C3). BMC 161. RSC 366.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VI; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Acquired from Old Roman Coins, March 2003.

Another of Vespasian's Pax types, continuing a major theme in his coinage.

This coin has sentimental value for being the first Flavian denarius I ever purchased. A nice one at that too.
1 commentsVespasian7009/02/18 at 23:48Britanikus: Nice Coin
V715b.jpg
Vespasian RIC-71593 viewsÆ Dupondius, 10.55g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 715 (C2). BMC 696.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M T P COS V CENS; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.
Rev: FELICITAS PVBLICA; S C in field; Felicitas stg. l., with caduceus and cornucopiae
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, August 2018.

A decently sized bronze coinage was struck for Vespasian in 74. The Felicitas on the reverse symbolises the prosperity and abundance Vespasian has brought to the empire. It is easily one of the commonest reverse types of the issue.

Well centred with a few marks on the reverse.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/01/18 at 17:55Nemonater: Congrats on the move into bronze!
V715b.jpg
Vespasian RIC-71593 viewsÆ Dupondius, 10.55g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 715 (C2). BMC 696.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M T P COS V CENS; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.
Rev: FELICITAS PVBLICA; S C in field; Felicitas stg. l., with caduceus and cornucopiae
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, August 2018.

A decently sized bronze coinage was struck for Vespasian in 74. The Felicitas on the reverse symbolises the prosperity and abundance Vespasian has brought to the empire. It is easily one of the commonest reverse types of the issue.

Well centred with a few marks on the reverse.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/01/18 at 14:00Jay GT4: Nice brown patina
V715b.jpg
Vespasian RIC-71593 viewsÆ Dupondius, 10.55g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 715 (C2). BMC 696.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M T P COS V CENS; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.
Rev: FELICITAS PVBLICA; S C in field; Felicitas stg. l., with caduceus and cornucopiae
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, August 2018.

A decently sized bronze coinage was struck for Vespasian in 74. The Felicitas on the reverse symbolises the prosperity and abundance Vespasian has brought to the empire. It is easily one of the commonest reverse types of the issue.

Well centred with a few marks on the reverse.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/01/18 at 13:36Mat: Very nice!
V715b.jpg
Vespasian RIC-71593 viewsÆ Dupondius, 10.55g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 715 (C2). BMC 696.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M T P COS V CENS; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.
Rev: FELICITAS PVBLICA; S C in field; Felicitas stg. l., with caduceus and cornucopiae
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, August 2018.

A decently sized bronze coinage was struck for Vespasian in 74. The Felicitas on the reverse symbolises the prosperity and abundance Vespasian has brought to the empire. It is easily one of the commonest reverse types of the issue.

Well centred with a few marks on the reverse.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/01/18 at 11:09okidoki: Nice David
V2aa_(2).jpg
Vespasian RIC 02 (2)101 viewsAR Denarius, 2.80g
Rome Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 2 (C2). BMC 35. RSC 226.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA in ex.; Jewess (as type of Judaea), draped and veiled, seated r. on ground in attitude of mourning, legs extended, head resting on l. hand, which is propped on knees, r. arm on lap; behind, trophy, consisting of helmet, cuirass, oblong and round shield, greaves, and two round shields
Acquired from eBay, August 2018.

My second example of the common Judaea Capta denarius. Here Judaea's legs are extended instead of the more common 'knees drawn up'. Mattingly notes the distinction in the BMCRE II catalogue, it is largely uncommented upon elsewhere. Most likely these denarii commemorating the defeat of the Jews in the Judaean War were struck after news had reached Rome of Titus' capture of Jerusalem in late August 70. The portraits still do not resemble Vespasian, who arrived in Rome in October 70. Vespasian had to have been very proud of his Judaean victory because this Capta denarius type was one of the first struck in Rome in such vast quantities. The Flavian propaganda resulting from this war proved to be very valuable in legitimising the dynasty's reign. Although a very common type, these command premium prices in trade because of the Judaean War connection.

This portrait features a lean Vespasian with short, stubbly hair.

4 commentsDavid Atherton08/28/18 at 16:39Mat: Great portrait and addition
V2aa_(2).jpg
Vespasian RIC 02 (2)101 viewsAR Denarius, 2.80g
Rome Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 2 (C2). BMC 35. RSC 226.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IVDAEA in ex.; Jewess (as type of Judaea), draped and veiled, seated r. on ground in attitude of mourning, legs extended, head resting on l. hand, which is propped on knees, r. arm on lap; behind, trophy, consisting of helmet, cuirass, oblong and round shield, greaves, and two round shields
Acquired from eBay, August 2018.

My second example of the common Judaea Capta denarius. Here Judaea's legs are extended instead of the more common 'knees drawn up'. Mattingly notes the distinction in the BMCRE II catalogue, it is largely uncommented upon elsewhere. Most likely these denarii commemorating the defeat of the Jews in the Judaean War were struck after news had reached Rome of Titus' capture of Jerusalem in late August 70. The portraits still do not resemble Vespasian, who arrived in Rome in October 70. Vespasian had to have been very proud of his Judaean victory because this Capta denarius type was one of the first struck in Rome in such vast quantities. The Flavian propaganda resulting from this war proved to be very valuable in legitimising the dynasty's reign. Although a very common type, these command premium prices in trade because of the Judaean War connection.

This portrait features a lean Vespasian with short, stubbly hair.

4 commentsDavid Atherton08/28/18 at 08:36Canaan: Lovely!!!
vesp r eagle.jpg
Vespasian RIC-847 (1)190 viewsAR Denarius, 3.21g
Rome Mint, 76 AD
RIC 847 (C2). BMC 180. RSC 121.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS VII across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
Acquired from Glenn W. Woods, July 2007.

The reverse is possibly a reference to Mucianius' death, which occured around the time the coin was minted. Mucianius was the Governor of Syria when Vespasian made his bid for the purple and helped him secure the throne.

The eagle & base type's original design included a thunderbolt, although not well rendered because of the unwieldiness of the design. Over time, either from laziness or expediency, the engravers began omitting the thunderbolt altogether. It seems most of these were struck without thunderbolts, so they were probably dropped very early in the issue's production. It's rare to find the type with one.

I love the portrait on this coin, Vespasian seems to be smirking...the eagle isn't a bad one either. A few flan flaws and dodgy obverse legends do not detract from the eye appeal.

2 commentsVespasian7008/26/18 at 14:31Britanikus: Nice Coin
V29a.jpg
Vespasian RIC 29 (2)77 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Rome Mint, January - June 70 AD
RIC 29 (C3). BMC 26. RSC 94h.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS ITER TR POT; Pax, draped, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand and winged caduceus in l.
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, August 2018.

This seated Pax is by far the most common type of the 'COS ITER' issue. It may even have been struck well after June 70, evidenced by the vast quantities that have survived and the classic Vespasianic portrait many of them display (Vespasian arrived in Rome c. October 70). COS ITER in the reverse legend is sometimes unusually spaced dependent on where Pax's branch is positioned - here the break occurs between the 'T' and 'E'. Most examples do not have such a break.

An early fine style portrait with true Vespasianic features. Unobtrusive flan flaw.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/16/18 at 13:57Vincent: He looks handsome...must be the makeup
V29a.jpg
Vespasian RIC 29 (2)77 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Rome Mint, January - June 70 AD
RIC 29 (C3). BMC 26. RSC 94h.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS ITER TR POT; Pax, draped, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand and winged caduceus in l.
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, August 2018.

This seated Pax is by far the most common type of the 'COS ITER' issue. It may even have been struck well after June 70, evidenced by the vast quantities that have survived and the classic Vespasianic portrait many of them display (Vespasian arrived in Rome c. October 70). COS ITER in the reverse legend is sometimes unusually spaced dependent on where Pax's branch is positioned - here the break occurs between the 'T' and 'E'. Most examples do not have such a break.

An early fine style portrait with true Vespasianic features. Unobtrusive flan flaw.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/16/18 at 12:43Canaan: Nice!!!
V29a.jpg
Vespasian RIC 29 (2)77 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Rome Mint, January - June 70 AD
RIC 29 (C3). BMC 26. RSC 94h.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS ITER TR POT; Pax, draped, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand and winged caduceus in l.
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, August 2018.

This seated Pax is by far the most common type of the 'COS ITER' issue. It may even have been struck well after June 70, evidenced by the vast quantities that have survived and the classic Vespasianic portrait many of them display (Vespasian arrived in Rome c. October 70). COS ITER in the reverse legend is sometimes unusually spaced dependent on where Pax's branch is positioned - here the break occurs between the 'T' and 'E'. Most examples do not have such a break.

An early fine style portrait with true Vespasianic features. Unobtrusive flan flaw.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/16/18 at 08:24FlaviusDomitianus: Nice specimen
V29a.jpg
Vespasian RIC 29 (2)77 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Rome Mint, January - June 70 AD
RIC 29 (C3). BMC 26. RSC 94h.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS ITER TR POT; Pax, draped, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand and winged caduceus in l.
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, August 2018.

This seated Pax is by far the most common type of the 'COS ITER' issue. It may even have been struck well after June 70, evidenced by the vast quantities that have survived and the classic Vespasianic portrait many of them display (Vespasian arrived in Rome c. October 70). COS ITER in the reverse legend is sometimes unusually spaced dependent on where Pax's branch is positioned - here the break occurs between the 'T' and 'E'. Most examples do not have such a break.

An early fine style portrait with true Vespasianic features. Unobtrusive flan flaw.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/16/18 at 04:05Jay GT4: Nice early portrait
V980a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-980 (3)62 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 980 (C). BMC 217 corr. RSC 219.
Obv: CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, right.
Rev: IMP XIX across field; Modius, standing on three legs, containing one ear of corn upright, then two ears of corn bending r. and l. with poppy in between and two ears of corn hanging over the sides
Acquired from Münzen & Medaillen, July 2018. 'From an old Swiss collection'.

A rare variant of the modius type with poppies in between the corn ears. The variants with poppies tend to have longer corn ears than the common examples without them. The poppy in the Roman world was often a symbol of abundance and fertility, so it is quite fitting to see them symbolically stored in a modius alongside corn ears. NB: BMC 217 has the poppies on either side of the upright corn ear.

Well centred on a ragged flan.
2 commentsDavid Atherton08/08/18 at 11:57Jay GT4: The subtleties
V980a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-980 (3)62 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 980 (C). BMC 217 corr. RSC 219.
Obv: CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, right.
Rev: IMP XIX across field; Modius, standing on three legs, containing one ear of corn upright, then two ears of corn bending r. and l. with poppy in between and two ears of corn hanging over the sides
Acquired from Münzen & Medaillen, July 2018. 'From an old Swiss collection'.

A rare variant of the modius type with poppies in between the corn ears. The variants with poppies tend to have longer corn ears than the common examples without them. The poppy in the Roman world was often a symbol of abundance and fertility, so it is quite fitting to see them symbolically stored in a modius alongside corn ears. NB: BMC 217 has the poppies on either side of the upright corn ear.

Well centred on a ragged flan.
2 commentsDavid Atherton08/08/18 at 07:29FlaviusDomitianus: Interesting variety, I'll keep an eye on them.
V980var_.jpg
Vespasian RIC-980 (2)83 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 980 (C). BMC 216 corr. RSC 216 corr.
Obv: CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, right.
Rev: IMP XIX across field; Modius, standing on three legs, containing six ears of corn upright and two hanging over the sides
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, July 2018.

A rare and, to my knowledge, unique variant of the common modius type. Normally just five corn-ears are seen standing upright with two hanging over the sides, here there are six standing upright. This deviation from the stock design was perhaps an engraver's error or whim. The modius type celebrates the emperor's provision of free grain to all Roman citizens, certainly a most valuable propaganda type! Normally, Vespasian shared his reverse designs with Titus Caesar - the modius was not one of them, perhaps emphasising Vespasian's sole responsibility for the grain supply. Unusually, the type was not directly modelled from any coin designs struck in the past and was part of an agrarian series of denarius reverse types struck between 77 and 78.

A superb portrait and well centred strike.
4 commentsDavid Atherton07/31/18 at 05:57quadrans: Interesting piece..
V980var_.jpg
Vespasian RIC-980 (2)83 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 980 (C). BMC 216 corr. RSC 216 corr.
Obv: CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, right.
Rev: IMP XIX across field; Modius, standing on three legs, containing six ears of corn upright and two hanging over the sides
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, July 2018.

A rare and, to my knowledge, unique variant of the common modius type. Normally just five corn-ears are seen standing upright with two hanging over the sides, here there are six standing upright. This deviation from the stock design was perhaps an engraver's error or whim. The modius type celebrates the emperor's provision of free grain to all Roman citizens, certainly a most valuable propaganda type! Normally, Vespasian shared his reverse designs with Titus Caesar - the modius was not one of them, perhaps emphasising Vespasian's sole responsibility for the grain supply. Unusually, the type was not directly modelled from any coin designs struck in the past and was part of an agrarian series of denarius reverse types struck between 77 and 78.

A superb portrait and well centred strike.
4 commentsDavid Atherton07/18/18 at 18:52Nemonater: What a portrait!
V980var_.jpg
Vespasian RIC-980 (2)83 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 980 (C). BMC 216 corr. RSC 216 corr.
Obv: CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, right.
Rev: IMP XIX across field; Modius, standing on three legs, containing six ears of corn upright and two hanging over the sides
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, July 2018.

A rare and, to my knowledge, unique variant of the common modius type. Normally just five corn-ears are seen standing upright with two hanging over the sides, here there are six standing upright. This deviation from the stock design was perhaps an engraver's error or whim. The modius type celebrates the emperor's provision of free grain to all Roman citizens, certainly a most valuable propaganda type! Normally, Vespasian shared his reverse designs with Titus Caesar - the modius was not one of them, perhaps emphasising Vespasian's sole responsibility for the grain supply. Unusually, the type was not directly modelled from any coin designs struck in the past and was part of an agrarian series of denarius reverse types struck between 77 and 78.

A superb portrait and well centred strike.
4 commentsDavid Atherton07/18/18 at 10:37Jay GT4: Really great
V980var_.jpg
Vespasian RIC-980 (2)83 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 980 (C). BMC 216 corr. RSC 216 corr.
Obv: CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, right.
Rev: IMP XIX across field; Modius, standing on three legs, containing six ears of corn upright and two hanging over the sides
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, July 2018.

A rare and, to my knowledge, unique variant of the common modius type. Normally just five corn-ears are seen standing upright with two hanging over the sides, here there are six standing upright. This deviation from the stock design was perhaps an engraver's error or whim. The modius type celebrates the emperor's provision of free grain to all Roman citizens, certainly a most valuable propaganda type! Normally, Vespasian shared his reverse designs with Titus Caesar - the modius was not one of them, perhaps emphasising Vespasian's sole responsibility for the grain supply. Unusually, the type was not directly modelled from any coin designs struck in the past and was part of an agrarian series of denarius reverse types struck between 77 and 78.

A superb portrait and well centred strike.
4 commentsDavid Atherton07/18/18 at 06:51FlaviusDomitianus: Excellent eye is required to notice this!
V43.jpg
Vespasian RIC 43 (2)77 viewsAR Denarius, 3.14g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 43 (C2). BMC 50. RSC 43.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: Above AVGVR, below, TRI POT; Simpulum, sprinkler, jug, and lituus
Acquired from Germania Inferior, June 2018.

The vast majority of denarii from this issue with the shortened obverse legend have a legend break above the portrait, normally seen between VE-SP or VES-P (see my other RIC 43). This is a rare variant without the break above the portrait. I suppose it was a whim of the engraver whether the legend was continuous or not. The reverse commemorates Vespasian being voted pontifex maximus by the Senate in November of 70, shortly after his arrival in Rome. It copies a type struck for Julius Caesar.

Workman-like portrait with beautiful gold toning and rainbow hints.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/04/18 at 21:08Jay GT4: Very nice
V43.jpg
Vespasian RIC 43 (2)77 viewsAR Denarius, 3.14g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 43 (C2). BMC 50. RSC 43.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: Above AVGVR, below, TRI POT; Simpulum, sprinkler, jug, and lituus
Acquired from Germania Inferior, June 2018.

The vast majority of denarii from this issue with the shortened obverse legend have a legend break above the portrait, normally seen between VE-SP or VES-P (see my other RIC 43). This is a rare variant without the break above the portrait. I suppose it was a whim of the engraver whether the legend was continuous or not. The reverse commemorates Vespasian being voted pontifex maximus by the Senate in November of 70, shortly after his arrival in Rome. It copies a type struck for Julius Caesar.

Workman-like portrait with beautiful gold toning and rainbow hints.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/04/18 at 13:21maridvnvm: A very attractive coin. Vespasian looks brutish.
V43.jpg
Vespasian RIC 43 (2)77 viewsAR Denarius, 3.14g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 43 (C2). BMC 50. RSC 43.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: Above AVGVR, below, TRI POT; Simpulum, sprinkler, jug, and lituus
Acquired from Germania Inferior, June 2018.

The vast majority of denarii from this issue with the shortened obverse legend have a legend break above the portrait, normally seen between VE-SP or VES-P (see my other RIC 43). This is a rare variant without the break above the portrait. I suppose it was a whim of the engraver whether the legend was continuous or not. The reverse commemorates Vespasian being voted pontifex maximus by the Senate in November of 70, shortly after his arrival in Rome. It copies a type struck for Julius Caesar.

Workman-like portrait with beautiful gold toning and rainbow hints.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/04/18 at 11:49okidoki: Congrats very nice toning
V1432.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1432133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1432 (R2). BMC p. 96, *. RSC 281. RPC 834 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., EPHE
Acquired from Pavlos S. Pavlov, May 2018.

Victory advancing left was a commonly struck reverse type at Ephesus up until Vespasian's COS III issue. From this issue going forward, the mint favoured the Victory advancing right and sparingly struck the advancing left variant. As a matter of fact, the left Victory virtually disappears by the time the COS V issue was produced. So, a very rare type for COS III - just 2 Victory left specimens versus 14 right specimens cited in RPC.

Fabulous Ephesian style!

12 commentsDavid Atherton06/21/18 at 05:45Randygeki(h2): Very cool!
V1432.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1432133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1432 (R2). BMC p. 96, *. RSC 281. RPC 834 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., EPHE
Acquired from Pavlos S. Pavlov, May 2018.

Victory advancing left was a commonly struck reverse type at Ephesus up until Vespasian's COS III issue. From this issue going forward, the mint favoured the Victory advancing right and sparingly struck the advancing left variant. As a matter of fact, the left Victory virtually disappears by the time the COS V issue was produced. So, a very rare type for COS III - just 2 Victory left specimens versus 14 right specimens cited in RPC.

Fabulous Ephesian style!

12 commentsDavid Atherton06/13/18 at 17:24Canaan: Perfection!!! Fleur de coin!!!
V1432.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1432133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1432 (R2). BMC p. 96, *. RSC 281. RPC 834 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., EPHE
Acquired from Pavlos S. Pavlov, May 2018.

Victory advancing left was a commonly struck reverse type at Ephesus up until Vespasian's COS III issue. From this issue going forward, the mint favoured the Victory advancing right and sparingly struck the advancing left variant. As a matter of fact, the left Victory virtually disappears by the time the COS V issue was produced. So, a very rare type for COS III - just 2 Victory left specimens versus 14 right specimens cited in RPC.

Fabulous Ephesian style!

12 commentsDavid Atherton05/31/18 at 13:37Pharsalos: Beautiful dies!
V1432.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1432133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1432 (R2). BMC p. 96, *. RSC 281. RPC 834 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., EPHE
Acquired from Pavlos S. Pavlov, May 2018.

Victory advancing left was a commonly struck reverse type at Ephesus up until Vespasian's COS III issue. From this issue going forward, the mint favoured the Victory advancing right and sparingly struck the advancing left variant. As a matter of fact, the left Victory virtually disappears by the time the COS V issue was produced. So, a very rare type for COS III - just 2 Victory left specimens versus 14 right specimens cited in RPC.

Fabulous Ephesian style!

12 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/18 at 18:38kc: Good acquisition
V1432.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1432133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1432 (R2). BMC p. 96, *. RSC 281. RPC 834 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., EPHE
Acquired from Pavlos S. Pavlov, May 2018.

Victory advancing left was a commonly struck reverse type at Ephesus up until Vespasian's COS III issue. From this issue going forward, the mint favoured the Victory advancing right and sparingly struck the advancing left variant. As a matter of fact, the left Victory virtually disappears by the time the COS V issue was produced. So, a very rare type for COS III - just 2 Victory left specimens versus 14 right specimens cited in RPC.

Fabulous Ephesian style!

12 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/18 at 17:24Canaan: Striking beauty!!!!
V1432.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1432133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1432 (R2). BMC p. 96, *. RSC 281. RPC 834 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., EPHE
Acquired from Pavlos S. Pavlov, May 2018.

Victory advancing left was a commonly struck reverse type at Ephesus up until Vespasian's COS III issue. From this issue going forward, the mint favoured the Victory advancing right and sparingly struck the advancing left variant. As a matter of fact, the left Victory virtually disappears by the time the COS V issue was produced. So, a very rare type for COS III - just 2 Victory left specimens versus 14 right specimens cited in RPC.

Fabulous Ephesian style!

12 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/18 at 13:41Mat: amazing portrait
V1432.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1432133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1432 (R2). BMC p. 96, *. RSC 281. RPC 834 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., EPHE
Acquired from Pavlos S. Pavlov, May 2018.

Victory advancing left was a commonly struck reverse type at Ephesus up until Vespasian's COS III issue. From this issue going forward, the mint favoured the Victory advancing right and sparingly struck the advancing left variant. As a matter of fact, the left Victory virtually disappears by the time the COS V issue was produced. So, a very rare type for COS III - just 2 Victory left specimens versus 14 right specimens cited in RPC.

Fabulous Ephesian style!

12 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/18 at 13:32quadrans: Huhh, Great coin and details, congratulations !!! ...
V1432.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1432133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1432 (R2). BMC p. 96, *. RSC 281. RPC 834 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., EPHE
Acquired from Pavlos S. Pavlov, May 2018.

Victory advancing left was a commonly struck reverse type at Ephesus up until Vespasian's COS III issue. From this issue going forward, the mint favoured the Victory advancing right and sparingly struck the advancing left variant. As a matter of fact, the left Victory virtually disappears by the time the COS V issue was produced. So, a very rare type for COS III - just 2 Victory left specimens versus 14 right specimens cited in RPC.

Fabulous Ephesian style!

12 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/18 at 12:33okidoki: bold coin
V1432.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1432133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1432 (R2). BMC p. 96, *. RSC 281. RPC 834 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., EPHE
Acquired from Pavlos S. Pavlov, May 2018.

Victory advancing left was a commonly struck reverse type at Ephesus up until Vespasian's COS III issue. From this issue going forward, the mint favoured the Victory advancing right and sparingly struck the advancing left variant. As a matter of fact, the left Victory virtually disappears by the time the COS V issue was produced. So, a very rare type for COS III - just 2 Victory left specimens versus 14 right specimens cited in RPC.

Fabulous Ephesian style!

12 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/18 at 10:44Carausius: Beautiful coin. Magnificent style. Congratulations...
V1432.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1432133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1432 (R2). BMC p. 96, *. RSC 281. RPC 834 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., EPHE
Acquired from Pavlos S. Pavlov, May 2018.

Victory advancing left was a commonly struck reverse type at Ephesus up until Vespasian's COS III issue. From this issue going forward, the mint favoured the Victory advancing right and sparingly struck the advancing left variant. As a matter of fact, the left Victory virtually disappears by the time the COS V issue was produced. So, a very rare type for COS III - just 2 Victory left specimens versus 14 right specimens cited in RPC.

Fabulous Ephesian style!

12 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/18 at 10:42Nemonater: Beautiful!
V1432.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1432133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1432 (R2). BMC p. 96, *. RSC 281. RPC 834 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., EPHE
Acquired from Pavlos S. Pavlov, May 2018.

Victory advancing left was a commonly struck reverse type at Ephesus up until Vespasian's COS III issue. From this issue going forward, the mint favoured the Victory advancing right and sparingly struck the advancing left variant. As a matter of fact, the left Victory virtually disappears by the time the COS V issue was produced. So, a very rare type for COS III - just 2 Victory left specimens versus 14 right specimens cited in RPC.

Fabulous Ephesian style!

12 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/18 at 10:39FlaviusDomitianus: Great coin, congrats!
V1432.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1432133 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1432 (R2). BMC p. 96, *. RSC 281. RPC 834 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., EPHE
Acquired from Pavlos S. Pavlov, May 2018.

Victory advancing left was a commonly struck reverse type at Ephesus up until Vespasian's COS III issue. From this issue going forward, the mint favoured the Victory advancing right and sparingly struck the advancing left variant. As a matter of fact, the left Victory virtually disappears by the time the COS V issue was produced. So, a very rare type for COS III - just 2 Victory left specimens versus 14 right specimens cited in RPC.

Fabulous Ephesian style!

12 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/18 at 10:37Jay GT4: Outstanding all around
V1368sm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1368124 viewsAR Denarius, 3.60g
Uncertain mint, 69-71 AD
RIC 1368 (R2). BMC 419. RSC 221.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IMPER below; Vespasian riding l., r. hand raised
Ex Künker 304, 19 March 2018, lot 1085.

Fascinating coins often come out of civil war. In late October 69 the Second Battle of Cremona was fought between the legions of Vitellius and Vespasian. It resulted in the utter defeat of the Vitellian side and their slow retreat towards Rome. Not long afterwards the Spanish legions went openly for Vespasian, which up until that point had only been neutrally friendly toward him. Coins were quickly struck for Vespasian in the newly won province. Most of these are attributed to Tarraco and an unknown Spanish mint. Intriguingly, a small military issue was contemporaneously struck at an uncertain mint somewhere in the western empire - Mattingly thought perhaps Aquileia. The issue contains some stylistic affinities with the Spanish series, but more importantly, recent metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting show the silver content is almost identical to that of the Spanish coins. It is very likely these early military denarii were also struck in Spain in late 69 soon after the province went over to Vespasian.

Here we have an extremely rare denarius from that uncertain military issue showing Vespasian in military dress riding left in the act of addressing his troops. Clearly, this is a propaganda type that was produced to help consolidate the legions in a newly won province. The type occurs no where else and is unique to the series. The portrait bears no resemblance to Vespasian, which is further evidence of the coin's early mintage, perhaps pre-dating the other Spanish issues.

Struck in high relief on a large flan.
9 commentsDavid Atherton05/20/18 at 17:18socalcoins: Congratulations!!!!
vesp spqr.jpg
Vespasian RIC-547154 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome Mint, 73 AD
RIC 547 (C). BMC 103. RSC 516.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG CEN; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: S P Q R in oak wreath
Acquired from Ancient Coin Art, April 2006.

The wreath is the Corona Civica. What did Vespasian do in 73 A.D. to be awarded this honor by the Senate and People of Rome?

The occasion of this issue is in doubt. The BMCRE sites the restoration of Achaea back to the Senate as one possibility.

I love this reverse. The main reason I purchased this example is because of the wonderful detail and lovely style of the reverse. Most examples I have seen of this type are very worn and do not show the oak-wreath in such fine detail.
3 commentsVespasian7005/16/18 at 07:04HELEN S: This coin is RIC 514..great example
V1368sm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1368124 viewsAR Denarius, 3.60g
Uncertain mint, 69-71 AD
RIC 1368 (R2). BMC 419. RSC 221.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IMPER below; Vespasian riding l., r. hand raised
Ex Künker 304, 19 March 2018, lot 1085.

Fascinating coins often come out of civil war. In late October 69 the Second Battle of Cremona was fought between the legions of Vitellius and Vespasian. It resulted in the utter defeat of the Vitellian side and their slow retreat towards Rome. Not long afterwards the Spanish legions went openly for Vespasian, which up until that point had only been neutrally friendly toward him. Coins were quickly struck for Vespasian in the newly won province. Most of these are attributed to Tarraco and an unknown Spanish mint. Intriguingly, a small military issue was contemporaneously struck at an uncertain mint somewhere in the western empire - Mattingly thought perhaps Aquileia. The issue contains some stylistic affinities with the Spanish series, but more importantly, recent metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting show the silver content is almost identical to that of the Spanish coins. It is very likely these early military denarii were also struck in Spain in late 69 soon after the province went over to Vespasian.

Here we have an extremely rare denarius from that uncertain military issue showing Vespasian in military dress riding left in the act of addressing his troops. Clearly, this is a propaganda type that was produced to help consolidate the legions in a newly won province. The type occurs no where else and is unique to the series. The portrait bears no resemblance to Vespasian, which is further evidence of the coin's early mintage, perhaps pre-dating the other Spanish issues.

Struck in high relief on a large flan.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/19/18 at 11:42NORMAN K: impressive
V1368sm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1368124 viewsAR Denarius, 3.60g
Uncertain mint, 69-71 AD
RIC 1368 (R2). BMC 419. RSC 221.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IMPER below; Vespasian riding l., r. hand raised
Ex Künker 304, 19 March 2018, lot 1085.

Fascinating coins often come out of civil war. In late October 69 the Second Battle of Cremona was fought between the legions of Vitellius and Vespasian. It resulted in the utter defeat of the Vitellian side and their slow retreat towards Rome. Not long afterwards the Spanish legions went openly for Vespasian, which up until that point had only been neutrally friendly toward him. Coins were quickly struck for Vespasian in the newly won province. Most of these are attributed to Tarraco and an unknown Spanish mint. Intriguingly, a small military issue was contemporaneously struck at an uncertain mint somewhere in the western empire - Mattingly thought perhaps Aquileia. The issue contains some stylistic affinities with the Spanish series, but more importantly, recent metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting show the silver content is almost identical to that of the Spanish coins. It is very likely these early military denarii were also struck in Spain in late 69 soon after the province went over to Vespasian.

Here we have an extremely rare denarius from that uncertain military issue showing Vespasian in military dress riding left in the act of addressing his troops. Clearly, this is a propaganda type that was produced to help consolidate the legions in a newly won province. The type occurs no where else and is unique to the series. The portrait bears no resemblance to Vespasian, which is further evidence of the coin's early mintage, perhaps pre-dating the other Spanish issues.

Struck in high relief on a large flan.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/18/18 at 17:24Randygeki(h2): Sweet coin!
V1368sm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1368124 viewsAR Denarius, 3.60g
Uncertain mint, 69-71 AD
RIC 1368 (R2). BMC 419. RSC 221.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IMPER below; Vespasian riding l., r. hand raised
Ex Künker 304, 19 March 2018, lot 1085.

Fascinating coins often come out of civil war. In late October 69 the Second Battle of Cremona was fought between the legions of Vitellius and Vespasian. It resulted in the utter defeat of the Vitellian side and their slow retreat towards Rome. Not long afterwards the Spanish legions went openly for Vespasian, which up until that point had only been neutrally friendly toward him. Coins were quickly struck for Vespasian in the newly won province. Most of these are attributed to Tarraco and an unknown Spanish mint. Intriguingly, a small military issue was contemporaneously struck at an uncertain mint somewhere in the western empire - Mattingly thought perhaps Aquileia. The issue contains some stylistic affinities with the Spanish series, but more importantly, recent metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting show the silver content is almost identical to that of the Spanish coins. It is very likely these early military denarii were also struck in Spain in late 69 soon after the province went over to Vespasian.

Here we have an extremely rare denarius from that uncertain military issue showing Vespasian in military dress riding left in the act of addressing his troops. Clearly, this is a propaganda type that was produced to help consolidate the legions in a newly won province. The type occurs no where else and is unique to the series. The portrait bears no resemblance to Vespasian, which is further evidence of the coin's early mintage, perhaps pre-dating the other Spanish issues.

Struck in high relief on a large flan.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/17/18 at 14:43quadrans: Yes, Great !!!
V1368sm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1368124 viewsAR Denarius, 3.60g
Uncertain mint, 69-71 AD
RIC 1368 (R2). BMC 419. RSC 221.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IMPER below; Vespasian riding l., r. hand raised
Ex Künker 304, 19 March 2018, lot 1085.

Fascinating coins often come out of civil war. In late October 69 the Second Battle of Cremona was fought between the legions of Vitellius and Vespasian. It resulted in the utter defeat of the Vitellian side and their slow retreat towards Rome. Not long afterwards the Spanish legions went openly for Vespasian, which up until that point had only been neutrally friendly toward him. Coins were quickly struck for Vespasian in the newly won province. Most of these are attributed to Tarraco and an unknown Spanish mint. Intriguingly, a small military issue was contemporaneously struck at an uncertain mint somewhere in the western empire - Mattingly thought perhaps Aquileia. The issue contains some stylistic affinities with the Spanish series, but more importantly, recent metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting show the silver content is almost identical to that of the Spanish coins. It is very likely these early military denarii were also struck in Spain in late 69 soon after the province went over to Vespasian.

Here we have an extremely rare denarius from that uncertain military issue showing Vespasian in military dress riding left in the act of addressing his troops. Clearly, this is a propaganda type that was produced to help consolidate the legions in a newly won province. The type occurs no where else and is unique to the series. The portrait bears no resemblance to Vespasian, which is further evidence of the coin's early mintage, perhaps pre-dating the other Spanish issues.

Struck in high relief on a large flan.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/17/18 at 13:39Mat: neat and cool coin
V1368sm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1368124 viewsAR Denarius, 3.60g
Uncertain mint, 69-71 AD
RIC 1368 (R2). BMC 419. RSC 221.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IMPER below; Vespasian riding l., r. hand raised
Ex Künker 304, 19 March 2018, lot 1085.

Fascinating coins often come out of civil war. In late October 69 the Second Battle of Cremona was fought between the legions of Vitellius and Vespasian. It resulted in the utter defeat of the Vitellian side and their slow retreat towards Rome. Not long afterwards the Spanish legions went openly for Vespasian, which up until that point had only been neutrally friendly toward him. Coins were quickly struck for Vespasian in the newly won province. Most of these are attributed to Tarraco and an unknown Spanish mint. Intriguingly, a small military issue was contemporaneously struck at an uncertain mint somewhere in the western empire - Mattingly thought perhaps Aquileia. The issue contains some stylistic affinities with the Spanish series, but more importantly, recent metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting show the silver content is almost identical to that of the Spanish coins. It is very likely these early military denarii were also struck in Spain in late 69 soon after the province went over to Vespasian.

Here we have an extremely rare denarius from that uncertain military issue showing Vespasian in military dress riding left in the act of addressing his troops. Clearly, this is a propaganda type that was produced to help consolidate the legions in a newly won province. The type occurs no where else and is unique to the series. The portrait bears no resemblance to Vespasian, which is further evidence of the coin's early mintage, perhaps pre-dating the other Spanish issues.

Struck in high relief on a large flan.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/17/18 at 13:35Jay GT4: Outstanding
V1368sm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1368124 viewsAR Denarius, 3.60g
Uncertain mint, 69-71 AD
RIC 1368 (R2). BMC 419. RSC 221.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IMPER below; Vespasian riding l., r. hand raised
Ex Künker 304, 19 March 2018, lot 1085.

Fascinating coins often come out of civil war. In late October 69 the Second Battle of Cremona was fought between the legions of Vitellius and Vespasian. It resulted in the utter defeat of the Vitellian side and their slow retreat towards Rome. Not long afterwards the Spanish legions went openly for Vespasian, which up until that point had only been neutrally friendly toward him. Coins were quickly struck for Vespasian in the newly won province. Most of these are attributed to Tarraco and an unknown Spanish mint. Intriguingly, a small military issue was contemporaneously struck at an uncertain mint somewhere in the western empire - Mattingly thought perhaps Aquileia. The issue contains some stylistic affinities with the Spanish series, but more importantly, recent metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting show the silver content is almost identical to that of the Spanish coins. It is very likely these early military denarii were also struck in Spain in late 69 soon after the province went over to Vespasian.

Here we have an extremely rare denarius from that uncertain military issue showing Vespasian in military dress riding left in the act of addressing his troops. Clearly, this is a propaganda type that was produced to help consolidate the legions in a newly won province. The type occurs no where else and is unique to the series. The portrait bears no resemblance to Vespasian, which is further evidence of the coin's early mintage, perhaps pre-dating the other Spanish issues.

Struck in high relief on a large flan.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/17/18 at 10:50FlaviusDomitianus: Awesome rarity!
V1368sm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1368124 viewsAR Denarius, 3.60g
Uncertain mint, 69-71 AD
RIC 1368 (R2). BMC 419. RSC 221.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IMPER below; Vespasian riding l., r. hand raised
Ex Künker 304, 19 March 2018, lot 1085.

Fascinating coins often come out of civil war. In late October 69 the Second Battle of Cremona was fought between the legions of Vitellius and Vespasian. It resulted in the utter defeat of the Vitellian side and their slow retreat towards Rome. Not long afterwards the Spanish legions went openly for Vespasian, which up until that point had only been neutrally friendly toward him. Coins were quickly struck for Vespasian in the newly won province. Most of these are attributed to Tarraco and an unknown Spanish mint. Intriguingly, a small military issue was contemporaneously struck at an uncertain mint somewhere in the western empire - Mattingly thought perhaps Aquileia. The issue contains some stylistic affinities with the Spanish series, but more importantly, recent metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting show the silver content is almost identical to that of the Spanish coins. It is very likely these early military denarii were also struck in Spain in late 69 soon after the province went over to Vespasian.

Here we have an extremely rare denarius from that uncertain military issue showing Vespasian in military dress riding left in the act of addressing his troops. Clearly, this is a propaganda type that was produced to help consolidate the legions in a newly won province. The type occurs no where else and is unique to the series. The portrait bears no resemblance to Vespasian, which is further evidence of the coin's early mintage, perhaps pre-dating the other Spanish issues.

Struck in high relief on a large flan.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/17/18 at 10:46Nemonater: Absolutely phenomenal!
V1409.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-140983 viewsAR Denarius, 2.59g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1409 (R2). BMC 442. RSC 66. RPC 818 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, horizontal Φ
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, March 2018.

The Ceres reverse type was consistently struck at Ephesus from 69 through 74. This scarce Group 3 example features an imperfectly struck Φ mintmark. The elaborate high back throne Ceres is seated upon distinguishes it from the Rome mint version of the type.

Struck in typical fine Ephesian style.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/06/18 at 04:47Randygeki(h2): Cool addition!!
V1409.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-140983 viewsAR Denarius, 2.59g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1409 (R2). BMC 442. RSC 66. RPC 818 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, horizontal Φ
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, March 2018.

The Ceres reverse type was consistently struck at Ephesus from 69 through 74. This scarce Group 3 example features an imperfectly struck Φ mintmark. The elaborate high back throne Ceres is seated upon distinguishes it from the Rome mint version of the type.

Struck in typical fine Ephesian style.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/04/18 at 19:19Jay GT4: Sweet
V1409.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-140983 viewsAR Denarius, 2.59g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1409 (R2). BMC 442. RSC 66. RPC 818 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, horizontal Φ
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, March 2018.

The Ceres reverse type was consistently struck at Ephesus from 69 through 74. This scarce Group 3 example features an imperfectly struck Φ mintmark. The elaborate high back throne Ceres is seated upon distinguishes it from the Rome mint version of the type.

Struck in typical fine Ephesian style.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/04/18 at 12:14orfew: Very interesting portrait
V1409.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-140983 viewsAR Denarius, 2.59g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1409 (R2). BMC 442. RSC 66. RPC 818 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, horizontal Φ
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, March 2018.

The Ceres reverse type was consistently struck at Ephesus from 69 through 74. This scarce Group 3 example features an imperfectly struck Φ mintmark. The elaborate high back throne Ceres is seated upon distinguishes it from the Rome mint version of the type.

Struck in typical fine Ephesian style.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/04/18 at 12:00quadrans: Nice piece..
V1409.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-140983 viewsAR Denarius, 2.59g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1409 (R2). BMC 442. RSC 66. RPC 818 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, horizontal Φ
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, March 2018.

The Ceres reverse type was consistently struck at Ephesus from 69 through 74. This scarce Group 3 example features an imperfectly struck Φ mintmark. The elaborate high back throne Ceres is seated upon distinguishes it from the Rome mint version of the type.

Struck in typical fine Ephesian style.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/04/18 at 11:39Nemonater: Striking portrait!
V1409.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-140983 viewsAR Denarius, 2.59g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1409 (R2). BMC 442. RSC 66. RPC 818 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, horizontal Φ
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, March 2018.

The Ceres reverse type was consistently struck at Ephesus from 69 through 74. This scarce Group 3 example features an imperfectly struck Φ mintmark. The elaborate high back throne Ceres is seated upon distinguishes it from the Rome mint version of the type.

Struck in typical fine Ephesian style.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/04/18 at 10:47Canaan: Very nice!!!
V1409.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-140983 viewsAR Denarius, 2.59g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1409 (R2). BMC 442. RSC 66. RPC 818 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, horizontal Φ
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, March 2018.

The Ceres reverse type was consistently struck at Ephesus from 69 through 74. This scarce Group 3 example features an imperfectly struck Φ mintmark. The elaborate high back throne Ceres is seated upon distinguishes it from the Rome mint version of the type.

Struck in typical fine Ephesian style.
7 commentsDavid Atherton04/04/18 at 09:51okidoki: interesting details
V1464~0.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-146495 viewsAR Denarius, 3.49g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD
RIC 1464 (R2). BMC p. 99, †. RSC 68 corr. RPC 852 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., annulet at tip of bust
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres, std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; below throne, annulet; in exergue, star
Ex Savoca, eBay, 2 March 2018.

A rare COS V Ephesian denarius notable for three control marks (one on the obverse, two on the reverse). Certain variants may have all three marks present but with different placements, lack one or two marks, or be any combination of the former and latter possibilities. I would assume the marks had something to do with the internal organisation of the mint's workshops. Also of note, this is the last denarius issue which can inarguably be attributed to Ephesus.

A bit off-centre, but in fine style.

8 commentsDavid Atherton03/27/18 at 19:03Randygeki(h2): Sweet coin!
V1464~0.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-146495 viewsAR Denarius, 3.49g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD
RIC 1464 (R2). BMC p. 99, †. RSC 68 corr. RPC 852 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., annulet at tip of bust
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres, std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; below throne, annulet; in exergue, star
Ex Savoca, eBay, 2 March 2018.

A rare COS V Ephesian denarius notable for three control marks (one on the obverse, two on the reverse). Certain variants may have all three marks present but with different placements, lack one or two marks, or be any combination of the former and latter possibilities. I would assume the marks had something to do with the internal organisation of the mint's workshops. Also of note, this is the last denarius issue which can inarguably be attributed to Ephesus.

A bit off-centre, but in fine style.

8 commentsDavid Atherton03/27/18 at 06:33ancientdave: Nice one!
V1464~0.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-146495 viewsAR Denarius, 3.49g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD
RIC 1464 (R2). BMC p. 99, †. RSC 68 corr. RPC 852 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., annulet at tip of bust
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres, std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; below throne, annulet; in exergue, star
Ex Savoca, eBay, 2 March 2018.

A rare COS V Ephesian denarius notable for three control marks (one on the obverse, two on the reverse). Certain variants may have all three marks present but with different placements, lack one or two marks, or be any combination of the former and latter possibilities. I would assume the marks had something to do with the internal organisation of the mint's workshops. Also of note, this is the last denarius issue which can inarguably be attributed to Ephesus.

A bit off-centre, but in fine style.

8 commentsDavid Atherton03/24/18 at 21:28Jay GT4: It's OK David
V1464~0.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-146495 viewsAR Denarius, 3.49g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD
RIC 1464 (R2). BMC p. 99, †. RSC 68 corr. RPC 852 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., annulet at tip of bust
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres, std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; below throne, annulet; in exergue, star
Ex Savoca, eBay, 2 March 2018.

A rare COS V Ephesian denarius notable for three control marks (one on the obverse, two on the reverse). Certain variants may have all three marks present but with different placements, lack one or two marks, or be any combination of the former and latter possibilities. I would assume the marks had something to do with the internal organisation of the mint's workshops. Also of note, this is the last denarius issue which can inarguably be attributed to Ephesus.

A bit off-centre, but in fine style.

8 commentsDavid Atherton03/22/18 at 10:19Nemonater: Fantastic details!
V1464~0.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-146495 viewsAR Denarius, 3.49g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD
RIC 1464 (R2). BMC p. 99, †. RSC 68 corr. RPC 852 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., annulet at tip of bust
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres, std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; below throne, annulet; in exergue, star
Ex Savoca, eBay, 2 March 2018.

A rare COS V Ephesian denarius notable for three control marks (one on the obverse, two on the reverse). Certain variants may have all three marks present but with different placements, lack one or two marks, or be any combination of the former and latter possibilities. I would assume the marks had something to do with the internal organisation of the mint's workshops. Also of note, this is the last denarius issue which can inarguably be attributed to Ephesus.

A bit off-centre, but in fine style.

8 commentsDavid Atherton03/21/18 at 11:45orfew: wonderful addition
V1464~0.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-146495 viewsAR Denarius, 3.49g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD
RIC 1464 (R2). BMC p. 99, †. RSC 68 corr. RPC 852 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., annulet at tip of bust
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres, std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; below throne, annulet; in exergue, star
Ex Savoca, eBay, 2 March 2018.

A rare COS V Ephesian denarius notable for three control marks (one on the obverse, two on the reverse). Certain variants may have all three marks present but with different placements, lack one or two marks, or be any combination of the former and latter possibilities. I would assume the marks had something to do with the internal organisation of the mint's workshops. Also of note, this is the last denarius issue which can inarguably be attributed to Ephesus.

A bit off-centre, but in fine style.

8 commentsDavid Atherton03/21/18 at 08:09FlaviusDomitianus: Sharp reverse
V1464~0.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-146495 viewsAR Denarius, 3.49g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD
RIC 1464 (R2). BMC p. 99, †. RSC 68 corr. RPC 852 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., annulet at tip of bust
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres, std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; below throne, annulet; in exergue, star
Ex Savoca, eBay, 2 March 2018.

A rare COS V Ephesian denarius notable for three control marks (one on the obverse, two on the reverse). Certain variants may have all three marks present but with different placements, lack one or two marks, or be any combination of the former and latter possibilities. I would assume the marks had something to do with the internal organisation of the mint's workshops. Also of note, this is the last denarius issue which can inarguably be attributed to Ephesus.

A bit off-centre, but in fine style.

8 commentsDavid Atherton03/21/18 at 07:29okidoki: nice and sharp
V1464~0.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-146495 viewsAR Denarius, 3.49g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD
RIC 1464 (R2). BMC p. 99, †. RSC 68 corr. RPC 852 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., annulet at tip of bust
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres, std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; below throne, annulet; in exergue, star
Ex Savoca, eBay, 2 March 2018.

A rare COS V Ephesian denarius notable for three control marks (one on the obverse, two on the reverse). Certain variants may have all three marks present but with different placements, lack one or two marks, or be any combination of the former and latter possibilities. I would assume the marks had something to do with the internal organisation of the mint's workshops. Also of note, this is the last denarius issue which can inarguably be attributed to Ephesus.

A bit off-centre, but in fine style.

8 commentsDavid Atherton03/21/18 at 05:39quadrans: Great coin
V773sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-773109 viewsAR Denarius, 2.89g
Rome Mint, 75 AD
RIC 773 (R3). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, bare, l.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VI; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Acquired from eBay, November 2017.

Here is an interesting situation of an extremely rare obverse paired with the most common reverse type ever struck for Vespasian's denarii. The Pax type with the common laureate right portrait was struck in vast quantities to commemorate the opening of the Temple of peace. The bare head left portraits are seen sparingly (Buttrey - 'Fleetingly') on the denarii of 75 and 76 exclusively with the seated Pax reverse. This denarius is the second known specimen of the exceedingly rare bare head COS VI Pax from 75. Unsurprisingly, it shares obverse dies with the unique specimen cited in RIC. The bare head portraits seem to have been the experimental work of one engraver operating at the mint in 75/76. Too bad this portrait variant didn't catch on, it has a delightfully attractive spare elegance.

Struck in fine style and in good metal.
7 commentsDavid Atherton12/30/17 at 18:35socalcoins: Congratulations on this awesome find! I love the ...
VBrockage.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-Unknown - Obverse Brockage94 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 69-70 AD
RIC - . BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: Incuse of obverse
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, December 2017.

Based on style and obverse legend this brockage is from Vespasian's first denarius issues at Rome.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/18/17 at 12:24okidoki: very nice
V773sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-773109 viewsAR Denarius, 2.89g
Rome Mint, 75 AD
RIC 773 (R3). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, bare, l.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VI; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Acquired from eBay, November 2017.

Here is an interesting situation of an extremely rare obverse paired with the most common reverse type ever struck for Vespasian's denarii. The Pax type with the common laureate right portrait was struck in vast quantities to commemorate the opening of the Temple of peace. The bare head left portraits are seen sparingly (Buttrey - 'Fleetingly') on the denarii of 75 and 76 exclusively with the seated Pax reverse. This denarius is the second known specimen of the exceedingly rare bare head COS VI Pax from 75. Unsurprisingly, it shares obverse dies with the unique specimen cited in RIC. The bare head portraits seem to have been the experimental work of one engraver operating at the mint in 75/76. Too bad this portrait variant didn't catch on, it has a delightfully attractive spare elegance.

Struck in fine style and in good metal.
7 commentsDavid Atherton12/14/17 at 03:29quadrans: Nice find David..
V773sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-773109 viewsAR Denarius, 2.89g
Rome Mint, 75 AD
RIC 773 (R3). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, bare, l.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VI; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Acquired from eBay, November 2017.

Here is an interesting situation of an extremely rare obverse paired with the most common reverse type ever struck for Vespasian's denarii. The Pax type with the common laureate right portrait was struck in vast quantities to commemorate the opening of the Temple of peace. The bare head left portraits are seen sparingly (Buttrey - 'Fleetingly') on the denarii of 75 and 76 exclusively with the seated Pax reverse. This denarius is the second known specimen of the exceedingly rare bare head COS VI Pax from 75. Unsurprisingly, it shares obverse dies with the unique specimen cited in RIC. The bare head portraits seem to have been the experimental work of one engraver operating at the mint in 75/76. Too bad this portrait variant didn't catch on, it has a delightfully attractive spare elegance.

Struck in fine style and in good metal.
7 commentsDavid Atherton12/13/17 at 17:49Kim B. N: he allmost looks like my dad. Very nice indee...
VBrockage.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-Unknown - Obverse Brockage94 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 69-70 AD
RIC - . BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: Incuse of obverse
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, December 2017.

Based on style and obverse legend this brockage is from Vespasian's first denarius issues at Rome.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/12/17 at 13:47Jay GT4: Nice!
VBrockage.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-Unknown - Obverse Brockage94 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 69-70 AD
RIC - . BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: Incuse of obverse
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, December 2017.

Based on style and obverse legend this brockage is from Vespasian's first denarius issues at Rome.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/12/17 at 08:20Nemonater: Cool coin with a distinctive portrait!
VBrockage.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-Unknown - Obverse Brockage94 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 69-70 AD
RIC - . BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: Incuse of obverse
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, December 2017.

Based on style and obverse legend this brockage is from Vespasian's first denarius issues at Rome.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/12/17 at 07:01Canaan: Nice!!!
VBrockage.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-Unknown - Obverse Brockage94 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome mint, 69-70 AD
RIC - . BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: Incuse of obverse
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, December 2017.

Based on style and obverse legend this brockage is from Vespasian's first denarius issues at Rome.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/12/17 at 01:37Randygeki(h2): Very nice! I was keeping an eye on this one.
V773sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-773109 viewsAR Denarius, 2.89g
Rome Mint, 75 AD
RIC 773 (R3). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, bare, l.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VI; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Acquired from eBay, November 2017.

Here is an interesting situation of an extremely rare obverse paired with the most common reverse type ever struck for Vespasian's denarii. The Pax type with the common laureate right portrait was struck in vast quantities to commemorate the opening of the Temple of peace. The bare head left portraits are seen sparingly (Buttrey - 'Fleetingly') on the denarii of 75 and 76 exclusively with the seated Pax reverse. This denarius is the second known specimen of the exceedingly rare bare head COS VI Pax from 75. Unsurprisingly, it shares obverse dies with the unique specimen cited in RIC. The bare head portraits seem to have been the experimental work of one engraver operating at the mint in 75/76. Too bad this portrait variant didn't catch on, it has a delightfully attractive spare elegance.

Struck in fine style and in good metal.
7 commentsDavid Atherton12/08/17 at 06:24maridvnvm: A very interesting coin indeed.
V773sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-773109 viewsAR Denarius, 2.89g
Rome Mint, 75 AD
RIC 773 (R3). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, bare, l.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VI; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Acquired from eBay, November 2017.

Here is an interesting situation of an extremely rare obverse paired with the most common reverse type ever struck for Vespasian's denarii. The Pax type with the common laureate right portrait was struck in vast quantities to commemorate the opening of the Temple of peace. The bare head left portraits are seen sparingly (Buttrey - 'Fleetingly') on the denarii of 75 and 76 exclusively with the seated Pax reverse. This denarius is the second known specimen of the exceedingly rare bare head COS VI Pax from 75. Unsurprisingly, it shares obverse dies with the unique specimen cited in RIC. The bare head portraits seem to have been the experimental work of one engraver operating at the mint in 75/76. Too bad this portrait variant didn't catch on, it has a delightfully attractive spare elegance.

Struck in fine style and in good metal.
7 commentsDavid Atherton12/07/17 at 04:18Canaan: Most interesting
V773sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-773109 viewsAR Denarius, 2.89g
Rome Mint, 75 AD
RIC 773 (R3). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, bare, l.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VI; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Acquired from eBay, November 2017.

Here is an interesting situation of an extremely rare obverse paired with the most common reverse type ever struck for Vespasian's denarii. The Pax type with the common laureate right portrait was struck in vast quantities to commemorate the opening of the Temple of peace. The bare head left portraits are seen sparingly (Buttrey - 'Fleetingly') on the denarii of 75 and 76 exclusively with the seated Pax reverse. This denarius is the second known specimen of the exceedingly rare bare head COS VI Pax from 75. Unsurprisingly, it shares obverse dies with the unique specimen cited in RIC. The bare head portraits seem to have been the experimental work of one engraver operating at the mint in 75/76. Too bad this portrait variant didn't catch on, it has a delightfully attractive spare elegance.

Struck in fine style and in good metal.
7 commentsDavid Atherton12/05/17 at 20:14Jay GT4: Outstanding find!
V773sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-773109 viewsAR Denarius, 2.89g
Rome Mint, 75 AD
RIC 773 (R3). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, bare, l.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VI; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Acquired from eBay, November 2017.

Here is an interesting situation of an extremely rare obverse paired with the most common reverse type ever struck for Vespasian's denarii. The Pax type with the common laureate right portrait was struck in vast quantities to commemorate the opening of the Temple of peace. The bare head left portraits are seen sparingly (Buttrey - 'Fleetingly') on the denarii of 75 and 76 exclusively with the seated Pax reverse. This denarius is the second known specimen of the exceedingly rare bare head COS VI Pax from 75. Unsurprisingly, it shares obverse dies with the unique specimen cited in RIC. The bare head portraits seem to have been the experimental work of one engraver operating at the mint in 75/76. Too bad this portrait variant didn't catch on, it has a delightfully attractive spare elegance.

Struck in fine style and in good metal.
7 commentsDavid Atherton12/05/17 at 09:26FlaviusDomitianus: Interesting rarity!
V1547a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-154797 viewsAR Denarius, 3.59g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1547 (R2). BMC 498. RSC 588. RPC 1921 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: VICTORIA AVG; Victory stg. r., on globe, with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 7, 9 July 2017, lot 313.

An exceptionally rare denarius from Antioch - it is only the eighth known example (the others are: BM, Vienna, Tom Cederlind 2007, Helios 4, Gemini X, CNG E339, Lanz eBay 2017). This left facing portrait is unique in the Antiochene denarius issues, as well as the only appearance of Victory on globe in the series. Butcher and Ponting's metal analysis of the type found a silver bullion content of 99% - a remarkable level of fineness for an imperial or provincial issue at that time. The portrait style is identical to the Antiochene tetradrachms with the left facing portraits and eagle on base reverses struck somewhat contemporaneously in 71-72. This is strong evidence that the same die engravers were producing both imperial and provincial issues at Antioch.

A stunning portrait in ultra-high relief.
9 commentsDavid Atherton11/12/17 at 17:53socalcoins: Wow!!!
V1396a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-139668 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1396 (R2). BMC 431. RSC 280b. RPC 806 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory, advancing l., holding wreath in extended r. hand and palm curving up in l.
Acquired from Pars Coins, September 2017. Ex Hirsch 326, 16 February 2017, lot 1924. Ex Savoca Live Auction 9, 21 August, 2016, lot 532.

Ephesus struck a small issue of denarii for Vespasian between 69 and 74. The vast majority of these Ephesian denarii have a mintmark of one sort or another. Those without one are preciously rare.
The earliest and rarest are undated with no mint mark and were minted in late 69 or early 70. This unmarked type with Victory on the reverse has been a most elusive one to acquire! Very scarce in trade.

Struck in fine Ephesian style.
3 commentsDavid Atherton11/12/17 at 17:52socalcoins: Incredible portait!!! Nice acquisition, David!
V1425a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1425A89 viewsAR Denarius, 2.54g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD
RIC 1425A. BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., BY
Ex Savoca Coins, eBay, October 2017.

An unpublished Victory adv. left for Vespasian's Ephesian Group 5 denarii. A unique specimen with Victory adv. right is cited in RIC II.1 (RIC 1425) for the group. A second Victory left specimen, a double die match with mine, has been noted in Doug Smith's collection. With the appearance of these two coins both Victory types can now be attested for Group 5. Tentatively the type will be considered a variant of RIC 1425 until it is officially assigned a place in the upcoming Addenda. It should be noted that COS III denarii are seen much more commonly with the EPHE mintmark where both Victory types are already attested. Generally speaking, denarii dated COS III with the BY mintmark are so rare that Mattingly in BMCRE II doubted many of the standard Ephesian types existed for the group. However, he did note a COS III Victory left with an unclear mintmark, citing Cohen 279 (BMC II p. 94, note).

**Update** Ian Carradice has been informed of the type and has added it to the upcoming Addenda (31/10/2018).

Struck in fine Ephesian style.

4 commentsDavid Atherton11/04/17 at 15:59Nemonater: Very cool, congrats!
V1425a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1425A89 viewsAR Denarius, 2.54g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD
RIC 1425A. BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., BY
Ex Savoca Coins, eBay, October 2017.

An unpublished Victory adv. left for Vespasian's Ephesian Group 5 denarii. A unique specimen with Victory adv. right is cited in RIC II.1 (RIC 1425) for the group. A second Victory left specimen, a double die match with mine, has been noted in Doug Smith's collection. With the appearance of these two coins both Victory types can now be attested for Group 5. Tentatively the type will be considered a variant of RIC 1425 until it is officially assigned a place in the upcoming Addenda. It should be noted that COS III denarii are seen much more commonly with the EPHE mintmark where both Victory types are already attested. Generally speaking, denarii dated COS III with the BY mintmark are so rare that Mattingly in BMCRE II doubted many of the standard Ephesian types existed for the group. However, he did note a COS III Victory left with an unclear mintmark, citing Cohen 279 (BMC II p. 94, note).

**Update** Ian Carradice has been informed of the type and has added it to the upcoming Addenda (31/10/2018).

Struck in fine Ephesian style.

4 commentsDavid Atherton11/02/17 at 08:11FlaviusDomitianus: Interesting rarity!
V1425a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1425A89 viewsAR Denarius, 2.54g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD
RIC 1425A. BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., BY
Ex Savoca Coins, eBay, October 2017.

An unpublished Victory adv. left for Vespasian's Ephesian Group 5 denarii. A unique specimen with Victory adv. right is cited in RIC II.1 (RIC 1425) for the group. A second Victory left specimen, a double die match with mine, has been noted in Doug Smith's collection. With the appearance of these two coins both Victory types can now be attested for Group 5. Tentatively the type will be considered a variant of RIC 1425 until it is officially assigned a place in the upcoming Addenda. It should be noted that COS III denarii are seen much more commonly with the EPHE mintmark where both Victory types are already attested. Generally speaking, denarii dated COS III with the BY mintmark are so rare that Mattingly in BMCRE II doubted many of the standard Ephesian types existed for the group. However, he did note a COS III Victory left with an unclear mintmark, citing Cohen 279 (BMC II p. 94, note).

**Update** Ian Carradice has been informed of the type and has added it to the upcoming Addenda (31/10/2018).

Struck in fine Ephesian style.

4 commentsDavid Atherton11/02/17 at 02:50ickster: You have to be pleased with this. Congrats!
V1425a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1425A89 viewsAR Denarius, 2.54g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD
RIC 1425A. BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., BY
Ex Savoca Coins, eBay, October 2017.

An unpublished Victory adv. left for Vespasian's Ephesian Group 5 denarii. A unique specimen with Victory adv. right is cited in RIC II.1 (RIC 1425) for the group. A second Victory left specimen, a double die match with mine, has been noted in Doug Smith's collection. With the appearance of these two coins both Victory types can now be attested for Group 5. Tentatively the type will be considered a variant of RIC 1425 until it is officially assigned a place in the upcoming Addenda. It should be noted that COS III denarii are seen much more commonly with the EPHE mintmark where both Victory types are already attested. Generally speaking, denarii dated COS III with the BY mintmark are so rare that Mattingly in BMCRE II doubted many of the standard Ephesian types existed for the group. However, he did note a COS III Victory left with an unclear mintmark, citing Cohen 279 (BMC II p. 94, note).

**Update** Ian Carradice has been informed of the type and has added it to the upcoming Addenda (31/10/2018).

Struck in fine Ephesian style.

4 commentsDavid Atherton11/02/17 at 02:27Jay GT4: Great eye David. I was watching this one
vespas_l_star_and_prow.jpg
Vespasian RIC-94293 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 942 (C). BMC 211. RSC 137.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: COS VIII; Prow r: above, eight pointed star
Acquired from Ancient Treasure, December 2008.

The RIC lists it as common, but I think it's slightly rarer than the right facing, which is also listed as common. Indeed Curtis Clay has informed me that the Reka Devnia hoard records 2 right facing and only 1 left facing portrait.

A bit porous, but with a full legend and decent portrait.
5 commentsVespasian7010/17/17 at 00:33Jay GT4: Missed this one! Great coin
V852.jpg
Vespasian RIC-852 (2)64 viewsAR Denarius, 3.25g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 852 (C). BMC 184A. RSC 373.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Ex eBay, September 2017.

Vespasian's seated Pax type is normally seen with a COS VI date, struck in conjunction with the opening of his Temple of Peace in 75 (probably Vespasian's most common denarius type). Here is a fairly rare COS VII seated Pax from 76. Owing to its rarity, the COS VII Pax could not have been struck for any length of time and likely dates to the first few weeks of 76 soon after Vespasian became COS VII on 1 January. Perhaps it was struck as a stop-gap until new reverse designs were produced and approved for the new year?

This coin is a considerable upgrade over the specimen I acquired in February 2017.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/27/17 at 04:19Randygeki(h2): Cool addition!
V852.jpg
Vespasian RIC-852 (2)64 viewsAR Denarius, 3.25g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 852 (C). BMC 184A. RSC 373.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Ex eBay, September 2017.

Vespasian's seated Pax type is normally seen with a COS VI date, struck in conjunction with the opening of his Temple of Peace in 75 (probably Vespasian's most common denarius type). Here is a fairly rare COS VII seated Pax from 76. Owing to its rarity, the COS VII Pax could not have been struck for any length of time and likely dates to the first few weeks of 76 soon after Vespasian became COS VII on 1 January. Perhaps it was struck as a stop-gap until new reverse designs were produced and approved for the new year?

This coin is a considerable upgrade over the specimen I acquired in February 2017.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/26/17 at 23:15Nemonater: Great style!
V852.jpg
Vespasian RIC-852 (2)64 viewsAR Denarius, 3.25g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 852 (C). BMC 184A. RSC 373.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Ex eBay, September 2017.

Vespasian's seated Pax type is normally seen with a COS VI date, struck in conjunction with the opening of his Temple of Peace in 75 (probably Vespasian's most common denarius type). Here is a fairly rare COS VII seated Pax from 76. Owing to its rarity, the COS VII Pax could not have been struck for any length of time and likely dates to the first few weeks of 76 soon after Vespasian became COS VII on 1 January. Perhaps it was struck as a stop-gap until new reverse designs were produced and approved for the new year?

This coin is a considerable upgrade over the specimen I acquired in February 2017.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/26/17 at 10:52Mat: I like the toning
V1396a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-139668 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1396 (R2). BMC 431. RSC 280b. RPC 806 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory, advancing l., holding wreath in extended r. hand and palm curving up in l.
Acquired from Pars Coins, September 2017. Ex Hirsch 326, 16 February 2017, lot 1924. Ex Savoca Live Auction 9, 21 August, 2016, lot 532.

Ephesus struck a small issue of denarii for Vespasian between 69 and 74. The vast majority of these Ephesian denarii have a mintmark of one sort or another. Those without one are preciously rare.
The earliest and rarest are undated with no mint mark and were minted in late 69 or early 70. This unmarked type with Victory on the reverse has been a most elusive one to acquire! Very scarce in trade.

Struck in fine Ephesian style.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/19/17 at 08:38Jay GT4: Lovely!
V1396a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-139668 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1396 (R2). BMC 431. RSC 280b. RPC 806 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory, advancing l., holding wreath in extended r. hand and palm curving up in l.
Acquired from Pars Coins, September 2017. Ex Hirsch 326, 16 February 2017, lot 1924. Ex Savoca Live Auction 9, 21 August, 2016, lot 532.

Ephesus struck a small issue of denarii for Vespasian between 69 and 74. The vast majority of these Ephesian denarii have a mintmark of one sort or another. Those without one are preciously rare.
The earliest and rarest are undated with no mint mark and were minted in late 69 or early 70. This unmarked type with Victory on the reverse has been a most elusive one to acquire! Very scarce in trade.

Struck in fine Ephesian style.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/19/17 at 08:04Nemonater: What a beauty, nice catch!
V794e_zpsyafi2d8j~original.jpg
Vespasian RIC-79466 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.36g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 794 (C). BMC - . RSC 614.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
Acquired from Traianvs Coins, September 2017.

Vespasian's moneyer's struck a great issue of undated quinarii in 75, possibly in conjunction with the opening of his Temple of Peace. Two standard Victory types (seated and advancing) were employed along with various variant legend spellings and orientations. The variations are: obverse legend - VESPASIANVS or less commonly VESPASIAN; reverse legend - AVGVSTI or less commonly AVGVST. The reverse legend can also either be oriented from low r. or high l. This coin is considered one of the more 'common' variants with VESPASIANVS in the obverse legend and AVGVSTI in the reverse, oriented from low r. Even so, it is a very rare piece, as are all Flavian quinarii compared with the denarii.

Struck on a large flan and in good mid-period style with the small portrait head.
4 commentsDavid Atherton09/13/17 at 04:17ancientdave: Great find!
V794e_zpsyafi2d8j~original.jpg
Vespasian RIC-79466 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.36g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 794 (C). BMC - . RSC 614.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
Acquired from Traianvs Coins, September 2017.

Vespasian's moneyer's struck a great issue of undated quinarii in 75, possibly in conjunction with the opening of his Temple of Peace. Two standard Victory types (seated and advancing) were employed along with various variant legend spellings and orientations. The variations are: obverse legend - VESPASIANVS or less commonly VESPASIAN; reverse legend - AVGVSTI or less commonly AVGVST. The reverse legend can also either be oriented from low r. or high l. This coin is considered one of the more 'common' variants with VESPASIANVS in the obverse legend and AVGVSTI in the reverse, oriented from low r. Even so, it is a very rare piece, as are all Flavian quinarii compared with the denarii.

Struck on a large flan and in good mid-period style with the small portrait head.
4 commentsDavid Atherton09/12/17 at 11:53Jay GT4: So great
V794e_zpsyafi2d8j~original.jpg
Vespasian RIC-79466 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.36g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 794 (C). BMC - . RSC 614.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
Acquired from Traianvs Coins, September 2017.

Vespasian's moneyer's struck a great issue of undated quinarii in 75, possibly in conjunction with the opening of his Temple of Peace. Two standard Victory types (seated and advancing) were employed along with various variant legend spellings and orientations. The variations are: obverse legend - VESPASIANVS or less commonly VESPASIAN; reverse legend - AVGVSTI or less commonly AVGVST. The reverse legend can also either be oriented from low r. or high l. This coin is considered one of the more 'common' variants with VESPASIANVS in the obverse legend and AVGVSTI in the reverse, oriented from low r. Even so, it is a very rare piece, as are all Flavian quinarii compared with the denarii.

Struck on a large flan and in good mid-period style with the small portrait head.
4 commentsDavid Atherton09/12/17 at 10:28FlaviusDomitianus: Nice addition.
V794e_zpsyafi2d8j~original.jpg
Vespasian RIC-79466 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.36g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 794 (C). BMC - . RSC 614.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
Acquired from Traianvs Coins, September 2017.

Vespasian's moneyer's struck a great issue of undated quinarii in 75, possibly in conjunction with the opening of his Temple of Peace. Two standard Victory types (seated and advancing) were employed along with various variant legend spellings and orientations. The variations are: obverse legend - VESPASIANVS or less commonly VESPASIAN; reverse legend - AVGVSTI or less commonly AVGVST. The reverse legend can also either be oriented from low r. or high l. This coin is considered one of the more 'common' variants with VESPASIANVS in the obverse legend and AVGVSTI in the reverse, oriented from low r. Even so, it is a very rare piece, as are all Flavian quinarii compared with the denarii.

Struck on a large flan and in good mid-period style with the small portrait head.
4 commentsDavid Atherton09/12/17 at 10:20okidoki:
V1547a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-154797 viewsAR Denarius, 3.59g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1547 (R2). BMC 498. RSC 588. RPC 1921 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: VICTORIA AVG; Victory stg. r., on globe, with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 7, 9 July 2017, lot 313.

An exceptionally rare denarius from Antioch - it is only the eighth known example (the others are: BM, Vienna, Tom Cederlind 2007, Helios 4, Gemini X, CNG E339, Lanz eBay 2017). This left facing portrait is unique in the Antiochene denarius issues, as well as the only appearance of Victory on globe in the series. Butcher and Ponting's metal analysis of the type found a silver bullion content of 99% - a remarkable level of fineness for an imperial or provincial issue at that time. The portrait style is identical to the Antiochene tetradrachms with the left facing portraits and eagle on base reverses struck somewhat contemporaneously in 71-72. This is strong evidence that the same die engravers were producing both imperial and provincial issues at Antioch.

A stunning portrait in ultra-high relief.
9 commentsDavid Atherton08/05/17 at 04:15quadrans: Hoops, Great coin indeed
T359_error.JPG
Vespasian-RIC-359a Engraver's Error72 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome Mint, 79-80 AD (Titus)
RIC 359a (C). BMC 124. RSC 149.
Obv: DIVVS AVGVSPVS (sic) VESPASIANVS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: Column mounted by shield and topped by urn, flanked by two laurels; in field, EX, on shield, S C
Ex Private Collection.

A Divus Vespasian denarius struck by Titus with an interesting engraver's error in the obverse legend - 'P' instead of 'T' in AVGVSTVS. Almost certainly unique to this one die. The style and weight are good - so, an official product of Rome.

Worn, but all the major devices are intact.
2 commentsDavid Atherton08/03/17 at 10:19Jay GT4: I'll be on the lookout now
T359_error.JPG
Vespasian-RIC-359a Engraver's Error72 viewsAR Denarius, 2.92g
Rome Mint, 79-80 AD (Titus)
RIC 359a (C). BMC 124. RSC 149.
Obv: DIVVS AVGVSPVS (sic) VESPASIANVS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: Column mounted by shield and topped by urn, flanked by two laurels; in field, EX, on shield, S C
Ex Private Collection.

A Divus Vespasian denarius struck by Titus with an interesting engraver's error in the obverse legend - 'P' instead of 'T' in AVGVSTVS. Almost certainly unique to this one die. The style and weight are good - so, an official product of Rome.

Worn, but all the major devices are intact.
2 commentsDavid Atherton08/02/17 at 12:01Vincent: Nice eye spotting...interesting to see if others a...
V1547a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-154797 viewsAR Denarius, 3.59g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1547 (R2). BMC 498. RSC 588. RPC 1921 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: VICTORIA AVG; Victory stg. r., on globe, with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 7, 9 July 2017, lot 313.

An exceptionally rare denarius from Antioch - it is only the eighth known example (the others are: BM, Vienna, Tom Cederlind 2007, Helios 4, Gemini X, CNG E339, Lanz eBay 2017). This left facing portrait is unique in the Antiochene denarius issues, as well as the only appearance of Victory on globe in the series. Butcher and Ponting's metal analysis of the type found a silver bullion content of 99% - a remarkable level of fineness for an imperial or provincial issue at that time. The portrait style is identical to the Antiochene tetradrachms with the left facing portraits and eagle on base reverses struck somewhat contemporaneously in 71-72. This is strong evidence that the same die engravers were producing both imperial and provincial issues at Antioch.

A stunning portrait in ultra-high relief.
9 commentsDavid Atherton07/28/17 at 07:10maridvnvm: Superb.
V1547a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-154797 viewsAR Denarius, 3.59g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1547 (R2). BMC 498. RSC 588. RPC 1921 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: VICTORIA AVG; Victory stg. r., on globe, with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 7, 9 July 2017, lot 313.

An exceptionally rare denarius from Antioch - it is only the eighth known example (the others are: BM, Vienna, Tom Cederlind 2007, Helios 4, Gemini X, CNG E339, Lanz eBay 2017). This left facing portrait is unique in the Antiochene denarius issues, as well as the only appearance of Victory on globe in the series. Butcher and Ponting's metal analysis of the type found a silver bullion content of 99% - a remarkable level of fineness for an imperial or provincial issue at that time. The portrait style is identical to the Antiochene tetradrachms with the left facing portraits and eagle on base reverses struck somewhat contemporaneously in 71-72. This is strong evidence that the same die engravers were producing both imperial and provincial issues at Antioch.

A stunning portrait in ultra-high relief.
9 commentsDavid Atherton07/26/17 at 05:45Randygeki(h2): Very cool!
V1547a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-154797 viewsAR Denarius, 3.59g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1547 (R2). BMC 498. RSC 588. RPC 1921 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: VICTORIA AVG; Victory stg. r., on globe, with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 7, 9 July 2017, lot 313.

An exceptionally rare denarius from Antioch - it is only the eighth known example (the others are: BM, Vienna, Tom Cederlind 2007, Helios 4, Gemini X, CNG E339, Lanz eBay 2017). This left facing portrait is unique in the Antiochene denarius issues, as well as the only appearance of Victory on globe in the series. Butcher and Ponting's metal analysis of the type found a silver bullion content of 99% - a remarkable level of fineness for an imperial or provincial issue at that time. The portrait style is identical to the Antiochene tetradrachms with the left facing portraits and eagle on base reverses struck somewhat contemporaneously in 71-72. This is strong evidence that the same die engravers were producing both imperial and provincial issues at Antioch.

A stunning portrait in ultra-high relief.
9 commentsDavid Atherton07/26/17 at 04:21ancientdave: A really sweet addition! Coingrats!
V1547a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-154797 viewsAR Denarius, 3.59g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1547 (R2). BMC 498. RSC 588. RPC 1921 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: VICTORIA AVG; Victory stg. r., on globe, with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 7, 9 July 2017, lot 313.

An exceptionally rare denarius from Antioch - it is only the eighth known example (the others are: BM, Vienna, Tom Cederlind 2007, Helios 4, Gemini X, CNG E339, Lanz eBay 2017). This left facing portrait is unique in the Antiochene denarius issues, as well as the only appearance of Victory on globe in the series. Butcher and Ponting's metal analysis of the type found a silver bullion content of 99% - a remarkable level of fineness for an imperial or provincial issue at that time. The portrait style is identical to the Antiochene tetradrachms with the left facing portraits and eagle on base reverses struck somewhat contemporaneously in 71-72. This is strong evidence that the same die engravers were producing both imperial and provincial issues at Antioch.

A stunning portrait in ultra-high relief.
9 commentsDavid Atherton07/25/17 at 22:59Jay GT4: Wonderful
V1547a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-154797 viewsAR Denarius, 3.59g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1547 (R2). BMC 498. RSC 588. RPC 1921 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: VICTORIA AVG; Victory stg. r., on globe, with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 7, 9 July 2017, lot 313.

An exceptionally rare denarius from Antioch - it is only the eighth known example (the others are: BM, Vienna, Tom Cederlind 2007, Helios 4, Gemini X, CNG E339, Lanz eBay 2017). This left facing portrait is unique in the Antiochene denarius issues, as well as the only appearance of Victory on globe in the series. Butcher and Ponting's metal analysis of the type found a silver bullion content of 99% - a remarkable level of fineness for an imperial or provincial issue at that time. The portrait style is identical to the Antiochene tetradrachms with the left facing portraits and eagle on base reverses struck somewhat contemporaneously in 71-72. This is strong evidence that the same die engravers were producing both imperial and provincial issues at Antioch.

A stunning portrait in ultra-high relief.
9 commentsDavid Atherton07/25/17 at 22:16Nemonater: Just fantastic!
V1547a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-154797 viewsAR Denarius, 3.59g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1547 (R2). BMC 498. RSC 588. RPC 1921 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: VICTORIA AVG; Victory stg. r., on globe, with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 7, 9 July 2017, lot 313.

An exceptionally rare denarius from Antioch - it is only the eighth known example (the others are: BM, Vienna, Tom Cederlind 2007, Helios 4, Gemini X, CNG E339, Lanz eBay 2017). This left facing portrait is unique in the Antiochene denarius issues, as well as the only appearance of Victory on globe in the series. Butcher and Ponting's metal analysis of the type found a silver bullion content of 99% - a remarkable level of fineness for an imperial or provincial issue at that time. The portrait style is identical to the Antiochene tetradrachms with the left facing portraits and eagle on base reverses struck somewhat contemporaneously in 71-72. This is strong evidence that the same die engravers were producing both imperial and provincial issues at Antioch.

A stunning portrait in ultra-high relief.
9 commentsDavid Atherton07/25/17 at 12:41FlaviusDomitianus: Lovely Nike on reverse
V1547a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-154797 viewsAR Denarius, 3.59g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1547 (R2). BMC 498. RSC 588. RPC 1921 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: VICTORIA AVG; Victory stg. r., on globe, with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 7, 9 July 2017, lot 313.

An exceptionally rare denarius from Antioch - it is only the eighth known example (the others are: BM, Vienna, Tom Cederlind 2007, Helios 4, Gemini X, CNG E339, Lanz eBay 2017). This left facing portrait is unique in the Antiochene denarius issues, as well as the only appearance of Victory on globe in the series. Butcher and Ponting's metal analysis of the type found a silver bullion content of 99% - a remarkable level of fineness for an imperial or provincial issue at that time. The portrait style is identical to the Antiochene tetradrachms with the left facing portraits and eagle on base reverses struck somewhat contemporaneously in 71-72. This is strong evidence that the same die engravers were producing both imperial and provincial issues at Antioch.

A stunning portrait in ultra-high relief.
9 commentsDavid Atherton07/25/17 at 12:23okidoki: Cool coin
V848asm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-848 (2)95 viewsAR Denarius, 3.34g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 848 (C). BMC 184. RSC 120.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: COS VII across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
Ex Solidus Numismatik Online-Auction 15, 22 May 2017, lot 172.

The more common variant of the type missing thunderbolt in eagle's claws. Somewhat rare with head left.

Worn, but in good style and fine metal.
5 commentsDavid Atherton06/29/17 at 14:14jason01 d: Very nice portrait type , very nice !
V848asm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-848 (2)95 viewsAR Denarius, 3.34g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 848 (C). BMC 184. RSC 120.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: COS VII across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
Ex Solidus Numismatik Online-Auction 15, 22 May 2017, lot 172.

The more common variant of the type missing thunderbolt in eagle's claws. Somewhat rare with head left.

Worn, but in good style and fine metal.
5 commentsDavid Atherton06/14/17 at 03:58Randygeki(h2): Cool addition!
V848asm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-848 (2)95 viewsAR Denarius, 3.34g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 848 (C). BMC 184. RSC 120.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: COS VII across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
Ex Solidus Numismatik Online-Auction 15, 22 May 2017, lot 172.

The more common variant of the type missing thunderbolt in eagle's claws. Somewhat rare with head left.

Worn, but in good style and fine metal.
5 commentsDavid Atherton06/14/17 at 03:55ancientdave: Great coin, with an excellent portrait in fine sty...
V848asm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-848 (2)95 viewsAR Denarius, 3.34g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 848 (C). BMC 184. RSC 120.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: COS VII across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
Ex Solidus Numismatik Online-Auction 15, 22 May 2017, lot 172.

The more common variant of the type missing thunderbolt in eagle's claws. Somewhat rare with head left.

Worn, but in good style and fine metal.
5 commentsDavid Atherton06/13/17 at 15:32Jay GT4: Nice one
V848asm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-848 (2)95 viewsAR Denarius, 3.34g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 848 (C). BMC 184. RSC 120.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: COS VII across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
Ex Solidus Numismatik Online-Auction 15, 22 May 2017, lot 172.

The more common variant of the type missing thunderbolt in eagle's claws. Somewhat rare with head left.

Worn, but in good style and fine metal.
5 commentsDavid Atherton06/13/17 at 14:48FlaviusDomitianus: Another fine addition.
V1477A.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1477A125 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD
RIC 1477A (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., a small 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII (from high l.); Winged caduceus

A unique specimen of the caduceus type from the rare and mysterious 'o' mint. This rare variant has the reverse legend starting from the upper left, all other known examples start from the lower right. I informed Ted Buttrey of the coin and he has assigned it 1477A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda.

Struck in good style on a large flan.
4 commentsDavid Atherton05/23/17 at 07:06Randygeki(h2): Very nice!
V1477A.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1477A125 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD
RIC 1477A (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., a small 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII (from high l.); Winged caduceus

A unique specimen of the caduceus type from the rare and mysterious 'o' mint. This rare variant has the reverse legend starting from the upper left, all other known examples start from the lower right. I informed Ted Buttrey of the coin and he has assigned it 1477A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda.

Struck in good style on a large flan.
4 commentsDavid Atherton05/12/17 at 00:32Nemonater: Wonderful style!
V1477A.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1477A125 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD
RIC 1477A (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., a small 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII (from high l.); Winged caduceus

A unique specimen of the caduceus type from the rare and mysterious 'o' mint. This rare variant has the reverse legend starting from the upper left, all other known examples start from the lower right. I informed Ted Buttrey of the coin and he has assigned it 1477A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda.

Struck in good style on a large flan.
4 commentsDavid Atherton05/09/17 at 17:17Jay GT4: Great catch
V1477A.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1477A125 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD
RIC 1477A (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., a small 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII (from high l.); Winged caduceus

A unique specimen of the caduceus type from the rare and mysterious 'o' mint. This rare variant has the reverse legend starting from the upper left, all other known examples start from the lower right. I informed Ted Buttrey of the coin and he has assigned it 1477A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda.

Struck in good style on a large flan.
4 commentsDavid Atherton05/09/17 at 06:13FlaviusDomitianus: Great find, congrats!
V19f.jpg
Vespasian RIC 19 (2)131 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome mint, January - June 70 AD
RIC 19 (C). BMC 7. RSC 84.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS ITER FORT RED; Fortuna, draped, standing l.,setting r. hand on prow and holding cornucopiae in l. hand
Ex eBay, March 2017.

Early in Vespasian's reign the Rome mint had a hard time getting his portrait right because he spent the balance of his first year as emperor in Egypt. There is a wide variation in portrait types and styles until the mint was able to procure a suitable portrait bust. Some, such as the one on this common Fortuna type, are unmodified Vitellius portraits. Certainly this denarius was one of the first coined for Vespasian at the mint.

A strikingly unusual portrait struck on a large flan.
4 commentsDavid Atherton04/23/17 at 21:24ancientdave: Neat addition!
V945.jpg
Vespasian RIC-945 Mule100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.22g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 944 (R3, this coin). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: COS VI in ex.; Pair of Oxen, under yoke, l.
Acquired from Celeste Jones Mining, April 2017. Ex CGB Monnaies 21, 18 June 2004, lot 2387.

A unique mint mule with an obverse of Vespasian combined with a reverse from Titus Caesar's parallel issue. Vespasian was COS VIII when the coin was struck in 77/78, so the reverse title is quite impossible. This specimen is cited in RIC, apparently the only one recorded. A combination of a rare left facing Vespasian portrait with the rare yoked oxen type for Titus Caesar makes it unlikely another specimen will turn up any time soon. The yoked oxen reverse copies a Republican denarius struck by L. Cassius Caecianus, Crawford 321/1. Possibly a 'colonist' or general agricultural type.

In very fine condition and good style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/20/17 at 08:52Nemonater: Fantastic!
V945.jpg
Vespasian RIC-945 Mule100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.22g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 944 (R3, this coin). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: COS VI in ex.; Pair of Oxen, under yoke, l.
Acquired from Celeste Jones Mining, April 2017. Ex CGB Monnaies 21, 18 June 2004, lot 2387.

A unique mint mule with an obverse of Vespasian combined with a reverse from Titus Caesar's parallel issue. Vespasian was COS VIII when the coin was struck in 77/78, so the reverse title is quite impossible. This specimen is cited in RIC, apparently the only one recorded. A combination of a rare left facing Vespasian portrait with the rare yoked oxen type for Titus Caesar makes it unlikely another specimen will turn up any time soon. The yoked oxen reverse copies a Republican denarius struck by L. Cassius Caecianus, Crawford 321/1. Possibly a 'colonist' or general agricultural type.

In very fine condition and good style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/19/17 at 13:50Mat: nice find
V945.jpg
Vespasian RIC-945 Mule100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.22g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 944 (R3, this coin). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: COS VI in ex.; Pair of Oxen, under yoke, l.
Acquired from Celeste Jones Mining, April 2017. Ex CGB Monnaies 21, 18 June 2004, lot 2387.

A unique mint mule with an obverse of Vespasian combined with a reverse from Titus Caesar's parallel issue. Vespasian was COS VIII when the coin was struck in 77/78, so the reverse title is quite impossible. This specimen is cited in RIC, apparently the only one recorded. A combination of a rare left facing Vespasian portrait with the rare yoked oxen type for Titus Caesar makes it unlikely another specimen will turn up any time soon. The yoked oxen reverse copies a Republican denarius struck by L. Cassius Caecianus, Crawford 321/1. Possibly a 'colonist' or general agricultural type.

In very fine condition and good style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/19/17 at 10:34Jay GT4: Great piece
V945.jpg
Vespasian RIC-945 Mule100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.22g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 944 (R3, this coin). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: COS VI in ex.; Pair of Oxen, under yoke, l.
Acquired from Celeste Jones Mining, April 2017. Ex CGB Monnaies 21, 18 June 2004, lot 2387.

A unique mint mule with an obverse of Vespasian combined with a reverse from Titus Caesar's parallel issue. Vespasian was COS VIII when the coin was struck in 77/78, so the reverse title is quite impossible. This specimen is cited in RIC, apparently the only one recorded. A combination of a rare left facing Vespasian portrait with the rare yoked oxen type for Titus Caesar makes it unlikely another specimen will turn up any time soon. The yoked oxen reverse copies a Republican denarius struck by L. Cassius Caecianus, Crawford 321/1. Possibly a 'colonist' or general agricultural type.

In very fine condition and good style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/19/17 at 06:46FlaviusDomitianus: It has found it's home, congrats.
V945.jpg
Vespasian RIC-945 Mule100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.22g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 944 (R3, this coin). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: COS VI in ex.; Pair of Oxen, under yoke, l.
Acquired from Celeste Jones Mining, April 2017. Ex CGB Monnaies 21, 18 June 2004, lot 2387.

A unique mint mule with an obverse of Vespasian combined with a reverse from Titus Caesar's parallel issue. Vespasian was COS VIII when the coin was struck in 77/78, so the reverse title is quite impossible. This specimen is cited in RIC, apparently the only one recorded. A combination of a rare left facing Vespasian portrait with the rare yoked oxen type for Titus Caesar makes it unlikely another specimen will turn up any time soon. The yoked oxen reverse copies a Republican denarius struck by L. Cassius Caecianus, Crawford 321/1. Possibly a 'colonist' or general agricultural type.

In very fine condition and good style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton04/19/17 at 05:56okidoki: very nice and special Mule
V1397ccc.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1397111 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1397 (R). BMC p. 89,†. RSC 291. RPC 807 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r.
Acquired from NB Numismatics, March 2017. Ex VAuctions 292 (Imperial Coins), 6 December 2012, lot 130.

The first denarius issue at Ephesus was struck without mint marks and all of them are quite rare. This particular denarius has a peculiarly crude style compared with other Ephesian denarii. RIC II.1 authors Carradice and Buttrey comment about this coin in the introduction on p. 8 - 'a recent example seen in trade (Imperial Coins 2004) had the correct legend (and good weight for a denarius, at 3.29g) but a very different, inferior style on both the obverse and reverse. Is such a coin a barbarous imitation, or simply the product of a less able die-engraver employed at the start of a mint's output?' Curiously, the RIC plate coin of this same type from Oxford is in a similarly crude style. Interesting to note that Mattingly in BMCRE II doubted the type existed without mint mark, which indicates how rare it is!

Struck on a small flan in high relief.

6 commentsDavid Atherton04/01/17 at 18:57socalcoins: Nice acquisition, David. I had my eye on this one...
V19f.jpg
Vespasian RIC 19 (2)131 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome mint, January - June 70 AD
RIC 19 (C). BMC 7. RSC 84.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS ITER FORT RED; Fortuna, draped, standing l.,setting r. hand on prow and holding cornucopiae in l. hand
Ex eBay, March 2017.

Early in Vespasian's reign the Rome mint had a hard time getting his portrait right because he spent the balance of his first year as emperor in Egypt. There is a wide variation in portrait types and styles until the mint was able to procure a suitable portrait bust. Some, such as the one on this common Fortuna type, are unmodified Vitellius portraits. Certainly this denarius was one of the first coined for Vespasian at the mint.

A strikingly unusual portrait struck on a large flan.
4 commentsDavid Atherton03/27/17 at 18:42Nemonater: What an interesting and unfamiliar portrait!
V19f.jpg
Vespasian RIC 19 (2)131 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome mint, January - June 70 AD
RIC 19 (C). BMC 7. RSC 84.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS ITER FORT RED; Fortuna, draped, standing l.,setting r. hand on prow and holding cornucopiae in l. hand
Ex eBay, March 2017.

Early in Vespasian's reign the Rome mint had a hard time getting his portrait right because he spent the balance of his first year as emperor in Egypt. There is a wide variation in portrait types and styles until the mint was able to procure a suitable portrait bust. Some, such as the one on this common Fortuna type, are unmodified Vitellius portraits. Certainly this denarius was one of the first coined for Vespasian at the mint.

A strikingly unusual portrait struck on a large flan.
4 commentsDavid Atherton03/27/17 at 11:20Jay GT4: Wow. Probably one of the first struck
V19f.jpg
Vespasian RIC 19 (2)131 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome mint, January - June 70 AD
RIC 19 (C). BMC 7. RSC 84.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS ITER FORT RED; Fortuna, draped, standing l.,setting r. hand on prow and holding cornucopiae in l. hand
Ex eBay, March 2017.

Early in Vespasian's reign the Rome mint had a hard time getting his portrait right because he spent the balance of his first year as emperor in Egypt. There is a wide variation in portrait types and styles until the mint was able to procure a suitable portrait bust. Some, such as the one on this common Fortuna type, are unmodified Vitellius portraits. Certainly this denarius was one of the first coined for Vespasian at the mint.

A strikingly unusual portrait struck on a large flan.
4 commentsDavid Atherton03/27/17 at 11:19FlaviusDomitianus: Interesting and intriguing.
V1397ccc.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1397111 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1397 (R). BMC p. 89,†. RSC 291. RPC 807 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r.
Acquired from NB Numismatics, March 2017. Ex VAuctions 292 (Imperial Coins), 6 December 2012, lot 130.

The first denarius issue at Ephesus was struck without mint marks and all of them are quite rare. This particular denarius has a peculiarly crude style compared with other Ephesian denarii. RIC II.1 authors Carradice and Buttrey comment about this coin in the introduction on p. 8 - 'a recent example seen in trade (Imperial Coins 2004) had the correct legend (and good weight for a denarius, at 3.29g) but a very different, inferior style on both the obverse and reverse. Is such a coin a barbarous imitation, or simply the product of a less able die-engraver employed at the start of a mint's output?' Curiously, the RIC plate coin of this same type from Oxford is in a similarly crude style. Interesting to note that Mattingly in BMCRE II doubted the type existed without mint mark, which indicates how rare it is!

Struck on a small flan in high relief.

6 commentsDavid Atherton03/14/17 at 22:41Kim B. N: Good old Ves looks fine without his ahmm.. thick c...
V1397ccc.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1397111 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1397 (R). BMC p. 89,†. RSC 291. RPC 807 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r.
Acquired from NB Numismatics, March 2017. Ex VAuctions 292 (Imperial Coins), 6 December 2012, lot 130.

The first denarius issue at Ephesus was struck without mint marks and all of them are quite rare. This particular denarius has a peculiarly crude style compared with other Ephesian denarii. RIC II.1 authors Carradice and Buttrey comment about this coin in the introduction on p. 8 - 'a recent example seen in trade (Imperial Coins 2004) had the correct legend (and good weight for a denarius, at 3.29g) but a very different, inferior style on both the obverse and reverse. Is such a coin a barbarous imitation, or simply the product of a less able die-engraver employed at the start of a mint's output?' Curiously, the RIC plate coin of this same type from Oxford is in a similarly crude style. Interesting to note that Mattingly in BMCRE II doubted the type existed without mint mark, which indicates how rare it is!

Struck on a small flan in high relief.

6 commentsDavid Atherton03/14/17 at 21:33Nemonater: How cool is that? Fantastic rarity!
V1397ccc.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1397111 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1397 (R). BMC p. 89,†. RSC 291. RPC 807 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r.
Acquired from NB Numismatics, March 2017. Ex VAuctions 292 (Imperial Coins), 6 December 2012, lot 130.

The first denarius issue at Ephesus was struck without mint marks and all of them are quite rare. This particular denarius has a peculiarly crude style compared with other Ephesian denarii. RIC II.1 authors Carradice and Buttrey comment about this coin in the introduction on p. 8 - 'a recent example seen in trade (Imperial Coins 2004) had the correct legend (and good weight for a denarius, at 3.29g) but a very different, inferior style on both the obverse and reverse. Is such a coin a barbarous imitation, or simply the product of a less able die-engraver employed at the start of a mint's output?' Curiously, the RIC plate coin of this same type from Oxford is in a similarly crude style. Interesting to note that Mattingly in BMCRE II doubted the type existed without mint mark, which indicates how rare it is!

Struck on a small flan in high relief.

6 commentsDavid Atherton03/14/17 at 08:18FlaviusDomitianus: Nice catch!
V1397ccc.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1397111 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1397 (R). BMC p. 89,†. RSC 291. RPC 807 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r.
Acquired from NB Numismatics, March 2017. Ex VAuctions 292 (Imperial Coins), 6 December 2012, lot 130.

The first denarius issue at Ephesus was struck without mint marks and all of them are quite rare. This particular denarius has a peculiarly crude style compared with other Ephesian denarii. RIC II.1 authors Carradice and Buttrey comment about this coin in the introduction on p. 8 - 'a recent example seen in trade (Imperial Coins 2004) had the correct legend (and good weight for a denarius, at 3.29g) but a very different, inferior style on both the obverse and reverse. Is such a coin a barbarous imitation, or simply the product of a less able die-engraver employed at the start of a mint's output?' Curiously, the RIC plate coin of this same type from Oxford is in a similarly crude style. Interesting to note that Mattingly in BMCRE II doubted the type existed without mint mark, which indicates how rare it is!

Struck on a small flan in high relief.

6 commentsDavid Atherton03/14/17 at 03:48quadrans: Great one..
V1397ccc.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1397111 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1397 (R). BMC p. 89,†. RSC 291. RPC 807 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r.
Acquired from NB Numismatics, March 2017. Ex VAuctions 292 (Imperial Coins), 6 December 2012, lot 130.

The first denarius issue at Ephesus was struck without mint marks and all of them are quite rare. This particular denarius has a peculiarly crude style compared with other Ephesian denarii. RIC II.1 authors Carradice and Buttrey comment about this coin in the introduction on p. 8 - 'a recent example seen in trade (Imperial Coins 2004) had the correct legend (and good weight for a denarius, at 3.29g) but a very different, inferior style on both the obverse and reverse. Is such a coin a barbarous imitation, or simply the product of a less able die-engraver employed at the start of a mint's output?' Curiously, the RIC plate coin of this same type from Oxford is in a similarly crude style. Interesting to note that Mattingly in BMCRE II doubted the type existed without mint mark, which indicates how rare it is!

Struck on a small flan in high relief.

6 commentsDavid Atherton03/13/17 at 23:18Jay GT4: Oh wow! Congrats!
V21.jpg
Vespasian RIC 21 (2)55 viewsAR Denarius, 2.82g
Rome Mint, January - June 70 AD
RIC 21 (C). BMC 17. RSC 94a.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS ITER TR POT; Aequitas, draped, standing l., holding scales in r. hand, transverse rod in l.
Acquired from Ars Coin Wein, February 2017.

The coin was likely struck in the early weeks of Vespasian's reign, which would account for the Vitellian-like portrait. The mint's engravers probably did not have a bust of Vespasian to work from and so produced a modified portrait of the previous emperor. With Vespasian still in Egypt, understandably the mint's engravers had a hard time figuring out his portrait ... at least until someone sent a portrait bust to the mint.

Good metal and unusual style.
1 commentsDavid Atherton03/09/17 at 09:48Jay GT4: Love these types of early portraits
V1412Aed.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1412A100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.07g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1412A (R3), BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., horizontal Φ
Acquired from Munthandel G Henzen, February 2017.

A previously unknown type for Vespasian's Ephesian denarii dated COS II (group 3). Before this specimen surfaced the Victory advancing right type was only known for COS III (group 5) and later issues at Ephesus. Normally for COS II Victory is advancing left, so, this is the earliest example of the Victory advancing right. The mint mark is a bit obscured, but under examination with a loupe I believe it to be Φ. I alerted Ted Buttrey about the coin and he has assigned it as RIC 1412A in the upcoming RIC II Addenda.

Good Ephesian style and large flan. Better in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton03/04/17 at 17:47socalcoins: Nice find, David! Congratulations!
V852sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-852 (1)137 viewsAR Denarius, 2.89g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 852 (C). BMC 184A. RSC 373.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Acquired from Wessex Coins (eBay), February 2017.

This seated Pax type is normally seen with a COS VI date, struck in conjunction with the opening of Vespasian's Temple of Peace in 75 (probably Vespasian's most common denarius type). Here is a fairly rare COS VII seated Pax from 76. The COS VII Pax could not have been struck for any length of time and likely dates to the first few weeks of 76 owing to its rarity. Furthermore, the reverse die appears to be a recut COS VI with an additional 'I', likely placing the piece soon after Vespasian became COS VII on 1 January 76. Perhaps this type was struck as a stop-gap until new reverse designs were produced and approved for the new year. Same reverse die as the RIC 853 plate coin. Although rated as 'common' in RIC this is a very difficult coin to find in trade.

Worn, but in good metal with all the major devices intact. The all important date is easy to read.
4 commentsDavid Atherton02/22/17 at 05:10Randygeki(h2): Another sweet find
V852sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-852 (1)137 viewsAR Denarius, 2.89g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 852 (C). BMC 184A. RSC 373.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Acquired from Wessex Coins (eBay), February 2017.

This seated Pax type is normally seen with a COS VI date, struck in conjunction with the opening of Vespasian's Temple of Peace in 75 (probably Vespasian's most common denarius type). Here is a fairly rare COS VII seated Pax from 76. The COS VII Pax could not have been struck for any length of time and likely dates to the first few weeks of 76 owing to its rarity. Furthermore, the reverse die appears to be a recut COS VI with an additional 'I', likely placing the piece soon after Vespasian became COS VII on 1 January 76. Perhaps this type was struck as a stop-gap until new reverse designs were produced and approved for the new year. Same reverse die as the RIC 853 plate coin. Although rated as 'common' in RIC this is a very difficult coin to find in trade.

Worn, but in good metal with all the major devices intact. The all important date is easy to read.
4 commentsDavid Atherton02/22/17 at 01:43Jay GT4: I'll say it again...when you know what to look...
V852sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-852 (1)137 viewsAR Denarius, 2.89g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 852 (C). BMC 184A. RSC 373.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Acquired from Wessex Coins (eBay), February 2017.

This seated Pax type is normally seen with a COS VI date, struck in conjunction with the opening of Vespasian's Temple of Peace in 75 (probably Vespasian's most common denarius type). Here is a fairly rare COS VII seated Pax from 76. The COS VII Pax could not have been struck for any length of time and likely dates to the first few weeks of 76 owing to its rarity. Furthermore, the reverse die appears to be a recut COS VI with an additional 'I', likely placing the piece soon after Vespasian became COS VII on 1 January 76. Perhaps this type was struck as a stop-gap until new reverse designs were produced and approved for the new year. Same reverse die as the RIC 853 plate coin. Although rated as 'common' in RIC this is a very difficult coin to find in trade.

Worn, but in good metal with all the major devices intact. The all important date is easy to read.
4 commentsDavid Atherton02/22/17 at 00:33Nicholas Z: Nice coin, even better write up.
V852sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-852 (1)137 viewsAR Denarius, 2.89g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 852 (C). BMC 184A. RSC 373.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Acquired from Wessex Coins (eBay), February 2017.

This seated Pax type is normally seen with a COS VI date, struck in conjunction with the opening of Vespasian's Temple of Peace in 75 (probably Vespasian's most common denarius type). Here is a fairly rare COS VII seated Pax from 76. The COS VII Pax could not have been struck for any length of time and likely dates to the first few weeks of 76 owing to its rarity. Furthermore, the reverse die appears to be a recut COS VI with an additional 'I', likely placing the piece soon after Vespasian became COS VII on 1 January 76. Perhaps this type was struck as a stop-gap until new reverse designs were produced and approved for the new year. Same reverse die as the RIC 853 plate coin. Although rated as 'common' in RIC this is a very difficult coin to find in trade.

Worn, but in good metal with all the major devices intact. The all important date is easy to read.
4 commentsDavid Atherton02/21/17 at 22:52Nemonater: Awesome find, well done!
V1412Aed.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1412A100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.07g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1412A (R3), BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., horizontal Φ
Acquired from Munthandel G Henzen, February 2017.

A previously unknown type for Vespasian's Ephesian denarii dated COS II (group 3). Before this specimen surfaced the Victory advancing right type was only known for COS III (group 5) and later issues at Ephesus. Normally for COS II Victory is advancing left, so, this is the earliest example of the Victory advancing right. The mint mark is a bit obscured, but under examination with a loupe I believe it to be Φ. I alerted Ted Buttrey about the coin and he has assigned it as RIC 1412A in the upcoming RIC II Addenda.

Good Ephesian style and large flan. Better in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/14/17 at 16:25Nemonater: Excellent find!
V1412Aed.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1412A100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.07g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1412A (R3), BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., horizontal Φ
Acquired from Munthandel G Henzen, February 2017.

A previously unknown type for Vespasian's Ephesian denarii dated COS II (group 3). Before this specimen surfaced the Victory advancing right type was only known for COS III (group 5) and later issues at Ephesus. Normally for COS II Victory is advancing left, so, this is the earliest example of the Victory advancing right. The mint mark is a bit obscured, but under examination with a loupe I believe it to be Φ. I alerted Ted Buttrey about the coin and he has assigned it as RIC 1412A in the upcoming RIC II Addenda.

Good Ephesian style and large flan. Better in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/14/17 at 15:26quadrans: It's OK David, I like the Ephesian style...
V1412Aed.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1412A100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.07g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1412A (R3), BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., horizontal Φ
Acquired from Munthandel G Henzen, February 2017.

A previously unknown type for Vespasian's Ephesian denarii dated COS II (group 3). Before this specimen surfaced the Victory advancing right type was only known for COS III (group 5) and later issues at Ephesus. Normally for COS II Victory is advancing left, so, this is the earliest example of the Victory advancing right. The mint mark is a bit obscured, but under examination with a loupe I believe it to be Φ. I alerted Ted Buttrey about the coin and he has assigned it as RIC 1412A in the upcoming RIC II Addenda.

Good Ephesian style and large flan. Better in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/14/17 at 10:56FlaviusDomitianus: Nice catch!
V1412Aed.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1412A100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.07g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1412A (R3), BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., horizontal Φ
Acquired from Munthandel G Henzen, February 2017.

A previously unknown type for Vespasian's Ephesian denarii dated COS II (group 3). Before this specimen surfaced the Victory advancing right type was only known for COS III (group 5) and later issues at Ephesus. Normally for COS II Victory is advancing left, so, this is the earliest example of the Victory advancing right. The mint mark is a bit obscured, but under examination with a loupe I believe it to be Φ. I alerted Ted Buttrey about the coin and he has assigned it as RIC 1412A in the upcoming RIC II Addenda.

Good Ephesian style and large flan. Better in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/14/17 at 04:41Randygeki(h2): Sweet score David
V1412Aed.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1412A100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.07g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1412A (R3), BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower r., horizontal Φ
Acquired from Munthandel G Henzen, February 2017.

A previously unknown type for Vespasian's Ephesian denarii dated COS II (group 3). Before this specimen surfaced the Victory advancing right type was only known for COS III (group 5) and later issues at Ephesus. Normally for COS II Victory is advancing left, so, this is the earliest example of the Victory advancing right. The mint mark is a bit obscured, but under examination with a loupe I believe it to be Φ. I alerted Ted Buttrey about the coin and he has assigned it as RIC 1412A in the upcoming RIC II Addenda.

Good Ephesian style and large flan. Better in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/14/17 at 00:05Jay GT4: Fantastic David!
V710sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-71070 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.45g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 710 (R). BMC 142. RSC 613.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS V CENS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm

The quinarius during Vespasian's reign was always struck with one of two standard 'Victory' types (seated or advancing) traditionally assigned to the denomination from Republican times. The historical nature of the reverse is in complete keeping with the programme of antiquarian types Rome was coining during the reign.

In decent condition with hints of rainbow toning on the obverse. A superb portrait and stylish reverse for such a small coin.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/02/17 at 15:41Randygeki(h2): Great addition David
V710sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-71070 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.45g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 710 (R). BMC 142. RSC 613.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS V CENS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm

The quinarius during Vespasian's reign was always struck with one of two standard 'Victory' types (seated or advancing) traditionally assigned to the denomination from Republican times. The historical nature of the reverse is in complete keeping with the programme of antiquarian types Rome was coining during the reign.

In decent condition with hints of rainbow toning on the obverse. A superb portrait and stylish reverse for such a small coin.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/01/17 at 23:38quadrans: I agree great portrait with the rare coin..
V710sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-71070 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.45g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 710 (R). BMC 142. RSC 613.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS V CENS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm

The quinarius during Vespasian's reign was always struck with one of two standard 'Victory' types (seated or advancing) traditionally assigned to the denomination from Republican times. The historical nature of the reverse is in complete keeping with the programme of antiquarian types Rome was coining during the reign.

In decent condition with hints of rainbow toning on the obverse. A superb portrait and stylish reverse for such a small coin.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/01/17 at 09:41Jay GT4: Great
V710sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-71070 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.45g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 710 (R). BMC 142. RSC 613.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS V CENS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm

The quinarius during Vespasian's reign was always struck with one of two standard 'Victory' types (seated or advancing) traditionally assigned to the denomination from Republican times. The historical nature of the reverse is in complete keeping with the programme of antiquarian types Rome was coining during the reign.

In decent condition with hints of rainbow toning on the obverse. A superb portrait and stylish reverse for such a small coin.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/01/17 at 05:37FlaviusDomitianus: Nice find
V710sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-71070 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.45g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 710 (R). BMC 142. RSC 613.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS V CENS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm

The quinarius during Vespasian's reign was always struck with one of two standard 'Victory' types (seated or advancing) traditionally assigned to the denomination from Republican times. The historical nature of the reverse is in complete keeping with the programme of antiquarian types Rome was coining during the reign.

In decent condition with hints of rainbow toning on the obverse. A superb portrait and stylish reverse for such a small coin.
5 commentsDavid Atherton02/01/17 at 05:16ancientdave: Excellent!
V847c.jpg
Vespasian RIC-847 (2)50 viewsAR Denarius, 3.08g
Rome Mint, 76 AD
RIC 847 (C2). BMC 180. RSC 121.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS VII across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
Acquired from Marc Walter, December 2016.

RIC describes this type as eagle with thunderbolt in claws. More commonly this type is seen without thunderbolt, as seen here. Oddly, it is not mentioned that there are two different variants in the catalogue.

Struck on a large flan in good mid-period style.
2 commentsDavid Atherton01/10/17 at 13:17Mat: Congrats on the find!
V847c.jpg
Vespasian RIC-847 (2)50 viewsAR Denarius, 3.08g
Rome Mint, 76 AD
RIC 847 (C2). BMC 180. RSC 121.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS VII across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
Acquired from Marc Walter, December 2016.

RIC describes this type as eagle with thunderbolt in claws. More commonly this type is seen without thunderbolt, as seen here. Oddly, it is not mentioned that there are two different variants in the catalogue.

Struck on a large flan in good mid-period style.
2 commentsDavid Atherton01/10/17 at 06:58Randygeki(h2): Congrats on anotherThunderbolt
V1431a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1431 (Countermarked)157 viewsAR Denarius, 3.06g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD; Countermarked under Vespasian at Ephesus, circa 74-79 AD
RIC 1431 (C). BMC 457. RSC 276. RPC 833 (14 spec.); c/m: GIC 839
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; c/m: IMP·VES (ligate)
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory, draped, advancing r., holding wreath extended in r. hand and palm over l. shoulder. EPHE lower r.
Acquired from Ancient Imports, November 2016.

In the mid to late 70's AD, Ephesus stamped older, worn Republican and early Imperial denarii circulating in the region with the IMP·VES countermark. Here is an exceptionally rare appearance of that Vespasian countermark on a denarius struck for Vespasian. I know of less than half a dozen other Vespasianic denarii similarly stamped. Of course the coin does not require any such countermark, therefore it is a remarkable mint error. The terminus post quem for the countermarking is 74, based on the discovery of another Vespasian countermarked Ephesian denarius dated COS IIII (CNG 78, lot 1753). RPC speculates that these countermarked coins represent a later 'issue' of silver from Ephesus struck sometime after 74 and before Vespasian's death in 79.

The mint workers applying the countermark were kind enough not to obliterate the portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/08/16 at 08:45Nemonater: The first I've ever seen, another great catch!
V1431a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1431 (Countermarked)157 viewsAR Denarius, 3.06g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD; Countermarked under Vespasian at Ephesus, circa 74-79 AD
RIC 1431 (C). BMC 457. RSC 276. RPC 833 (14 spec.); c/m: GIC 839
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; c/m: IMP·VES (ligate)
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory, draped, advancing r., holding wreath extended in r. hand and palm over l. shoulder. EPHE lower r.
Acquired from Ancient Imports, November 2016.

In the mid to late 70's AD, Ephesus stamped older, worn Republican and early Imperial denarii circulating in the region with the IMP·VES countermark. Here is an exceptionally rare appearance of that Vespasian countermark on a denarius struck for Vespasian. I know of less than half a dozen other Vespasianic denarii similarly stamped. Of course the coin does not require any such countermark, therefore it is a remarkable mint error. The terminus post quem for the countermarking is 74, based on the discovery of another Vespasian countermarked Ephesian denarius dated COS IIII (CNG 78, lot 1753). RPC speculates that these countermarked coins represent a later 'issue' of silver from Ephesus struck sometime after 74 and before Vespasian's death in 79.

The mint workers applying the countermark were kind enough not to obliterate the portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/08/16 at 06:29FlaviusDomitianus: Very interesting coin, congrats!
V1431a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1431 (Countermarked)157 viewsAR Denarius, 3.06g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD; Countermarked under Vespasian at Ephesus, circa 74-79 AD
RIC 1431 (C). BMC 457. RSC 276. RPC 833 (14 spec.); c/m: GIC 839
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; c/m: IMP·VES (ligate)
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory, draped, advancing r., holding wreath extended in r. hand and palm over l. shoulder. EPHE lower r.
Acquired from Ancient Imports, November 2016.

In the mid to late 70's AD, Ephesus stamped older, worn Republican and early Imperial denarii circulating in the region with the IMP·VES countermark. Here is an exceptionally rare appearance of that Vespasian countermark on a denarius struck for Vespasian. I know of less than half a dozen other Vespasianic denarii similarly stamped. Of course the coin does not require any such countermark, therefore it is a remarkable mint error. The terminus post quem for the countermarking is 74, based on the discovery of another Vespasian countermarked Ephesian denarius dated COS IIII (CNG 78, lot 1753). RPC speculates that these countermarked coins represent a later 'issue' of silver from Ephesus struck sometime after 74 and before Vespasian's death in 79.

The mint workers applying the countermark were kind enough not to obliterate the portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/08/16 at 01:56ancientdave: That is really very cool. What an awesome find! I ...
V1431a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1431 (Countermarked)157 viewsAR Denarius, 3.06g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD; Countermarked under Vespasian at Ephesus, circa 74-79 AD
RIC 1431 (C). BMC 457. RSC 276. RPC 833 (14 spec.); c/m: GIC 839
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; c/m: IMP·VES (ligate)
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory, draped, advancing r., holding wreath extended in r. hand and palm over l. shoulder. EPHE lower r.
Acquired from Ancient Imports, November 2016.

In the mid to late 70's AD, Ephesus stamped older, worn Republican and early Imperial denarii circulating in the region with the IMP·VES countermark. Here is an exceptionally rare appearance of that Vespasian countermark on a denarius struck for Vespasian. I know of less than half a dozen other Vespasianic denarii similarly stamped. Of course the coin does not require any such countermark, therefore it is a remarkable mint error. The terminus post quem for the countermarking is 74, based on the discovery of another Vespasian countermarked Ephesian denarius dated COS IIII (CNG 78, lot 1753). RPC speculates that these countermarked coins represent a later 'issue' of silver from Ephesus struck sometime after 74 and before Vespasian's death in 79.

The mint workers applying the countermark were kind enough not to obliterate the portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/07/16 at 23:55Sam: Valuable addition.
V1431a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1431 (Countermarked)157 viewsAR Denarius, 3.06g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD; Countermarked under Vespasian at Ephesus, circa 74-79 AD
RIC 1431 (C). BMC 457. RSC 276. RPC 833 (14 spec.); c/m: GIC 839
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; c/m: IMP·VES (ligate)
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory, draped, advancing r., holding wreath extended in r. hand and palm over l. shoulder. EPHE lower r.
Acquired from Ancient Imports, November 2016.

In the mid to late 70's AD, Ephesus stamped older, worn Republican and early Imperial denarii circulating in the region with the IMP·VES countermark. Here is an exceptionally rare appearance of that Vespasian countermark on a denarius struck for Vespasian. I know of less than half a dozen other Vespasianic denarii similarly stamped. Of course the coin does not require any such countermark, therefore it is a remarkable mint error. The terminus post quem for the countermarking is 74, based on the discovery of another Vespasian countermarked Ephesian denarius dated COS IIII (CNG 78, lot 1753). RPC speculates that these countermarked coins represent a later 'issue' of silver from Ephesus struck sometime after 74 and before Vespasian's death in 79.

The mint workers applying the countermark were kind enough not to obliterate the portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/07/16 at 22:39Mat: Interesting & nice find!
V1431a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1431 (Countermarked)157 viewsAR Denarius, 3.06g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD; Countermarked under Vespasian at Ephesus, circa 74-79 AD
RIC 1431 (C). BMC 457. RSC 276. RPC 833 (14 spec.); c/m: GIC 839
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; c/m: IMP·VES (ligate)
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory, draped, advancing r., holding wreath extended in r. hand and palm over l. shoulder. EPHE lower r.
Acquired from Ancient Imports, November 2016.

In the mid to late 70's AD, Ephesus stamped older, worn Republican and early Imperial denarii circulating in the region with the IMP·VES countermark. Here is an exceptionally rare appearance of that Vespasian countermark on a denarius struck for Vespasian. I know of less than half a dozen other Vespasianic denarii similarly stamped. Of course the coin does not require any such countermark, therefore it is a remarkable mint error. The terminus post quem for the countermarking is 74, based on the discovery of another Vespasian countermarked Ephesian denarius dated COS IIII (CNG 78, lot 1753). RPC speculates that these countermarked coins represent a later 'issue' of silver from Ephesus struck sometime after 74 and before Vespasian's death in 79.

The mint workers applying the countermark were kind enough not to obliterate the portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/07/16 at 22:30Jay GT4: David this is incredible! What a coin!
V801a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-80170 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.61g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 801 (R2). BMC 284. RSC 616a.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, November 2016.

An undated quinarius, part of a large issue of quinarii most likely struck in 75. Keeping with tradition, Vespasian employed two Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. They are all quite rare. Those with AVGVSTI are rarer than those with AVGVST.

Well centred and in fine metal.
6 commentsDavid Atherton12/05/16 at 00:57Randygeki(h2): Congrats! A cool find
V801a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-80170 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.61g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 801 (R2). BMC 284. RSC 616a.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, November 2016.

An undated quinarius, part of a large issue of quinarii most likely struck in 75. Keeping with tradition, Vespasian employed two Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. They are all quite rare. Those with AVGVSTI are rarer than those with AVGVST.

Well centred and in fine metal.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/29/16 at 13:30Mat: Great example, congrats. Jealous
V801a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-80170 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.61g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 801 (R2). BMC 284. RSC 616a.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, November 2016.

An undated quinarius, part of a large issue of quinarii most likely struck in 75. Keeping with tradition, Vespasian employed two Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. They are all quite rare. Those with AVGVSTI are rarer than those with AVGVST.

Well centred and in fine metal.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/29/16 at 10:06Jay GT4: These are great
V801a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-80170 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.61g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 801 (R2). BMC 284. RSC 616a.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, November 2016.

An undated quinarius, part of a large issue of quinarii most likely struck in 75. Keeping with tradition, Vespasian employed two Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. They are all quite rare. Those with AVGVSTI are rarer than those with AVGVST.

Well centred and in fine metal.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/29/16 at 07:00Nemonater: Wow, very nice!
V801a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-80170 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.61g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 801 (R2). BMC 284. RSC 616a.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, November 2016.

An undated quinarius, part of a large issue of quinarii most likely struck in 75. Keeping with tradition, Vespasian employed two Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. They are all quite rare. Those with AVGVSTI are rarer than those with AVGVST.

Well centred and in fine metal.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/29/16 at 06:12FlaviusDomitianus: Good one
V801a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-80170 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.61g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 801 (R2). BMC 284. RSC 616a.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, November 2016.

An undated quinarius, part of a large issue of quinarii most likely struck in 75. Keeping with tradition, Vespasian employed two Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. They are all quite rare. Those with AVGVSTI are rarer than those with AVGVST.

Well centred and in fine metal.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/29/16 at 03:40okidoki: very nice David
V1473bsm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-147389 viewsAR Denarius, 2.78g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD
RIC 1473 (R). BMC 482. RSC 114a. RPC 1451 (4 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., a small 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: COS VII above; Pegasus r.
Ex Welch Collection. Acquired from eBay, January 2013.

The 'o' mint struck the Pegasus type for Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian, while Rome struck the type only for Domitian. The 'o' mint is infamous for mixing up types and titles incorrectly. This coin features Vespasian with correct titles. Very rare.

Worn, but in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/25/16 at 19:07socalcoins: Nice find, David!! That issue is much rarer (in t...
V1473bsm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-147389 viewsAR Denarius, 2.78g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD
RIC 1473 (R). BMC 482. RSC 114a. RPC 1451 (4 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., a small 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: COS VII above; Pegasus r.
Ex Welch Collection. Acquired from eBay, January 2013.

The 'o' mint struck the Pegasus type for Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian, while Rome struck the type only for Domitian. The 'o' mint is infamous for mixing up types and titles incorrectly. This coin features Vespasian with correct titles. Very rare.

Worn, but in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/05/16 at 13:27kc: Beautiful coin, Congratulations David ))
V1473bsm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-147389 viewsAR Denarius, 2.78g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD
RIC 1473 (R). BMC 482. RSC 114a. RPC 1451 (4 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., a small 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: COS VII above; Pegasus r.
Ex Welch Collection. Acquired from eBay, January 2013.

The 'o' mint struck the Pegasus type for Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian, while Rome struck the type only for Domitian. The 'o' mint is infamous for mixing up types and titles incorrectly. This coin features Vespasian with correct titles. Very rare.

Worn, but in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/05/16 at 07:40FlaviusDomitianus: Great catch, congrats!
V1473bsm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-147389 viewsAR Denarius, 2.78g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD
RIC 1473 (R). BMC 482. RSC 114a. RPC 1451 (4 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., a small 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: COS VII above; Pegasus r.
Ex Welch Collection. Acquired from eBay, January 2013.

The 'o' mint struck the Pegasus type for Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian, while Rome struck the type only for Domitian. The 'o' mint is infamous for mixing up types and titles incorrectly. This coin features Vespasian with correct titles. Very rare.

Worn, but in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/05/16 at 07:23okidoki: congrats
V1473bsm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-147389 viewsAR Denarius, 2.78g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD
RIC 1473 (R). BMC 482. RSC 114a. RPC 1451 (4 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., a small 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: COS VII above; Pegasus r.
Ex Welch Collection. Acquired from eBay, January 2013.

The 'o' mint struck the Pegasus type for Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian, while Rome struck the type only for Domitian. The 'o' mint is infamous for mixing up types and titles incorrectly. This coin features Vespasian with correct titles. Very rare.

Worn, but in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/05/16 at 02:27Jay GT4: Wow! What a wonderful coin.
V1473bsm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-147389 viewsAR Denarius, 2.78g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD
RIC 1473 (R). BMC 482. RSC 114a. RPC 1451 (4 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., a small 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: COS VII above; Pegasus r.
Ex Welch Collection. Acquired from eBay, January 2013.

The 'o' mint struck the Pegasus type for Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian, while Rome struck the type only for Domitian. The 'o' mint is infamous for mixing up types and titles incorrectly. This coin features Vespasian with correct titles. Very rare.

Worn, but in fine style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton11/05/16 at 01:33Nemonater: Another rare beauty!
V1399.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1399118 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1399 (C). BMC 434. RSC 37. RPC 808 (10 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: AVG and horizontal Φ; in oak-wreath
Ex Roma E-Sale 28, 2 July 2016, lot 456. Ex Thersites Collection.

Vespasian's undated Ephesian Group 2 denarii are all fairly scarce. The AVG in oak-wreath type is probably the most common of the issue. These early undated issues were most likely struck in late 69 or early 70.

Despite the strange flan shape, struck in fine style and darkly toned.
9 commentsDavid Atherton10/14/16 at 19:25Jim H: "Strange flan shape" nothing! We spend all of our...
V1420.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-142091 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1420 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG VESPAS; Titus and Domitian, togate, veiled, standing l., each holding patera in r. hand, l. hands at sides; in exergue, BY
Ex Hirsch 323, 22 September 2016, lot 2390.

An extremely rare Ephesus Group 4 denarius. When the new edition of RIC II was published in 2007 only one specimen was known of this dynastic type with mint mark in exergue. Since its publication, several other examples have come to light in addition to mine, bringing the total number of specimens to around a dozen. RIC makes a distinction between two different mint mark placings for this type: in exergue, as seen here, and between T & D.

Struck in fine style with hints of gunmetal toning.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/13/16 at 01:47ancientdave: Wow, excellent addition!
V1420.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-142091 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1420 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG VESPAS; Titus and Domitian, togate, veiled, standing l., each holding patera in r. hand, l. hands at sides; in exergue, BY
Ex Hirsch 323, 22 September 2016, lot 2390.

An extremely rare Ephesus Group 4 denarius. When the new edition of RIC II was published in 2007 only one specimen was known of this dynastic type with mint mark in exergue. Since its publication, several other examples have come to light in addition to mine, bringing the total number of specimens to around a dozen. RIC makes a distinction between two different mint mark placings for this type: in exergue, as seen here, and between T & D.

Struck in fine style with hints of gunmetal toning.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/12/16 at 20:54Nemonater: Another beauty, I love these dynastic types!
V1420.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-142091 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1420 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG VESPAS; Titus and Domitian, togate, veiled, standing l., each holding patera in r. hand, l. hands at sides; in exergue, BY
Ex Hirsch 323, 22 September 2016, lot 2390.

An extremely rare Ephesus Group 4 denarius. When the new edition of RIC II was published in 2007 only one specimen was known of this dynastic type with mint mark in exergue. Since its publication, several other examples have come to light in addition to mine, bringing the total number of specimens to around a dozen. RIC makes a distinction between two different mint mark placings for this type: in exergue, as seen here, and between T & D.

Struck in fine style with hints of gunmetal toning.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/12/16 at 17:55quadrans: Great coin..and details.., very characteristic por...
V1420.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-142091 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1420 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG VESPAS; Titus and Domitian, togate, veiled, standing l., each holding patera in r. hand, l. hands at sides; in exergue, BY
Ex Hirsch 323, 22 September 2016, lot 2390.

An extremely rare Ephesus Group 4 denarius. When the new edition of RIC II was published in 2007 only one specimen was known of this dynastic type with mint mark in exergue. Since its publication, several other examples have come to light in addition to mine, bringing the total number of specimens to around a dozen. RIC makes a distinction between two different mint mark placings for this type: in exergue, as seen here, and between T & D.

Struck in fine style with hints of gunmetal toning.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/12/16 at 16:50Sam: Superb.
V1420.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-142091 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1420 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG VESPAS; Titus and Domitian, togate, veiled, standing l., each holding patera in r. hand, l. hands at sides; in exergue, BY
Ex Hirsch 323, 22 September 2016, lot 2390.

An extremely rare Ephesus Group 4 denarius. When the new edition of RIC II was published in 2007 only one specimen was known of this dynastic type with mint mark in exergue. Since its publication, several other examples have come to light in addition to mine, bringing the total number of specimens to around a dozen. RIC makes a distinction between two different mint mark placings for this type: in exergue, as seen here, and between T & D.

Struck in fine style with hints of gunmetal toning.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/12/16 at 11:30orfew: Great example, congrats
V1420.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-142091 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1420 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG VESPAS; Titus and Domitian, togate, veiled, standing l., each holding patera in r. hand, l. hands at sides; in exergue, BY
Ex Hirsch 323, 22 September 2016, lot 2390.

An extremely rare Ephesus Group 4 denarius. When the new edition of RIC II was published in 2007 only one specimen was known of this dynastic type with mint mark in exergue. Since its publication, several other examples have come to light in addition to mine, bringing the total number of specimens to around a dozen. RIC makes a distinction between two different mint mark placings for this type: in exergue, as seen here, and between T & D.

Struck in fine style with hints of gunmetal toning.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/12/16 at 11:15Mat: Nice coin, great portrait
V1420.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-142091 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1420 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG VESPAS; Titus and Domitian, togate, veiled, standing l., each holding patera in r. hand, l. hands at sides; in exergue, BY
Ex Hirsch 323, 22 September 2016, lot 2390.

An extremely rare Ephesus Group 4 denarius. When the new edition of RIC II was published in 2007 only one specimen was known of this dynastic type with mint mark in exergue. Since its publication, several other examples have come to light in addition to mine, bringing the total number of specimens to around a dozen. RIC makes a distinction between two different mint mark placings for this type: in exergue, as seen here, and between T & D.

Struck in fine style with hints of gunmetal toning.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/12/16 at 08:59Jay GT4: Exceptional!
V1420.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-142091 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1420 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG VESPAS; Titus and Domitian, togate, veiled, standing l., each holding patera in r. hand, l. hands at sides; in exergue, BY
Ex Hirsch 323, 22 September 2016, lot 2390.

An extremely rare Ephesus Group 4 denarius. When the new edition of RIC II was published in 2007 only one specimen was known of this dynastic type with mint mark in exergue. Since its publication, several other examples have come to light in addition to mine, bringing the total number of specimens to around a dozen. RIC makes a distinction between two different mint mark placings for this type: in exergue, as seen here, and between T & D.

Struck in fine style with hints of gunmetal toning.
8 commentsDavid Atherton10/12/16 at 05:30FlaviusDomitianus: Great coin, excellent style
V1418bsm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1418108 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1418 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG V-ESPAS; Heads of Titus, bare, r., and Domitian, bare, l., confronting; BY in r. field (on its side, obscured)
Ex Trusted Coins, eBay, September 2016.

The confronting heads of Titus and Domitian is one of the rarest reverse types struck at Ephesus for Vespasian. RIC lists this rare variant with mintmark sideways in right field as 'unique'. I was able to match my specimen's reverse die with another example (Lanz 128, 22 May 2006, lot 322) which showed the BY mintmark, confirming the coin's attribution. Since the publication of the new RIC, I have identified 4 specimens of this extremely rare variant, all from the same reverse die. Also, take note of the unusual break in the reverse legend: V - ESPAS.

Struck with nearly full legends in fine Ephesian style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton09/20/16 at 22:18Nemonater: Three great portraits in one coin. Excellent!
V1418bsm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1418108 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1418 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG V-ESPAS; Heads of Titus, bare, r., and Domitian, bare, l., confronting; BY in r. field (on its side, obscured)
Ex Trusted Coins, eBay, September 2016.

The confronting heads of Titus and Domitian is one of the rarest reverse types struck at Ephesus for Vespasian. RIC lists this rare variant with mintmark sideways in right field as 'unique'. I was able to match my specimen's reverse die with another example (Lanz 128, 22 May 2006, lot 322) which showed the BY mintmark, confirming the coin's attribution. Since the publication of the new RIC, I have identified 4 specimens of this extremely rare variant, all from the same reverse die. Also, take note of the unusual break in the reverse legend: V - ESPAS.

Struck with nearly full legends in fine Ephesian style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton09/20/16 at 17:33quadrans: This in on my waiting list , Great coin !!...
V1418bsm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1418108 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1418 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG V-ESPAS; Heads of Titus, bare, r., and Domitian, bare, l., confronting; BY in r. field (on its side, obscured)
Ex Trusted Coins, eBay, September 2016.

The confronting heads of Titus and Domitian is one of the rarest reverse types struck at Ephesus for Vespasian. RIC lists this rare variant with mintmark sideways in right field as 'unique'. I was able to match my specimen's reverse die with another example (Lanz 128, 22 May 2006, lot 322) which showed the BY mintmark, confirming the coin's attribution. Since the publication of the new RIC, I have identified 4 specimens of this extremely rare variant, all from the same reverse die. Also, take note of the unusual break in the reverse legend: V - ESPAS.

Struck with nearly full legends in fine Ephesian style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton09/20/16 at 11:07Mat: Neat coin, especially the reverse
V1418bsm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1418108 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Ephesus mint, 70 AD
RIC 1418 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG V-ESPAS; Heads of Titus, bare, r., and Domitian, bare, l., confronting; BY in r. field (on its side, obscured)
Ex Trusted Coins, eBay, September 2016.

The confronting heads of Titus and Domitian is one of the rarest reverse types struck at Ephesus for Vespasian. RIC lists this rare variant with mintmark sideways in right field as 'unique'. I was able to match my specimen's reverse die with another example (Lanz 128, 22 May 2006, lot 322) which showed the BY mintmark, confirming the coin's attribution. Since the publication of the new RIC, I have identified 4 specimens of this extremely rare variant, all from the same reverse die. Also, take note of the unusual break in the reverse legend: V - ESPAS.

Struck with nearly full legends in fine Ephesian style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton09/20/16 at 06:10FlaviusDomitianus: Interesting rarity, great job.
T357c.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-357(2)97 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD (Titus)
RIC 357 (C2). BMC 129. RSC 497.
Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: Capricorns, l. and r., crossed, supporting round shield inscribed S C : below, globe
Acquired from Civitas Galleries, August 2016.

A rare variant of this common Divus Vespasian denarius type struck under Titus. It is much more common to find the capricorns back to back with no tails, supporting a small shield. Here we see the capricorns crossed with tails, supporting a large shield. Curiously, RIC does not note the rare variant nor assign it a catalogue number.

Previously a jewellery mount piece.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/26/16 at 03:31ancientdave: Nice coin!
T357c.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-357(2)97 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD (Titus)
RIC 357 (C2). BMC 129. RSC 497.
Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: Capricorns, l. and r., crossed, supporting round shield inscribed S C : below, globe
Acquired from Civitas Galleries, August 2016.

A rare variant of this common Divus Vespasian denarius type struck under Titus. It is much more common to find the capricorns back to back with no tails, supporting a small shield. Here we see the capricorns crossed with tails, supporting a large shield. Curiously, RIC does not note the rare variant nor assign it a catalogue number.

Previously a jewellery mount piece.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/24/16 at 12:29curtislclay: BMC pl. 47.9 illustrates this variant, but also th...
T357c.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-357(2)97 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD (Titus)
RIC 357 (C2). BMC 129. RSC 497.
Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: Capricorns, l. and r., crossed, supporting round shield inscribed S C : below, globe
Acquired from Civitas Galleries, August 2016.

A rare variant of this common Divus Vespasian denarius type struck under Titus. It is much more common to find the capricorns back to back with no tails, supporting a small shield. Here we see the capricorns crossed with tails, supporting a large shield. Curiously, RIC does not note the rare variant nor assign it a catalogue number.

Previously a jewellery mount piece.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/24/16 at 08:42Nemonater: Very nice
T357c.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-357(2)97 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD (Titus)
RIC 357 (C2). BMC 129. RSC 497.
Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: Capricorns, l. and r., crossed, supporting round shield inscribed S C : below, globe
Acquired from Civitas Galleries, August 2016.

A rare variant of this common Divus Vespasian denarius type struck under Titus. It is much more common to find the capricorns back to back with no tails, supporting a small shield. Here we see the capricorns crossed with tails, supporting a large shield. Curiously, RIC does not note the rare variant nor assign it a catalogue number.

Previously a jewellery mount piece.
4 commentsDavid Atherton08/24/16 at 03:07quadrans: Interesting specimen..
V1399.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1399118 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1399 (C). BMC 434. RSC 37. RPC 808 (10 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: AVG and horizontal Φ; in oak-wreath
Ex Roma E-Sale 28, 2 July 2016, lot 456. Ex Thersites Collection.

Vespasian's undated Ephesian Group 2 denarii are all fairly scarce. The AVG in oak-wreath type is probably the most common of the issue. These early undated issues were most likely struck in late 69 or early 70.

Despite the strange flan shape, struck in fine style and darkly toned.
9 commentsDavid Atherton07/19/16 at 22:44mix_val: congrats
V1399.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1399118 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1399 (C). BMC 434. RSC 37. RPC 808 (10 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: AVG and horizontal Φ; in oak-wreath
Ex Roma E-Sale 28, 2 July 2016, lot 456. Ex Thersites Collection.

Vespasian's undated Ephesian Group 2 denarii are all fairly scarce. The AVG in oak-wreath type is probably the most common of the issue. These early undated issues were most likely struck in late 69 or early 70.

Despite the strange flan shape, struck in fine style and darkly toned.
9 commentsDavid Atherton07/19/16 at 14:45NORMAN K: interesting shape as well
V1399.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1399118 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1399 (C). BMC 434. RSC 37. RPC 808 (10 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: AVG and horizontal Φ; in oak-wreath
Ex Roma E-Sale 28, 2 July 2016, lot 456. Ex Thersites Collection.

Vespasian's undated Ephesian Group 2 denarii are all fairly scarce. The AVG in oak-wreath type is probably the most common of the issue. These early undated issues were most likely struck in late 69 or early 70.

Despite the strange flan shape, struck in fine style and darkly toned.
9 commentsDavid Atherton07/19/16 at 11:59FlaviusDomitianus: Lovely coin indeed
V1399.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1399118 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1399 (C). BMC 434. RSC 37. RPC 808 (10 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: AVG and horizontal Φ; in oak-wreath
Ex Roma E-Sale 28, 2 July 2016, lot 456. Ex Thersites Collection.

Vespasian's undated Ephesian Group 2 denarii are all fairly scarce. The AVG in oak-wreath type is probably the most common of the issue. These early undated issues were most likely struck in late 69 or early 70.

Despite the strange flan shape, struck in fine style and darkly toned.
9 commentsDavid Atherton07/19/16 at 11:10Nemonater: Really beautiful
V1399.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1399118 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1399 (C). BMC 434. RSC 37. RPC 808 (10 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: AVG and horizontal Φ; in oak-wreath
Ex Roma E-Sale 28, 2 July 2016, lot 456. Ex Thersites Collection.

Vespasian's undated Ephesian Group 2 denarii are all fairly scarce. The AVG in oak-wreath type is probably the most common of the issue. These early undated issues were most likely struck in late 69 or early 70.

Despite the strange flan shape, struck in fine style and darkly toned.
9 commentsDavid Atherton07/19/16 at 11:07Mat: Nice find, David.
V1399.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1399118 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1399 (C). BMC 434. RSC 37. RPC 808 (10 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: AVG and horizontal Φ; in oak-wreath
Ex Roma E-Sale 28, 2 July 2016, lot 456. Ex Thersites Collection.

Vespasian's undated Ephesian Group 2 denarii are all fairly scarce. The AVG in oak-wreath type is probably the most common of the issue. These early undated issues were most likely struck in late 69 or early 70.

Despite the strange flan shape, struck in fine style and darkly toned.
9 commentsDavid Atherton07/19/16 at 10:06quadrans: I like this style..
V1399.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1399118 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1399 (C). BMC 434. RSC 37. RPC 808 (10 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: AVG and horizontal Φ; in oak-wreath
Ex Roma E-Sale 28, 2 July 2016, lot 456. Ex Thersites Collection.

Vespasian's undated Ephesian Group 2 denarii are all fairly scarce. The AVG in oak-wreath type is probably the most common of the issue. These early undated issues were most likely struck in late 69 or early 70.

Despite the strange flan shape, struck in fine style and darkly toned.
9 commentsDavid Atherton07/19/16 at 09:58Jay GT4: The reverse is amazing
V1399.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1399118 viewsAR Denarius, 3.18g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1399 (C). BMC 434. RSC 37. RPC 808 (10 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: AVG and horizontal Φ; in oak-wreath
Ex Roma E-Sale 28, 2 July 2016, lot 456. Ex Thersites Collection.

Vespasian's undated Ephesian Group 2 denarii are all fairly scarce. The AVG in oak-wreath type is probably the most common of the issue. These early undated issues were most likely struck in late 69 or early 70.

Despite the strange flan shape, struck in fine style and darkly toned.
9 commentsDavid Atherton07/19/16 at 05:24ancientdave: Great portrait in fine style. Love the toning as w...
58678q00.jpg
Vespasian RIC 39116 viewsAR Denarius, 2.69g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 39 (R). BMC 59A. RSC 564.
Obv: IMP CAES VES-P AVG P M; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: TRI POT II COS III P P; Mars adv. r., with spear and aquila
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, June 2012. Ex Maridvnvm Collection.

A very rare Vespasian denarius from 71 AD. The reverse features the familiar Mars walking right with spear and aquila, nothing new there...however, it's the shorter obverse legend used in early 71 and the (unique to this series) TRI POT II COS III P P reverse legend that makes this a rare denarius. Oddly enough, the only other denarius from the same series (Pax seated) was minted in copious amounts.

The coin itself has deep cabinet toning and good centering. Very nice in hand. Vespasian seems to be cracking a rare smile too.
7 commentsDavid Atherton07/08/16 at 17:10maridvnvm: FYI ex-Maridvnvm collection
V1434a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1434121 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1434 (R). BMC 459 var. RSC 293 var. RPC 835 (14 spec.) var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Bust of woman, draped, wearing crown of towers, r.; EPHE in l. field
Acquired from Künker, June 2016. Ex Nudelman Numismatica Auction 10, 13 June 2011, lot 46.

RIC, alone among the major references, assigns a separate catalogue number to this rare variant with the mint mark behind the reverse bust. It's much more common to find the mint mark below bust. This variant seems to have been struck at a ratio of 1:10 compared with the common variety. A reverse type not struck at Rome.

Fantastic portraits in superb Ephesian style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton06/23/16 at 11:24gallienus1: Marvelous coin!
V1434a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1434121 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1434 (R). BMC 459 var. RSC 293 var. RPC 835 (14 spec.) var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Bust of woman, draped, wearing crown of towers, r.; EPHE in l. field
Acquired from Künker, June 2016. Ex Nudelman Numismatica Auction 10, 13 June 2011, lot 46.

RIC, alone among the major references, assigns a separate catalogue number to this rare variant with the mint mark behind the reverse bust. It's much more common to find the mint mark below bust. This variant seems to have been struck at a ratio of 1:10 compared with the common variety. A reverse type not struck at Rome.

Fantastic portraits in superb Ephesian style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton06/22/16 at 04:09ancientdave: Wonderful find!
V1434a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1434121 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1434 (R). BMC 459 var. RSC 293 var. RPC 835 (14 spec.) var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Bust of woman, draped, wearing crown of towers, r.; EPHE in l. field
Acquired from Künker, June 2016. Ex Nudelman Numismatica Auction 10, 13 June 2011, lot 46.

RIC, alone among the major references, assigns a separate catalogue number to this rare variant with the mint mark behind the reverse bust. It's much more common to find the mint mark below bust. This variant seems to have been struck at a ratio of 1:10 compared with the common variety. A reverse type not struck at Rome.

Fantastic portraits in superb Ephesian style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton06/21/16 at 13:50Norbert: congratulations for securing this wonderful coin
V1434a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1434121 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1434 (R). BMC 459 var. RSC 293 var. RPC 835 (14 spec.) var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Bust of woman, draped, wearing crown of towers, r.; EPHE in l. field
Acquired from Künker, June 2016. Ex Nudelman Numismatica Auction 10, 13 June 2011, lot 46.

RIC, alone among the major references, assigns a separate catalogue number to this rare variant with the mint mark behind the reverse bust. It's much more common to find the mint mark below bust. This variant seems to have been struck at a ratio of 1:10 compared with the common variety. A reverse type not struck at Rome.

Fantastic portraits in superb Ephesian style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton06/20/16 at 19:16Nemonater:
V1434a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1434121 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1434 (R). BMC 459 var. RSC 293 var. RPC 835 (14 spec.) var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Bust of woman, draped, wearing crown of towers, r.; EPHE in l. field
Acquired from Künker, June 2016. Ex Nudelman Numismatica Auction 10, 13 June 2011, lot 46.

RIC, alone among the major references, assigns a separate catalogue number to this rare variant with the mint mark behind the reverse bust. It's much more common to find the mint mark below bust. This variant seems to have been struck at a ratio of 1:10 compared with the common variety. A reverse type not struck at Rome.

Fantastic portraits in superb Ephesian style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton06/20/16 at 19:16Jay GT4: Awesome!
V1434a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1434121 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1434 (R). BMC 459 var. RSC 293 var. RPC 835 (14 spec.) var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Bust of woman, draped, wearing crown of towers, r.; EPHE in l. field
Acquired from Künker, June 2016. Ex Nudelman Numismatica Auction 10, 13 June 2011, lot 46.

RIC, alone among the major references, assigns a separate catalogue number to this rare variant with the mint mark behind the reverse bust. It's much more common to find the mint mark below bust. This variant seems to have been struck at a ratio of 1:10 compared with the common variety. A reverse type not struck at Rome.

Fantastic portraits in superb Ephesian style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton06/20/16 at 18:00okidoki: Very nice David
V1434a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1434121 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1434 (R). BMC 459 var. RSC 293 var. RPC 835 (14 spec.) var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Bust of woman, draped, wearing crown of towers, r.; EPHE in l. field
Acquired from Künker, June 2016. Ex Nudelman Numismatica Auction 10, 13 June 2011, lot 46.

RIC, alone among the major references, assigns a separate catalogue number to this rare variant with the mint mark behind the reverse bust. It's much more common to find the mint mark below bust. This variant seems to have been struck at a ratio of 1:10 compared with the common variety. A reverse type not struck at Rome.

Fantastic portraits in superb Ephesian style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton06/20/16 at 17:58FlaviusDomitianus: Exceptional example. Congrats!
V1434a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1434121 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD
RIC 1434 (R). BMC 459 var. RSC 293 var. RPC 835 (14 spec.) var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Bust of woman, draped, wearing crown of towers, r.; EPHE in l. field
Acquired from Künker, June 2016. Ex Nudelman Numismatica Auction 10, 13 June 2011, lot 46.

RIC, alone among the major references, assigns a separate catalogue number to this rare variant with the mint mark behind the reverse bust. It's much more common to find the mint mark below bust. This variant seems to have been struck at a ratio of 1:10 compared with the common variety. A reverse type not struck at Rome.

Fantastic portraits in superb Ephesian style.
8 commentsDavid Atherton06/20/16 at 17:53quadrans: Beautiful coin ...
V800a.JPG
Vespasian RIC-800105 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.34g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 800 (C). BMC 285. RSC 594.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
Acquired from CGB, May 2016.

Quniarii struck during the Flavian era are exceedingly rare compared to the denarii. Vespasian's largest issue of quinarii are undated and most likely date to 75. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms, therefore it fits neatly to 75. Vespasian employed two traditional Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during the reign.

Deeply toned with a decent portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/04/16 at 22:40ancientdave: Fantastic example! These are tough to find!
V800a.JPG
Vespasian RIC-800105 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.34g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 800 (C). BMC 285. RSC 594.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
Acquired from CGB, May 2016.

Quniarii struck during the Flavian era are exceedingly rare compared to the denarii. Vespasian's largest issue of quinarii are undated and most likely date to 75. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms, therefore it fits neatly to 75. Vespasian employed two traditional Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during the reign.

Deeply toned with a decent portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/27/16 at 00:00Jay GT4: Lovely
V800a.JPG
Vespasian RIC-800105 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.34g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 800 (C). BMC 285. RSC 594.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
Acquired from CGB, May 2016.

Quniarii struck during the Flavian era are exceedingly rare compared to the denarii. Vespasian's largest issue of quinarii are undated and most likely date to 75. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms, therefore it fits neatly to 75. Vespasian employed two traditional Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during the reign.

Deeply toned with a decent portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/26/16 at 17:31quadrans: Great coin .!
V800a.JPG
Vespasian RIC-800105 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.34g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 800 (C). BMC 285. RSC 594.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
Acquired from CGB, May 2016.

Quniarii struck during the Flavian era are exceedingly rare compared to the denarii. Vespasian's largest issue of quinarii are undated and most likely date to 75. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms, therefore it fits neatly to 75. Vespasian employed two traditional Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during the reign.

Deeply toned with a decent portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/26/16 at 08:43Nemonater: Great portrait, toning.
V800a.JPG
Vespasian RIC-800105 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.34g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 800 (C). BMC 285. RSC 594.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
Acquired from CGB, May 2016.

Quniarii struck during the Flavian era are exceedingly rare compared to the denarii. Vespasian's largest issue of quinarii are undated and most likely date to 75. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms, therefore it fits neatly to 75. Vespasian employed two traditional Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during the reign.

Deeply toned with a decent portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/26/16 at 06:56FlaviusDomitianus: I like the toning, nice catch.
V800a.JPG
Vespasian RIC-800105 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.34g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 800 (C). BMC 285. RSC 594.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
Acquired from CGB, May 2016.

Quniarii struck during the Flavian era are exceedingly rare compared to the denarii. Vespasian's largest issue of quinarii are undated and most likely date to 75. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms, therefore it fits neatly to 75. Vespasian employed two traditional Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during the reign.

Deeply toned with a decent portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton05/26/16 at 04:19Pharsalos: Beautiful tone, charming little coin.
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688214 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569.
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
15 commentsDavid Atherton05/25/16 at 14:20NORMAN K: Great acquisition.
V793.jpg
Vespasian RIC-793128 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.41g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 793 (R). BMC 288 var. RSC 614a var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
Acquired from CGB, April 2016.

Vespasian revived the quinarius after a long hiatus going back to the time of Augustus. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during the reign. The largest issue of quinarii, of which this coin is part of, was minted in 75. Keeping to tradition, Vespasian employed two Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. They are all quite rare. Dating this undated issue is a little tricky. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms, therefore it fits neatly to 75.

This example is in exceedingly fine condition and style for the series.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/19/16 at 00:05Randygeki(h2): Fantastic coin!
V793.jpg
Vespasian RIC-793128 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.41g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 793 (R). BMC 288 var. RSC 614a var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
Acquired from CGB, April 2016.

Vespasian revived the quinarius after a long hiatus going back to the time of Augustus. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during the reign. The largest issue of quinarii, of which this coin is part of, was minted in 75. Keeping to tradition, Vespasian employed two Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. They are all quite rare. Dating this undated issue is a little tricky. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms, therefore it fits neatly to 75.

This example is in exceedingly fine condition and style for the series.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/15/16 at 10:01David Atherton: The weight is 1.41g.
V793.jpg
Vespasian RIC-793128 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.41g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 793 (R). BMC 288 var. RSC 614a var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
Acquired from CGB, April 2016.

Vespasian revived the quinarius after a long hiatus going back to the time of Augustus. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during the reign. The largest issue of quinarii, of which this coin is part of, was minted in 75. Keeping to tradition, Vespasian employed two Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. They are all quite rare. Dating this undated issue is a little tricky. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms, therefore it fits neatly to 75.

This example is in exceedingly fine condition and style for the series.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/15/16 at 01:49quadrans: Yes, great coin congratulation..
V793.jpg
Vespasian RIC-793128 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.41g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 793 (R). BMC 288 var. RSC 614a var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
Acquired from CGB, April 2016.

Vespasian revived the quinarius after a long hiatus going back to the time of Augustus. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during the reign. The largest issue of quinarii, of which this coin is part of, was minted in 75. Keeping to tradition, Vespasian employed two Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. They are all quite rare. Dating this undated issue is a little tricky. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms, therefore it fits neatly to 75.

This example is in exceedingly fine condition and style for the series.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/14/16 at 20:31Pharsalos: Fantastic example of a rare imperial quinarius! Ho...
V793.jpg
Vespasian RIC-793128 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.41g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 793 (R). BMC 288 var. RSC 614a var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
Acquired from CGB, April 2016.

Vespasian revived the quinarius after a long hiatus going back to the time of Augustus. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during the reign. The largest issue of quinarii, of which this coin is part of, was minted in 75. Keeping to tradition, Vespasian employed two Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. They are all quite rare. Dating this undated issue is a little tricky. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms, therefore it fits neatly to 75.

This example is in exceedingly fine condition and style for the series.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/14/16 at 05:32FlaviusDomitianus: Nice find, congrats!
V793.jpg
Vespasian RIC-793128 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.41g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 793 (R). BMC 288 var. RSC 614a var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
Acquired from CGB, April 2016.

Vespasian revived the quinarius after a long hiatus going back to the time of Augustus. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during the reign. The largest issue of quinarii, of which this coin is part of, was minted in 75. Keeping to tradition, Vespasian employed two Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. They are all quite rare. Dating this undated issue is a little tricky. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms, therefore it fits neatly to 75.

This example is in exceedingly fine condition and style for the series.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/14/16 at 03:56ancientdave: A wonderful find! Congrats!
V793.jpg
Vespasian RIC-793128 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.41g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 793 (R). BMC 288 var. RSC 614a var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
Acquired from CGB, April 2016.

Vespasian revived the quinarius after a long hiatus going back to the time of Augustus. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during the reign. The largest issue of quinarii, of which this coin is part of, was minted in 75. Keeping to tradition, Vespasian employed two Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. They are all quite rare. Dating this undated issue is a little tricky. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms, therefore it fits neatly to 75.

This example is in exceedingly fine condition and style for the series.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/14/16 at 00:29Jay GT4: What a nose! Great portrait and Victory is amazin...
V793.jpg
Vespasian RIC-793128 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.41g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 793 (R). BMC 288 var. RSC 614a var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
Acquired from CGB, April 2016.

Vespasian revived the quinarius after a long hiatus going back to the time of Augustus. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during the reign. The largest issue of quinarii, of which this coin is part of, was minted in 75. Keeping to tradition, Vespasian employed two Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. They are all quite rare. Dating this undated issue is a little tricky. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms, therefore it fits neatly to 75.

This example is in exceedingly fine condition and style for the series.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/13/16 at 23:40Nemonater: A really outstanding piece! Well done!
V793.jpg
Vespasian RIC-793128 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.41g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 793 (R). BMC 288 var. RSC 614a var.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
Acquired from CGB, April 2016.

Vespasian revived the quinarius after a long hiatus going back to the time of Augustus. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during the reign. The largest issue of quinarii, of which this coin is part of, was minted in 75. Keeping to tradition, Vespasian employed two Victory types (advancing and seated) for the reverses. They are all quite rare. Dating this undated issue is a little tricky. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms, therefore it fits neatly to 75.

This example is in exceedingly fine condition and style for the series.
9 commentsDavid Atherton04/13/16 at 23:37orfew: Great reverse on that coin
vespasian prow and star.JPG
Vespasian RIC-941189 viewsAR Denarius, 3.39g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 941 (C). BMC 210. RSC 136.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS VIII; Prow r. : above, star of eight rays
Acquired from Glenn W. Woods, November 2003. Ex unspecified CNG MBS.

A reverse type which copies one from Marc Antony's coinage.

Obviously a major feature of Vespasian's coinage was his recoining of many past reverse types. I don't think they were chosen at random and many of these must have had some sort of contemporary meaning.

This has always been an intriguing reverse type in my opinion. I'm not quite sure what a star and prow have to do with one another, but they do create an eye appealing reverse design.
5 commentsVespasian7004/03/16 at 20:39Jay GT4: Such a great coin. I need both the Antony and Fla...
V846a.jpg
Vespasian RIC-84699 viewsAR Denarius, 2.90g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 846 (R). BMC p. 34 note. RSC 122a.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: COS VII across field; Eagle head r. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

A fairly rare denarius with portrait left and the head of the eagle to the right. Variant lacking thunderbolt.

Deep toning combined with an artistic portrait makes this a wonderful coin with plenty of in hand eye appeal.

4 commentsDavid Atherton04/02/16 at 13:42Molinari: Really nice!
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688214 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569.
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
15 commentsDavid Atherton03/26/16 at 13:10Vincent: Wow, what a coin story....Hail Vespasian
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688214 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569.
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
15 commentsDavid Atherton03/19/16 at 10:38djmacdo: I did not even know such a type exists!
V1345.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1345114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Uncertain Western Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1345 (R2). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVGVSTV; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 41, 6 March 2016, lot 675.

Many mints were operating during the civil war of 68/69 in the west and it is sometimes difficult to pin down certain issues to a specific mint. This Libertas type with an unusual AVGVSTV ending the obverse legend is one such coin and was totally unknown until recently. The reverse type suggests Spain, as does the portrait style - which is very similar to the gold and bronze issues from Tarraco. However, RIC notes that this variety of the type has no known Spanish provenance, unlike the other Libertas type (see my V1339) attributed to Spain. The coin's theme is a civil war one and most certainly was struck very early in Vespasian's reign.

A beautiful coin in hand with a spectacular portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton03/19/16 at 10:36djmacdo: Wow. Totally new to me--and such a nice specimen!
V1345.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1345114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Uncertain Western Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1345 (R2). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVGVSTV; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 41, 6 March 2016, lot 675.

Many mints were operating during the civil war of 68/69 in the west and it is sometimes difficult to pin down certain issues to a specific mint. This Libertas type with an unusual AVGVSTV ending the obverse legend is one such coin and was totally unknown until recently. The reverse type suggests Spain, as does the portrait style - which is very similar to the gold and bronze issues from Tarraco. However, RIC notes that this variety of the type has no known Spanish provenance, unlike the other Libertas type (see my V1339) attributed to Spain. The coin's theme is a civil war one and most certainly was struck very early in Vespasian's reign.

A beautiful coin in hand with a spectacular portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton03/16/16 at 01:09Enodia: quite nice. this portrait is very lifelike.
V1345.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1345114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Uncertain Western Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1345 (R2). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVGVSTV; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 41, 6 March 2016, lot 675.

Many mints were operating during the civil war of 68/69 in the west and it is sometimes difficult to pin down certain issues to a specific mint. This Libertas type with an unusual AVGVSTV ending the obverse legend is one such coin and was totally unknown until recently. The reverse type suggests Spain, as does the portrait style - which is very similar to the gold and bronze issues from Tarraco. However, RIC notes that this variety of the type has no known Spanish provenance, unlike the other Libertas type (see my V1339) attributed to Spain. The coin's theme is a civil war one and most certainly was struck very early in Vespasian's reign.

A beautiful coin in hand with a spectacular portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton03/15/16 at 22:19Nemonater:
V1345.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1345114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Uncertain Western Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1345 (R2). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVGVSTV; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 41, 6 March 2016, lot 675.

Many mints were operating during the civil war of 68/69 in the west and it is sometimes difficult to pin down certain issues to a specific mint. This Libertas type with an unusual AVGVSTV ending the obverse legend is one such coin and was totally unknown until recently. The reverse type suggests Spain, as does the portrait style - which is very similar to the gold and bronze issues from Tarraco. However, RIC notes that this variety of the type has no known Spanish provenance, unlike the other Libertas type (see my V1339) attributed to Spain. The coin's theme is a civil war one and most certainly was struck very early in Vespasian's reign.

A beautiful coin in hand with a spectacular portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton03/15/16 at 18:13okidoki: very nice different Vespasian
V1345.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1345114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Uncertain Western Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1345 (R2). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVGVSTV; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 41, 6 March 2016, lot 675.

Many mints were operating during the civil war of 68/69 in the west and it is sometimes difficult to pin down certain issues to a specific mint. This Libertas type with an unusual AVGVSTV ending the obverse legend is one such coin and was totally unknown until recently. The reverse type suggests Spain, as does the portrait style - which is very similar to the gold and bronze issues from Tarraco. However, RIC notes that this variety of the type has no known Spanish provenance, unlike the other Libertas type (see my V1339) attributed to Spain. The coin's theme is a civil war one and most certainly was struck very early in Vespasian's reign.

A beautiful coin in hand with a spectacular portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton03/15/16 at 08:40FlaviusDomitianus: Great coin indeed
V1345.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1345114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Uncertain Western Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1345 (R2). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVGVSTV; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 41, 6 March 2016, lot 675.

Many mints were operating during the civil war of 68/69 in the west and it is sometimes difficult to pin down certain issues to a specific mint. This Libertas type with an unusual AVGVSTV ending the obverse legend is one such coin and was totally unknown until recently. The reverse type suggests Spain, as does the portrait style - which is very similar to the gold and bronze issues from Tarraco. However, RIC notes that this variety of the type has no known Spanish provenance, unlike the other Libertas type (see my V1339) attributed to Spain. The coin's theme is a civil war one and most certainly was struck very early in Vespasian's reign.

A beautiful coin in hand with a spectacular portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton03/15/16 at 06:40Potator II: Definitely a spectacular portrait, especially on s...
V1345.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1345114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Uncertain Western Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1345 (R2). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVGVSTV; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 41, 6 March 2016, lot 675.

Many mints were operating during the civil war of 68/69 in the west and it is sometimes difficult to pin down certain issues to a specific mint. This Libertas type with an unusual AVGVSTV ending the obverse legend is one such coin and was totally unknown until recently. The reverse type suggests Spain, as does the portrait style - which is very similar to the gold and bronze issues from Tarraco. However, RIC notes that this variety of the type has no known Spanish provenance, unlike the other Libertas type (see my V1339) attributed to Spain. The coin's theme is a civil war one and most certainly was struck very early in Vespasian's reign.

A beautiful coin in hand with a spectacular portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton03/15/16 at 02:51Mat: Beautiful all around, congrats.
V1345.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1345114 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Uncertain Western Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1345 (R2). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVGVSTV; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 41, 6 March 2016, lot 675.

Many mints were operating during the civil war of 68/69 in the west and it is sometimes difficult to pin down certain issues to a specific mint. This Libertas type with an unusual AVGVSTV ending the obverse legend is one such coin and was totally unknown until recently. The reverse type suggests Spain, as does the portrait style - which is very similar to the gold and bronze issues from Tarraco. However, RIC notes that this variety of the type has no known Spanish provenance, unlike the other Libertas type (see my V1339) attributed to Spain. The coin's theme is a civil war one and most certainly was struck very early in Vespasian's reign.

A beautiful coin in hand with a spectacular portrait.
8 commentsDavid Atherton03/15/16 at 01:13Jay GT4: Great rarity. Never seen one of these!
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688214 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569.
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
15 commentsDavid Atherton03/10/16 at 10:29mix_val: A satisfying addition to your collection
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688214 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569.
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
15 commentsDavid Atherton03/10/16 at 04:48Enodia: i'm a Greek coin snob and even i love this one...
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688214 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569.
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
15 commentsDavid Atherton03/10/16 at 04:07ancientdave: Wow! A marvelous find! Congrats!
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688214 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569.
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
15 commentsDavid Atherton03/10/16 at 03:41quadrans: Hoops, not an every day coin...
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688214 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569.
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
15 commentsDavid Atherton03/10/16 at 02:03ickster: Congratulations I end the day better informed tha...
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688214 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569.
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
15 commentsDavid Atherton03/10/16 at 01:01orfew: great coin David
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688214 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569.
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
15 commentsDavid Atherton03/09/16 at 22:32Sam: WOW ! Congratulations .. This is a home run
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688214 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569.
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
15 commentsDavid Atherton03/09/16 at 20:00Pharsalos: Fascinating rarity!
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688214 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569.
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
15 commentsDavid Atherton03/09/16 at 19:47Nemonater: Wonderful!
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688214 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569.
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
15 commentsDavid Atherton03/09/16 at 19:43Molinari: Congratulations!
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688214 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569.
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
15 commentsDavid Atherton03/09/16 at 19:31Jochen: Congrats!
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688214 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569.
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
15 commentsDavid Atherton03/09/16 at 19:18Jay GT4: What a coin! Great catch David!
V1395b.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1395117 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Ephesus Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1395 (R3). BMC 430. RSC 248. RPC 805 (1 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG VESPAS; Titus and Domitian veiled, togate, stg. front (heads l.), each with patera
Ex CNG E368, 10 February 2016, lot 406.

Part of the first group of denarii struck at Ephesus. Unlike the other groups struck at the mint, this very rare early issue did not use mint-marks. My specimen is apparently the second known of the Titus and Domitian togate type (although the other specimen in the BM is off-centre and a possible mint-mark could be off flan).

A pleasing coin with a fine Ephesian style portrait. Much better in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/17/16 at 02:56ancientdave: Awesome find!
V1395b.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1395117 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Ephesus Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1395 (R3). BMC 430. RSC 248. RPC 805 (1 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG VESPAS; Titus and Domitian veiled, togate, stg. front (heads l.), each with patera
Ex CNG E368, 10 February 2016, lot 406.

Part of the first group of denarii struck at Ephesus. Unlike the other groups struck at the mint, this very rare early issue did not use mint-marks. My specimen is apparently the second known of the Titus and Domitian togate type (although the other specimen in the BM is off-centre and a possible mint-mark could be off flan).

A pleasing coin with a fine Ephesian style portrait. Much better in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/16/16 at 22:18Nemonater: Another great addition from a sharp eye!
V1395b.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1395117 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Ephesus Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1395 (R3). BMC 430. RSC 248. RPC 805 (1 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG VESPAS; Titus and Domitian veiled, togate, stg. front (heads l.), each with patera
Ex CNG E368, 10 February 2016, lot 406.

Part of the first group of denarii struck at Ephesus. Unlike the other groups struck at the mint, this very rare early issue did not use mint-marks. My specimen is apparently the second known of the Titus and Domitian togate type (although the other specimen in the BM is off-centre and a possible mint-mark could be off flan).

A pleasing coin with a fine Ephesian style portrait. Much better in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/16/16 at 18:30FlaviusDomitianus: Great catch, congrats.
V1395b.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1395117 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Ephesus Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1395 (R3). BMC 430. RSC 248. RPC 805 (1 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG VESPAS; Titus and Domitian veiled, togate, stg. front (heads l.), each with patera
Ex CNG E368, 10 February 2016, lot 406.

Part of the first group of denarii struck at Ephesus. Unlike the other groups struck at the mint, this very rare early issue did not use mint-marks. My specimen is apparently the second known of the Titus and Domitian togate type (although the other specimen in the BM is off-centre and a possible mint-mark could be off flan).

A pleasing coin with a fine Ephesian style portrait. Much better in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/16/16 at 18:29Sam: Phenomenal rarity , the reverse reminds me of Augu...
V1395b.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1395117 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Ephesus Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1395 (R3). BMC 430. RSC 248. RPC 805 (1 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG VESPAS; Titus and Domitian veiled, togate, stg. front (heads l.), each with patera
Ex CNG E368, 10 February 2016, lot 406.

Part of the first group of denarii struck at Ephesus. Unlike the other groups struck at the mint, this very rare early issue did not use mint-marks. My specimen is apparently the second known of the Titus and Domitian togate type (although the other specimen in the BM is off-centre and a possible mint-mark could be off flan).

A pleasing coin with a fine Ephesian style portrait. Much better in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/16/16 at 18:27okidoki: Indeed and a tough coin
V1395b.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1395117 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Ephesus Mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1395 (R3). BMC 430. RSC 248. RPC 805 (1 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: LIBERI IMP AVG VESPAS; Titus and Domitian veiled, togate, stg. front (heads l.), each with patera
Ex CNG E368, 10 February 2016, lot 406.

Part of the first group of denarii struck at Ephesus. Unlike the other groups struck at the mint, this very rare early issue did not use mint-marks. My specimen is apparently the second known of the Titus and Domitian togate type (although the other specimen in the BM is off-centre and a possible mint-mark could be off flan).

A pleasing coin with a fine Ephesian style portrait. Much better in hand.
6 commentsDavid Atherton02/16/16 at 18:06Jay GT4: Great acquisition David!
V1339.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1339119 viewsAR Denarius, 3.07g
Uncertain Spanish mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1339 (R2). BMC 360. RSC 259.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 39, 4 January 2016, lot 874.

Late in 69 during the waning stages of the Civil War, Spain began striking coins for Vespasian. Some of these Spanish issues may be earlier than those struck at Rome. The Libertas reverse was copied from the Spanish coinage of Galba and both he and Vitellius issued left facing portraits in the province. The metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting of this issue shows Spanish silver was used in its production, however, the location of the mint is a mystery. The coin's style is different than those traditionally attributed to Tarraco(?), so another mint must have been active in the province. Also of note, the style is very similar to those of RIC's Uncertain western mint group 2 denarii. The reverse type of Libertas was used by the various contenders during the Civil War to show they were rescuing the Roman people from 'tyranny'.

A wonderful portrait in similar style to the Spanish issues of Vitellius. Very rare.
8 commentsDavid Atherton01/16/16 at 10:25okidoki: Nice
V1339.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1339119 viewsAR Denarius, 3.07g
Uncertain Spanish mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1339 (R2). BMC 360. RSC 259.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 39, 4 January 2016, lot 874.

Late in 69 during the waning stages of the Civil War, Spain began striking coins for Vespasian. Some of these Spanish issues may be earlier than those struck at Rome. The Libertas reverse was copied from the Spanish coinage of Galba and both he and Vitellius issued left facing portraits in the province. The metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting of this issue shows Spanish silver was used in its production, however, the location of the mint is a mystery. The coin's style is different than those traditionally attributed to Tarraco(?), so another mint must have been active in the province. Also of note, the style is very similar to those of RIC's Uncertain western mint group 2 denarii. The reverse type of Libertas was used by the various contenders during the Civil War to show they were rescuing the Roman people from 'tyranny'.

A wonderful portrait in similar style to the Spanish issues of Vitellius. Very rare.
8 commentsDavid Atherton01/14/16 at 06:18FlaviusDomitianus: Interesting rarity, congrats.
V1339.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1339119 viewsAR Denarius, 3.07g
Uncertain Spanish mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1339 (R2). BMC 360. RSC 259.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 39, 4 January 2016, lot 874.

Late in 69 during the waning stages of the Civil War, Spain began striking coins for Vespasian. Some of these Spanish issues may be earlier than those struck at Rome. The Libertas reverse was copied from the Spanish coinage of Galba and both he and Vitellius issued left facing portraits in the province. The metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting of this issue shows Spanish silver was used in its production, however, the location of the mint is a mystery. The coin's style is different than those traditionally attributed to Tarraco(?), so another mint must have been active in the province. Also of note, the style is very similar to those of RIC's Uncertain western mint group 2 denarii. The reverse type of Libertas was used by the various contenders during the Civil War to show they were rescuing the Roman people from 'tyranny'.

A wonderful portrait in similar style to the Spanish issues of Vitellius. Very rare.
8 commentsDavid Atherton01/14/16 at 04:36ancientdave: A very cool coin. Nice find!
V1339.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1339119 viewsAR Denarius, 3.07g
Uncertain Spanish mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1339 (R2). BMC 360. RSC 259.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 39, 4 January 2016, lot 874.

Late in 69 during the waning stages of the Civil War, Spain began striking coins for Vespasian. Some of these Spanish issues may be earlier than those struck at Rome. The Libertas reverse was copied from the Spanish coinage of Galba and both he and Vitellius issued left facing portraits in the province. The metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting of this issue shows Spanish silver was used in its production, however, the location of the mint is a mystery. The coin's style is different than those traditionally attributed to Tarraco(?), so another mint must have been active in the province. Also of note, the style is very similar to those of RIC's Uncertain western mint group 2 denarii. The reverse type of Libertas was used by the various contenders during the Civil War to show they were rescuing the Roman people from 'tyranny'.

A wonderful portrait in similar style to the Spanish issues of Vitellius. Very rare.
8 commentsDavid Atherton01/14/16 at 03:22quadrans: Great addition
V1339.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1339119 viewsAR Denarius, 3.07g
Uncertain Spanish mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1339 (R2). BMC 360. RSC 259.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 39, 4 January 2016, lot 874.

Late in 69 during the waning stages of the Civil War, Spain began striking coins for Vespasian. Some of these Spanish issues may be earlier than those struck at Rome. The Libertas reverse was copied from the Spanish coinage of Galba and both he and Vitellius issued left facing portraits in the province. The metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting of this issue shows Spanish silver was used in its production, however, the location of the mint is a mystery. The coin's style is different than those traditionally attributed to Tarraco(?), so another mint must have been active in the province. Also of note, the style is very similar to those of RIC's Uncertain western mint group 2 denarii. The reverse type of Libertas was used by the various contenders during the Civil War to show they were rescuing the Roman people from 'tyranny'.

A wonderful portrait in similar style to the Spanish issues of Vitellius. Very rare.
8 commentsDavid Atherton01/14/16 at 01:04ickster: Nice coin and, as always, very educational. Thanks...
V1339.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1339119 viewsAR Denarius, 3.07g
Uncertain Spanish mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1339 (R2). BMC 360. RSC 259.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 39, 4 January 2016, lot 874.

Late in 69 during the waning stages of the Civil War, Spain began striking coins for Vespasian. Some of these Spanish issues may be earlier than those struck at Rome. The Libertas reverse was copied from the Spanish coinage of Galba and both he and Vitellius issued left facing portraits in the province. The metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting of this issue shows Spanish silver was used in its production, however, the location of the mint is a mystery. The coin's style is different than those traditionally attributed to Tarraco(?), so another mint must have been active in the province. Also of note, the style is very similar to those of RIC's Uncertain western mint group 2 denarii. The reverse type of Libertas was used by the various contenders during the Civil War to show they were rescuing the Roman people from 'tyranny'.

A wonderful portrait in similar style to the Spanish issues of Vitellius. Very rare.
8 commentsDavid Atherton01/13/16 at 23:46Mat: Great stuff!
V1339.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1339119 viewsAR Denarius, 3.07g
Uncertain Spanish mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1339 (R2). BMC 360. RSC 259.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 39, 4 January 2016, lot 874.

Late in 69 during the waning stages of the Civil War, Spain began striking coins for Vespasian. Some of these Spanish issues may be earlier than those struck at Rome. The Libertas reverse was copied from the Spanish coinage of Galba and both he and Vitellius issued left facing portraits in the province. The metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting of this issue shows Spanish silver was used in its production, however, the location of the mint is a mystery. The coin's style is different than those traditionally attributed to Tarraco(?), so another mint must have been active in the province. Also of note, the style is very similar to those of RIC's Uncertain western mint group 2 denarii. The reverse type of Libertas was used by the various contenders during the Civil War to show they were rescuing the Roman people from 'tyranny'.

A wonderful portrait in similar style to the Spanish issues of Vitellius. Very rare.
8 commentsDavid Atherton01/13/16 at 23:33Nemonater: Awesome acquisition. Very nice and interesting!
V1339.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1339119 viewsAR Denarius, 3.07g
Uncertain Spanish mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1339 (R2). BMC 360. RSC 259.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: LIBERTAS PVBLICA; Libertas stg. l., with pileus and rod
Ex Pecunem 39, 4 January 2016, lot 874.

Late in 69 during the waning stages of the Civil War, Spain began striking coins for Vespasian. Some of these Spanish issues may be earlier than those struck at Rome. The Libertas reverse was copied from the Spanish coinage of Galba and both he and Vitellius issued left facing portraits in the province. The metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting of this issue shows Spanish silver was used in its production, however, the location of the mint is a mystery. The coin's style is different than those traditionally attributed to Tarraco(?), so another mint must have been active in the province. Also of note, the style is very similar to those of RIC's Uncertain western mint group 2 denarii. The reverse type of Libertas was used by the various contenders during the Civil War to show they were rescuing the Roman people from 'tyranny'.

A wonderful portrait in similar style to the Spanish issues of Vitellius. Very rare.
8 commentsDavid Atherton01/13/16 at 23:16Jay GT4: Brilliant! Congrats David
vesp den _600 hjb capricorn rev~0.JPG
Vespasian-RIC-1058258 viewsAR Denarius, 3.21g
Rome mint, 79 AD
RIC 1058 (C). BMC 251. RSC 554.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: TR - POT X COS VIIII; Capricorn l. : below, globe
Ex Berk 138, 1 June 2004, lot 224.

Another of Vespasian's recoinages. This time a reverse of Augustus is copied.

A coin in a remarkable state of preservation. The globe under the capricorn is normally cross-hatched. I've never come across another one with curving latitudinal lines.
6 commentsVespasian7010/08/15 at 08:14lordmarcovan: I've always loved this type. Used to have a m...
2630313.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-145697 viewsAR Denarius, 2.35g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD
RIC 1456 (R). BMC p. 99. RSC 68. RPC 852 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, star
Ex CNG E263, 31 August 2011, lot 313.

This type is from one of the last major series minted at Ephesus. Also minted at Rome but here distinguished by an ornate high back chair.

Despite this denarius having a few flaws and a cracked flan, the major devices are intact and the details of the reverse are quite well preserved, especially the cornucopiae and the poppies.

4 commentsDavid Atherton09/24/15 at 16:41orfew: That reverse just pops off of the coin. Very nice.
10702LG.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1400111 viewsAR Denarius, 2.81g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1400 (R). BMC 434A. RSC 65c. RPC 809 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, horizontal Φ
Ex G&N, eBay, 04 June 2012. Ex Hirsch 280, 9 February 2012, lot 4664.

Part of an early series from Ephesus, the coin is quite rare, as are most of the coins from the same issue. The BM has two specimens.

Minted on a fairly tight flan, the coin has a pleasing style and is in good metal.

Thanks to Curtis Clay for additional attribution help.
4 commentsDavid Atherton09/24/15 at 16:40orfew: Wow, such a great portrait
V1302a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1302125 viewsAR Denarius, 3.36g
Tarraco mint, 70 AD
RIC 1302 (R). BMC 351A. RSC 5.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CEASAR AVG F COS CAESAR AVG F PR; Heads of Titus, bare, r., and Domitian, bare, l., confronting
Ex Pecunem 35, 6 September 2015, lot 582.

Vespasian announced his intentions of founding a dynasty to the Senate - "My successor shall be my son or no one at all." He struck coins to advertise the fact and the type with confronting heads of Titus and Domitian is one of the more blatant examples of this. The type is most commonly encountered from Rome, however, a much rarer example of the type was struck at Tarraco in Spain. They can be distinguished from Rome by style and the use of dots in the legend. It can be difficult to sort these Spanish denarii out from the Rome examples because at this early stage Rome did not have a standard style. My coin is a reverse die match with the Gemini X, lot 733 specimen.

A few scrapes and the use of a worn die do not distract too much from this coin's appeal.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/16/15 at 06:16okidoki: congrats looks like some did not like Domitian
V1302a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1302125 viewsAR Denarius, 3.36g
Tarraco mint, 70 AD
RIC 1302 (R). BMC 351A. RSC 5.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CEASAR AVG F COS CAESAR AVG F PR; Heads of Titus, bare, r., and Domitian, bare, l., confronting
Ex Pecunem 35, 6 September 2015, lot 582.

Vespasian announced his intentions of founding a dynasty to the Senate - "My successor shall be my son or no one at all." He struck coins to advertise the fact and the type with confronting heads of Titus and Domitian is one of the more blatant examples of this. The type is most commonly encountered from Rome, however, a much rarer example of the type was struck at Tarraco in Spain. They can be distinguished from Rome by style and the use of dots in the legend. It can be difficult to sort these Spanish denarii out from the Rome examples because at this early stage Rome did not have a standard style. My coin is a reverse die match with the Gemini X, lot 733 specimen.

A few scrapes and the use of a worn die do not distract too much from this coin's appeal.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/15/15 at 05:50FlaviusDomitianus: Great find, congrats!
V1302a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1302125 viewsAR Denarius, 3.36g
Tarraco mint, 70 AD
RIC 1302 (R). BMC 351A. RSC 5.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CEASAR AVG F COS CAESAR AVG F PR; Heads of Titus, bare, r., and Domitian, bare, l., confronting
Ex Pecunem 35, 6 September 2015, lot 582.

Vespasian announced his intentions of founding a dynasty to the Senate - "My successor shall be my son or no one at all." He struck coins to advertise the fact and the type with confronting heads of Titus and Domitian is one of the more blatant examples of this. The type is most commonly encountered from Rome, however, a much rarer example of the type was struck at Tarraco in Spain. They can be distinguished from Rome by style and the use of dots in the legend. It can be difficult to sort these Spanish denarii out from the Rome examples because at this early stage Rome did not have a standard style. My coin is a reverse die match with the Gemini X, lot 733 specimen.

A few scrapes and the use of a worn die do not distract too much from this coin's appeal.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/15/15 at 01:33Nemonater: Outstanding!
V1302a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1302125 viewsAR Denarius, 3.36g
Tarraco mint, 70 AD
RIC 1302 (R). BMC 351A. RSC 5.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CEASAR AVG F COS CAESAR AVG F PR; Heads of Titus, bare, r., and Domitian, bare, l., confronting
Ex Pecunem 35, 6 September 2015, lot 582.

Vespasian announced his intentions of founding a dynasty to the Senate - "My successor shall be my son or no one at all." He struck coins to advertise the fact and the type with confronting heads of Titus and Domitian is one of the more blatant examples of this. The type is most commonly encountered from Rome, however, a much rarer example of the type was struck at Tarraco in Spain. They can be distinguished from Rome by style and the use of dots in the legend. It can be difficult to sort these Spanish denarii out from the Rome examples because at this early stage Rome did not have a standard style. My coin is a reverse die match with the Gemini X, lot 733 specimen.

A few scrapes and the use of a worn die do not distract too much from this coin's appeal.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/14/15 at 22:08Sam: Superb , coin , description and photo.
V1302a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1302125 viewsAR Denarius, 3.36g
Tarraco mint, 70 AD
RIC 1302 (R). BMC 351A. RSC 5.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CEASAR AVG F COS CAESAR AVG F PR; Heads of Titus, bare, r., and Domitian, bare, l., confronting
Ex Pecunem 35, 6 September 2015, lot 582.

Vespasian announced his intentions of founding a dynasty to the Senate - "My successor shall be my son or no one at all." He struck coins to advertise the fact and the type with confronting heads of Titus and Domitian is one of the more blatant examples of this. The type is most commonly encountered from Rome, however, a much rarer example of the type was struck at Tarraco in Spain. They can be distinguished from Rome by style and the use of dots in the legend. It can be difficult to sort these Spanish denarii out from the Rome examples because at this early stage Rome did not have a standard style. My coin is a reverse die match with the Gemini X, lot 733 specimen.

A few scrapes and the use of a worn die do not distract too much from this coin's appeal.
5 commentsDavid Atherton09/14/15 at 22:07Jay GT4: Wonderful Spanish style! I still don't have o...
5020b.jpg
Vespasian RIC-850146 viewsAR Denarius, 3.44g
Rome Mint, 76 AD
RIC 850 (R2). BMC 279. RSC 554.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: IOVIS CVSTOS; Jupiter, bearded, naked, standing facing, sacrificing out of patera in r. hand over low garland altar and holding long vertical sceptre in l.
Acquired from Atlantis, August 2004.

Rare with left facing portrait.
2 commentsVespasian7008/13/15 at 14:18Lucas H: stellar example of a scarce coin. All of the exam...
V1465a.jpeg
Vespasian-RIC-1465106 viewsAR Denarius, 3.02g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD
RIC 1465 (R2). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower l., annulet, at lower r., star
Ex Ancient Treasures, eBay, 26 July 2015.

The various mint marks found on the denarii struck for the Flavians at Ephesus are somewhat mysterious in purpose and meaning. There is no blatant reason why they are present in the issue. This denarius struck for Vespasian in 74 towards the end of the series has not one, but two mint marks on the reverse, an annulet and star. Perhaps they were internal mint control marks?

A victorious peace bestowed by the emperor is advertised on the reverse, while a severe looking Vespasian on the obverse demands you love and accept that peace, or else.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/03/15 at 23:05Randygeki(h2): Very nice!
V1465a.jpeg
Vespasian-RIC-1465106 viewsAR Denarius, 3.02g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD
RIC 1465 (R2). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower l., annulet, at lower r., star
Ex Ancient Treasures, eBay, 26 July 2015.

The various mint marks found on the denarii struck for the Flavians at Ephesus are somewhat mysterious in purpose and meaning. There is no blatant reason why they are present in the issue. This denarius struck for Vespasian in 74 towards the end of the series has not one, but two mint marks on the reverse, an annulet and star. Perhaps they were internal mint control marks?

A victorious peace bestowed by the emperor is advertised on the reverse, while a severe looking Vespasian on the obverse demands you love and accept that peace, or else.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/03/15 at 20:52Nemonater: Very nice
V1465a.jpeg
Vespasian-RIC-1465106 viewsAR Denarius, 3.02g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD
RIC 1465 (R2). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower l., annulet, at lower r., star
Ex Ancient Treasures, eBay, 26 July 2015.

The various mint marks found on the denarii struck for the Flavians at Ephesus are somewhat mysterious in purpose and meaning. There is no blatant reason why they are present in the issue. This denarius struck for Vespasian in 74 towards the end of the series has not one, but two mint marks on the reverse, an annulet and star. Perhaps they were internal mint control marks?

A victorious peace bestowed by the emperor is advertised on the reverse, while a severe looking Vespasian on the obverse demands you love and accept that peace, or else.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/03/15 at 17:48okidoki: grimm face
V1465a.jpeg
Vespasian-RIC-1465106 viewsAR Denarius, 3.02g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD
RIC 1465 (R2). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower l., annulet, at lower r., star
Ex Ancient Treasures, eBay, 26 July 2015.

The various mint marks found on the denarii struck for the Flavians at Ephesus are somewhat mysterious in purpose and meaning. There is no blatant reason why they are present in the issue. This denarius struck for Vespasian in 74 towards the end of the series has not one, but two mint marks on the reverse, an annulet and star. Perhaps they were internal mint control marks?

A victorious peace bestowed by the emperor is advertised on the reverse, while a severe looking Vespasian on the obverse demands you love and accept that peace, or else.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/03/15 at 16:52Charles S: very nice coin
V1465a.jpeg
Vespasian-RIC-1465106 viewsAR Denarius, 3.02g
Ephesus mint, 74 AD
RIC 1465 (R2). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm; at lower l., annulet, at lower r., star
Ex Ancient Treasures, eBay, 26 July 2015.

The various mint marks found on the denarii struck for the Flavians at Ephesus are somewhat mysterious in purpose and meaning. There is no blatant reason why they are present in the issue. This denarius struck for Vespasian in 74 towards the end of the series has not one, but two mint marks on the reverse, an annulet and star. Perhaps they were internal mint control marks?

A victorious peace bestowed by the emperor is advertised on the reverse, while a severe looking Vespasian on the obverse demands you love and accept that peace, or else.
5 commentsDavid Atherton08/03/15 at 11:21Mat: Neat find and interesting portrait.
V853b.JPG
Vespasian RIC-853189 viewsAR Denarius, 3.41g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 853 (R2). BMC p. 34 note. RSC 374.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, bare, l.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Ex Private Collection.

An extremely rare denarius from 76. Left facing, bare head, and COS VII combine to make this an exceptional coin. This is the 7th known specimen: Berlin, Paris, Gemini 2013, Curtis Clay 2010, Private collection, and ebay 2003 (RIC plate coin) are the other examples. All have the same obverse die, Clay 2010 and my coin are die pair matches. These bare portraits were struck with the Pax reverse in both 75 (unique) and in 76. Why the engraver chose an unlaureate bust is a mystery. Perhaps struck in error, which would explain why so few were minted.

I haven't seen a photo of the other unique bare head Pax type from 75 (RIC 773, Vecchi 13, lot 757), but Curtis Clay has confirmed it is a different obverse die and may possibly read COS VII! If true, the bare l. portrait was only struck with the COS VII Pax. Only having the coin in hand will solve the mystery for certain. *

A compact and neat portrait emphasising Vespasian's militaristic look.

* See my RIC 773 for confirmation of the bare head portrait in 75, added December 2017.
8 commentsDavid Atherton05/22/15 at 07:53labienus: Glad it found its home. Best. Pierre
V853b.JPG
Vespasian RIC-853189 viewsAR Denarius, 3.41g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 853 (R2). BMC p. 34 note. RSC 374.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, bare, l.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Ex Private Collection.

An extremely rare denarius from 76. Left facing, bare head, and COS VII combine to make this an exceptional coin. This is the 7th known specimen: Berlin, Paris, Gemini 2013, Curtis Clay 2010, Private collection, and ebay 2003 (RIC plate coin) are the other examples. All have the same obverse die, Clay 2010 and my coin are die pair matches. These bare portraits were struck with the Pax reverse in both 75 (unique) and in 76. Why the engraver chose an unlaureate bust is a mystery. Perhaps struck in error, which would explain why so few were minted.

I haven't seen a photo of the other unique bare head Pax type from 75 (RIC 773, Vecchi 13, lot 757), but Curtis Clay has confirmed it is a different obverse die and may possibly read COS VII! If true, the bare l. portrait was only struck with the COS VII Pax. Only having the coin in hand will solve the mystery for certain. *

A compact and neat portrait emphasising Vespasian's militaristic look.

* See my RIC 773 for confirmation of the bare head portrait in 75, added December 2017.
8 commentsDavid Atherton05/19/15 at 05:38FlaviusDomitianus: Great addition.
V853b.JPG
Vespasian RIC-853189 viewsAR Denarius, 3.41g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 853 (R2). BMC p. 34 note. RSC 374.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, bare, l.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Ex Private Collection.

An extremely rare denarius from 76. Left facing, bare head, and COS VII combine to make this an exceptional coin. This is the 7th known specimen: Berlin, Paris, Gemini 2013, Curtis Clay 2010, Private collection, and ebay 2003 (RIC plate coin) are the other examples. All have the same obverse die, Clay 2010 and my coin are die pair matches. These bare portraits were struck with the Pax reverse in both 75 (unique) and in 76. Why the engraver chose an unlaureate bust is a mystery. Perhaps struck in error, which would explain why so few were minted.

I haven't seen a photo of the other unique bare head Pax type from 75 (RIC 773, Vecchi 13, lot 757), but Curtis Clay has confirmed it is a different obverse die and may possibly read COS VII! If true, the bare l. portrait was only struck with the COS VII Pax. Only having the coin in hand will solve the mystery for certain. *

A compact and neat portrait emphasising Vespasian's militaristic look.

* See my RIC 773 for confirmation of the bare head portrait in 75, added December 2017.
8 commentsDavid Atherton05/19/15 at 04:56ancientdave: Very nice coin & great write-up!
V853b.JPG
Vespasian RIC-853189 viewsAR Denarius, 3.41g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 853 (R2). BMC p. 34 note. RSC 374.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, bare, l.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Ex Private Collection.

An extremely rare denarius from 76. Left facing, bare head, and COS VII combine to make this an exceptional coin. This is the 7th known specimen: Berlin, Paris, Gemini 2013, Curtis Clay 2010, Private collection, and ebay 2003 (RIC plate coin) are the other examples. All have the same obverse die, Clay 2010 and my coin are die pair matches. These bare portraits were struck with the Pax reverse in both 75 (unique) and in 76. Why the engraver chose an unlaureate bust is a mystery. Perhaps struck in error, which would explain why so few were minted.

I haven't seen a photo of the other unique bare head Pax type from 75 (RIC 773, Vecchi 13, lot 757), but Curtis Clay has confirmed it is a different obverse die and may possibly read COS VII! If true, the bare l. portrait was only struck with the COS VII Pax. Only having the coin in hand will solve the mystery for certain. *

A compact and neat portrait emphasising Vespasian's militaristic look.

* See my RIC 773 for confirmation of the bare head portrait in 75, added December 2017.
8 commentsDavid Atherton05/19/15 at 03:46quadrans: Congratulation....
V853b.JPG
Vespasian RIC-853189 viewsAR Denarius, 3.41g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 853 (R2). BMC p. 34 note. RSC 374.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, bare, l.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Ex Private Collection.

An extremely rare denarius from 76. Left facing, bare head, and COS VII combine to make this an exceptional coin. This is the 7th known specimen: Berlin, Paris, Gemini 2013, Curtis Clay 2010, Private collection, and ebay 2003 (RIC plate coin) are the other examples. All have the same obverse die, Clay 2010 and my coin are die pair matches. These bare portraits were struck with the Pax reverse in both 75 (unique) and in 76. Why the engraver chose an unlaureate bust is a mystery. Perhaps struck in error, which would explain why so few were minted.

I haven't seen a photo of the other unique bare head Pax type from 75 (RIC 773, Vecchi 13, lot 757), but Curtis Clay has confirmed it is a different obverse die and may possibly read COS VII! If true, the bare l. portrait was only struck with the COS VII Pax. Only having the coin in hand will solve the mystery for certain. *

A compact and neat portrait emphasising Vespasian's militaristic look.

* See my RIC 773 for confirmation of the bare head portrait in 75, added December 2017.
8 commentsDavid Atherton05/18/15 at 21:14Jay GT4: Fantastic!
V853b.JPG
Vespasian RIC-853189 viewsAR Denarius, 3.41g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 853 (R2). BMC p. 34 note. RSC 374.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, bare, l.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Ex Private Collection.

An extremely rare denarius from 76. Left facing, bare head, and COS VII combine to make this an exceptional coin. This is the 7th known specimen: Berlin, Paris, Gemini 2013, Curtis Clay 2010, Private collection, and ebay 2003 (RIC plate coin) are the other examples. All have the same obverse die, Clay 2010 and my coin are die pair matches. These bare portraits were struck with the Pax reverse in both 75 (unique) and in 76. Why the engraver chose an unlaureate bust is a mystery. Perhaps struck in error, which would explain why so few were minted.

I haven't seen a photo of the other unique bare head Pax type from 75 (RIC 773, Vecchi 13, lot 757), but Curtis Clay has confirmed it is a different obverse die and may possibly read COS VII! If true, the bare l. portrait was only struck with the COS VII Pax. Only having the coin in hand will solve the mystery for certain. *

A compact and neat portrait emphasising Vespasian's militaristic look.

* See my RIC 773 for confirmation of the bare head portrait in 75, added December 2017.
8 commentsDavid Atherton05/18/15 at 21:09Nemonater: Absolutely wonderful!
V853b.JPG
Vespasian RIC-853189 viewsAR Denarius, 3.41g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 853 (R2). BMC p. 34 note. RSC 374.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, bare, l.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Ex Private Collection.

An extremely rare denarius from 76. Left facing, bare head, and COS VII combine to make this an exceptional coin. This is the 7th known specimen: Berlin, Paris, Gemini 2013, Curtis Clay 2010, Private collection, and ebay 2003 (RIC plate coin) are the other examples. All have the same obverse die, Clay 2010 and my coin are die pair matches. These bare portraits were struck with the Pax reverse in both 75 (unique) and in 76. Why the engraver chose an unlaureate bust is a mystery. Perhaps struck in error, which would explain why so few were minted.

I haven't seen a photo of the other unique bare head Pax type from 75 (RIC 773, Vecchi 13, lot 757), but Curtis Clay has confirmed it is a different obverse die and may possibly read COS VII! If true, the bare l. portrait was only struck with the COS VII Pax. Only having the coin in hand will solve the mystery for certain. *

A compact and neat portrait emphasising Vespasian's militaristic look.

* See my RIC 773 for confirmation of the bare head portrait in 75, added December 2017.
8 commentsDavid Atherton05/18/15 at 21:07David Atherton: Thanks Curtis for the additonal info. I will ammen...
V853b.JPG
Vespasian RIC-853189 viewsAR Denarius, 3.41g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 853 (R2). BMC p. 34 note. RSC 374.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, bare, l.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Ex Private Collection.

An extremely rare denarius from 76. Left facing, bare head, and COS VII combine to make this an exceptional coin. This is the 7th known specimen: Berlin, Paris, Gemini 2013, Curtis Clay 2010, Private collection, and ebay 2003 (RIC plate coin) are the other examples. All have the same obverse die, Clay 2010 and my coin are die pair matches. These bare portraits were struck with the Pax reverse in both 75 (unique) and in 76. Why the engraver chose an unlaureate bust is a mystery. Perhaps struck in error, which would explain why so few were minted.

I haven't seen a photo of the other unique bare head Pax type from 75 (RIC 773, Vecchi 13, lot 757), but Curtis Clay has confirmed it is a different obverse die and may possibly read COS VII! If true, the bare l. portrait was only struck with the COS VII Pax. Only having the coin in hand will solve the mystery for certain. *

A compact and neat portrait emphasising Vespasian's militaristic look.

* See my RIC 773 for confirmation of the bare head portrait in 75, added December 2017.
8 commentsDavid Atherton05/18/15 at 20:36curtislclay: I was happy to acquire a specimen myself in 2010: ...
vesp den eagle.JPG
Vespasian RIC-848 (1)209 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 848 (C). BMC 184. RSC 120.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: COS VII across field; Eagle head l. standing on thunderbolt, on Altar. Very uncommon with thunderbolt showing.
Acquired from Bart Lewis, February 2004.

The BMCR speculates this reverse commemorates the passing of Mucianus 'the Emperor-maker', the former governor of Syria who helped Vespasian come to power. The eagle is a symbol of the afterlife.

A left facing bust of this type which is a bit scarcer than the right facing one.
5 commentsVespasian7004/19/15 at 13:57Lucas H: I've never see any of this series with the ega...
V1553.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1553169 viewsAR Denarius, 3.32g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1553 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: AVGVR above TRI POT below; priestly implements
Ex Ibercoin Auction 18.1, 3 December 2014, lot 5106.

The denarii struck at Antioch often copied reverse types struck at Rome. The priestly implements reverse is a quite common type for Rome but exceedingly rare at Antioch. This is the second known specimen of the type issued from Antioch, a die pair match with the other example sold by G&M in 2004, the RIC plate coin. The obverse is also a die match with my very rare RIC 1557 Victory type. The coin is attributed to Antioch based on style - the lettering being a dead giveaway.

A fantastic example nicely centered and in excellent condition.
5 commentsDavid Atherton01/06/15 at 12:51kc: top coin
V1553.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1553169 viewsAR Denarius, 3.32g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1553 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: AVGVR above TRI POT below; priestly implements
Ex Ibercoin Auction 18.1, 3 December 2014, lot 5106.

The denarii struck at Antioch often copied reverse types struck at Rome. The priestly implements reverse is a quite common type for Rome but exceedingly rare at Antioch. This is the second known specimen of the type issued from Antioch, a die pair match with the other example sold by G&M in 2004, the RIC plate coin. The obverse is also a die match with my very rare RIC 1557 Victory type. The coin is attributed to Antioch based on style - the lettering being a dead giveaway.

A fantastic example nicely centered and in excellent condition.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/15/14 at 15:06quadrans: Huhhh good pick up.. excellent, congratulation..
V1553.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1553169 viewsAR Denarius, 3.32g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1553 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: AVGVR above TRI POT below; priestly implements
Ex Ibercoin Auction 18.1, 3 December 2014, lot 5106.

The denarii struck at Antioch often copied reverse types struck at Rome. The priestly implements reverse is a quite common type for Rome but exceedingly rare at Antioch. This is the second known specimen of the type issued from Antioch, a die pair match with the other example sold by G&M in 2004, the RIC plate coin. The obverse is also a die match with my very rare RIC 1557 Victory type. The coin is attributed to Antioch based on style - the lettering being a dead giveaway.

A fantastic example nicely centered and in excellent condition.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/15/14 at 14:48FlaviusDomitianus: Congrats Hawkeye!
V1553.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1553169 viewsAR Denarius, 3.32g
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1553 (R3). BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: AVGVR above TRI POT below; priestly implements
Ex Ibercoin Auction 18.1, 3 December 2014, lot 5106.

The denarii struck at Antioch often copied reverse types struck at Rome. The priestly implements reverse is a quite common type for Rome but exceedingly rare at Antioch. This is the second known specimen of the type issued from Antioch, a die pair match with the other example sold by G&M in 2004, the RIC plate coin. The obverse is also a die match with my very rare RIC 1557 Victory type. The coin is attributed to Antioch based on style - the lettering being a dead giveaway.

A fantastic example nicely centered and in excellent condition.
5 commentsDavid Atherton12/15/14 at 12:00Jay GT4: Good to know your stuff! Great find!