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T16A.jpg
Titus RIC 16A49 viewsAR Denarius, 2.83g
Rome mint, 79 AD
RIC 16A (R3). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
Ex Roma Numismatics, E-Sale 58, 20 June 2019, lot 1078.

A unique First issue Annona paired with a Second issue obverse legend. The Annona reverse was a carry-over type struck for Titus as Caesar under Vespasian just before his death and was likely issued in the first few days of Titus' reign as a stop-gap until new reverse designs could be created. It is by far the rarest type from the First issue. The obverse legend changed in the second issue from the First issue's IMP T CAESAR to IMP TITVS CAES, this would be the standard obverse legend on the denarii for the remainder of the reign. The appearance of the Annona type with the new obverse legend is possibly a mule using an old First issue reverse die with a new Second issue obverse. There is a slight possibility that it was an intentional strike, but the fact that no other Second issue Annona specimens have surfaced is a strong indication it is accidental.

I informed Ian Carradice of the piece and he has assigned it RIC 16A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda with the note: 'Perhaps a mule, with rev die from the previous issue'.

Good Roman style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton07/16/19 at 22:30Nemonater: Awesome addition!
T16A.jpg
Titus RIC 16A49 viewsAR Denarius, 2.83g
Rome mint, 79 AD
RIC 16A (R3). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
Ex Roma Numismatics, E-Sale 58, 20 June 2019, lot 1078.

A unique First issue Annona paired with a Second issue obverse legend. The Annona reverse was a carry-over type struck for Titus as Caesar under Vespasian just before his death and was likely issued in the first few days of Titus' reign as a stop-gap until new reverse designs could be created. It is by far the rarest type from the First issue. The obverse legend changed in the second issue from the First issue's IMP T CAESAR to IMP TITVS CAES, this would be the standard obverse legend on the denarii for the remainder of the reign. The appearance of the Annona type with the new obverse legend is possibly a mule using an old First issue reverse die with a new Second issue obverse. There is a slight possibility that it was an intentional strike, but the fact that no other Second issue Annona specimens have surfaced is a strong indication it is accidental.

I informed Ian Carradice of the piece and he has assigned it RIC 16A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda with the note: 'Perhaps a mule, with rev die from the previous issue'.

Good Roman style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton07/16/19 at 20:53okidoki: Nice find
T16A.jpg
Titus RIC 16A49 viewsAR Denarius, 2.83g
Rome mint, 79 AD
RIC 16A (R3). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
Ex Roma Numismatics, E-Sale 58, 20 June 2019, lot 1078.

A unique First issue Annona paired with a Second issue obverse legend. The Annona reverse was a carry-over type struck for Titus as Caesar under Vespasian just before his death and was likely issued in the first few days of Titus' reign as a stop-gap until new reverse designs could be created. It is by far the rarest type from the First issue. The obverse legend changed in the second issue from the First issue's IMP T CAESAR to IMP TITVS CAES, this would be the standard obverse legend on the denarii for the remainder of the reign. The appearance of the Annona type with the new obverse legend is possibly a mule using an old First issue reverse die with a new Second issue obverse. There is a slight possibility that it was an intentional strike, but the fact that no other Second issue Annona specimens have surfaced is a strong indication it is accidental.

I informed Ian Carradice of the piece and he has assigned it RIC 16A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda with the note: 'Perhaps a mule, with rev die from the previous issue'.

Good Roman style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton07/16/19 at 20:35Jay GT4: Great find David
V1137.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-113719 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.51g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1137 (R). BMC p. 198 note ‡.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: S P Q R / •P•P• / OB CIVES / SERVATOS within oak wreath
Ex Leu Web Auction 8, 29-30 June 2019, lot 1008.

During the great bronze issue of 71 a sestertius reverse type was struck at both Rome and Lyon (Lugdunum) which commemorates the Senate awarding the corona civica to Vespasian. The corona civica was originally a military honour bestowed upon a Roman who had saved a fellow citizen's life in battle. It was one of the greatest public honours. In the imperial era the honour developed from a coveted military decoration into an imperial emblem granted by the Senate to the emperor. The wreath was made of oak leaves and is sometimes called a corona quercea after the common name for the oak. Artistically it is sometimes depicted with acorns scattered amongst the leaves. Plutarch believed the oak was chosen for this highest of honours for several reasons. The tree was easily found throughout the countryside and was quite convenient for fashioning a wreath when the need arose. Also, the oak is sacred to Jupiter and Juno and thus was an appropriate symbolic honour given to one who has saved the life of a fellow Roman citizen, or indeed the state. Finally, the early settlers of Rome, the Arcadians, were nicknamed 'acorn-eaters' in an oracle of Apollo.

The Wreath was awarded to Vespasian by the Senate for rescuing the Roman people from civil war and bringing about peace. The legend within the wreath S P Q R / P P / OB CIVES / SERVATOS translates as: 'The Senate and the Roman People / Father of the Nation / For Having Saved the Citizens'. This rare Lugdunese specimen commemorating the award was struck during the first bronze issue at that mint.

Cleaned surfaces with brass toning.
2 commentsDavid Atherton07/16/19 at 20:32Jay GT4: Lovely
Lycia_Masekytes_RPC1_3303.jpg
Lycian League, Masikytes2 viewsLycian League, Masikytes. c. 40-35 BC. AR Hemidrachm (1.70 gm). Laureate head of Apollo r. / Kithara (lyre), M-A across fields, serpent coiled around omphalos to l., all within incuse square.  EF.  CNG EA 447 #118. Ex-Dr. Erik Miller Coll. RPC I #3303; Troxell, Lycian, Period IV, Series 3 #97; McClean 8875.
In Greek myths, Apollo slayed the great serpent Python so that he could establish his oracular temple at Delphi. An omphalos marked the spot where he slayed Python and is depicted on ancient coins as an omphalos stone with a serpent wound around it.
1 commentsChristian T07/16/19 at 14:14shanxi: nice one
V1137.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-113719 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.51g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1137 (R). BMC p. 198 note ‡.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: S P Q R / •P•P• / OB CIVES / SERVATOS within oak wreath
Ex Leu Web Auction 8, 29-30 June 2019, lot 1008.

During the great bronze issue of 71 a sestertius reverse type was struck at both Rome and Lyon (Lugdunum) which commemorates the Senate awarding the corona civica to Vespasian. The corona civica was originally a military honour bestowed upon a Roman who had saved a fellow citizen's life in battle. It was one of the greatest public honours. In the imperial era the honour developed from a coveted military decoration into an imperial emblem granted by the Senate to the emperor. The wreath was made of oak leaves and is sometimes called a corona quercea after the common name for the oak. Artistically it is sometimes depicted with acorns scattered amongst the leaves. Plutarch believed the oak was chosen for this highest of honours for several reasons. The tree was easily found throughout the countryside and was quite convenient for fashioning a wreath when the need arose. Also, the oak is sacred to Jupiter and Juno and thus was an appropriate symbolic honour given to one who has saved the life of a fellow Roman citizen, or indeed the state. Finally, the early settlers of Rome, the Arcadians, were nicknamed 'acorn-eaters' in an oracle of Apollo.

The Wreath was awarded to Vespasian by the Senate for rescuing the Roman people from civil war and bringing about peace. The legend within the wreath S P Q R / P P / OB CIVES / SERVATOS translates as: 'The Senate and the Roman People / Father of the Nation / For Having Saved the Citizens'. This rare Lugdunese specimen commemorating the award was struck during the first bronze issue at that mint.

Cleaned surfaces with brass toning.
2 commentsDavid Atherton07/16/19 at 13:17FlaviusDomitianus: Nice example.
Constantius_II.jpg
Roman Empire, Constantius II, Fel temp reparatio,A Soldier attacks the horseman145 viewsRIC VIII : 132
Struck A.D.350 - 355
Antioch
1 commentsXLi07/16/19 at 05:38Randygeki(h2): Very nice!
fall.jpg
Roman Empire, Constantius II77 viewsCa. 348-350 AD.
SMNS
RIC 82
Ex Lanz 2017
3 commentsXLi07/16/19 at 05:37Randygeki(h2): Excellent !
AR_DENARIUS_OF_MARK_ANTONY_AND_OCTAVIAN_CAESAR_THE_TRIUMVIRS_PERIOD_41_BC_5.jpg
Mark Antony (Triumvir) Gens: Antonia Moneyer: M. Barbatius Pollio Coin: Silver Denarius 3 viewsM ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P, - Bare head of Mark Antony right
CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C - Bare head of Octavian right.
Mint: Ephesus (41 BC)
Wt./Size/Axis: 3.00g / 19mm / 12h
References:
RSC 8
Crawford 517/2
CRI 243
Sydenham 1181
Acquisition/Sale: imperatorcoins-and-estatesales eBay $0.00 07/19
Notes: Jul 14, 19 - The Gary R. Wilson Collection

(Coin broken probably from crystallization and repaired.)
2 commentsGary W207/15/19 at 19:11Gary W2: I agree. For what I paid, I can live with the brea...
020_Vespasian,_AR-Den,_IMP_CAESAR_VESPAS_AVG_COS_III_TR_P_P_P,_PACI_AVGVSTAE,_EPHE,_RIC_1431,_BMC_457,_RSC_276,_RPC_833,_Ephesos_71_AD_Q-001,_6h,_17-18mm,_3,41g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1431, Ephesus, AR-Denarius, PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, #124 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1431, Ephesus, AR-Denarius, PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, #1
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P, Laureate head right.
reverse: PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, holding wreath extended in right hand and palm over the left shoulder. EPHE lower right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0-18,0mm, weight: 3,41 g, axis: 0h,
mint: Ephesus, date: 71 A.D., ref: RIC² 1431, RPC II 833, BMC 457, RSC 276,
Q-001
5 commentsquadrans07/15/19 at 13:01Vincent: Gem of an example, with lovely classical style... ...
LepidusCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, AR Denarius - Crawford 495/2d12 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Aemilius Lepidus and Octavian, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.70g; 20mm).
Military Mint in Italy.

Obverse: LEPIDVS· PONT· MAX· III· V· R· P· C; bare head of Lepidus facing right.

Reverse: C· CAESAR· IMP· III· VIR· R ·P· C; bare head of Octavian facing right.

References: Crawford 495/2d; HCRI 140a; Sydenham 1323var (rev legend); Aemilia 35var (rev legend); BMCRR (Africa) 29-31var (rev legend); Banti & Simonetti 7 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Leu Numismatik Auction 8 (30 Jun 2019) Lot 949; Leu 7 (9 May 1973) Lot 317; Joseph Martini Collection [R.Ratto (24 Feb 1930) Lot 1334]; R. Ratto FPL (1927) Lot 629; Dr. Bonazzi Collection [R.Ratto (23 Jan 1924) Lot 1352].

This reverse die differs from most of this denarius issue in that the inscription begins with the initial “C” for Octavian's first name (Caius), while the remainder of the issue begins, simply, "CAESAR." The coins appear to celebrate the formation of the Second Triumvirate, although it is unclear why Lepidus did not also strike coins with Antony’s portrait.
1 commentsCarausius07/15/19 at 03:55Jay GT4: Wonderful. Congrats
Domitian_RIC_435_~0.jpg
Roman, Domitian, AR Denarius6 viewsDOMITIAN, (A.D. 81-96), silver denarius, Rome mint, issued A.D. 86, Second Issue
(3.47 g),
Obv. laureate head of Domitian to right, around IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V, Rev. around IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P, Minerva standing to right, fighting, holding javelin and shield,
RIC 435, RSC 201b BMC 93.
Attractive blue and gold patina, extremely fine.
Ex Dr V.J.A. Flynn Collection. With old dealer's ticket.
Noble Numismatics Auction 120 Lot 3217 April 4, 2019.
2 commentsorfew07/15/19 at 02:41Jay GT4: That's a great coin!
Antoninus_Pius_Sestertius.jpg
Antoninus Pius Sestertius3 viewsObv. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate head right.
Rev. TR POT COS III S C, She-wolf standing right, suckling the twins Romulus and Remus.
Mint: Rome, 140 AD.

31mm 23.94g

RIC 648; Strack 895; Banti 439; BMCRE 1318

Ex Old French Collection

The she-wolf suckling the twins refers to the foundation myth of Rome and celebrates the 900th anniversary of the capital during the reign of Antoninus Pius.
1 commentskc07/15/19 at 02:40Jay GT4: Cool coin
AR_DENARIUS_OF_MARK_ANTONY_AND_OCTAVIAN_CAESAR_THE_TRIUMVIRS_PERIOD_41_BC_5.jpg
Mark Antony (Triumvir) Gens: Antonia Moneyer: M. Barbatius Pollio Coin: Silver Denarius 3 viewsM ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P, - Bare head of Mark Antony right
CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C - Bare head of Octavian right.
Mint: Ephesus (41 BC)
Wt./Size/Axis: 3.00g / 19mm / 12h
References:
RSC 8
Crawford 517/2
CRI 243
Sydenham 1181
Acquisition/Sale: imperatorcoins-and-estatesales eBay $0.00 07/19
Notes: Jul 14, 19 - The Gary R. Wilson Collection

(Coin broken probably from crystallization and repaired.)
2 commentsGary W207/15/19 at 02:19Jay GT4: At least you have all the pieces! Nice to have tw...
Domitian_Sestertius.jpg
Domitian Sestertius5 viewsObv. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XVII CENS PER P P, laureate head right.
Rev. IOVI VICTORI S C, Jupiter seated left, holding Victory and Long scepter.
Mint: Rome, 95-96 AD.

32mm 27.34g

RIC 412; BMCRE 474; Cohen 316

Domitian's full title at the time of his death was "Imperator Caesar divi Vespasiani filius Domitianus Augustus Germanicus, Pontifex maximus, Tribuniciae potestatis XVI, Imperator XXIII, Consul XVII, Censor perpetuus, Pater patriae" as shown on this sestertius.
The Flavian dynasty ended with Domitian. His successor was the long-time senator Nerva. He was a transitional candidate on the one hand from the Flavian circle and so wearable for the Praetorians and especially the Senate, on the other hand, he was expected as a childless, older man no long reign. However, his position was endangered, as Domitian had been very popular with the army and the people.
When the emperors represented Jupiter the Victorius on their coins, they either intend to ascribe the glory of their victories to him, or rather to designate themselves under the form and attributes of Jupiter Victor, as though they had conquered the enemy under his auspices.
1 commentskc07/15/19 at 01:38Jay GT4: Wow!
T6.JPG
Titus RIC 06100 viewsAR Denarius, 2.80g
Rome mint, 79 AD
RIC 6 (R2). BMC p. 432. RSC 270a.
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Ceres std. l., with corn ears and poppy and torch
Acquired from Marc Walter, eBay, 25 August 2012.

Minted in 79 AD after 1 July, this is an early denarius, indicated by the absence of P P (Pater Patriae) in the reverse legend.
The Ceres reverse is a carry-over type struck by Vespasian in 79 before his death and adopted by Titus after he donned the purple.

A type that is quite rare and hard to come by in trade. A reverse die match with the RIC plate coin.
7 commentsDavid Atherton07/14/19 at 01:30Jay GT4: Great rarity
T498aa.jpg
Titus RIC-49826 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.38g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
RIC 498 (C). BMC 309. RPC 501.
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
Acquired from Munthandel G. Henzen, June 2019.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. This sestertius with its massive portrait and large reverse figure is quite typical for this elusive mint. The reverse copies a common Pax type struck contemporaneously at Rome.

Good style with dark brown patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/13/19 at 22:20Jay GT4: Nice big coin!
G_354_Pergamon.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Asklepios, snake, omphalos, c/m owl8 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE 21, 200-133 BC
Obv.: laureate head of bearded Asklepios
Rev.: ΑΣΚΛΗΠΙΟΥ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ, snake coiled around omphalos, without monogram, countermark owl

AE, 10.6g, 20.5mm
Ref.: SNG France 1815 (with countermark)
1 commentsshanxi07/13/19 at 20:24quadrans: Nice piece.. , and great owl...
T498aa.jpg
Titus RIC-49826 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.38g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
RIC 498 (C). BMC 309. RPC 501.
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
Acquired from Munthandel G. Henzen, June 2019.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. This sestertius with its massive portrait and large reverse figure is quite typical for this elusive mint. The reverse copies a common Pax type struck contemporaneously at Rome.

Good style with dark brown patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/13/19 at 20:23quadrans: Great portrait,...
Domitian_RIC_435_~0.jpg
Roman, Domitian, AR Denarius6 viewsDOMITIAN, (A.D. 81-96), silver denarius, Rome mint, issued A.D. 86, Second Issue
(3.47 g),
Obv. laureate head of Domitian to right, around IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V, Rev. around IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P, Minerva standing to right, fighting, holding javelin and shield,
RIC 435, RSC 201b BMC 93.
Attractive blue and gold patina, extremely fine.
Ex Dr V.J.A. Flynn Collection. With old dealer's ticket.
Noble Numismatics Auction 120 Lot 3217 April 4, 2019.
2 commentsorfew07/13/19 at 20:21quadrans: Wow, nice piece...
T498aa.jpg
Titus RIC-49826 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.38g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
RIC 498 (C). BMC 309. RPC 501.
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
Acquired from Munthandel G. Henzen, June 2019.

A mystery mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends (DIVI VESP F for Titus), and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issue consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome. This sestertius with its massive portrait and large reverse figure is quite typical for this elusive mint. The reverse copies a common Pax type struck contemporaneously at Rome.

Good style with dark brown patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/13/19 at 17:47FlaviusDomitianus: Pleasant example with honest wear.
020_Vespasian,_AR-Den,_IMP_CAESAR_VESPAS_AVG_COS_III_TR_P_P_P,_PACI_AVGVSTAE,_EPHE,_RIC_1431,_BMC_457,_RSC_276,_RPC_833,_Ephesos_71_AD_Q-001,_6h,_17-18mm,_3,41g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1431, Ephesus, AR-Denarius, PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, #124 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1431, Ephesus, AR-Denarius, PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, #1
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P, Laureate head right.
reverse: PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, holding wreath extended in right hand and palm over the left shoulder. EPHE lower right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0-18,0mm, weight: 3,41 g, axis: 0h,
mint: Ephesus, date: 71 A.D., ref: RIC² 1431, RPC II 833, BMC 457, RSC 276,
Q-001
5 commentsquadrans07/13/19 at 14:10orfew: Lovely
020_Vespasian,_AR-Den,_IMP_CAESAR_VESPAS_AVG_COS_III_TR_P_P_P,_PACI_AVGVSTAE,_EPHE,_RIC_1431,_BMC_457,_RSC_276,_RPC_833,_Ephesos_71_AD_Q-001,_6h,_17-18mm,_3,41g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1431, Ephesus, AR-Denarius, PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, #124 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1431, Ephesus, AR-Denarius, PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, #1
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P, Laureate head right.
reverse: PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, holding wreath extended in right hand and palm over the left shoulder. EPHE lower right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0-18,0mm, weight: 3,41 g, axis: 0h,
mint: Ephesus, date: 71 A.D., ref: RIC² 1431, RPC II 833, BMC 457, RSC 276,
Q-001
5 commentsquadrans07/13/19 at 12:07*Alex: great eye appeal. Nice.
020_Vespasian,_AR-Den,_IMP_CAESAR_VESPAS_AVG_COS_III_TR_P_P_P,_PACI_AVGVSTAE,_EPHE,_RIC_1431,_BMC_457,_RSC_276,_RPC_833,_Ephesos_71_AD_Q-001,_6h,_17-18mm,_3,41g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1431, Ephesus, AR-Denarius, PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, #124 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1431, Ephesus, AR-Denarius, PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, #1
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P, Laureate head right.
reverse: PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, holding wreath extended in right hand and palm over the left shoulder. EPHE lower right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0-18,0mm, weight: 3,41 g, axis: 0h,
mint: Ephesus, date: 71 A.D., ref: RIC² 1431, RPC II 833, BMC 457, RSC 276,
Q-001
5 commentsquadrans07/13/19 at 10:30FlaviusDomitianus: Great example.
T220.jpg
Titus RIC-22048 viewsÆ As, 9.10g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
RIC 220 (R). BMC p. 266 note.
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: AETERNIT AVGVST; S C in field; Aeternitas stg. r., l. foot on globe, with sceptre and cornucopiae
Acquired from eBay, June 2019.

Aeternitas, the personification of eternity, as a coin type was first introduced during the reign of Vespasian and would be periodically struck until the 4th century. This As featuring Aeternitas was struck during Titus' second and largest bronze issue in 80-81. Mattingly in BMCRE II speculates the type here refers to the consecration of Vespasian - 'Aeternitas holds sceptre and cornucopiae, the attributes of majesty and prosperity, while the globe under her foot shows that the application is world-wide. Stress is laid more on the great future than on the great past of the Flavian line.' A most fitting interpretation for a coin that declares 'The eternity of the Augustus'.

Honest wear with greenish-brown patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/13/19 at 07:34quadrans: Nice one
series-x-2~0.jpg
S.835 Anglo-Saxon sceat4 viewsEclectic Anglo-Saxon sceat
S.835
Type 30a
Abramson 105-40
O: Facing bust, possibly Wodan/Odin
R: Two figures wearing hats and clothes and holding staves to the side. Female figure left, male right

This type, which features an obverse similar to the series X continental (Ribe) type, has two figures on the reverse. Both characters seem to be wearing hats, one with some sort of sunburst above it (possibly representing a halo) The figures seem to be representing a man and woman, which can be noted with crude anatomical features

Ex- TimeLines
1 commentsNap07/13/19 at 07:31quadrans: Interesting piece..
DomitianVictrix.jpg
RIC 791 Domitian denarius32 viewsIMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP XV
Laureate head right

IMP XXII COS XVII CENS PPP
Minerva, winged, flying left with spear and shield

Rome September 14, 95 AD-September 13, 96 AD

3.15g

RIC 791 (C)

Ex-Savoca 21st Blue Auction lot 1060
5 commentsJay GT407/13/19 at 07:30quadrans: Interesting piece..
15609101840072427343326582000083.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Anonymous Post Semi-Libral AE Uncia - Crawford 41/107 viewsRome, The Republic.
Anonymous (Post Semi-libral Series), 215-212 BCE.
AE Uncia (7.87g; 24mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma facing right; pellet (mark-of-value) behind.

Reverse: Prow facing right; ROMA above; pellet (mark-of-value) below.

References: Crawford 41/10; McCabe Group A1; RBW 135.

Provenance: Ex Nomisma E-Live Auction 10 (18 Jun 2019) Lot 12.

This series is the second of the “prow” struck bronze series. It is most easily recognized by the left side of the prow device which has a clearly delineated edge, while on later series the left side of the prow appears to extend off the side of the coin. The series was issued during the Second Punic War and reflects the continued reduction in weight standard of the Roman bronze coinage during the conflict; this issue having occurred on the heels of the “semi-libral reduction” of 217-215 BCE. It would soon be followed by further weight reductions.
2 commentsCarausius07/13/19 at 07:30quadrans: Nice one
C653ECA2-859E-4783-B657-5B7D0C00C9BC.jpeg
Crusaders . Principality of Antioch, Late Anonymous 1250-1268 AE 6 viewsCrusaders . Principality of Antioch, Late Anonymous 1250-1268 AE
15.4 mm , 0.32 g.
A-N-T-V counterclockwise in the angles of a long cross pattée
blundered A-N-T-I in the angles of a long cross pattée
Seltman, NC 1966, p. 61, 2 var.; CCS 132 var.
Ex Slocum Collection, Sotheby's, London, Auction of March 6th, 1997, lot 164 ; ex collection of Alex G. Malloy ; Forum Ancient Coins,April 2013 ; Ex Erich Wäckerlin collection
Ex Münzen & Medaillen GmbH
Auction 47 lot 160 .
1 commentsVladislav D07/13/19 at 07:29quadrans: Interesting piece..
RIC_1235_Vespasianus.jpg
RIC 1235 Vespasianus33 viewsObv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P, laureate head right
Rev: PROVIDENT / S C (in exergue), Great altar with six panels
AE/As (27.78 mm 9.950 g 6h) Struck in Lugdunum 77-78 A.D.
RIC 1235 (C), BMCRE-BNF unlisted
purchased on eBay from alora
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus07/13/19 at 07:29quadrans: Another nice piece
RIC_731_Vespasianus.jpg
RIC 0731 Vespasianus31 viewsObv: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS V CENS, Laureate head left
Rev: S-C, in field; Spes standing left, holding flower
AE/As (29.72 mm 10.17 g 6h) Struck in Rome 74 A.D.
RIC 731 (C), BMCRE unlisted, BNF 722
purchased on eBay from alora
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus07/13/19 at 07:29quadrans: Nice piece..
020_Vespasian,_AR-Den,_IMP_CAESAR_VESPAS_AVG_COS_III_TR_P_P_P,_PACI_AVGVSTAE,_EPHE,_RIC_1431,_BMC_457,_RSC_276,_RPC_833,_Ephesos_71_AD_Q-001,_6h,_17-18mm,_3,41g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1431, Ephesus, AR-Denarius, PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, #124 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1431, Ephesus, AR-Denarius, PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, #1
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P, Laureate head right.
reverse: PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, holding wreath extended in right hand and palm over the left shoulder. EPHE lower right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0-18,0mm, weight: 3,41 g, axis: 0h,
mint: Ephesus, date: 71 A.D., ref: RIC² 1431, RPC II 833, BMC 457, RSC 276,
Q-001
5 commentsquadrans07/13/19 at 02:16Jay GT4: Oh that's nice!
RIC_1235_Vespasianus.jpg
RIC 1235 Vespasianus33 viewsObv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P, laureate head right
Rev: PROVIDENT / S C (in exergue), Great altar with six panels
AE/As (27.78 mm 9.950 g 6h) Struck in Lugdunum 77-78 A.D.
RIC 1235 (C), BMCRE-BNF unlisted
purchased on eBay from alora
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus07/12/19 at 22:28David Atherton: Nice example.
Domitian_RIC_573.jpg
Domitian AR Denarius 88 CE First Issue19 viewsDomitian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 88. First Issue
3.25g, 19mm, 6h.
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN PM TR P VII, laureate head right
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P P P, Minerva standing right with spear and shield. RIC 573 (R2)
Ex: Roma Numismatics E-Sale 59 July 11, 2019 Lot 799
2 commentsorfew07/12/19 at 21:29FlaviusDomitianus: Sharp shooting, I overlooked this one!
Domitian_RIC_573.jpg
Domitian AR Denarius 88 CE First Issue19 viewsDomitian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 88. First Issue
3.25g, 19mm, 6h.
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN PM TR P VII, laureate head right
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P P P, Minerva standing right with spear and shield. RIC 573 (R2)
Ex: Roma Numismatics E-Sale 59 July 11, 2019 Lot 799
2 commentsorfew07/12/19 at 19:38Jay GT4: GERMAN!
Domitian_Ric_425.jpg
Domitian AR Denarius 86 CE First Issue14 viewsDomitian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 86. First Issue
3.38g, 20mm, 5h
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V, laureate head right
Rev: IMP XI COS XII CENS P P P, Minerva advancing right, holding spear and shield.
RIC 425 (R) BMC 88, RSC 194
Roma Numismatics E-Sale 57. Thursday 30th May 2019 Lot 861
1 commentsorfew07/12/19 at 19:37Jay GT4: Yeah!
Vespasian_Ric_970_new.jpg
Vespasian AR Denarius11 viewsVespasian AR Denarius 77-78
Obv: Laureate head left: CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG
Rev: CERES stg l with corn ears poppy and sceptre; CERES AVGVST
Ric 970, BMC Page 425 add note to no. 300 left facing variant Colchester, RSC 54a (Colchester)
Purchased from Ebay July 2019
1 commentsorfew07/12/19 at 19:37Jay GT4: Good eyes to find this one!
RIC_731_Vespasianus.jpg
RIC 0731 Vespasianus31 viewsObv: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS V CENS, Laureate head left
Rev: S-C, in field; Spes standing left, holding flower
AE/As (29.72 mm 10.17 g 6h) Struck in Rome 74 A.D.
RIC 731 (C), BMCRE unlisted, BNF 722
purchased on eBay from alora
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus07/12/19 at 19:36Jay GT4: Great coin
V1431a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1431 (Countermarked)160 viewsAR Denarius, 3.06g
Ephesus Mint, 71 AD; Countermarked under Vespasian at Ephesus, circa 74-79 AD
RIC 1431 (C). BMC 457. RSC 276. RPC 833 (14 spec.); c/m: GIC 839
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; c/m: IMP·VES (ligate)
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory, draped, advancing r., holding wreath extended in r. hand and palm over l. shoulder. EPHE lower r.
Acquired from Ancient Imports, November 2016.

In the mid to late 70's AD, Ephesus stamped older, worn Republican and early Imperial denarii circulating in the region with the IMP·VES countermark. Here is an exceptionally rare appearance of that Vespasian countermark on a denarius struck for Vespasian. I know of less than half a dozen other Vespasianic denarii similarly stamped. Of course the coin does not require any such countermark, therefore it is a remarkable mint error. The terminus post quem for the countermarking is 74, based on the discovery of another Vespasian countermarked Ephesian denarius dated COS IIII (CNG 78, lot 1753). RPC speculates that these countermarked coins represent a later 'issue' of silver from Ephesus struck sometime after 74 and before Vespasian's death in 79.

The mint workers applying the countermark were kind enough not to obliterate the portrait.
7 commentsDavid Atherton07/12/19 at 18:50quadrans: Interesting piece..
15609101840072427343326582000083.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Anonymous Post Semi-Libral AE Uncia - Crawford 41/107 viewsRome, The Republic.
Anonymous (Post Semi-libral Series), 215-212 BCE.
AE Uncia (7.87g; 24mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma facing right; pellet (mark-of-value) behind.

Reverse: Prow facing right; ROMA above; pellet (mark-of-value) below.

References: Crawford 41/10; McCabe Group A1; RBW 135.

Provenance: Ex Nomisma E-Live Auction 10 (18 Jun 2019) Lot 12.

This series is the second of the “prow” struck bronze series. It is most easily recognized by the left side of the prow device which has a clearly delineated edge, while on later series the left side of the prow appears to extend off the side of the coin. The series was issued during the Second Punic War and reflects the continued reduction in weight standard of the Roman bronze coinage during the conflict; this issue having occurred on the heels of the “semi-libral reduction” of 217-215 BCE. It would soon be followed by further weight reductions.
2 commentsCarausius07/12/19 at 12:23Jay GT4: I like that prow
15609102152135298521374562440152.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Q. Marius, AE As - Crawford 148/13 viewsRome, The Republic.
Q. Marius, 189-180 BCE.
AE As (31.17g; 32mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Head of Janus; I (mark of value) above.

Reverse: Prow facing right; Q.MARI above; I (mark of value) to right; ROMA below.

References: Crawford 148/1; Sydenham 367 (R7); BMCRR 822; Maria 1.

Provenance: Ex Nomisma E-Live Auction 10 (18 Jun 2019) Lot 22; Bombarda Collection; NAC 9 (16 Apr 1996) Lot 587.

This is a particularly fine example of this scarce type. Not much is known of the moneyer beyond his coins. He is likely NOT an ancestor of Gaius Marius who would later serve seven consulships and challenge Sulla.
1 commentsCarausius07/12/19 at 03:21Jay GT4: That's great!
DomitianVictrix.jpg
RIC 791 Domitian denarius32 viewsIMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP XV
Laureate head right

IMP XXII COS XVII CENS PPP
Minerva, winged, flying left with spear and shield

Rome September 14, 95 AD-September 13, 96 AD

3.15g

RIC 791 (C)

Ex-Savoca 21st Blue Auction lot 1060
5 commentsJay GT407/12/19 at 02:54Nemonater: Nice!
DomitianVictrix.jpg
RIC 791 Domitian denarius32 viewsIMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP XV
Laureate head right

IMP XXII COS XVII CENS PPP
Minerva, winged, flying left with spear and shield

Rome September 14, 95 AD-September 13, 96 AD

3.15g

RIC 791 (C)

Ex-Savoca 21st Blue Auction lot 1060
5 commentsJay GT407/11/19 at 19:03orfew: I love the toning on that one. A very nice pickup.
DomitianVictrix.jpg
RIC 791 Domitian denarius32 viewsIMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP XV
Laureate head right

IMP XXII COS XVII CENS PPP
Minerva, winged, flying left with spear and shield

Rome September 14, 95 AD-September 13, 96 AD

3.15g

RIC 791 (C)

Ex-Savoca 21st Blue Auction lot 1060
5 commentsJay GT407/11/19 at 18:06FlaviusDomitianus: Lovely toning.
DomitianVictrix.jpg
RIC 791 Domitian denarius32 viewsIMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP XV
Laureate head right

IMP XXII COS XVII CENS PPP
Minerva, winged, flying left with spear and shield

Rome September 14, 95 AD-September 13, 96 AD

3.15g

RIC 791 (C)

Ex-Savoca 21st Blue Auction lot 1060
5 commentsJay GT407/11/19 at 17:39okidoki: very nice reverse
sphinx_collage_7_19.jpg
SPHINX COLLAGE b5 viewsTop row: Ionia, Chios; Ionia, Chios; Ionia, Chios
Middle row: Spain, Castulo; Caria, Canus; Troas, Gergis
Bottom row: Troas, Gergis; Ionia, Chios; Egypt, Alexandria (A. Pius); Sicily, Himera
1 commentslaney07/11/19 at 16:39shanxi: nice collection
1402.jpg
PROBUS RIC 861 H2 BUST OFFICINA 112 viewsOBVERSE: IMP C M AVR PROBVS P F AVG
REVERSE: SOLI INVICTO
BUST TYPE: H2 = radiate bust left in consular robe, holding eagle-tipped sceptre (scipio)
FIELD / EXERGUE MARKS: -/-//KAA
WEIGHT 4.03g / AXIS: 1h
RIC: 861
COLLECTION NO. 1402

Note: Superbe strike and quality of details, especially on reverse. Virtually as struck and stunning!
2 commentsBarnaba607/11/19 at 12:16Barnaba6: Thanks Jay!
1402.jpg
PROBUS RIC 861 H2 BUST OFFICINA 112 viewsOBVERSE: IMP C M AVR PROBVS P F AVG
REVERSE: SOLI INVICTO
BUST TYPE: H2 = radiate bust left in consular robe, holding eagle-tipped sceptre (scipio)
FIELD / EXERGUE MARKS: -/-//KAA
WEIGHT 4.03g / AXIS: 1h
RIC: 861
COLLECTION NO. 1402

Note: Superbe strike and quality of details, especially on reverse. Virtually as struck and stunning!
2 commentsBarnaba607/11/19 at 12:07Jay GT4: Outstanding
1401.jpg
ALFOLDI 041.06212 viewsOBVERSE: IMP C M AVR PROBVS P AVG
REVERSE: PAX AVG
BUST TYPE: F5 = Radiate, cuirassed bust left, holding spear
FIELD / EXERGUE MARKS: -/-//XXIV
WEIGHT 5.08g / AXIS: 12h
RIC 709 VAR. (UNLISTED WITH XXIV MINTMARK)
ALFOLDI 041.062 (1 EX.)
COLLECTION NO. 1401

Note: scarce bust type
1 commentsBarnaba607/11/19 at 12:07Jay GT4: I like it
1405.jpg
ALFOLDI 085.00215 viewsOBVERSE: IMP[erator] PROBVS INV[ictvs] AVG[vstvs]
REVERSE: SPES AVG[vsti] N[ostri]
BUST TYPE: E2 VAR.= Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed and draped bust left, holding spear and shield (decorated with Gorgoneion), seen from rear
FIELD / EXERGUE MARKS: -/-//XXI
WEIGHT 3.72g / AXIS: 12h
RIC 790
ALFOLDI 085.002 (2 EX.)
COLLECTION NO. 1405

Ex Ph. Gysen collection = EX JACQUIER auction 45 lot 1517

NOTE: Extremely rare and desirable bust type with a very interesting shield decorated with Gorgoneion in combination with a rare reverse type struck only during the 2nd emmission at Siscia.
3 commentsBarnaba607/11/19 at 12:06Jay GT4: Great portrait and helmet
1405.jpg
ALFOLDI 085.00215 viewsOBVERSE: IMP[erator] PROBVS INV[ictvs] AVG[vstvs]
REVERSE: SPES AVG[vsti] N[ostri]
BUST TYPE: E2 VAR.= Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed and draped bust left, holding spear and shield (decorated with Gorgoneion), seen from rear
FIELD / EXERGUE MARKS: -/-//XXI
WEIGHT 3.72g / AXIS: 12h
RIC 790
ALFOLDI 085.002 (2 EX.)
COLLECTION NO. 1405

Ex Ph. Gysen collection = EX JACQUIER auction 45 lot 1517

NOTE: Extremely rare and desirable bust type with a very interesting shield decorated with Gorgoneion in combination with a rare reverse type struck only during the 2nd emmission at Siscia.
3 commentsBarnaba607/11/19 at 10:33Barnaba6: Indeed Grzegorz. Thanks for your comment!
1403.jpg
ALFOLDI 029.00117 viewsOBVERSE: IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG
REVERSE: FELICITAS AVG
BUST TYPE: A2 = Radiate, cuirassed and draped bust right, seen from back
FIELD / EXERGUE MARKS: -/Γ//XXI
WEIGHT 3.75g / AXIS: 12h
RIC 680
ALFOLDI 029.001 (4 EX.)
COLLECTION NO. 1403

NOTE: Very rare and sought-after variant of the Felicitas Avg reverse with Felicitas holding a short caduceus and a long sceptre - Alfoldi type no. 29 (by far the rarest of the 4 Felicitas variants described by Alfoldi).
2 commentsBarnaba607/11/19 at 10:33Barnaba6: Thanks okidoki!
1405.jpg
ALFOLDI 085.00215 viewsOBVERSE: IMP[erator] PROBVS INV[ictvs] AVG[vstvs]
REVERSE: SPES AVG[vsti] N[ostri]
BUST TYPE: E2 VAR.= Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed and draped bust left, holding spear and shield (decorated with Gorgoneion), seen from rear
FIELD / EXERGUE MARKS: -/-//XXI
WEIGHT 3.72g / AXIS: 12h
RIC 790
ALFOLDI 085.002 (2 EX.)
COLLECTION NO. 1405

Ex Ph. Gysen collection = EX JACQUIER auction 45 lot 1517

NOTE: Extremely rare and desirable bust type with a very interesting shield decorated with Gorgoneion in combination with a rare reverse type struck only during the 2nd emmission at Siscia.
3 commentsBarnaba607/11/19 at 10:16vrtsprb: Also, this is a fairly unusual helmet representati...
1403.jpg
ALFOLDI 029.00117 viewsOBVERSE: IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG
REVERSE: FELICITAS AVG
BUST TYPE: A2 = Radiate, cuirassed and draped bust right, seen from back
FIELD / EXERGUE MARKS: -/Γ//XXI
WEIGHT 3.75g / AXIS: 12h
RIC 680
ALFOLDI 029.001 (4 EX.)
COLLECTION NO. 1403

NOTE: Very rare and sought-after variant of the Felicitas Avg reverse with Felicitas holding a short caduceus and a long sceptre - Alfoldi type no. 29 (by far the rarest of the 4 Felicitas variants described by Alfoldi).
2 commentsBarnaba607/11/19 at 09:36okidoki: Congrats very nice
Philippus_I_SAECVLARES_AVGG_VI_bu_b.jpg
SAECVLARES AVGG VI47 viewsPhilippus I. antoninianus
Rome mint
very rare
1 commentsTibsi07/10/19 at 15:24Callimachus: Beautiful coin.
Bithynia,_Kios,_cc_350-300_BC,_AR_Hemidrachm,_Laureate_head_of_Apollo_right,_MI_#923;H-TO_#931;,_Prow_of_galley_left__BMC_6,_SNGCop_370,_Q-001,_11h,_12,5-13,5mm,_2,25g-s.jpg
Bithynia, Kios, (cc. 350-300 B.C.), AR-Hemidrachm, SNG Cop 370, ΔΙΑΣ, Prow of galley left, #116 viewsBithynia, Kios, (cc. 350-300 B.C.), AR-Hemidrachm, SNG Cop 370, ΔΙΑΣ, Prow of galley left, #1
avers: Laureate head of Apollo right.
reverse: MIΛH-TOΣ, Prow of galley left.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 12,5-13,5mm, weight: 2,25g, axis: 11h,
mint: Bithynia, Kios, date: cc. 350-300 B.C., ref: SNG Cop 370, BMC 6, RecGen 3.14
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans07/10/19 at 11:26Jay GT4: It's OK Q
sic1.jpg
Sikyon, Sikyonia7 views330-280 B.C.
Silver Hemidrachm (or Triobol)
2.67 gm, 16.3 mm
Obv.: Chimaera standing left, right forepaw raised; ΣI beneath
Rev.: Dove flying left; ΔI in field to right.
HGC 5, 213; SNGuk_0300_2338;
BMC 112 var. (initials); Sear 2767 var. (intials);
[SNG Copenhagen 61; BCD Peloponnesos 299]

NGC certified (94282063-009 Ch VF), but removed from holder.
4 commentsJaimelai07/09/19 at 23:43Jaimelai: Thanks, been looking for one of these for a while.
sic1.jpg
Sikyon, Sikyonia7 views330-280 B.C.
Silver Hemidrachm (or Triobol)
2.67 gm, 16.3 mm
Obv.: Chimaera standing left, right forepaw raised; ΣI beneath
Rev.: Dove flying left; ΔI in field to right.
HGC 5, 213; SNGuk_0300_2338;
BMC 112 var. (initials); Sear 2767 var. (intials);
[SNG Copenhagen 61; BCD Peloponnesos 299]

NGC certified (94282063-009 Ch VF), but removed from holder.
4 commentsJaimelai07/09/19 at 22:47Tracy Aiello: Great obverse.
sic1.jpg
Sikyon, Sikyonia7 views330-280 B.C.
Silver Hemidrachm (or Triobol)
2.67 gm, 16.3 mm
Obv.: Chimaera standing left, right forepaw raised; ΣI beneath
Rev.: Dove flying left; ΔI in field to right.
HGC 5, 213; SNGuk_0300_2338;
BMC 112 var. (initials); Sear 2767 var. (intials);
[SNG Copenhagen 61; BCD Peloponnesos 299]

NGC certified (94282063-009 Ch VF), but removed from holder.
4 commentsJaimelai07/09/19 at 17:28quadrans: Nice piece..
5F9950D1-33D5-4C76-8151-8EFA44A9C63D.jpeg
SELEUKID EMPIRE. Antiochos VI Dionysos. 144-142 BC. 3 viewsSELEUKID EMPIRE. Antiochos VI Dionysos. 144-142 BC. AR Drachm (18mm, 4.23 g, 1h). Antioch on the Orontes mint. Dated SE 169 (144/3 BC). Radiate and diademed head right / Apollo, testing arrow and resting hand on bow, seated left on omphalos; Φ between Apollo’s feet, [Θ]ΞP (date) and ΣT[A] in exergue. SC 2002.1a; HGC 9, 1036a; DCA 182. Beautifully toned and lustrous.1 commentsMark R107/09/19 at 17:27quadrans: Nice piece..
8973_8974.jpg
Probus, Antoninianus, SALVS AVG, XXIV1 viewsAE Antoninianus
Probus
Augustus: 276 - 282AD
Issued: 280AD
21.5mm 3.30gr 6h
O: IMP PROBVS PF AVG; Helmeted, radiate and cuirassed bust left, holding spear over shoulder in right hand and shield with dots in design in left hand.
R: SALVS AVG; Salus, standing right, feeding snake in right hand from patera in left.
Exergue: XXIV, below line.
Siscia Mint
RIC V-2 Siscia 748, XXIV; Alfoldi 65 #48 var. (V not listed in XXI variants).
Aorta: B15, O79, R141, T19, M6.
master-numismatics/Marisa Andresevic 153393291318
3/3/19 7/5/19
1 commentsNicholas Z07/09/19 at 14:01Barnaba6: the coin is Alfoldi 65, #48 precisely, not variati...
9163_9164.jpg
Probus, Antoninianus, SOLI INVICTO, XXIV1 viewsAE Antoninianus
Probus
Augustus: 276 - 282AD
Issued: 277AD
25.0 x 23.0mm 3.86gr 0h
O: IMP CM AVR PROBVS PF AVG; Radiate, mantled bust right, holding eagle-tipped scepter.
R: SOLI INVICTO; Sol driving quadriga left, whip in raised right hand.
Exergue: XXIV
Siscia Mint
Not in RIC
Sear 12042; Alfoldi 76, #157.
Aorta: B55, O38, R155, T135, M6.
fvrivs.rvfvs/Jeremy Mancevice 352641478257
6/19/19 7/6/19
1 commentsNicholas Z07/09/19 at 13:51Barnaba6: The coin is listed in RIC under no. 767; the corre...
9161_9162.jpg
Probus, Antoninianus, VIRTVS PROBI AVG, XXIVI2 viewsAE Antoninianus
Probus
Augustus: 276 - 282AD
Issued: 278AD
22.0 x 20.0mm 2.97gr 6h
O: IMP CM AVR PROBVS P-F AVG; Radiate, cuirassed bust left, carrying shield and spear over right shoulder.
R: VIRTVS P-ROBI AVG; Mars advancing right, holding long spear and trophy.
Exergue: XXIVI, below line.
Siscia Mint
RIC V-2 Siscia 810, XXIVI; Sear 12071; Alfoldi 96, #216.
Aorta: B65, 038, R195, T41, M6.
fvrivs.rvfvs/Jeremy Mancevice 273832257126
6/19/19 7/6/19
1 commentsNicholas Z07/09/19 at 13:46Barnaba6: nice coin! but the correct Alfoldi attribution is ...
8178A732-E722-408B-AFFE-578EB282340D.jpeg
CALABRIA, Tarentum. Circa 272-240 BC.6 viewsCALABRIA, Tarentum. Circa 272-240 BC. AR Nomos (20mm, 6.48 g, 9h). Warrior on horseback right, holding shield and spear; DI above; APO[LL/WNIOS] in two lines below / Phalanthos riding dolphin left, head facing with flowing chlamys around left arm, holding trident in right hand; crowning Nike to left; waves below. Vlasto 894-898; HN Italy 1038. Lustrous2 commentsMark R107/09/19 at 12:28Mark R1: Thanks Jay. I’m glad you like it.
sic1.jpg
Sikyon, Sikyonia7 views330-280 B.C.
Silver Hemidrachm (or Triobol)
2.67 gm, 16.3 mm
Obv.: Chimaera standing left, right forepaw raised; ΣI beneath
Rev.: Dove flying left; ΔI in field to right.
HGC 5, 213; SNGuk_0300_2338;
BMC 112 var. (initials); Sear 2767 var. (intials);
[SNG Copenhagen 61; BCD Peloponnesos 299]

NGC certified (94282063-009 Ch VF), but removed from holder.
4 commentsJaimelai07/09/19 at 03:12Jay GT4: Nice one
B793BA9B-40D3-497D-BC02-AA3B4AAA6895.jpeg
KINGS of PAEONIA. Patraos. Circa 335-315 BC. AR Tetradrachm4 viewsKINGS of PAEONIA. Patraos. Circa 335-315 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26 mm, 12.62 g, 8h). Lustrous EF. Damastion mint(?). Laureate head of Apollo right / Warrior on horse rearing right, spearing enemy warrior who defends with shield and spear. Paeonian Hoard 434. Superb EF with unusually well struck up types. Irregular flan (not clipped or cut1 commentsMark R107/09/19 at 03:12Jay GT4: Fantastic reverse and I like the effect of the dou...
8178A732-E722-408B-AFFE-578EB282340D.jpeg
CALABRIA, Tarentum. Circa 272-240 BC.6 viewsCALABRIA, Tarentum. Circa 272-240 BC. AR Nomos (20mm, 6.48 g, 9h). Warrior on horseback right, holding shield and spear; DI above; APO[LL/WNIOS] in two lines below / Phalanthos riding dolphin left, head facing with flowing chlamys around left arm, holding trident in right hand; crowning Nike to left; waves below. Vlasto 894-898; HN Italy 1038. Lustrous2 commentsMark R107/09/19 at 03:10Jay GT4: You get been busy! Great coin
VespShieldWreath1393.jpg
Vespasian / Shield Within Wreath RIC 139323 viewsVespasian; 69-79 AD, Ephesus, c. 69-70 AD, Denarius, 2.80g.
O: IMP CAES - VESPAS AVG Head laureate r.; on neck rectangular countermark IMP VES with IMP and VE ligate (Howgego-839).
R: AVG on round shield within oak wreath; rectangular countermark IMP VES with IMP and VE ligate.

Extremely rare, apparently the second recorded specimen, the first having appeared in Schenk-Behrens 76, 26 Nov. 1998, lot 186, as reported but not illustrated by RIC-1393.

The attribution of this reverse type to Ephesus, suggested by the use on later marked coins of that mint of a simplified version of the same type, AVG within oak wreath but without the shield, is confirmed by the countermark of Vespasian on this specimen, since the few Flavian denarii known to have been marked with that countermark are all coins of the Ephesus mint.
5 commentsNemonater07/08/19 at 19:59orfew: Wonderful piece. Well done!
s-l1600_(30).jpg
Roman Empire, Herennius Etruscus 249-250AD29 viewsHerennius Etruscus 249-250AD
Silver Antoninianus
Clasped Hands reverse
Click for larger image,you could see the fingernail~
20mm, 3.87g
Ex silbury 2019
1 commentsXLi07/08/19 at 17:31quadrans: Nice piece..
Larissa_Obe_and_Rev.jpg
Facing Head of Larissa11 viewsThessaly Greece, the City of Larissa

Obv: Head of the nymph Larissa 3/4 facing l., wearing ampyx flanked by two hornlike locks, round curl to the l. of the head1; earring on the r. (?), wearing wire necklace (?). Border of dots.
Rev: Horse crouching r., l. foreleg raised and bent (parallel with the lower part of the hind legs), preparing to roll, ΛAPIΣ above horse and AIΩN in the exergue.
Denomination: Silver Drachm; Mint: Larissa; Date: c. 356 - 346 BC2; Weight: 6.05g; Diameter: 19mm; Die axis: 130º; References, for example: Lorber Hoard, Phase L-III; SNG COP 121.

Notes:
1On p. 10 of Lorber Hoard Catharine Lorber observes that on later Phase L-III head types the round curl to the left of the head “...tends to evolve into a long wavy lock scarcely different from the others above and below it.” Therefore, perhaps this coin falls earlier in Phase L-III.
2This is the date range given in Lorber Hoard, p. 11. She states that the Third Sacred War must have been the historical context for the intensive Phase L-III drachm production.
The city of Larissa was named after the local water nymph, said to be the daughter of Pelasgos. He was said to be the ancestor of the pre-Greek Pelasgians. According to myth Larissa drowned while playing ball on the banks of the Peneios river. (HGC p. 130).

Provenance: ex. Pegasi Auction, A22, lot 117

Photo credits: Harlan J. Berk Ltd.

Sources

HGC: Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Greece: Achaia Phthiotis, Ainis, Magnesia, Malis, Oita, Perrhaibia, Thessaly, Akarnania, Aitolia, Lokris, Phokis, Boiotia, Euboia, Attica, Megaris, and Corinthia, Sixth to First Centuries BC, The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Vol. 4. Lancaster/London: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc, 2014.
Lorber Hoard: Lorber, Catharine C. “A Hoard of Facing Head Larissa Drachms” in Schweizerische Numismatische Rundschau, vol. 79 (2000): 7 - 15.
SNG COP: Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum: Thessaly - Illyricum. Copenhagen: Einar Munksgaard, 1943.
4 commentsTracy Aiello07/08/19 at 16:54quadrans: wow, great coin,
T220.jpg
Titus RIC-22048 viewsÆ As, 9.10g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
RIC 220 (R). BMC p. 266 note.
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: AETERNIT AVGVST; S C in field; Aeternitas stg. r., l. foot on globe, with sceptre and cornucopiae
Acquired from eBay, June 2019.

Aeternitas, the personification of eternity, as a coin type was first introduced during the reign of Vespasian and would be periodically struck until the 4th century. This As featuring Aeternitas was struck during Titus' second and largest bronze issue in 80-81. Mattingly in BMCRE II speculates the type here refers to the consecration of Vespasian - 'Aeternitas holds sceptre and cornucopiae, the attributes of majesty and prosperity, while the globe under her foot shows that the application is world-wide. Stress is laid more on the great future than on the great past of the Flavian line.' A most fitting interpretation for a coin that declares 'The eternity of the Augustus'.

Honest wear with greenish-brown patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/08/19 at 15:16Jay GT4: Nice portrait
Larissa_Obe_and_Rev.jpg
Facing Head of Larissa11 viewsThessaly Greece, the City of Larissa

Obv: Head of the nymph Larissa 3/4 facing l., wearing ampyx flanked by two hornlike locks, round curl to the l. of the head1; earring on the r. (?), wearing wire necklace (?). Border of dots.
Rev: Horse crouching r., l. foreleg raised and bent (parallel with the lower part of the hind legs), preparing to roll, ΛAPIΣ above horse and AIΩN in the exergue.
Denomination: Silver Drachm; Mint: Larissa; Date: c. 356 - 346 BC2; Weight: 6.05g; Diameter: 19mm; Die axis: 130º; References, for example: Lorber Hoard, Phase L-III; SNG COP 121.

Notes:
1On p. 10 of Lorber Hoard Catharine Lorber observes that on later Phase L-III head types the round curl to the left of the head “...tends to evolve into a long wavy lock scarcely different from the others above and below it.” Therefore, perhaps this coin falls earlier in Phase L-III.
2This is the date range given in Lorber Hoard, p. 11. She states that the Third Sacred War must have been the historical context for the intensive Phase L-III drachm production.
The city of Larissa was named after the local water nymph, said to be the daughter of Pelasgos. He was said to be the ancestor of the pre-Greek Pelasgians. According to myth Larissa drowned while playing ball on the banks of the Peneios river. (HGC p. 130).

Provenance: ex. Pegasi Auction, A22, lot 117

Photo credits: Harlan J. Berk Ltd.

Sources

HGC: Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Greece: Achaia Phthiotis, Ainis, Magnesia, Malis, Oita, Perrhaibia, Thessaly, Akarnania, Aitolia, Lokris, Phokis, Boiotia, Euboia, Attica, Megaris, and Corinthia, Sixth to First Centuries BC, The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Vol. 4. Lancaster/London: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc, 2014.
Lorber Hoard: Lorber, Catharine C. “A Hoard of Facing Head Larissa Drachms” in Schweizerische Numismatische Rundschau, vol. 79 (2000): 7 - 15.
SNG COP: Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum: Thessaly - Illyricum. Copenhagen: Einar Munksgaard, 1943.
4 commentsTracy Aiello07/08/19 at 14:24shanxi: nice one
T220.jpg
Titus RIC-22048 viewsÆ As, 9.10g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
RIC 220 (R). BMC p. 266 note.
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: AETERNIT AVGVST; S C in field; Aeternitas stg. r., l. foot on globe, with sceptre and cornucopiae
Acquired from eBay, June 2019.

Aeternitas, the personification of eternity, as a coin type was first introduced during the reign of Vespasian and would be periodically struck until the 4th century. This As featuring Aeternitas was struck during Titus' second and largest bronze issue in 80-81. Mattingly in BMCRE II speculates the type here refers to the consecration of Vespasian - 'Aeternitas holds sceptre and cornucopiae, the attributes of majesty and prosperity, while the globe under her foot shows that the application is world-wide. Stress is laid more on the great future than on the great past of the Flavian line.' A most fitting interpretation for a coin that declares 'The eternity of the Augustus'.

Honest wear with greenish-brown patina.
3 commentsDavid Atherton07/08/19 at 13:59FlaviusDomitianus: Nice find.
Larissa_Obe_and_Rev.jpg
Facing Head of Larissa11 viewsThessaly Greece, the City of Larissa

Obv: Head of the nymph Larissa 3/4 facing l., wearing ampyx flanked by two hornlike locks, round curl to the l. of the head1; earring on the r. (?), wearing wire necklace (?). Border of dots.
Rev: Horse crouching r., l. foreleg raised and bent (parallel with the lower part of the hind legs), preparing to roll, ΛAPIΣ above horse and AIΩN in the exergue.
Denomination: Silver Drachm; Mint: Larissa; Date: c. 356 - 346 BC2; Weight: 6.05g; Diameter: 19mm; Die axis: 130º; References, for example: Lorber Hoard, Phase L-III; SNG COP 121.

Notes:
1On p. 10 of Lorber Hoard Catharine Lorber observes that on later Phase L-III head types the round curl to the left of the head “...tends to evolve into a long wavy lock scarcely different from the others above and below it.” Therefore, perhaps this coin falls earlier in Phase L-III.
2This is the date range given in Lorber Hoard, p. 11. She states that the Third Sacred War must have been the historical context for the intensive Phase L-III drachm production.
The city of Larissa was named after the local water nymph, said to be the daughter of Pelasgos. He was said to be the ancestor of the pre-Greek Pelasgians. According to myth Larissa drowned while playing ball on the banks of the Peneios river. (HGC p. 130).

Provenance: ex. Pegasi Auction, A22, lot 117

Photo credits: Harlan J. Berk Ltd.

Sources

HGC: Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Greece: Achaia Phthiotis, Ainis, Magnesia, Malis, Oita, Perrhaibia, Thessaly, Akarnania, Aitolia, Lokris, Phokis, Boiotia, Euboia, Attica, Megaris, and Corinthia, Sixth to First Centuries BC, The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Vol. 4. Lancaster/London: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc, 2014.
Lorber Hoard: Lorber, Catharine C. “A Hoard of Facing Head Larissa Drachms” in Schweizerische Numismatische Rundschau, vol. 79 (2000): 7 - 15.
SNG COP: Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum: Thessaly - Illyricum. Copenhagen: Einar Munksgaard, 1943.
4 commentsTracy Aiello07/08/19 at 10:49Grant H: love the horse
Larissa_Obe_and_Rev.jpg
Facing Head of Larissa11 viewsThessaly Greece, the City of Larissa

Obv: Head of the nymph Larissa 3/4 facing l., wearing ampyx flanked by two hornlike locks, round curl to the l. of the head1; earring on the r. (?), wearing wire necklace (?). Border of dots.
Rev: Horse crouching r., l. foreleg raised and bent (parallel with the lower part of the hind legs), preparing to roll, ΛAPIΣ above horse and AIΩN in the exergue.
Denomination: Silver Drachm; Mint: Larissa; Date: c. 356 - 346 BC2; Weight: 6.05g; Diameter: 19mm; Die axis: 130º; References, for example: Lorber Hoard, Phase L-III; SNG COP 121.

Notes:
1On p. 10 of Lorber Hoard Catharine Lorber observes that on later Phase L-III head types the round curl to the left of the head “...tends to evolve into a long wavy lock scarcely different from the others above and below it.” Therefore, perhaps this coin falls earlier in Phase L-III.
2This is the date range given in Lorber Hoard, p. 11. She states that the Third Sacred War must have been the historical context for the intensive Phase L-III drachm production.
The city of Larissa was named after the local water nymph, said to be the daughter of Pelasgos. He was said to be the ancestor of the pre-Greek Pelasgians. According to myth Larissa drowned while playing ball on the banks of the Peneios river. (HGC p. 130).

Provenance: ex. Pegasi Auction, A22, lot 117

Photo credits: Harlan J. Berk Ltd.

Sources

HGC: Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Greece: Achaia Phthiotis, Ainis, Magnesia, Malis, Oita, Perrhaibia, Thessaly, Akarnania, Aitolia, Lokris, Phokis, Boiotia, Euboia, Attica, Megaris, and Corinthia, Sixth to First Centuries BC, The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Vol. 4. Lancaster/London: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc, 2014.
Lorber Hoard: Lorber, Catharine C. “A Hoard of Facing Head Larissa Drachms” in Schweizerische Numismatische Rundschau, vol. 79 (2000): 7 - 15.
SNG COP: Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum: Thessaly - Illyricum. Copenhagen: Einar Munksgaard, 1943.
4 commentsTracy Aiello07/08/19 at 02:20Nemonater: Beautiful!
VespShieldWreath1393.jpg
Vespasian / Shield Within Wreath RIC 139323 viewsVespasian; 69-79 AD, Ephesus, c. 69-70 AD, Denarius, 2.80g.
O: IMP CAES - VESPAS AVG Head laureate r.; on neck rectangular countermark IMP VES with IMP and VE ligate (Howgego-839).
R: AVG on round shield within oak wreath; rectangular countermark IMP VES with IMP and VE ligate.

Extremely rare, apparently the second recorded specimen, the first having appeared in Schenk-Behrens 76, 26 Nov. 1998, lot 186, as reported but not illustrated by RIC-1393.

The attribution of this reverse type to Ephesus, suggested by the use on later marked coins of that mint of a simplified version of the same type, AVG within oak wreath but without the shield, is confirmed by the countermark of Vespasian on this specimen, since the few Flavian denarii known to have been marked with that countermark are all coins of the Ephesus mint.
5 commentsNemonater07/07/19 at 21:41FlaviusDomitianus: A truly great find, congrats!
1299_P_Hadrian_pseudo_RPC736.jpg
0736 THRACE, Bizya, Pseudo-autonomous under Hadrian Tyche standing9 viewsReference.
RPC III, 736; Jurukova 165

Obv. ΔΙΟΝΥСω ΚΤΙСΤΗ
Dionysos seated right on throne, holding grape bunch and a single grape; vine to left

Rev. ΒΙΖΥΗΝΩΝ.
River-god and Tyche; to left, river-god reclining right, resting right arm on water-urn, holding reed in left hand; to right, Tyche standing facing, head left, wearing long garment and kalathos, holding cantharus in right hand and two ears of corn in left hand.

6.59 gr
22 mm
h
1 commentsokidoki07/07/19 at 20:55shanxi: interesting coin
D110a.jpg
Domitian RIC-11039 viewsÆ As, 10.56g
Rome mint, 82 AD
RIC 110 (C3). BMC 281.
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VIII DES VIIII P P; S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
Acquired from Holding History, eBay, June 2019.

Early in Domitian's reign Minerva figured prominently on the aes coinage. This As from early 82 featuring his patron deity with spear and shield would later be adopted by the denarius issues after the overhaul of the mint later in the year. It would become one of the standard four Minerva types for that denomination.

Fetching olive green patina.
4 commentsDavid Atherton07/07/19 at 20:22Nemonater: Beautiful!
AntCaesSchottCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, AR Denarius - Crawford 488/211 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius. 43 BCE.
AR Denarius (4.19g; 19mm).
Military mint in Cisalpine Gaul.

Obverse: M.A[NTON IMP RPC]; Antony's bare, bearded head facing right; lituus behind.

Reverse: CAESAR DIC; Laureate head of Julius Caesar facing right; jug behind.

References: Crawford 488/2; HCRI 123; Sydenham 1166; BMCRR (Gaul) 55; Antonia 5-6.

Provenance: Ex Roma E-Live Auction 1 (25-6 Jul 2018) Lot 531; Bernard Poindessault Collection [Oger-Blanchet (17 Nov 2017) Lot 148]; Edouard Schott Collection [E. Bourgey (21 Mar 1972) Lot 337].

This is one of Antony’s earliest issues following the creation of the Second Triumvirate with Octavian and Lepidus. The titulature "RPC" (tip of "C" just barely visible beneath Antony’s portrait on this specimen) reflects the new status. Antony is depicted with a slight beard of mourning, as is Octavian on his coins until the defeat of the Tyrannicides at Philippi the following year. Both Antony and Caesar have symbols of the augurate behind their portraits, as both were members of the college of augurs, and this served to highlight their common bond. The somewhat comical portrait style is reflective of the military mint, with limited die engraver talent.
1 commentsCarausius07/07/19 at 17:49Jay GT4: Outstanding! Wish mine was this nice
ConstantineII_RIC-147.jpg
Roman Imperial: Constantine II (317-337 CE) Æ3 Nummus, Trier (RIC-147)10 viewsObv: FL CL CONSTANTINVS IVN N C; Bareheaded, draped and cuirassed bust of Constantine right
Rev: CLARITAS REIPVBLICAE; Sol standing, raising right hand and holding globe, T-F across fields, •ATR in exergue
1 commentsQuant.Geek07/07/19 at 17:29lech.stepniewski: Nice coin, but it is RIC 154
AntonyLegV.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion V Denarius10 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.79g; 19mm).
Military Mint traveling with Antony, 32-1 BCE.

Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; galley facing right.

Reverse: LEG V; Aquilia between two standards.

References: Crawford 544/18; HCRI 354; Sydenham 1221; BMCRR (East) 196; Banti 75 (this coin); Antonia 110.

Provenance: Ex Kress 109 (24-25 Oct 1958), Lot 749.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding. Thirty-seven examples of the LEG V variety appeared in the 1905 Delos hoard of 604 Antony Legionary denarii, making it one of the most common varieties of the series. However, an example with a verifiable old provenance, such as this coin, is quite rare.
2 commentsCarausius07/07/19 at 14:52Norbert: great coin & pedigree. Congrats
D110a.jpg
Domitian RIC-11039 viewsÆ As, 10.56g
Rome mint, 82 AD
RIC 110 (C3). BMC 281.
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VIII DES VIIII P P; S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
Acquired from Holding History, eBay, June 2019.

Early in Domitian's reign Minerva figured prominently on the aes coinage. This As from early 82 featuring his patron deity with spear and shield would later be adopted by the denarius issues after the overhaul of the mint later in the year. It would become one of the standard four Minerva types for that denomination.

Fetching olive green patina.
4 commentsDavid Atherton07/07/19 at 14:41FlaviusDomitianus: Nice patina
D110a.jpg
Domitian RIC-11039 viewsÆ As, 10.56g
Rome mint, 82 AD
RIC 110 (C3). BMC 281.
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VIII DES VIIII P P; S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
Acquired from Holding History, eBay, June 2019.

Early in Domitian's reign Minerva figured prominently on the aes coinage. This As from early 82 featuring his patron deity with spear and shield would later be adopted by the denarius issues after the overhaul of the mint later in the year. It would become one of the standard four Minerva types for that denomination.

Fetching olive green patina.
4 commentsDavid Atherton07/07/19 at 13:56Vincent: He looks handsome...ahh, the bounty of youth...
D110a.jpg
Domitian RIC-11039 viewsÆ As, 10.56g
Rome mint, 82 AD
RIC 110 (C3). BMC 281.
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VIII DES VIIII P P; S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
Acquired from Holding History, eBay, June 2019.

Early in Domitian's reign Minerva figured prominently on the aes coinage. This As from early 82 featuring his patron deity with spear and shield would later be adopted by the denarius issues after the overhaul of the mint later in the year. It would become one of the standard four Minerva types for that denomination.

Fetching olive green patina.
4 commentsDavid Atherton07/07/19 at 12:51Jay GT4: Delightful portrait
VespShieldWreath1393.jpg
Vespasian / Shield Within Wreath RIC 139323 viewsVespasian; 69-79 AD, Ephesus, c. 69-70 AD, Denarius, 2.80g.
O: IMP CAES - VESPAS AVG Head laureate r.; on neck rectangular countermark IMP VES with IMP and VE ligate (Howgego-839).
R: AVG on round shield within oak wreath; rectangular countermark IMP VES with IMP and VE ligate.

Extremely rare, apparently the second recorded specimen, the first having appeared in Schenk-Behrens 76, 26 Nov. 1998, lot 186, as reported but not illustrated by RIC-1393.

The attribution of this reverse type to Ephesus, suggested by the use on later marked coins of that mint of a simplified version of the same type, AVG within oak wreath but without the shield, is confirmed by the countermark of Vespasian on this specimen, since the few Flavian denarii known to have been marked with that countermark are all coins of the Ephesus mint.
5 commentsNemonater07/07/19 at 12:08David Atherton: Utterly fantastic!
VespShieldWreath1393.jpg
Vespasian / Shield Within Wreath RIC 139323 viewsVespasian; 69-79 AD, Ephesus, c. 69-70 AD, Denarius, 2.80g.
O: IMP CAES - VESPAS AVG Head laureate r.; on neck rectangular countermark IMP VES with IMP and VE ligate (Howgego-839).
R: AVG on round shield within oak wreath; rectangular countermark IMP VES with IMP and VE ligate.

Extremely rare, apparently the second recorded specimen, the first having appeared in Schenk-Behrens 76, 26 Nov. 1998, lot 186, as reported but not illustrated by RIC-1393.

The attribution of this reverse type to Ephesus, suggested by the use on later marked coins of that mint of a simplified version of the same type, AVG within oak wreath but without the shield, is confirmed by the countermark of Vespasian on this specimen, since the few Flavian denarii known to have been marked with that countermark are all coins of the Ephesus mint.
5 commentsNemonater07/07/19 at 12:01Jay GT4: Amazing rarity! Congrats!
AntonyLegV.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion V Denarius10 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.79g; 19mm).
Military Mint traveling with Antony, 32-1 BCE.

Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; galley facing right.

Reverse: LEG V; Aquilia between two standards.

References: Crawford 544/18; HCRI 354; Sydenham 1221; BMCRR (East) 196; Banti 75 (this coin); Antonia 110.

Provenance: Ex Kress 109 (24-25 Oct 1958), Lot 749.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding. Thirty-seven examples of the LEG V variety appeared in the 1905 Delos hoard of 604 Antony Legionary denarii, making it one of the most common varieties of the series. However, an example with a verifiable old provenance, such as this coin, is quite rare.
2 commentsCarausius07/07/19 at 12:00Jay GT4: Wow, that is a wonderful coin
VespShieldWreath1393.jpg
Vespasian / Shield Within Wreath RIC 139323 viewsVespasian; 69-79 AD, Ephesus, c. 69-70 AD, Denarius, 2.80g.
O: IMP CAES - VESPAS AVG Head laureate r.; on neck rectangular countermark IMP VES with IMP and VE ligate (Howgego-839).
R: AVG on round shield within oak wreath; rectangular countermark IMP VES with IMP and VE ligate.

Extremely rare, apparently the second recorded specimen, the first having appeared in Schenk-Behrens 76, 26 Nov. 1998, lot 186, as reported but not illustrated by RIC-1393.

The attribution of this reverse type to Ephesus, suggested by the use on later marked coins of that mint of a simplified version of the same type, AVG within oak wreath but without the shield, is confirmed by the countermark of Vespasian on this specimen, since the few Flavian denarii known to have been marked with that countermark are all coins of the Ephesus mint.
5 commentsNemonater07/07/19 at 07:01quadrans: Interesting piece..
Domitian_RIC_666.jpg
Domitian AR Denarius50 viewsDomitian AR Denarius 88 -89 CE
19mm., 2,93g.
Obv: Head laureate r; IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TR P VIII
Rev:Minerva stg. L with spear; IMP XVIII COS XIII CENS PPP
RIC 666 (R2) BMC—RSC--
Purchased from Savoca auctions June 23, 2019
2 commentsorfew07/07/19 at 02:19Nemonater: Nice addition!
Athens_tetradrachm_struck_454-404bc,_16_71g,_Roma_e4_lot_118,_Mar_1_2014,_£360,_total_£440_91(_745_14).jpg
Athens tetradrachm 454-404 bc18 views1 commentsChance Vandal07/06/19 at 18:03Nathan P: Great and relatively early (440s?) example of the ...
edward-v-groat-1.jpg
S.2155 Edward V6 viewsGroat of Edward V, king of England 1483
Mint: London
Mintmark: boar's head 1 over sun and rose 1/sun and rose 1
S.2155

This issue was probably struck under Richard III but before Edward's death in the tower. The coin's obverse depicts the boar's head mint-mark, which replaced the halved sun-and-rose, which was in use probably from the end of Edward IV's reign until Richard. The sun and rose groats in the name of Edward cannot conclusively be attributed to either Edward IV or Edward V. On the other hand, coins with the boar's head are presumably from Richard's time, since the boar's head was Richard's symbol.

This leads to a confusing coinage of 1483, where major events occurred during a period of 3 months. Edward IV died on April 9. His eldest son Edward was styled Edward V, though never had a coronation. The 12 year-old Edward unfortunately became a political pawn, and his uncle Richard, unsatisfied with his role as Lord Protector, managed to have Edward and his brother Richard of Shrewsbury declared illegitamate and marginalized. Uncle Richard became King Richard III on June 26. Edward and his brother were prisoners in the tower, and it is likely that they were murdered that year, though nobody really knows when they died. Bones purporting to be the two princes were found in the 17th century, but have never been analyzed by modern DNA testing.

So we are left with a coin in the name of Edward, but depicting Richard III's badge. The Edward could be Edward IV, and there are plenty of situations of coinage continuing in the name of the recently deceased king (coins of Richard I in the name of Henry II, coins of Edward I in the name of Henry III, and Edward VI in the name of Henry VIII). It could also be Edward V, since Richard was trying, at least initially, to appear to be ruling in Edward V's name as Lord Protector. It can possibly be considered that ths coin was struck by Richard in Edward V's name before the demise of the young king, perhaps during Richard's protectorate. Or it could be a posthumous issue as it seems to be contemporaneous with other coins in the name of Richard himself.

My take is that the Edward written on the coin is most likely to be Edward V, making this one of the very few coins that come from that reign.

Ex- DNW 3 Jul 2019 (lot 802), M Lessen, Spink, SNC Jan/Feb 1926 (lot 49003)
1 commentsNap07/06/19 at 15:21Callimachus: A very rare coin. Beautiful.
0142.jpg
C. Servilius M.f., Denarius 4 viewsC. Servilius M.f., Denarius

RRC: 239/1
136 bc
3,94 gr

AV: Helmeted head of Roma right, wreath behind, mark of value and ROMA below
RV: The Dioscuri galloping in opposite directions, looking back at each other; C SERVEILI M F in exergue

ex Gemini, Auct XIV, Lot 353, 18.04.2018
reported as Ex Philip T. Ashton Collection. Ex Berk 164, 21 May 2009, lot 263.
1 commentsNorbert07/05/19 at 07:29shanxi: nice
4470081.jpg
Akarnania Leukas AR Stater circa 320-280 BC 19.5 mm 8.53g 1h Pegasi 13216 viewsPegasos flying left/Helmeted head of Athena left,stylis behind.
ex Dr Erik Miller collection.purchased from C.J Martin 18 June 1974,Sotheby 15 May 1974 lot 31
2 commentsGrant H07/05/19 at 04:03quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
Terone.JPG
Macedonia, Terone, Tetrobol, 424-422 BC7 viewsMacedonia, Terone, Tetrobol, 424-422 BC, , Silver, HGC:3.1-696
Oinochoe
Quadripartite incuse square
T - E
CARACTERISTICS
COIN CONDITION COMMENTS high relief
PATINA dark patina
PATINA ancient patina
FLAN well-centered flan
COMPOSITION Silver
DIAMETER 15
DENOMINATION Tetrobol
YEAR 424-422 BC
GREECE PROVINCE Macedonia
HGC 3.1-696
GREEK COIN THEME Terone
1 commentsMark R107/05/19 at 04:03quadrans: Nice piece..
1297_P_Hadrian_RPC3803_5.jpg
3803 SELEUCIS Laodicea ad Mare. Hadrian Tetradrachm 121-22 AD Tyche13 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3803.5; Prieur 1107; Adra 1555-7

Issue Year 168

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙϹΑΡ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟϹ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹΕΒΑϹΤ
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, right

Rev. ΙΟΥΛΙΕⲰΝ ΤⲰΝ ΚΑΙ ΛΑΟΔΙΚΕⲰΝ
Turreted and draped bust of Tyche, r.; in field, r., ΗΞΡ

13.55 gr
25.5 mm
12h

Note.
From the Michel Prieur Collection, purchased privately from Joselito Eechtout, May 2013.
3 commentsokidoki07/05/19 at 04:02quadrans: Wow, nice piece..
BCC_J38_Archelaus.jpg
BCC J387 viewsJudaea - AE Prutah
Caesarea Maritima
Herod Archelaus 4BCE - 6CE
Mint of Jerusalem
Obv:HP[ω∆OY]
Bunch of grapes, vine leaf to left.
Rev:EΘNAPXOY
Tall military helmet, facing,
with crest and cheek straps,
caduceus, below left.
18mm. 2.71gm. Axis:180
Hendin III 505
J. Berlin Caesarea Collection
1 commentsv-drome07/04/19 at 12:37Mark R1: Interesting coin
nptra.jpg
Crusaders, Frankish Greece , Duchy of Neopatras . John II Angelus-Comnenus AD 1303-1318.Billon denier tournois 13 viewsCrusaders, Frankish Greece , Duchy of Neopatras . John II Angelus-Comnenus AD 1303-1318.Billon denier tournois
Obverse : + ANGELVS SA B C , cross
Reverse : + DELLA PATCRA , castle tournois
CCS 125 Unrecorded variant .
Very Rare .
1 commentsVladislav D07/04/19 at 12:34Mark R1: Cool looking coin.
4470081.jpg
Akarnania Leukas AR Stater circa 320-280 BC 19.5 mm 8.53g 1h Pegasi 13216 viewsPegasos flying left/Helmeted head of Athena left,stylis behind.
ex Dr Erik Miller collection.purchased from C.J Martin 18 June 1974,Sotheby 15 May 1974 lot 31
2 commentsGrant H07/03/19 at 23:34Tracy Aiello: That is magnificent.
RIC_674_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0674 Domitianus28 viewsObv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII, Laureate head right
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P, Minerva advancing right, with spear and shield
AR/Denarius (19668 mm 3.344 g 6h) Struck in Rome 88-89 A.D. (6th issue)
RIC 674 (R), RSC 254c - BMCRE 157 - BNF unlisted
Purchased from Münzhandlung Ritter
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus07/03/19 at 20:06Nemonater: Awesome
1297_P_Hadrian_RPC3803_5.jpg
3803 SELEUCIS Laodicea ad Mare. Hadrian Tetradrachm 121-22 AD Tyche13 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3803.5; Prieur 1107; Adra 1555-7

Issue Year 168

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙϹΑΡ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟϹ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹΕΒΑϹΤ
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, right

Rev. ΙΟΥΛΙΕⲰΝ ΤⲰΝ ΚΑΙ ΛΑΟΔΙΚΕⲰΝ
Turreted and draped bust of Tyche, r.; in field, r., ΗΞΡ

13.55 gr
25.5 mm
12h

Note.
From the Michel Prieur Collection, purchased privately from Joselito Eechtout, May 2013.
3 commentsokidoki07/03/19 at 19:33shanxi: wonderful
Vlasto_338.jpg
CALABRIA, Taras. Circa 400-390 BC. AR Nomos9 views20mm, 7.93 g, 2h
Youth on horse galloping right; tiny Λ below / Phalanthos, holding torch, riding dolphin left.

Fischer-Bossert Group 26, 361.2 (V164/R283) = Vlasto 338 (this coin); HN Italy 850. Old collection tone, small edge test cut, a few marks on edge, struck from worn dies. VF.

Ex Michel Pandely Vlasto Collection.
1 commentsLeo07/03/19 at 18:59Jay GT4: Fantastic provenance!
Vlasto_338~0.jpg
Greek, Catalogue of the Collection of Tarentine Coins formed by M. P. Vlasto #3388 views20mm, 7.93 g, 2h
Youth on horse galloping right; tiny Λ below / Phalanthos, holding torch, riding dolphin left.

Fischer-Bossert Group 26, 361.2 (V164/R283) = Vlasto 338 (this coin); HN Italy 850. Old collection tone, small edge test cut, a few marks on edge, struck from worn dies. VF.

Ex Michel Pandely Vlasto Collection.
1 commentsLeo07/03/19 at 18:58Jay GT4: Love the hair on the rider
1297_P_Hadrian_RPC3803_5.jpg
3803 SELEUCIS Laodicea ad Mare. Hadrian Tetradrachm 121-22 AD Tyche13 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3803.5; Prieur 1107; Adra 1555-7

Issue Year 168

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙϹΑΡ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟϹ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹΕΒΑϹΤ
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, right

Rev. ΙΟΥΛΙΕⲰΝ ΤⲰΝ ΚΑΙ ΛΑΟΔΙΚΕⲰΝ
Turreted and draped bust of Tyche, r.; in field, r., ΗΞΡ

13.55 gr
25.5 mm
12h

Note.
From the Michel Prieur Collection, purchased privately from Joselito Eechtout, May 2013.
3 commentsokidoki07/03/19 at 18:57Jay GT4: Lovely style!
RIC_677_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0677 Domitianus19 viewsObv : IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII, Laureate head right
Rev : IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P, Minerva standing left, with spear
AR/Denarius (19.11 mm 3.39 g 6h) Struck in Rome 88-89 A.D.(6th issue)
RIC 677 (R), RSC - BMCRE - BNF unlisted
Purchased on eBay from Manuel Guerrero in 2013
1 commentsFlaviusDomitianus07/03/19 at 18:56Jay GT4: Good find!
RIC_674_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0674 Domitianus28 viewsObv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII, Laureate head right
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P, Minerva advancing right, with spear and shield
AR/Denarius (19668 mm 3.344 g 6h) Struck in Rome 88-89 A.D. (6th issue)
RIC 674 (R), RSC 254c - BMCRE 157 - BNF unlisted
Purchased from Münzhandlung Ritter
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus07/03/19 at 18:56Jay GT4: Great rare coin and in nice condition!
RIC_144_Titus.jpg
RIC 0144 Titus13 viewsObv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII, Laureate head leftt
Rev: FELICIT PVBLIC / S C (in field), Felicitas standing left holding sceptre and cornucopia
AE/Sestertius (32.31 mm 22.58 g 6h) Struck in Rome 80-81 A.D. (Group 2)
RIC 144 (C2), BMCRE 158-9, BNF 154
Purchased on eBay from Münzhandlung Ritter
4 commentsFlaviusDomitianus07/03/19 at 15:17okidoki: very nice
848C5FCB-5EE9-43DF-B128-4A7C814C8C02.jpeg
Acarnania, Leucas, Stater, Leukas, EF(40-45), Silver, Pozzi:1317v12 viewsCOIN CONDITION EF(40-45)
MAIN CATEGORY Coins
COMPOSITION Silver
WEIGHT (GRAMS) 7.90
DENOMINATION Stater
GREECE PROVINCE Akarnania
GREEK COIN THEME Leucas
POZZI 1317v
MINT NAME Leukas
2 commentsMark R107/03/19 at 05:22Pekka K: ΦΙΛΑΝΔΡΟ&#...
C8D2CAFD-F0EB-4939-8CE6-1D5C1D6E7CA9.jpeg
Mysia, Parion, Hemidrachm, Variety, , Silver, SNG France:--8 viewsCoin, Mysia, Parion, 4th century BC, Hemidrachm, , Silver, SNG France:--
Bull standing left, head reverted; pellet between hind legs
Facing gorgoneion
rare variety with pellet between hind legs
CARACTERISTICS
COIN RARITY rare variety
COMPOSITION Silver
GREECE PROVINCE Mysia
DIAMETER 12.5
DENOMINATION Hemidrachm
GREEK COIN THEME Parion
1 commentsMark R107/03/19 at 03:12Tracy Aiello: Very nice!
Larissa_Bull_Wrestling_Large.jpg
Bull Wrestling Drachm70 viewsThessaly Greece, the City of Larissa

Obv: The hero Thessalos1 to r. naked, except for chlamys around his shoulders and petasos, flying in the air, attached to his neck by a cord, holding with both hands a band that is around the forehead of a bull leaping r. All within a border of dots (not here visible).
Rev: ΛΑΡΙ above, Σ to the r. (not here visible), ΙΑ below (not here visible), bridled horse with trailing rein prancing r., no ground line. All within incuse square.
Denomination: Silver Drachm; Mint: Larissa; Date: c. 420 - 400 BC2; Weight: 6.06g; Diameter: 18mm: Die axis: 270º; References, for example: HGC 4, 423 (same obv.); Lorber 2008, pl. 43, 59 (same dies); BCD Thessaly II 372.7 (same dies).

Notes:
1Considered the ancestor of all Thessalians. The figure is also sometimes considered to be Jason (of Jason and the Argonauts), who according to one tradition was the father of Thessalos (HGC 4, p. 132).
2This is the date given in HGC 4. According to Lorber 2008 this coin should be placed in the revived bull wrestling drachm coinage, beginning c. 450 - 440 BC.

This type is related to the Thessalian sport of bull wrestling (taurokathapsia) “...regularly showcased at the Taureia games honoring Poseidon Taureios.” (HGC 4, p. 132).

Provenance: from the BCD collection, reportedly found 8 kms west of Pharsalus, May 1997.

Photo credits: Shanna Schmidt Numismatics

Sources

BCD Thessaly II: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. The BCD Collection of the Coinage of Thessaly. Triton XV Auction. (3 January 2012, New York).
HGC: Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Greece: Achaia Phthiotis, Ainis, Magnesia, Malis, Oita, Perrhaibia, Thessaly, Akarnania, Aitolia, Lokris, Phokis, Boiotia, Euboia, Attica, Megaris, and Corinthia, Sixth to First Centuries BC, The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Vol. 4. Lancaster/London: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc, 2014.
Lorber, Catharine C. “Thessalian Hoards and the Coinage of Larissa” in American Journal of Numismatics, second series 20 (2008): 119 - 142.
7 commentsTracy Aiello07/03/19 at 01:38Mark R1: Good one
RIC_144_Titus.jpg
RIC 0144 Titus13 viewsObv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII, Laureate head leftt
Rev: FELICIT PVBLIC / S C (in field), Felicitas standing left holding sceptre and cornucopia
AE/Sestertius (32.31 mm 22.58 g 6h) Struck in Rome 80-81 A.D. (Group 2)
RIC 144 (C2), BMCRE 158-9, BNF 154
Purchased on eBay from Münzhandlung Ritter
4 commentsFlaviusDomitianus07/03/19 at 01:14orfew: Nice portrait
848C5FCB-5EE9-43DF-B128-4A7C814C8C02.jpeg
Acarnania, Leucas, Stater, Leukas, EF(40-45), Silver, Pozzi:1317v12 viewsCOIN CONDITION EF(40-45)
MAIN CATEGORY Coins
COMPOSITION Silver
WEIGHT (GRAMS) 7.90
DENOMINATION Stater
GREECE PROVINCE Akarnania
GREEK COIN THEME Leucas
POZZI 1317v
MINT NAME Leukas
2 commentsMark R107/02/19 at 22:25Jay GT4: Sweet!
RIC_223_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0223 Domitianus46 viewsObv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERMAN COS X, Laureate head right, with aegis
Rev: MONETA AVGVST / S-C in field; Moneta standing left, with scales and cornucopia
AE/As (27.39 mm 11.408 g 6h) Struck in Rome 84 A.D. (b type)
RIC 223 (R2, no picture), BMCRE-BNF unlisted
ex Savoca 21st Blue Auction Lot 841
3 commentsFlaviusDomitianus07/02/19 at 18:59Jay GT4: That's great!
Vlasto_665.jpg
CALABRIA. Taras. Circa 290-281 BC. Stater10 viewsSilver, 21 mm, 7.95 g, 3 h
ΣA Nude rider on horse prancing to right, holding whip.
Rev. TAPAΣ / ⊢H Phalanthos seated astride dolphin to left, holding kantharos; behind, caduceus.
Fischer-Bossert 803-805 (V402/R816). HN III 947. Vlasto 665 (same obverse die).
A particularly elegant coin. Reverse struck slightly off-center. Extremely fine.
2 commentsLeo07/02/19 at 18:32Matt Inglima: A real beauty!
Vlasto_665.jpg
CALABRIA. Taras. Circa 290-281 BC. Stater10 viewsSilver, 21 mm, 7.95 g, 3 h
ΣA Nude rider on horse prancing to right, holding whip.
Rev. TAPAΣ / ⊢H Phalanthos seated astride dolphin to left, holding kantharos; behind, caduceus.
Fischer-Bossert 803-805 (V402/R816). HN III 947. Vlasto 665 (same obverse die).
A particularly elegant coin. Reverse struck slightly off-center. Extremely fine.
2 commentsLeo07/02/19 at 16:56Jay GT4: Great!
RIC_144_Titus.jpg
RIC 0144 Titus13 viewsObv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII, Laureate head leftt
Rev: FELICIT PVBLIC / S C (in field), Felicitas standing left holding sceptre and cornucopia
AE/Sestertius (32.31 mm 22.58 g 6h) Struck in Rome 80-81 A.D. (Group 2)
RIC 144 (C2), BMCRE 158-9, BNF 154
Purchased on eBay from Münzhandlung Ritter
4 commentsFlaviusDomitianus07/02/19 at 16:47Jay GT4: Very bold coin
RIC_144_Titus.jpg
RIC 0144 Titus13 viewsObv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII, Laureate head leftt
Rev: FELICIT PVBLIC / S C (in field), Felicitas standing left holding sceptre and cornucopia
AE/Sestertius (32.31 mm 22.58 g 6h) Struck in Rome 80-81 A.D. (Group 2)
RIC 144 (C2), BMCRE 158-9, BNF 154
Purchased on eBay from Münzhandlung Ritter
4 commentsFlaviusDomitianus07/02/19 at 16:39quadrans: Nice find...
Nero_RIC_I_215.JPG
Nero, 54 - 68 AD15 viewsObv: NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER PM TRP IMP PP, radiate head of Nero facing right.

Rev: GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, cloak draped around waist, sacrificing from patera in right hand over a flaming altar on left, holding a cornucopia in left hand, S - C flanking across field, I (mark of value) in exergue.

Orichalcum As, Rome mint, 64 AD

7.657 grams, 25.2 mm, 150°

RIC I 215, S1977 (var.)

Ex: FORVM
1 commentsMatt Inglima07/02/19 at 11:48Jay GT4: Great coin
1296_P_Hadrian_RPC1454.jpg
1454 Hadrian, Cistophorus Uncertain mint in Asia Minor, Roma seated6 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1454; Metcalf 103

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P
Laureate head right

Rev. COS III
Roma seated left on chair and shield holding Victory in extended right and vertical spear in upraised left

10.35 gr
26 mm
6h
1 commentsokidoki07/02/19 at 08:09shanxi: nice Roma
00221q00.jpg
Attica, Athens. (Circa 454-449 BC)10 viewsAR Tetradrachm

25 mm, 17.20 g

This is a transitional Owl tetradrachm that bridges the early classical owls (minted from 478-454) with the subsequent mass classical (standardized) coinage, which really got going in the early 440s BC to finance Pericles' building projects like the Parthenon and then later the Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC) vs. Sparta. The 454 date is critical in that it was the year that Athens moved the treasury of the Delian league (confederation of Greek states led by Athens to defend against the Persian threat) from Delos to Athens.

This coin shares many attributes of Starr V early classical coinage (465-454 BC). On the obverse, the olive leaves on Athena's helmet connect to her diadem with small stems (which disappear in the mass coinage). In addition, the palmette leaves on Athena's helmet are smaller, less decorative, and more realistic. Finally, Athena is smiling (she starts to frown as the war with Sparta goes badly) and is more beautifully depicted than in the more hastily produced mass coinage.

On the reverse, like with the Starr V coins, the incuse is quite noticeable and the AOE (short for AOENAION, or "Of the Athenians") is written in smaller letters (they are much bigger in the mass coinage). Also, the owl is stouter, has smaller eyes, and his head is at an angle rather than parallel to the ground like all later issues.

The only difference between the Starr V owls and this example is in the owl's tail - in Starr V it ends with three small feathers. On this coin and all subsequent coinage the owl's tail ends in a single prong. Given all the other similarities to Starr V it is likely this coin was minted soon after the Treasury's move from Delos to Athens - perhaps 454/453.
2 commentsNathan P07/02/19 at 04:37Matt Inglima: One of the most impressive ancient coin types... s...
V1235.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-123529 viewsÆ As, 9.42g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1235 (C). BMC 846 var.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: PROVIDENT in exergue; S C in field; Garlanded Altar
Acquired from Kölner, June 2019.

Late in Vespasian's reign the mint at Lyon (ancient Lugdunum) struck a fairly large issue of bronze at a time when the mint at Rome was winding down its own bronze production. Presumably this late issue was produced to address a shortage of bronze coinage in the Western provinces. Many of the types were recycled from earlier issues from both Rome and Lyon. The common PROVIDENT altar type was sometimes struck at Lyon with a decorative garland, as seen on this example. Although this variant is not rare, surprisingly it is missing from the BM collection. Although the type is commonly described as an altar, Marvin Tameanko has convincingly argued it is actually a sacellum, or small shrine. Originally, Tiberius struck the Provident altar type for Divus Augustus. It was later revived during the recent Civil War and was struck by both Galba and Vitellius.

Provenanced to an old 'South German collection from the 1920s to the 1950s'. Nice old cabinet tone.
2 commentsDavid Atherton07/02/19 at 00:17Jay GT4: Sweet
00221q00.jpg
Attica, Athens. (Circa 454-449 BC)10 viewsAR Tetradrachm

25 mm, 17.20 g

This is a transitional Owl tetradrachm that bridges the early classical owls (minted from 478-454) with the subsequent mass classical (standardized) coinage, which really got going in the early 440s BC to finance Pericles' building projects like the Parthenon and then later the Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC) vs. Sparta. The 454 date is critical in that it was the year that Athens moved the treasury of the Delian league (confederation of Greek states led by Athens to defend against the Persian threat) from Delos to Athens.

This coin shares many attributes of Starr V early classical coinage (465-454 BC). On the obverse, the olive leaves on Athena's helmet connect to her diadem with small stems (which disappear in the mass coinage). In addition, the palmette leaves on Athena's helmet are smaller, less decorative, and more realistic. Finally, Athena is smiling (she starts to frown as the war with Sparta goes badly) and is more beautifully depicted than in the more hastily produced mass coinage.

On the reverse, like with the Starr V coins, the incuse is quite noticeable and the AOE (short for AOENAION, or "Of the Athenians") is written in smaller letters (they are much bigger in the mass coinage). Also, the owl is stouter, has smaller eyes, and his head is at an angle rather than parallel to the ground like all later issues.

The only difference between the Starr V owls and this example is in the owl's tail - in Starr V it ends with three small feathers. On this coin and all subsequent coinage the owl's tail ends in a single prong. Given all the other similarities to Starr V it is likely this coin was minted soon after the Treasury's move from Delos to Athens - perhaps 454/453.
2 commentsNathan P07/01/19 at 23:27Tracy Aiello: Beautiful coin; great write-up.
Domitian_RIC_336_Leu.jpg
Domitian AR Denarius39 viewsDomitian, 81-96. Denarius 85 CE Fourth Issue
(Silver, 20 mm, 3.32 g, 6 h), Rome.
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII Laureate head of Domitian to right, wearing aegis.
Rev. IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P Minerva standing front, head to left, holding thunderbolt in her right hand and a spear in her left; behind her, shield.
BMC 79. Cohen 178 var. (without aegis). RIC 336 (R2).
Leu Numismatic E-Auction 8 Lot 1038 June 30, 2019.
4 commentsorfew07/01/19 at 21:16Jay GT4: That's great! Love the Aegis
Domitian_RIC_336_Leu.jpg
Domitian AR Denarius39 viewsDomitian, 81-96. Denarius 85 CE Fourth Issue
(Silver, 20 mm, 3.32 g, 6 h), Rome.
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII Laureate head of Domitian to right, wearing aegis.
Rev. IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P Minerva standing front, head to left, holding thunderbolt in her right hand and a spear in her left; behind her, shield.
BMC 79. Cohen 178 var. (without aegis). RIC 336 (R2).
Leu Numismatic E-Auction 8 Lot 1038 June 30, 2019.
4 commentsorfew07/01/19 at 20:31okidoki: very nice reverse
V1235.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-123529 viewsÆ As, 9.42g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
RIC 1235 (C). BMC 846 var.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: PROVIDENT in exergue; S C in field; Garlanded Altar
Acquired from Kölner, June 2019.

Late in Vespasian's reign the mint at Lyon (ancient Lugdunum) struck a fairly large issue of bronze at a time when the mint at Rome was winding down its own bronze production. Presumably this late issue was produced to address a shortage of bronze coinage in the Western provinces. Many of the types were recycled from earlier issues from both Rome and Lyon. The common PROVIDENT altar type was sometimes struck at Lyon with a decorative garland, as seen on this example. Although this variant is not rare, surprisingly it is missing from the BM collection. Although the type is commonly described as an altar, Marvin Tameanko has convincingly argued it is actually a sacellum, or small shrine. Originally, Tiberius struck the Provident altar type for Divus Augustus. It was later revived during the recent Civil War and was struck by both Galba and Vitellius.

Provenanced to an old 'South German collection from the 1920s to the 1950s'. Nice old cabinet tone.
2 commentsDavid Atherton07/01/19 at 18:19okidoki: very nice reverse
Domitian_RIC_336_Leu.jpg
Domitian AR Denarius39 viewsDomitian, 81-96. Denarius 85 CE Fourth Issue
(Silver, 20 mm, 3.32 g, 6 h), Rome.
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII Laureate head of Domitian to right, wearing aegis.
Rev. IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P Minerva standing front, head to left, holding thunderbolt in her right hand and a spear in her left; behind her, shield.
BMC 79. Cohen 178 var. (without aegis). RIC 336 (R2).
Leu Numismatic E-Auction 8 Lot 1038 June 30, 2019.
4 commentsorfew07/01/19 at 14:43quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
Domitian_RIC_336_Leu.jpg
Domitian AR Denarius39 viewsDomitian, 81-96. Denarius 85 CE Fourth Issue
(Silver, 20 mm, 3.32 g, 6 h), Rome.
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII Laureate head of Domitian to right, wearing aegis.
Rev. IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P Minerva standing front, head to left, holding thunderbolt in her right hand and a spear in her left; behind her, shield.
BMC 79. Cohen 178 var. (without aegis). RIC 336 (R2).
Leu Numismatic E-Auction 8 Lot 1038 June 30, 2019.
4 commentsorfew07/01/19 at 14:32David Atherton: Wonderful aegis on that one!
V1397ccc.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1397116 viewsAR Denarius, 3.29g
Ephesus mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1397 (R). BMC p. 89,†. RSC 291. RPC 807 (5 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI ORB TERR AVG; Turreted and draped female bust, r.
Acquired from NB Numismatics, March 2017. Ex VAuctions 292 (Imperial Coins), 6 December 2012, lot 130.

The first denarius issue at Ephesus was struck without mint marks and all of them are quite rare. This particular denarius has a peculiarly crude style compared with other Ephesian denarii. RIC II.1 authors Carradice and Buttrey comment about this coin in the introduction on p. 8 - 'a recent example seen in trade (Imperial Coins 2004) had the correct legend (and good weight for a denarius, at 3.29g) but a very different, inferior style on both the obverse and reverse. Is such a coin a barbarous imitation, or simply the product of a less able die-engraver employed at the start of a mint's output?' Curiously, the RIC plate coin of this same type from Oxford is in a similarly crude style. Interesting to note that Mattingly in BMCRE II doubted the type existed without mint mark, which indicates how rare it is!

Struck on a small flan in high relief.

7 commentsDavid Atherton07/01/19 at 12:29orfew: Wow, what an interesting coin.
Pisidia,_Antioch,_049p_Septimius_Severus_(193-211_A_D_),_AE-22___Imitatio,_Q-001,_0h,_22,0mm,_5,25g-s~0.jpg
049p Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), Pisidia, Antioch, SNG BN 1117-8, AE-22, ANTIOCH MENCIS CO, Mên wearing a long robe and Phrygian cap,44 views049p Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), Pisidia, Antioch, SNG BN 1117-8, AE-22, ANTIOCH MENCIS CO, Mên wearing a long robe and Phrygian cap,
avers: IMP CAES SEP SEV PER A, Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left.
reverse: ANTIOCH MENCIS CO, Mên (Lunus), wearing a long robe and Phrygian cap, crescent on the left shoulder, standing slightly right, left foot resting on bucranium, holding Nike with the trophy in left hand and spear in right, rooster at foot left.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 22,0mm, weight: 5,25g, axis: 0h,
mint: Pisidia, Antioch, date: 193-211 A.D., ref: SNG BN 1117-8, Krzyźanowska obv. die XIX.
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans07/01/19 at 05:50Randygeki(h2): Sweet!
692_P_Hadrian_RPC2556.jpg
2556 LYDIA, Gordus Julia Pseudo-autonomous AE 15 under hadrian Amphora22 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2556; SNG München 179

Magistrate Ludus

Obv. ΓΟΡΔΟΥ
Turreted and draped bust of the Tyche of the city, right.

Rev. ΕΠΙ ΛΥΔΟΥ
Amphora

2.23 gr
15 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki07/01/19 at 00:03Aleph: Isn’t this a krater rather than an amphora? Ampho...
Phoenicia,_Aradus,_027p_Traianus_(98-117_A_D_),_Astarte-Europa-Traianus_r_,_Bull_l_,_BMC_Phoen__374,_AE-23mm,_(EOT_y375)_116-7_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_23mm,_10,69g-s.jpg
027p Traianus (98-117 A.D.), Phoenicia, Arados, BMC Phoenicia 374, AE-23, Bull left, #142 views027p Traianus (98-117 A.D.), Phoenicia, Arados, BMC Phoenicia 374, AE-23, Bull left, #1
avers: Bust of Astarte-Europa right, in stephane and veil, falling from chignon, smaller laureate head of Trajan right in front
reverse: Bull running left, date EOT (year 375) above, Phoenician letter on left, APAΔIΩN belove.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 23,0mm, weight:10,69g, axes:0h,
mint: Phoenicia, Arados, date: EOT=year 375, 116-117 A.D.,
ref: BMC Phoenicia 374
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans06/30/19 at 19:28shanxi: I like the little Trajanio
0139.jpg
Mn. Cordius Rufus, Denarius10 viewsMn. Cordius Rufus, Denarius

RRC 463/1a
46 bc
3,62 gr

Av: Jugate heads of the dioskuri.
Rv: Venus standing left, holding scales and sceptre.

Ex Münzen & Medaillen GmbH, Auktion 46, lot 677.
Reported as ex L. Schulman, Auktion 24 (2000), Nr. 1435.
2 commentsNorbert06/30/19 at 18:20quadrans: Great coin
Faustina_II_R690_fac.jpg
RPC - Thrace, Augusta Traiana, Faustina II, Demeter15 viewsFaustina Junior
Thrace, Augusta Traiana
AE25
Obv.: ΦΑVСΤΕΙΝΑ СΕΒΑСΤΗ, draped bust of Faustina II right.
Rev.: ΑVΓΟVСΤΗС ΤΡΑΙΑΝΗС, veiled Demeter standing, facing, head, l., holding two ears of corn and long torch
Ae, 7.87g, 25 mm
Ref.: RPC Vol. 4, № 9375 (temporary)
1 commentsshanxi06/30/19 at 18:19quadrans: Nice one
Pisidia,_Antioch,_049p_Septimius_Severus_(193-211_A_D_),_AE-22___Imitatio,_Q-001,_0h,_22,0mm,_5,25g-s~0.jpg
049p Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), Pisidia, Antioch, SNG BN 1117-8, AE-22, ANTIOCH MENCIS CO, Mên wearing a long robe and Phrygian cap,44 views049p Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), Pisidia, Antioch, SNG BN 1117-8, AE-22, ANTIOCH MENCIS CO, Mên wearing a long robe and Phrygian cap,
avers: IMP CAES SEP SEV PER A, Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left.
reverse: ANTIOCH MENCIS CO, Mên (Lunus), wearing a long robe and Phrygian cap, crescent on the left shoulder, standing slightly right, left foot resting on bucranium, holding Nike with the trophy in left hand and spear in right, rooster at foot left.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 22,0mm, weight: 5,25g, axis: 0h,
mint: Pisidia, Antioch, date: 193-211 A.D., ref: SNG BN 1117-8, Krzyźanowska obv. die XIX.
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans06/30/19 at 17:11Tracy Aiello: That is a great reverse.
Pisidia,_Antioch,_049p_Septimius_Severus_(193-211_A_D_),_AE-22___Imitatio,_Q-001,_0h,_22,0mm,_5,25g-s~0.jpg
049p Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), Pisidia, Antioch, SNG BN 1117-8, AE-22, ANTIOCH MENCIS CO, Mên wearing a long robe and Phrygian cap,44 views049p Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), Pisidia, Antioch, SNG BN 1117-8, AE-22, ANTIOCH MENCIS CO, Mên wearing a long robe and Phrygian cap,
avers: IMP CAES SEP SEV PER A, Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left.
reverse: ANTIOCH MENCIS CO, Mên (Lunus), wearing a long robe and Phrygian cap, crescent on the left shoulder, standing slightly right, left foot resting on bucranium, holding Nike with the trophy in left hand and spear in right, rooster at foot left.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 22,0mm, weight: 5,25g, axis: 0h,
mint: Pisidia, Antioch, date: 193-211 A.D., ref: SNG BN 1117-8, Krzyźanowska obv. die XIX.
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans06/30/19 at 17:10*Alex: Nice in a naive sort of way.
0139.jpg
Mn. Cordius Rufus, Denarius10 viewsMn. Cordius Rufus, Denarius

RRC 463/1a
46 bc
3,62 gr

Av: Jugate heads of the dioskuri.
Rv: Venus standing left, holding scales and sceptre.

Ex Münzen & Medaillen GmbH, Auktion 46, lot 677.
Reported as ex L. Schulman, Auktion 24 (2000), Nr. 1435.
2 commentsNorbert06/30/19 at 15:44okidoki: very nice
Trajanus.png
Trajan, denarius8 viewsTrajan, denarius.
Rome mint.
3.12 g. 19 mm.
Obv. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate bust right.
Rev. SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, VIA TRAIANA, personification of via Traiana reclining left on rocks with wheel and branch; VIA TRAIANA in exergue.
RIC 266.
1 commentsMarsman06/30/19 at 00:09Tracy Aiello: Great coin.
septimius_severus.png
Septimius Severus, denarius8 viewsSeptimius Severus, denarius.
Rome mint.
Obv. L SEPT SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX, bust right.
Rev. VICTORIAE AVGG FEL, Victory advancing left, holding open wreath in both hands over shield set on low base.
RIC 144b
2.80 g, 15 mm.
1 commentsMarsman06/29/19 at 23:31Jay GT4: Great piece
Nero_tetradrachm.png
Nero Billon Tetradrachm11 viewsNero Billon Tetradrachm.
Alexandria. Year 13 = 66/67 AD.
12,77 g.
Obv. NEΡΩ KΛAV KAIΣ ΣEB ΓEΡ AV, radiate bust of Nero left wearing aegis
Rev. LIΓ to left / ΔIOΣ OΛYMΠIOY, laureate head of Zeus Olympius right.
RPC I 5297
2 commentsMarsman06/29/19 at 21:39quadrans: Nice piece..
Otho_denarius.png
Otho, denarius10 viewsOtho, denarius
Rome mint.
2,89 g. 19 mm.
Obv. IMP M OTHO CAESAR AVG TR P, bare head right
Rev. SECVRITAS P R, Securitas standing left, holding wreath and sceptre.
RIC 8
Broken and repaired.
1 commentsMarsman06/29/19 at 21:27Jay GT4: Still a nice portrait despite the break
Caligula_denarius.jpg
Caligula, denarius11 viewsCaligula, denarius.
37-8 AD, Lugdunum.
3.62g.
Obv: C CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR POT / laureate head of Caligula right.
Rev. GERMANICVS CAES P C CAES AVG GERM / bare head of Germanicus right.
RIC 18.
1 commentsMarsman06/29/19 at 21:01Jay GT4: Love the double portrait
Nero_tetradrachm.png
Nero Billon Tetradrachm11 viewsNero Billon Tetradrachm.
Alexandria. Year 13 = 66/67 AD.
12,77 g.
Obv. NEΡΩ KΛAV KAIΣ ΣEB ΓEΡ AV, radiate bust of Nero left wearing aegis
Rev. LIΓ to left / ΔIOΣ OΛYMΠIOY, laureate head of Zeus Olympius right.
RPC I 5297
2 commentsMarsman06/29/19 at 21:01Jay GT4: Great coin
RIC_223_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0223 Domitianus46 viewsObv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERMAN COS X, Laureate head right, with aegis
Rev: MONETA AVGVST / S-C in field; Moneta standing left, with scales and cornucopia
AE/As (27.39 mm 11.408 g 6h) Struck in Rome 84 A.D. (b type)
RIC 223 (R2, no picture), BMCRE-BNF unlisted
ex Savoca 21st Blue Auction Lot 841
3 commentsFlaviusDomitianus06/29/19 at 19:29Vincent: Sweet, nice find🤗
T16A.jpg
Titus RIC 16A49 viewsAR Denarius, 2.83g
Rome mint, 79 AD
RIC 16A (R3). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
Ex Roma Numismatics, E-Sale 58, 20 June 2019, lot 1078.

A unique First issue Annona paired with a Second issue obverse legend. The Annona reverse was a carry-over type struck for Titus as Caesar under Vespasian just before his death and was likely issued in the first few days of Titus' reign as a stop-gap until new reverse designs could be created. It is by far the rarest type from the First issue. The obverse legend changed in the second issue from the First issue's IMP T CAESAR to IMP TITVS CAES, this would be the standard obverse legend on the denarii for the remainder of the reign. The appearance of the Annona type with the new obverse legend is possibly a mule using an old First issue reverse die with a new Second issue obverse. There is a slight possibility that it was an intentional strike, but the fact that no other Second issue Annona specimens have surfaced is a strong indication it is accidental.

I informed Ian Carradice of the piece and he has assigned it RIC 16A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda with the note: 'Perhaps a mule, with rev die from the previous issue'.

Good Roman style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/29/19 at 17:57kc: Cheap rarity!
T16A.jpg
Titus RIC 16A49 viewsAR Denarius, 2.83g
Rome mint, 79 AD
RIC 16A (R3). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
Ex Roma Numismatics, E-Sale 58, 20 June 2019, lot 1078.

A unique First issue Annona paired with a Second issue obverse legend. The Annona reverse was a carry-over type struck for Titus as Caesar under Vespasian just before his death and was likely issued in the first few days of Titus' reign as a stop-gap until new reverse designs could be created. It is by far the rarest type from the First issue. The obverse legend changed in the second issue from the First issue's IMP T CAESAR to IMP TITVS CAES, this would be the standard obverse legend on the denarii for the remainder of the reign. The appearance of the Annona type with the new obverse legend is possibly a mule using an old First issue reverse die with a new Second issue obverse. There is a slight possibility that it was an intentional strike, but the fact that no other Second issue Annona specimens have surfaced is a strong indication it is accidental.

I informed Ian Carradice of the piece and he has assigned it RIC 16A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda with the note: 'Perhaps a mule, with rev die from the previous issue'.

Good Roman style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/29/19 at 17:42FlaviusDomitianus: Well spotted!
Pisidia,_Antioch,_049p_Septimius_Severus_(193-211_A_D_),_AE-22___Imitatio,_Q-001,_0h,_22,0mm,_5,25g-s.jpg
Pisidia, Antioch, 049p Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), SNG BN 1117-8, AE-22, ANTIOCH MENCIS CO, Mên wearing a long robe and Phrygian cap,39 viewsPisidia, Antioch, 049p Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), SNG BN 1117-8, AE-22, ANTIOCH MENCIS CO, Mên wearing a long robe and Phrygian cap,
avers: IMP CAES SEP SEV PER A, Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left.
reverse: ANTIOCH MENCIS CO, Mên (Lunus), wearing a long robe and Phrygian cap, crescent on the left shoulder, standing slightly right, left foot resting on bucranium, holding Nike with the trophy in left hand and spear in right, rooster at foot left.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 22,0mm, weight: 5,25g, axis: 0h,
mint: Pisidia, Antioch, date: 193-211 A.D., ref: SNG BN 1117-8, Krzyźanowska obv. die XIX.
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans06/29/19 at 17:08okidoki: great looks
T16A.jpg
Titus RIC 16A49 viewsAR Denarius, 2.83g
Rome mint, 79 AD
RIC 16A (R3). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona std. l., with sack of corn ears
Ex Roma Numismatics, E-Sale 58, 20 June 2019, lot 1078.

A unique First issue Annona paired with a Second issue obverse legend. The Annona reverse was a carry-over type struck for Titus as Caesar under Vespasian just before his death and was likely issued in the first few days of Titus' reign as a stop-gap until new reverse designs could be created. It is by far the rarest type from the First issue. The obverse legend changed in the second issue from the First issue's IMP T CAESAR to IMP TITVS CAES, this would be the standard obverse legend on the denarii for the remainder of the reign. The appearance of the Annona type with the new obverse legend is possibly a mule using an old First issue reverse die with a new Second issue obverse. There is a slight possibility that it was an intentional strike, but the fact that no other Second issue Annona specimens have surfaced is a strong indication it is accidental.

I informed Ian Carradice of the piece and he has assigned it RIC 16A in the upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda with the note: 'Perhaps a mule, with rev die from the previous issue'.

Good Roman style.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/29/19 at 16:40Mat: I like the look of this one
RIC_223_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0223 Domitianus46 viewsObv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERMAN COS X, Laureate head right, with aegis
Rev: MONETA AVGVST / S-C in field; Moneta standing left, with scales and cornucopia
AE/As (27.39 mm 11.408 g 6h) Struck in Rome 84 A.D. (b type)
RIC 223 (R2, no picture), BMCRE-BNF unlisted
ex Savoca 21st Blue Auction Lot 841
3 commentsFlaviusDomitianus06/29/19 at 13:00kc: I must say - cute German
justfol.jpg
Justinian I (527 - 565 A.D.)22 viewsÆ Follis
O: DN ISTINI-ANVS PP AVG Helmeted and cuirassed bust of Justinian facing, holding globus cruciger and a shield.
R: Large M, cross above, ANNO left, regnal year XXXI right, G ( = officina 3 ) below, THEUP in ex.
Theoupolis - Antiochia 
18.64g
32mm
SB 220
2 commentsMat06/29/19 at 06:27quadrans: Nice piece..
Domitian_Horseback.jpg
RIC 539 variant Domitian denarius36 viewsCAES AV DOMIT COS II
Laureate head right

Domitian on horse left; right hand raised, sceptre in left

Rome? 73 AD

3.34g

RIC 539 (R2) variant?: Missing G and F in legend.

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya

Stylistically this coin resembles some others of this type but without the legend errors. The fabric is similar to those from Antioch. Is this an ancient imitation or perhaps an apprentice cut the legend? Or is it an unknown type from Antioch?
3 commentsJay GT406/29/19 at 06:27quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
VespasianEXSC.jpg
RIC 364 Vespasian denarius41 viewsDIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS
Laureate head right

EX SC
Victory advancing left placing shield on trophy; below, Judaea seated left

Rome 80-81 AD, after the deification of Vespasian

2.91g

RIC 364 (C)

Ex-Manfred Olding 2019 no 180; Ex-Paul Schürer (1890-1976); Ex-Fritz Reusing (1874-1956) with handwritten tag.

Reusing was a German portrait painter of the early 20th Century whose portraits included Richard Strauss, Igor Strawinsky, Max Planck, and Albert Einstein. After Reusing's death his nephew Paul Schürer inherited and curated the collection.

Heavy black patina with old scratches beneath.
6 commentsJay GT406/29/19 at 06:26quadrans: Nice one
D281.jpg
Domitian RIC-28160 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.14g
Rome mint, 85 AD
RIC 281 (R). BMC 301.
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: S C in exergue; Domitian stg. r., clasping hands over altar with officer stg. l.; behind officer, one soldier with standard and one soldier at r. with spear and shield
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, June 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 182. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), acquired from the Heynen Collection; inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his greatest military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The Germanic triumph received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. This rare sestertius depicts a rather ambiguous scene showing Domitian, the much larger figure on the left, clasping hands with a legate over an altar while two legionaries stand by. What exactly is going on here is a mystery. Mattingly in BMCRE II believed it to be 'the taking of the sacramentum, the military oath'. Others have postulated the scene shows Domitian greeting Agricola upon his return from Britannia. The Agricola connection is highly unlikely. The type is struck for several more years, so it cannot be referring to one single 'event'. It's an intriguing scene in the context of the Germania Capta series, perhaps depicting a post victory ceremony. Whatever the meaning, the reverse strongly underscores Domitian's bond with the military.

This wonderful old cabinet toned piece is from the collection of the German portrait painter Fritz Reusing.

3 commentsDavid Atherton06/29/19 at 06:26quadrans: Great coin
1291_P_Hadrian_RPC5294_3.jpg
5294 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Drachm 120-21 AD Nike advancing16 viewsReference.
RPC III, 5294.3; Dattari-Savio Pl. 86, 7726 (this coin) and Pl. XXXXVI (this rev. Illustrated).); Emmett 1007.5

Issue L E = year 5

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑΙ - ΑΔΡΙΑ СƐΒ
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., drapery on l. shoulder

Rev. L Ε
Trophy with standing captive; to r., Nike advancing l. holding wreath and palm-branch; between, kneeling captive

17.51 gr
34 mm
12h
1 commentsokidoki06/29/19 at 06:25quadrans: Interesting piece..
Tarsos_01.jpg
Asia Minor, Kilikia, Tarsos - Tyche, Sandan, Pyramid15 viewsKilikia, Tarsos
Æ 26, 164-27 BC
Obv: Turreted bust of Tyche right
Rev: TAPΣEΩN, Sandan standing right on horned, winged animal, within a pyramidal monument surmounted by an eagle; to left monograms.
Æ, 26.4mm, 18.3g
SNG Levante 961
Ex Numismatik Naumann, auction 44, Lot 485
1 commentsshanxi06/29/19 at 06:13quadrans: Nice one
G_027_Arados_fac.jpg
Phoenicia, Arados, Tyche, Nike18 viewsPhoenicia, Arados
Tetradrachm
Dated year 193 (67/66 BC)
Obv.: Turreted, veiled and draped bust of Tyche right
Rev.: Nike standing to right, holding aplustre and palm, Γ P(retrograde)Ρ (= year 193), phoenician letter Gimel and MΣ below, AΡAΔIΩN in right field; all within wreath.
Ref.: BMC 271, Duyrat, Arados 97, 3837
Ex CNG (Jan. 1999)
2 commentsshanxi06/29/19 at 06:09quadrans: Nice piece..
Lucius_Verus_03.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, AD 164/165, Lucius Verus, Armenia23 viewsLucius Verus
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: Λ AYPHΛIOC OYHPOC CEB, laureate head right
Rev.: APMENIA, Trophy of arms, at base of which Armenian captive seated right, head left, wearing pointed cap, hands tied behind back, L - E = year 5 (164/165).
Billon, 13.88g, 21,8mm
Ref.: Dattari-Savio pl. 197, 3692 var. Cologne 2163 var. Oxford 2519 var.
[var: APMENIA left and right, not in circular legend]
2 commentsshanxi06/29/19 at 06:00quadrans: Another nice piece
Hadrian_6.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, AD 128/129, Hadrian, Sabina34 viewsHadrian
Egypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm
Obv.: AVT KAI TPAI AΔPIA CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
Rev.: CABINA CEBACTH, Draped bust of Sabina right.
Billon, 13,32 g, 25.8mm
Ref.: Geissen 90, 997. Dattari 1249. Kampmann-Ganschow 135, 32. 469
2 commentsshanxi06/29/19 at 05:59quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
Faustina_II_R689_fac~0.jpg
RPC - Egypt, Alexandria, AD 153/154, Faustina II, Nilus15 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Æ Drachm
Obv.: ΦΑVСΤΙΝΑ СƐΒΑС(С)ΤΗ (legend starting at 1 o'clock), draped bust right
Rev.. Nilus, with crocodile beside him, reclining, l., holding reed and cornucopia; (below, water plants)
L IZ= year 17 of Antoninus Pius (153/154).
Æ, 22.11g, 34mm
Ref.: RPC IV online 14755 (temporary)
1 commentsshanxi06/29/19 at 05:58quadrans: Nice one
Domitian_Horseback.jpg
RIC 539 variant Domitian denarius36 viewsCAES AV DOMIT COS II
Laureate head right

Domitian on horse left; right hand raised, sceptre in left

Rome? 73 AD

3.34g

RIC 539 (R2) variant?: Missing G and F in legend.

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya

Stylistically this coin resembles some others of this type but without the legend errors. The fabric is similar to those from Antioch. Is this an ancient imitation or perhaps an apprentice cut the legend? Or is it an unknown type from Antioch?
3 commentsJay GT406/29/19 at 04:22Matt Inglima: A wonderful coin, congratulations on the addition ...
justfol.jpg
Justinian I (527 - 565 A.D.)22 viewsÆ Follis
O: DN ISTINI-ANVS PP AVG Helmeted and cuirassed bust of Justinian facing, holding globus cruciger and a shield.
R: Large M, cross above, ANNO left, regnal year XXXI right, G ( = officina 3 ) below, THEUP in ex.
Theoupolis - Antiochia 
18.64g
32mm
SB 220
2 commentsMat06/29/19 at 03:32Randygeki(h2): Cool addition
Faustina_II_R689_fac.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, AD 153/154, Faustina II, Nilus17 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Æ Drachm
Obv.: ΦΑVСΤΙΝΑ СƐΒΑС(С)ΤΗ (legend starting at 1 o'clock), draped bust right
Rev.. Nilus, with crocodile beside him, reclining, l., holding reed and cornucopia; (below, water plants)
L IZ= year 17 of Antoninus Pius (153/154).
Æ, 22.11g, 34mm
Ref.: RPC IV online 14755 (temporary)
2 commentsshanxi06/29/19 at 00:56Jay GT4: Cool reverse
Domitian_Horseback.jpg
RIC 539 variant Domitian denarius36 viewsCAES AV DOMIT COS II
Laureate head right

Domitian on horse left; right hand raised, sceptre in left

Rome? 73 AD

3.34g

RIC 539 (R2) variant?: Missing G and F in legend.

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya

Stylistically this coin resembles some others of this type but without the legend errors. The fabric is similar to those from Antioch. Is this an ancient imitation or perhaps an apprentice cut the legend? Or is it an unknown type from Antioch?
3 commentsJay GT406/29/19 at 00:19Randygeki(h2): Sweet
VespasianEXSC.jpg
RIC 364 Vespasian denarius41 viewsDIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS
Laureate head right

EX SC
Victory advancing left placing shield on trophy; below, Judaea seated left

Rome 80-81 AD, after the deification of Vespasian

2.91g

RIC 364 (C)

Ex-Manfred Olding 2019 no 180; Ex-Paul Schürer (1890-1976); Ex-Fritz Reusing (1874-1956) with handwritten tag.

Reusing was a German portrait painter of the early 20th Century whose portraits included Richard Strauss, Igor Strawinsky, Max Planck, and Albert Einstein. After Reusing's death his nephew Paul Schürer inherited and curated the collection.

Heavy black patina with old scratches beneath.
6 commentsJay GT406/28/19 at 20:11FlaviusDomitianus: Excellent!
VespasianEXSC.jpg
RIC 364 Vespasian denarius41 viewsDIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS
Laureate head right

EX SC
Victory advancing left placing shield on trophy; below, Judaea seated left

Rome 80-81 AD, after the deification of Vespasian

2.91g

RIC 364 (C)

Ex-Manfred Olding 2019 no 180; Ex-Paul Schürer (1890-1976); Ex-Fritz Reusing (1874-1956) with handwritten tag.

Reusing was a German portrait painter of the early 20th Century whose portraits included Richard Strauss, Igor Strawinsky, Max Planck, and Albert Einstein. After Reusing's death his nephew Paul Schürer inherited and curated the collection.

Heavy black patina with old scratches beneath.
6 commentsJay GT406/28/19 at 19:46David Atherton: Nice addition!
VespasianEXSC.jpg
RIC 364 Vespasian denarius41 viewsDIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS
Laureate head right

EX SC
Victory advancing left placing shield on trophy; below, Judaea seated left

Rome 80-81 AD, after the deification of Vespasian

2.91g

RIC 364 (C)

Ex-Manfred Olding 2019 no 180; Ex-Paul Schürer (1890-1976); Ex-Fritz Reusing (1874-1956) with handwritten tag.

Reusing was a German portrait painter of the early 20th Century whose portraits included Richard Strauss, Igor Strawinsky, Max Planck, and Albert Einstein. After Reusing's death his nephew Paul Schürer inherited and curated the collection.

Heavy black patina with old scratches beneath.
6 commentsJay GT406/28/19 at 19:22orfew: A lovely example
VespasianEXSC.jpg
RIC 364 Vespasian denarius41 viewsDIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS
Laureate head right

EX SC
Victory advancing left placing shield on trophy; below, Judaea seated left

Rome 80-81 AD, after the deification of Vespasian

2.91g

RIC 364 (C)

Ex-Manfred Olding 2019 no 180; Ex-Paul Schürer (1890-1976); Ex-Fritz Reusing (1874-1956) with handwritten tag.

Reusing was a German portrait painter of the early 20th Century whose portraits included Richard Strauss, Igor Strawinsky, Max Planck, and Albert Einstein. After Reusing's death his nephew Paul Schürer inherited and curated the collection.

Heavy black patina with old scratches beneath.
6 commentsJay GT406/28/19 at 18:39Enodia: Nice coin, great provenance!
VespasianEXSC.jpg
RIC 364 Vespasian denarius41 viewsDIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS
Laureate head right

EX SC
Victory advancing left placing shield on trophy; below, Judaea seated left

Rome 80-81 AD, after the deification of Vespasian

2.91g

RIC 364 (C)

Ex-Manfred Olding 2019 no 180; Ex-Paul Schürer (1890-1976); Ex-Fritz Reusing (1874-1956) with handwritten tag.

Reusing was a German portrait painter of the early 20th Century whose portraits included Richard Strauss, Igor Strawinsky, Max Planck, and Albert Einstein. After Reusing's death his nephew Paul Schürer inherited and curated the collection.

Heavy black patina with old scratches beneath.
6 commentsJay GT406/28/19 at 17:53okidoki: very nice reverse
D281.jpg
Domitian RIC-28160 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.14g
Rome mint, 85 AD
RIC 281 (R). BMC 301.
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: S C in exergue; Domitian stg. r., clasping hands over altar with officer stg. l.; behind officer, one soldier with standard and one soldier at r. with spear and shield
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, June 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 182. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), acquired from the Heynen Collection; inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his greatest military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The Germanic triumph received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. This rare sestertius depicts a rather ambiguous scene showing Domitian, the much larger figure on the left, clasping hands with a legate over an altar while two legionaries stand by. What exactly is going on here is a mystery. Mattingly in BMCRE II believed it to be 'the taking of the sacramentum, the military oath'. Others have postulated the scene shows Domitian greeting Agricola upon his return from Britannia. The Agricola connection is highly unlikely. The type is struck for several more years, so it cannot be referring to one single 'event'. It's an intriguing scene in the context of the Germania Capta series, perhaps depicting a post victory ceremony. Whatever the meaning, the reverse strongly underscores Domitian's bond with the military.

This wonderful old cabinet toned piece is from the collection of the German portrait painter Fritz Reusing.

3 commentsDavid Atherton06/28/19 at 15:26Steve P: Sweet centering ... I always love the looks of the...
P1190234.jpg
Kamarina - Onkiai20 viewsKamarina
Onkiai
Obv. Gorgoneion facing
Rev. KAMA. Owl standing right, clutching lizard in talons. Value mark . (dot) in exergue
Struck ca. 420 - 410 BC.
0.95 Gr.
CNS III, 47, 2-3; HGC 2, 552
3 commentsnummis durensis06/28/19 at 15:23Steve P: Sweet, sweet coin (congrats)
P1190234.jpg
Kamarina - Onkiai20 viewsKamarina
Onkiai
Obv. Gorgoneion facing
Rev. KAMA. Owl standing right, clutching lizard in talons. Value mark . (dot) in exergue
Struck ca. 420 - 410 BC.
0.95 Gr.
CNS III, 47, 2-3; HGC 2, 552
3 commentsnummis durensis06/28/19 at 05:18quadrans: Nice piece..
Augustus_RIC_222.jpg
Augustus AR Denarius16 views
Octavian as Augustus, 27 BC – 14 AD Denarius
Lugdunum circa 13-14,
18mm., 3.56g.
Obv: Laureate head r.
Rev. Tiberius in triumphal quadriga r., holding laurel branch and eagle-tipped sceptre.
RSC 301. RIC 224.
Ex: Naville Numismatics Live auction 50 Lot 439 June 23, 2019
2 commentsorfew06/28/19 at 02:40David Atherton: Wonderful!
D281.jpg
Domitian RIC-28160 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.14g
Rome mint, 85 AD
RIC 281 (R). BMC 301.
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: S C in exergue; Domitian stg. r., clasping hands over altar with officer stg. l.; behind officer, one soldier with standard and one soldier at r. with spear and shield
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, June 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 182. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), acquired from the Heynen Collection; inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his greatest military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The Germanic triumph received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. This rare sestertius depicts a rather ambiguous scene showing Domitian, the much larger figure on the left, clasping hands with a legate over an altar while two legionaries stand by. What exactly is going on here is a mystery. Mattingly in BMCRE II believed it to be 'the taking of the sacramentum, the military oath'. Others have postulated the scene shows Domitian greeting Agricola upon his return from Britannia. The Agricola connection is highly unlikely. The type is struck for several more years, so it cannot be referring to one single 'event'. It's an intriguing scene in the context of the Germania Capta series, perhaps depicting a post victory ceremony. Whatever the meaning, the reverse strongly underscores Domitian's bond with the military.

This wonderful old cabinet toned piece is from the collection of the German portrait painter Fritz Reusing.

3 commentsDavid Atherton06/28/19 at 01:59Jay GT4: Fantastic addition and intriguing
Aeolis,_Kyme,_After_ca_190_BC__AE-15,_K-Y_Artemis_clasping_hands_with_figure,Two_figures_in_quadriga_r_,_BMC_96,_SNG_Cop_113,_Q-001,_0h,_15mm,_4,52g-s.jpg
Aeolis, Kyme, (After ca. 190 B.C.), AE-15, BMC 096, Two figures in quadriga right, #151 viewsAeolis, Kyme, (After ca. 190 B.C.), AE-15, BMC 096, Two figures in quadriga right, #1
avers: K-Y across fields, Artemis standing right, holding a torch and clasping hands with figure standing left, holding a transverse spear.
reverse: Two figures in quadriga right, one holding a long transverse spear.
exergue: K/Y//--(in avers), diameter: 15,0mm, weight: 4,52g, axes: 0h,
mint: Aeolis, Kyme, date: After ca. 190 B.C., ref: BMC 096, SNG Cop 113, SNG von Aulock 1644,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans06/27/19 at 19:55shanxi: for this type a good one
Severus_Alexander_Bimetallic_Medaillon_2.jpg
Roman Empire, Severus Alexander, Bimetallic Medaillon65 viewsObv. IMP CAES M AVREL SEV ALEXANDER PIVS FELIX AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left, seen from behind.
Rev. PONTIF MAX TR P V COS II P P, Alexander on quadriga right, holding eagle-tipped scepter and olive branch, crowned by Victory.
Mint: Rome, 226 AD.

38mm 41.44g

Cohen 481?


Curtis Clay

"A spectacular acquisition!

I know of two other specimens of this medallion:

(1) In ANS, ex Newell Coll.; ex Naville X, 1926, 1765; ex Hirsch 29, 1910, Herzfelder Coll., 1221; ex Sotheby, 29 June 1893, Hermann Weber Coll., 230; doubtless ex Northwick Sale, 1860, 333 (description only). Published by Toynbee, Roman Medallions, p. 85, note 103 and Fagerlie, ANS Medallions, Museum Notes 15, 1969, p. 82.

From the same dies as yours, 55.14g, and also bimetallic according to the Naville X catalogue, though Fagerlie fails to mention this fact and it's not clear one way or the other from the photographs.

(2) In Paris according to Gnecchi no. 21, 50.0g, not illustrated, no mention of bimetallic, but personal examination would be needed to be sure!"
3 commentskc06/27/19 at 17:17mix_val: I am green with envy!
P1190234.jpg
Kamarina - Onkiai20 viewsKamarina
Onkiai
Obv. Gorgoneion facing
Rev. KAMA. Owl standing right, clutching lizard in talons. Value mark . (dot) in exergue
Struck ca. 420 - 410 BC.
0.95 Gr.
CNS III, 47, 2-3; HGC 2, 552
3 commentsnummis durensis06/27/19 at 15:29Jay GT4: I like it
Severus_Alexander_Bimetallic_Medaillon_2.jpg
Roman Empire, Severus Alexander, Bimetallic Medaillon65 viewsObv. IMP CAES M AVREL SEV ALEXANDER PIVS FELIX AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left, seen from behind.
Rev. PONTIF MAX TR P V COS II P P, Alexander on quadriga right, holding eagle-tipped scepter and olive branch, crowned by Victory.
Mint: Rome, 226 AD.

38mm 41.44g

Cohen 481?


Curtis Clay

"A spectacular acquisition!

I know of two other specimens of this medallion:

(1) In ANS, ex Newell Coll.; ex Naville X, 1926, 1765; ex Hirsch 29, 1910, Herzfelder Coll., 1221; ex Sotheby, 29 June 1893, Hermann Weber Coll., 230; doubtless ex Northwick Sale, 1860, 333 (description only). Published by Toynbee, Roman Medallions, p. 85, note 103 and Fagerlie, ANS Medallions, Museum Notes 15, 1969, p. 82.

From the same dies as yours, 55.14g, and also bimetallic according to the Naville X catalogue, though Fagerlie fails to mention this fact and it's not clear one way or the other from the photographs.

(2) In Paris according to Gnecchi no. 21, 50.0g, not illustrated, no mention of bimetallic, but personal examination would be needed to be sure!"
3 commentskc06/27/19 at 11:47okidoki: very nice reverse
Claudius_AD_41-54__Rome~0.jpg
Claudius (Augustus) Coin: Bronze Quadrans25 viewsTI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG - Three-legged modius
PON M TR P IMP COS II around large S • C. - Legend surrounding large S C
Mint: Rome ( 1-4 January AD 42)
Wt./Size/Axis: 2.95g / 17mm / 6h
Rarity: R3
References:
RIC I 88
von Kaenel Type 65
Provenances:
Savoca Coins
Acquisition/Sale: Savoca Coins Internet 21st Blue Auction #1017 $0.00 06/19
Notes: Jun 23, 19 - The modius was a roman unit for grain corresponding to 8.7 liters (2.3 gallons).

The Gary R. Wilson Collection

There were eight different issues of quadrans under Claudius:
PON M TR P IMP COS DES IT (modius)-41AD-Common
PON M TR P IMP COS DES IT (scales)-41AD -Common
PONT MAX TR POT IMP (modius)-41AD-Rare
PONT MAX TR POT IMP (scales)-41AD-Rare
PON M TR P IMP COS II (modius)-42AD-This Coin- R3
PON M TR P IMP COS II (scales)-42AD- R3
PON M TR P IMP P P COS II (modius)-42AD- Common
PON M TR P IMP P P COS II (scales)-42AD- Scarce

Quadrantes, like quinarii, were issued only occasionally, perhaps exclusively for imperial distributions. Suetonius reported that, from the roof of the Basilica Julia "Caligula threw coins among the people." Perhaps this small coin was thrown to the crowd by Claudius himself at a similar event.

The most common theme for the quadrans was the modius, a Roman grain container. This coin was probably redeemable for a modius of grain.

Per CNG: Very rare. Struck 1-4 January AD 42.
3 commentsGary W206/27/19 at 11:36okidoki: very nice
Faustina_II_R689_fac.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, AD 153/154, Faustina II, Nilus17 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Æ Drachm
Obv.: ΦΑVСΤΙΝΑ СƐΒΑС(С)ΤΗ (legend starting at 1 o'clock), draped bust right
Rev.. Nilus, with crocodile beside him, reclining, l., holding reed and cornucopia; (below, water plants)
L IZ= year 17 of Antoninus Pius (153/154).
Æ, 22.11g, 34mm
Ref.: RPC IV online 14755 (temporary)
2 commentsshanxi06/27/19 at 11:36okidoki: very nice Drachm
Revolt_BCC_j15.jpg
BCC j1556 viewsJudaean
1st Revolt 69/70CE
AE 1/8 Shekel - Jerusalem Mint
Obv: Le G A La T Tz I O N (to the
redemption of Zion) Chalice with pearled rim.
Rev:Sha Na T A R Ba H (Year 4)
Lulav flanked by etrog on either side.
18x19mm. 4.11gm. Axis:330
Hendin 670
1 commentsv-drome06/27/19 at 02:00Aarmale: Beautiful!
Philip_II__A_D__247-249__AR_antoninianus__Rome__55.jpg
Philip II (Augustus) Coin: Silver Antoninianus 13 viewsIMP PHILIPPVS AVG - Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
SAECVLARES AVGG - Goat walking left, III in exergue.
Exergue: III


Mint: Rome (248 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 1.00g / 1mm / 12h
References:
RIC 224
RSC 72.
Provenances:
Agora Auctions
Acquisition/Sale: Agora Auctions Internet Numismatic Sale #86 #168 $0.00 06/19
Notes: Jun 5, 19 - The Gary R. Wilson Collection

Secular Games Issue
1 commentsGary W206/26/19 at 18:15Tracy Aiello: Damn, great goat!
Kings_of_Thrace,_Lysimachos,_305-281_BC,_AR-Drachm,_Heracles,_Zeus,_BAS,_Price_L29,_Magnesia_ad_Maeandrum,_305-297_BC,_Q-001,_0h,_17,5-18,7mm,_4,14g-s.jpg
Thrace, Kings, Macedonian, Lysimachos, (305-281 B.C.), Price L29, Magnesia ad Maeandrum, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, #152 viewsThrace, Kings, Macedonian, Lysimachos, (305-281 B.C.), Price L29, Magnesia ad Maeandrum, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, #1
avers: Head of beardless Heracles right wearing a lion skin headdress.
reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ, ΛYΣIMAXOY, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, eagle on the outstretched right hand, scepter in the left hand, lion-forepart left, are the left field, A beneath the throne.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter:17,5-18,7mm, weight: 4,17g, axes: 0h,
mint: Thrace, Kings, Macedonian, Lysimachos, Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, date: 305 - 281 B.C.,
ref: Price L29,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans06/26/19 at 12:55shanxi: nice, I like the lion
Claudius_AD_41-54__Rome~0.jpg
Claudius (Augustus) Coin: Bronze Quadrans25 viewsTI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG - Three-legged modius
PON M TR P IMP COS II around large S • C. - Legend surrounding large S C
Mint: Rome ( 1-4 January AD 42)
Wt./Size/Axis: 2.95g / 17mm / 6h
Rarity: R3
References:
RIC I 88
von Kaenel Type 65
Provenances:
Savoca Coins
Acquisition/Sale: Savoca Coins Internet 21st Blue Auction #1017 $0.00 06/19
Notes: Jun 23, 19 - The modius was a roman unit for grain corresponding to 8.7 liters (2.3 gallons).

The Gary R. Wilson Collection

There were eight different issues of quadrans under Claudius:
PON M TR P IMP COS DES IT (modius)-41AD-Common
PON M TR P IMP COS DES IT (scales)-41AD -Common
PONT MAX TR POT IMP (modius)-41AD-Rare
PONT MAX TR POT IMP (scales)-41AD-Rare
PON M TR P IMP COS II (modius)-42AD-This Coin- R3
PON M TR P IMP COS II (scales)-42AD- R3
PON M TR P IMP P P COS II (modius)-42AD- Common
PON M TR P IMP P P COS II (scales)-42AD- Scarce

Quadrantes, like quinarii, were issued only occasionally, perhaps exclusively for imperial distributions. Suetonius reported that, from the roof of the Basilica Julia "Caligula threw coins among the people." Perhaps this small coin was thrown to the crowd by Claudius himself at a similar event.

The most common theme for the quadrans was the modius, a Roman grain container. This coin was probably redeemable for a modius of grain.

Per CNG: Very rare. Struck 1-4 January AD 42.
3 commentsGary W206/26/19 at 11:33Steve P: Sweet quadrans addition (great patina)
Kings_of_Thrace,_Lysimachos,_305-281_BC,_AR-Drachm,_Heracles,_Zeus,_BAS,_Price_L19,_Abydos,_305-297_BC,_Q-001,_0h,_17mm,_4,18g-s.jpg
Thrace, Kings, Macedonian, Lysimachos, (305-281 B.C.), Price L19, Abydos, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, #142 viewsThrace, Kings, Macedonian, Lysimachos, (305-281 B.C.), Price L19, Abydos, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, #1
avers: Head of beardless Heracles right wearing a lion skin headdress.
reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ, ΛYΣIMAXOY, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, eagle on the outstretched right hand, scepter in the left hand, lion-forepart left, are the left field above the monogram, beneath the throne head right wearing a Phrygian cap.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0mm, weight: 4,18g, axes: 0h,
mint: Thrace, Kings, Macedonian, Lysimachos, Abydos mint, date: 299/298- 297/296 B.C.,
ref: Price L19, Thompson 67, Müller 17,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans06/26/19 at 11:30Steve P: Congrats on adding another winner
Claudius_AD_41-54__Rome~0.jpg
Claudius (Augustus) Coin: Bronze Quadrans25 viewsTI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG - Three-legged modius
PON M TR P IMP COS II around large S • C. - Legend surrounding large S C
Mint: Rome ( 1-4 January AD 42)
Wt./Size/Axis: 2.95g / 17mm / 6h
Rarity: R3
References:
RIC I 88
von Kaenel Type 65
Provenances:
Savoca Coins
Acquisition/Sale: Savoca Coins Internet 21st Blue Auction #1017 $0.00 06/19
Notes: Jun 23, 19 - The modius was a roman unit for grain corresponding to 8.7 liters (2.3 gallons).

The Gary R. Wilson Collection

There were eight different issues of quadrans under Claudius:
PON M TR P IMP COS DES IT (modius)-41AD-Common
PON M TR P IMP COS DES IT (scales)-41AD -Common
PONT MAX TR POT IMP (modius)-41AD-Rare
PONT MAX TR POT IMP (scales)-41AD-Rare
PON M TR P IMP COS II (modius)-42AD-This Coin- R3
PON M TR P IMP COS II (scales)-42AD- R3
PON M TR P IMP P P COS II (modius)-42AD- Common
PON M TR P IMP P P COS II (scales)-42AD- Scarce

Quadrantes, like quinarii, were issued only occasionally, perhaps exclusively for imperial distributions. Suetonius reported that, from the roof of the Basilica Julia "Caligula threw coins among the people." Perhaps this small coin was thrown to the crowd by Claudius himself at a similar event.

The most common theme for the quadrans was the modius, a Roman grain container. This coin was probably redeemable for a modius of grain.

Per CNG: Very rare. Struck 1-4 January AD 42.
3 commentsGary W206/26/19 at 11:03Jay GT4: Great piece
nerosnake.jpg
Nero (54 - 68 A.D.)53 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm 
O: NEΡΩ KΛAY KAIS SEBA GEP AVTO, laureate head right.
R: NEO AGAQ DAIM, Agathodaemon serpent, coiled with head up, holding poppies and grain ears, L ς (date) to right. Year 6.
23mm
13.11g
Milne 203; Emmett 106.6 (R4) ; RPC 5260

The Agathodaemon was a good spirit/demon that was worshipped by the ancient Egyptians. 
He had the shape of a serpent with a human head. 
The Greek inscription on the reverse of this coin shows that this is the "neo" or "new" agathodaemon serpent, or, in other words, the new good spirit (of rule by Nero). 

Pending Wildwinds Publishing!
8 commentsMat06/26/19 at 06:12Randygeki(h2): Great portrait on this one Mat
mytet.jpg
Pergamon, Mysia (133 - 67 B.C)25 viewsAR Cistophoric Tetradrachm
O:  Cista mystica with half-open lid, from which a snake emerges, all within wreath of ivy with berries.
R: Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; above, ME, prytaneis monogram, and A (controls), (Pergamon monogram) to left, serpent-entwined thyrsos to right.
11.36g
26mm
Kleiner, Hoard 40; SNG BN 1744

Ex. Glenn Schinke, March 1995
4 commentsMat06/26/19 at 06:11Randygeki(h2): Cool
Severus_Alexander_Bimetallic_Medaillon_2.jpg
Roman Empire, Severus Alexander, Bimetallic Medaillon65 viewsObv. IMP CAES M AVREL SEV ALEXANDER PIVS FELIX AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left, seen from behind.
Rev. PONTIF MAX TR P V COS II P P, Alexander on quadriga right, holding eagle-tipped scepter and olive branch, crowned by Victory.
Mint: Rome, 226 AD.

38mm 41.44g

Cohen 481?


Curtis Clay

"A spectacular acquisition!

I know of two other specimens of this medallion:

(1) In ANS, ex Newell Coll.; ex Naville X, 1926, 1765; ex Hirsch 29, 1910, Herzfelder Coll., 1221; ex Sotheby, 29 June 1893, Hermann Weber Coll., 230; doubtless ex Northwick Sale, 1860, 333 (description only). Published by Toynbee, Roman Medallions, p. 85, note 103 and Fagerlie, ANS Medallions, Museum Notes 15, 1969, p. 82.

From the same dies as yours, 55.14g, and also bimetallic according to the Naville X catalogue, though Fagerlie fails to mention this fact and it's not clear one way or the other from the photographs.

(2) In Paris according to Gnecchi no. 21, 50.0g, not illustrated, no mention of bimetallic, but personal examination would be needed to be sure!"
3 commentskc06/25/19 at 22:51Jay GT4: Gorgeous
Kings_of_Thrace,_Lysimachos,_305-281_BC,_AR-Drachm,_Heracles,_Zeus,_BAS,_Price_L19,_Abydos,_305-297_BC,_Q-001,_0h,_17mm,_4,18g-s.jpg
Thrace, Kings, Macedonian, Lysimachos, (305-281 B.C.), Price L19, Abydos, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, #142 viewsThrace, Kings, Macedonian, Lysimachos, (305-281 B.C.), Price L19, Abydos, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, #1
avers: Head of beardless Heracles right wearing a lion skin headdress.
reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ, ΛYΣIMAXOY, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, eagle on the outstretched right hand, scepter in the left hand, lion-forepart left, are the left field above the monogram, beneath the throne head right wearing a Phrygian cap.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0mm, weight: 4,18g, axes: 0h,
mint: Thrace, Kings, Macedonian, Lysimachos, Abydos mint, date: 299/298- 297/296 B.C.,
ref: Price L19, Thompson 67, Müller 17,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans06/25/19 at 21:16Jay GT4: Great coin
Kings_of_Thrace,_Lysimachos,_305-281_BC,_AR-Drachm,_Heracles,_Zeus,_BAS,_Price_L19,_Abydos,_305-297_BC,_Q-001,_0h,_17mm,_4,18g-s.jpg
Thrace, Kings, Macedonian, Lysimachos, (305-281 B.C.), Price L19, Abydos, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, #142 viewsThrace, Kings, Macedonian, Lysimachos, (305-281 B.C.), Price L19, Abydos, AR-Drachm, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, #1
avers: Head of beardless Heracles right wearing a lion skin headdress.
reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ, ΛYΣIMAXOY, Zeus seated on the stool-throne left, eagle on the outstretched right hand, scepter in the left hand, lion-forepart left, are the left field above the monogram, beneath the throne head right wearing a Phrygian cap.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0mm, weight: 4,18g, axes: 0h,
mint: Thrace, Kings, Macedonian, Lysimachos, Abydos mint, date: 299/298- 297/296 B.C.,
ref: Price L19, Thompson 67, Müller 17,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans06/25/19 at 20:55okidoki: very nice reverse
avarbuckle1.jpg
Avar belt strap end - Griffin scene13 viewsA bronze Avar belt strap end depicting two griffins and a deer, dating to approximately the 8th century CE.

Height: 1 1/2 in
Length: 4 in
1 commentsSalaethus06/25/19 at 18:12quadrans: Nice piece..
Orodes-I__(90-77_BC),_AR-Drachm,_Sellwood_31-6-,_Q-001,_0h,_18,3-20mm,_4,05g-s.jpg
Parthia, Orodes I. (90-77 B.C.), AR-Drachm, Sellwood 31-6 (???), Archer right on throne, #252 viewsParthia, Orodes I. (90-77 B.C.), AR-Drachm, Sellwood 31-6 (???), Archer right on throne, #2
avers: King head, left, w/tiara (3 rows of pellets, eight-point star as side decoration, long ear flap) and diadem w/ribbon, mustache, short beard; earring(???), cuirass, dotted border 8 to 14h.
reverse: Archer, right, on the throne, w/bow in the right hand. 7-line legend: BAΣIΛEΩΣ/ MEΓAΛoY/ APΣAKoY /AVToKPAToPoΣ /ΦIΛoΠAToPoΣ /EΠIΦANoYΣ /ΦIΛEΛΛΗNoΣ, exergual line.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,3-20,0mm, weight: 4,05g, axes: 0h,
mint: Ekbatana (???), date: (???) B.C., ref: Sellwood 31-6, (???)
Q-002
2 commentsquadrans06/25/19 at 17:41Robert L3: Very nice. Great nose on this one.
T294.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-29452 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
RIC 294 (C). BMC 231.
Obv: CAES DIVI AVG VESP F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 177. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

An exquisite sestertius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus featuring his patron deity Minerva. DIVI AVG VESP F tells us the coin was struck after Vespasian's deification. The date of Vespasian's consecratio is dated by the epigraphic evidence sometime between September 8, 79 - May 29, 80, so this sestertius could not have been struck much earlier than June 80. The Minerva reverse was one of the more common types struck during this second bronze issue for Domitian Caesar under Titus.

Although fine portraits can occasionally be seen in silver, it is on the larger canvas of the bronze where the full flower of Roman imperial portraiture can be seen. This sestertius has one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've come across. A superb example of the imperial engraver's art.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/25/19 at 17:13mix_val: Handsome portrait
115237.jpg
Sicily Akragas circa 400-380 BC AE hemilitron 26mm 17.66g 12h SNG ANS 1097-110121 viewsAfter the desrtruction of the city by the Carthaginians in 406BC,the striking in new issues in Akragas virtually ceased until the citys refoundation by Timoleon,circa 339 BC.the sole exception was the bronze River god/Eagle on Ionic column issue[CNS 89}
Information from CNGCOINS.COM
1 commentsGrant H06/25/19 at 15:38*Alex: Interesting coin.
ROGER_DE_PINS,_(1355-1365_AD)__St_John,_Order,_Rhodes,_Gigliato,_Metc__1194_var__Q-001,_11h,_27mm,_3,8g-s.jpg
Crusaders, Antioch, Roger de Pins, (1355-1365 A.D.), Metcalf, Crusades, 1194 var., AR-Gigliato, St.John, Order, Rhodes, ✠ OSPITAL•S•IOHIS•IRLNI•QT'•RODI•, Cross Fleury with the arms, #152 viewsCrusaders, Antioch, Roger de Pins, (1355-1365 A.D.), Metcalf, Crusades, 1194 var., AR-Gigliato, St.John, Order, Rhodes, ✠ OSPITAL•S•IOHIS•IRLNI•QT'•RODI•, Cross Fleury with the arms, #1
avers: ✠ F•ROGIERIUS•D•PINIBUS•DI•GRA•M•, The Grand Master kneeling before the cross, no symbols.
reverse: ✠ OSPITAL•S•IOHIS•IRLNI•QT'•RODI•, Cross Fleury with the arms of the order at the ends.
diameter: 27,0mm, weight: 3,8g, axis: 11h,
mint: St.John, Order, Rhodes, mint mark:-,
date:1355-1365 A.D., ref: Metcalf, Crusades, 1194 var., Schlumb. IX, 20 var., Beckenb. 1001 var.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans06/25/19 at 14:38*Alex: Great coin. I really like it.
1293_P_Hadrian_Strack--_eastern.jpg
Hadrian Denarius 125-28 AD Roma seated left Eastern Mint18 viewsReference.
RIC -; BMC -; Strack *-- cf (Taf. XIX, 40 und XX, 14).

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.

Rev. COS III
Roma seated left on curule chair holding Victory and sceptre

2.82 gr
17 mm
6h

Note.
Same obverse die as http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-149088
3 commentsokidoki06/25/19 at 02:54Steve P: Yeeehaaa => wow Oki, that's a sweet addition (...
Augustus_RIC_222.jpg
Augustus AR Denarius16 views
Octavian as Augustus, 27 BC – 14 AD Denarius
Lugdunum circa 13-14,
18mm., 3.56g.
Obv: Laureate head r.
Rev. Tiberius in triumphal quadriga r., holding laurel branch and eagle-tipped sceptre.
RSC 301. RIC 224.
Ex: Naville Numismatics Live auction 50 Lot 439 June 23, 2019
2 commentsorfew06/24/19 at 21:28Jay GT4: Excellent!
Vespasian_RIC_545.jpg
Vespasian AR Denarius11 viewsVespasian, 69-79 Denarius circa 73,
AR 19.5mm., 3.25g.
Obv: Laureate head r. ; IMP CAES VESP AVG CENS
Rev:. Vespasian seated r. on curule chair, with feet on footstool, holding scepter and olive branch; PONTIF MAXIM
RIC 546. C 387.
Ex: E.E. Clain-Stefanelli collection
Ex: Naville Numismatics Live auction 50 Lot 467 June 23, 2019
1 commentsorfew06/24/19 at 21:28Jay GT4: Great provenance!
Galba_Sestertius.jpg
Galba Sestertius25 viewsObv. IMP SER SVLP CAESAVG TR P, laureate and draped bust right.
Rev. LIBERTAS PVBLICA S C, Libertas, draped, standing left, holding pileus in right and rod in left hand.
Mint: Rome, 68 AD.

35mm 26.67g

RIC 309; BMC 71


Ex Swiss Collection, purchased in 2018.

Though reigning scarcely seven months, Servius Sulpicius Galba has the honor of inspiring Rome's portrait artists to reach heights never again equaled or surpassed. Achieving the throne at age 70, Galba was a wizened Roman aristocrat whose sagging, craggy countenance could not have been more different than that of his predecessor, the bloated and dissolute Nero. Indeed, Galba seems to have deliberately promoted himself as a steely martinet who would restore Rome to proper Republican austerity. His coinage pairs his aged, scowling portrait with reverses touting traditional Roman virtues, here depicting Libertas, a concept that embodies both freedom and responsibility. Rome's mint masters rose brilliantly to the challenge, producing astoundingly lifelike and sculptural portraits such as the present example. But Galba's austerity program proved to be a major miscalculation, as Rome was not yet ready for such bitter medicine (NAC)
2 commentskc06/24/19 at 20:46FlaviusDomitianus: Nice river patina
Galba_Sestertius.jpg
Galba Sestertius25 viewsObv. IMP SER SVLP CAESAVG TR P, laureate and draped bust right.
Rev. LIBERTAS PVBLICA S C, Libertas, draped, standing left, holding pileus in right and rod in left hand.
Mint: Rome, 68 AD.

35mm 26.67g

RIC 309; BMC 71


Ex Swiss Collection, purchased in 2018.

Though reigning scarcely seven months, Servius Sulpicius Galba has the honor of inspiring Rome's portrait artists to reach heights never again equaled or surpassed. Achieving the throne at age 70, Galba was a wizened Roman aristocrat whose sagging, craggy countenance could not have been more different than that of his predecessor, the bloated and dissolute Nero. Indeed, Galba seems to have deliberately promoted himself as a steely martinet who would restore Rome to proper Republican austerity. His coinage pairs his aged, scowling portrait with reverses touting traditional Roman virtues, here depicting Libertas, a concept that embodies both freedom and responsibility. Rome's mint masters rose brilliantly to the challenge, producing astoundingly lifelike and sculptural portraits such as the present example. But Galba's austerity program proved to be a major miscalculation, as Rome was not yet ready for such bitter medicine (NAC)
2 commentskc06/24/19 at 20:45Jay GT4: Great coin
Orodes-I__(90-77_BC),_AR-Drachm,_Sellwood_31-6-,_Q-001,_0h,_18,3-20mm,_4,05g-s.jpg
Parthia, Orodes I. (90-77 B.C.), AR-Drachm, Sellwood 31-6 (???), Archer right on throne, #252 viewsParthia, Orodes I. (90-77 B.C.), AR-Drachm, Sellwood 31-6 (???), Archer right on throne, #2
avers: King head, left, w/tiara (3 rows of pellets, eight-point star as side decoration, long ear flap) and diadem w/ribbon, mustache, short beard; earring(???), cuirass, dotted border 8 to 14h.
reverse: Archer, right, on the throne, w/bow in the right hand. 7-line legend: BAΣIΛEΩΣ/ MEΓAΛoY/ APΣAKoY /AVToKPAToPoΣ /ΦIΛoΠAToPoΣ /EΠIΦANoYΣ /ΦIΛEΛΛΗNoΣ, exergual line.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,3-20,0mm, weight: 4,05g, axes: 0h,
mint: Ekbatana (???), date: (???) B.C., ref: Sellwood 31-6, (???)
Q-002
2 commentsquadrans06/24/19 at 20:21Mat: Nice addition
1293_P_Hadrian_Strack--_eastern.jpg
Hadrian Denarius 125-28 AD Roma seated left Eastern Mint18 viewsReference.
RIC -; BMC -; Strack *-- cf (Taf. XIX, 40 und XX, 14).

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.

Rev. COS III
Roma seated left on curule chair holding Victory and sceptre

2.82 gr
17 mm
6h

Note.
Same obverse die as http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-149088
3 commentsokidoki06/24/19 at 17:24quadrans: Wow, nice piece...
1293_P_Hadrian_Strack--_eastern.jpg
Hadrian Denarius 125-28 AD Roma seated left Eastern Mint18 viewsReference.
RIC -; BMC -; Strack *-- cf (Taf. XIX, 40 und XX, 14).

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.

Rev. COS III
Roma seated left on curule chair holding Victory and sceptre

2.82 gr
17 mm
6h

Note.
Same obverse die as http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-149088
3 commentsokidoki06/24/19 at 16:34Jay GT4: That's a great coin
Antiochus_III.jpg
Seleucid - Antiochus III (The Great) (222-187 BCE)11 viewsMetal/Size: AE18; Weight: 5.08 grams; Denomination: Bronze Unit; Mint: Military Mint in Coele-Syria; Date: 202-187 BCE; Obverse: Macedonian shield with gorgan in central boss. Reverse: Elephant walking right, anchor above, monogram below; counter marked horse head in center of elephant - BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOΥ (King Antiochus) below, control mark under belly. References: SC #1089; HGC #9, 490.1 commentsmuseumguy06/24/19 at 11:51shanxi: nice elephant
89767q00.jpg
Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus Restoration LEGIO VI8 viewsSilver Denarius
Roman Imperial - The Principate

Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus

LEGIO VI

Rome mint, 165 - 166 A.D.
VF, toned, shallow scratches, small edge split
18.6 mm / 3.329 g / 0°

Rare

Obverse: "ANTONINVS AVGVR III VIR R P C", War galley, four oarsmen visible, rowing left over waves.
Reverse: "ANTONINVS ET VERVS AVG REST", Aquila in center between two legionary standards, "LEG VI" in center above exergue.

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins 2019 RS89767-165
Ex Collection of a Texas Wine Doctor
Ex CNG e-auction 401 (2017) lot 539.

BMCRE IV p 456, 501, RIC III 248, 443, RSC I Antony 83

MyID: 058A

Image Credit: Forvm Ancient Coins
2 commentsTenthGen06/24/19 at 02:35TenthGen: Thanks!
89767q00.jpg
Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus Restoration LEGIO VI8 viewsSilver Denarius
Roman Imperial - The Principate

Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus

LEGIO VI

Rome mint, 165 - 166 A.D.
VF, toned, shallow scratches, small edge split
18.6 mm / 3.329 g / 0°

Rare

Obverse: "ANTONINVS AVGVR III VIR R P C", War galley, four oarsmen visible, rowing left over waves.
Reverse: "ANTONINVS ET VERVS AVG REST", Aquila in center between two legionary standards, "LEG VI" in center above exergue.

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins 2019 RS89767-165
Ex Collection of a Texas Wine Doctor
Ex CNG e-auction 401 (2017) lot 539.

BMCRE IV p 456, 501, RIC III 248, 443, RSC I Antony 83

MyID: 058A

Image Credit: Forvm Ancient Coins
2 commentsTenthGen06/24/19 at 00:06Jay GT4: Sweet!
89794q00.jpg
Marc Antony LEGIO ? - IMPVES Countermark9 viewsSilver Denarius
Roman Imperatorial

Marc Antony LEGIO ? IMPVES Countermark

? Patrae Mint. Fall 32-Spring 31 BC. Countermarked 74-79 AD at Ephesus.
Coin fair to poor. Countermark aVF.
18.7 mm / 2.873 g

Obverse: Galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow. "ANT*AVG / III VIR*R*P*C"
Reverse: "LEG ?", aquila between two legionary standards. Countermark "IMPVES" (IMP ligate, VE ligate)

Ex: Forum Ancient Coins (2019)
Ex: L.O.H.

cf Crawford 544/14, BMCRR II East 190. RSC I 27 ff. Countermark Howgego 839 (Vespasian).

MyID: 059A.

Image Credit: Forvm Ancient Coins
1 commentsTenthGen06/24/19 at 00:05Jay GT4: Nice! I have one of these also, 2 of my areas of ...
Domitian_RIC_666.jpg
Domitian AR Denarius50 viewsDomitian AR Denarius 88 -89 CE
19mm., 2,93g.
Obv: Head laureate r; IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TR P VIII
Rev:Minerva stg. L with spear; IMP XVIII COS XIII CENS PPP
RIC 666 (R2) BMC—RSC--
Purchased from Savoca auctions June 23, 2019
2 commentsorfew06/23/19 at 21:58Jay GT4: Great find Andrew
Vlasto_607.jpg
CALABRIA. Taras. Circa 302-280 BC. Nomos20 viewsSilver, 22 mm, 7.82 g, 9 h
Nude rider on horse galloping to right, stabbing with spear held in his right hand and holding two other spears and shield with his left; below, ΣΑ.
Rev. ΤΑΡΑΣ Youthful oikist, nude, riding dolphin to left, holding kantharos in his right hand and trident with his left; to left, K; below, dolphin.
HN Italy 937. Vlasto 607.
1 commentsLeo06/23/19 at 16:40Jay GT4: Beautiful fresh dies
T294.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-29452 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
RIC 294 (C). BMC 231.
Obv: CAES DIVI AVG VESP F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 177. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

An exquisite sestertius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus featuring his patron deity Minerva. DIVI AVG VESP F tells us the coin was struck after Vespasian's deification. The date of Vespasian's consecratio is dated by the epigraphic evidence sometime between September 8, 79 - May 29, 80, so this sestertius could not have been struck much earlier than June 80. The Minerva reverse was one of the more common types struck during this second bronze issue for Domitian Caesar under Titus.

Although fine portraits can occasionally be seen in silver, it is on the larger canvas of the bronze where the full flower of Roman imperial portraiture can be seen. This sestertius has one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've come across. A superb example of the imperial engraver's art.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/23/19 at 14:29orfew: Now that was a talented engraver. A wonderful coin...
T294.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-29452 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
RIC 294 (C). BMC 231.
Obv: CAES DIVI AVG VESP F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 177. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

An exquisite sestertius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus featuring his patron deity Minerva. DIVI AVG VESP F tells us the coin was struck after Vespasian's deification. The date of Vespasian's consecratio is dated by the epigraphic evidence sometime between September 8, 79 - May 29, 80, so this sestertius could not have been struck much earlier than June 80. The Minerva reverse was one of the more common types struck during this second bronze issue for Domitian Caesar under Titus.

Although fine portraits can occasionally be seen in silver, it is on the larger canvas of the bronze where the full flower of Roman imperial portraiture can be seen. This sestertius has one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've come across. A superb example of the imperial engraver's art.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/23/19 at 14:13kc: Good details and a realistic portrait.
T294.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-29452 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
RIC 294 (C). BMC 231.
Obv: CAES DIVI AVG VESP F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 177. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

An exquisite sestertius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus featuring his patron deity Minerva. DIVI AVG VESP F tells us the coin was struck after Vespasian's deification. The date of Vespasian's consecratio is dated by the epigraphic evidence sometime between September 8, 79 - May 29, 80, so this sestertius could not have been struck much earlier than June 80. The Minerva reverse was one of the more common types struck during this second bronze issue for Domitian Caesar under Titus.

Although fine portraits can occasionally be seen in silver, it is on the larger canvas of the bronze where the full flower of Roman imperial portraiture can be seen. This sestertius has one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've come across. A superb example of the imperial engraver's art.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/23/19 at 12:39Pharsalos: Amazing portrait, beautifully engraved reverse too...
RIC_555_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0555 Domitianus69 viewsObv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII, Laureate head right
Rev: COS XIIII, across field, Minerva standing left, with spear
AR/Denarius - 20.86 mm 3.560 g 6h - Struck in Rome 88 A.D. (1st group)
RIC 555 (R2) - RSC 66 - BMCRE unlisted - BNF 113
ex Rauch Auction 108 Lot 160
5 commentsFlaviusDomitianus06/23/19 at 12:19David Atherton: A beauty.
T294.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-29452 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
RIC 294 (C). BMC 231.
Obv: CAES DIVI AVG VESP F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 177. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

An exquisite sestertius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus featuring his patron deity Minerva. DIVI AVG VESP F tells us the coin was struck after Vespasian's deification. The date of Vespasian's consecratio is dated by the epigraphic evidence sometime between September 8, 79 - May 29, 80, so this sestertius could not have been struck much earlier than June 80. The Minerva reverse was one of the more common types struck during this second bronze issue for Domitian Caesar under Titus.

Although fine portraits can occasionally be seen in silver, it is on the larger canvas of the bronze where the full flower of Roman imperial portraiture can be seen. This sestertius has one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've come across. A superb example of the imperial engraver's art.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/23/19 at 12:16FlaviusDomitianus: The sestertii of this issue have strong portraits....
T294.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-29452 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
RIC 294 (C). BMC 231.
Obv: CAES DIVI AVG VESP F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 177. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

An exquisite sestertius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus featuring his patron deity Minerva. DIVI AVG VESP F tells us the coin was struck after Vespasian's deification. The date of Vespasian's consecratio is dated by the epigraphic evidence sometime between September 8, 79 - May 29, 80, so this sestertius could not have been struck much earlier than June 80. The Minerva reverse was one of the more common types struck during this second bronze issue for Domitian Caesar under Titus.

Although fine portraits can occasionally be seen in silver, it is on the larger canvas of the bronze where the full flower of Roman imperial portraiture can be seen. This sestertius has one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've come across. A superb example of the imperial engraver's art.
6 commentsDavid Atherton06/23/19 at 12:11Jay GT4: Love the way the two tone patina highlights the po...
Larissa_Head_BCD_Thessaly_II_283_.jpg
Facing Head of Larissa28 viewsThessaly Greece, the City of Larissa

Obv: Head of the nymph Larissa facing slightly r., wearing ampyx, pendant earring, and wire necklace. Border of dots.
Rev: reverse horse crouching l., l. foreleg raised, preparing to roll and lie down. ΛAPI above horse and ΣAIΩN in the exergue.
Denomination: Silver Drachm; Mint: Larissa; Date: c. 380 - 365 BC1; Weight: 5.812g; Diameter: 20.8mm; Die axis: 90º; References, for example: BCD Thessaly I 1149; BCD Thessaly II 283; McClean 4623; HGC 4 441; Lorber - Shahar, Middle Series 1 Type A (O1/R42

Notes:
1This is the date range stated in BCD Thessaly I.
2Unfortunately this website no longer functions and it will not be brought back up (Catharine Lorber, personal communication, September 7, 2018).
The city of Larissa was named after the local water nymph, said to be the daughter of Pelasgos. He was said to be the ancestor of the pre-Greek Pelasgians. According to myth Larissa drowned while playing ball on the banks of the Peneios river. (HGC p. 130).

Photo credits: Forum Ancient Coins

Sources

BCD Thessaly I: Nomos AG, Auction 4. Coins of Thessaly, the BCD Collection. (10 May 2011, Zurich).
BCD Thessaly II: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. The BCD Collection of the Coinage of Thessaly. Triton XV Auction. (3 January 2012, New York).
HGC: Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Greece: Achaia Phthiotis, Ainis, Magnesia, Malis, Oita, Perrhaibia, Thessaly, Akarnania, Aitolia, Lokris, Phokis, Boiotia, Euboia, Attica, Megaris, and Corinthia, Sixth to First Centuries BC, The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Vol. 4. Lancaster/London: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc, 2014.
Lorber, Catharine and Shahar C. “The Silver Facing Head Coins of Larissa.” 2005. http://www.lightfigures.com/numismat/larissa/index.php. Note: this website no longer functions.
McClean: Grose, S. W. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Volume II The Greek Mainland, The Aegaean Islands, Crete. London: Cambridge University Press, 1926.
3 commentsTracy Aiello06/23/19 at 10:53Grant H: love the horse
Larissa_Head_BCD_Thessaly_II_283_.jpg
Facing Head of Larissa28 viewsThessaly Greece, the City of Larissa

Obv: Head of the nymph Larissa facing slightly r., wearing ampyx, pendant earring, and wire necklace. Border of dots.
Rev: reverse horse crouching l., l. foreleg raised, preparing to roll and lie down. ΛAPI above horse and ΣAIΩN in the exergue.
Denomination: Silver Drachm; Mint: Larissa; Date: c. 380 - 365 BC1; Weight: 5.812g; Diameter: 20.8mm; Die axis: 90º; References, for example: BCD Thessaly I 1149; BCD Thessaly II 283; McClean 4623; HGC 4 441; Lorber - Shahar, Middle Series 1 Type A (O1/R42

Notes:
1This is the date range stated in BCD Thessaly I.
2Unfortunately this website no longer functions and it will not be brought back up (Catharine Lorber, personal communication, September 7, 2018).
The city of Larissa was named after the local water nymph, said to be the daughter of Pelasgos. He was said to be the ancestor of the pre-Greek Pelasgians. According to myth Larissa drowned while playing ball on the banks of the Peneios river. (HGC p. 130).

Photo credits: Forum Ancient Coins

Sources

BCD Thessaly I: Nomos AG, Auction 4. Coins of Thessaly, the BCD Collection. (10 May 2011, Zurich).
BCD Thessaly II: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. The BCD Collection of the Coinage of Thessaly. Triton XV Auction. (3 January 2012, New York).
HGC: Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Greece: Achaia Phthiotis, Ainis, Magnesia, Malis, Oita, Perrhaibia, Thessaly, Akarnania, Aitolia, Lokris, Phokis, Boiotia, Euboia, Attica, Megaris, and Corinthia, Sixth to First Centuries BC, The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Vol. 4. Lancaster/London: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc, 2014.
Lorber, Catharine and Shahar C. “The Silver Facing Head Coins of Larissa.” 2005. http://www.lightfigures.com/numismat/larissa/index.php. Note: this website no longer functions.
McClean: Grose, S. W. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Volume II The Greek Mainland, The Aegaean Islands, Crete. London: Cambridge University Press, 1926.
3 commentsTracy Aiello06/23/19 at 02:39Steve P: Ya gotta love it!! ... Larissa rocks!
Phrygia,_Eumeneia,_005_Tiberius_(14-37_AD),_Tiberius_r_,_Bull_r_,_BMC_35,_RPC_3144,_Q-001,_6h,_16-17mm,_5,72g-s.jpg
005p Tiberius (14-37 A.D.), Phrygia, Eumeneia, RPC I 3144, AE-17, -/-//--, OVAΛEΡIOΣ ΖMEΡTOΡIΧ EYMENEΩN, Βull butting right.60 views005p Tiberius (14-37 A.D.), Phrygia, Eumeneia, RPC I 3144, AE-17, -/-//--, OVAΛEΡIOΣ ΖMEΡTOΡIΧ EYMENEΩN, Βull butting right.
avers: ΣEBAΣ TOΣ, Bare head of Tiberius right.
reverse: OVAΛEΡIOΣ ΖMEΡTOΡIΧ EYMENEΩN, Βull butting right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,0-17,0mm, weight: 5,72 g, axes: 6h,
mint: Phrygia, Eumeneia, date: 35-36 A.D.,
ref: RPC I. 3144, BMC Phrygia 35,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans06/23/19 at 00:18Jay GT4: Great bull
Vespasian_Sesterz.jpg
Roman Empire, Vespasian, Sestertius76 viewsObv. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M T P P P COS III, laureate head right.
Rev. S C, Mars, helmeted, naked except for cloak around waist, advancing right, holding transverse spear in right hand and trophy over left shoulder in left hand.
Mint: Rome, 71 AD.

34mm 25.46g

RIC 113

Ex Portuguese Collection, purchased 2019.
Ex A. E. Cahn, Auction 75, 30th May 1932, lot 1017.

Curtis Clay
This example: no. 102d (A139/P184) in Kraays unpublished die catalogue (Cahn 75, 1017).
Other examples of the same dies: BMC 570, Hall 1189, Fitzwilliam 59.

The reverse type of Mars advancing (and likely an image of Mars Ultor) is common to all three Flavians. The representation of Mars is different from the Augustan types but likely has a similar inference – here being that of avenging the rebellion of the Jews. Even so the connection to earlier Augustan issues was probably well recognized at the time. (NAC)
4 commentskc06/23/19 at 00:03Pharsalos: What a portrait, beautiful dies.
Arcadia,_Tegea,_cc__450-400_BC_,_AR_Tetartemorion,_Helmeted_head_of_Athena_left,__Letter_T_within_shallow_incuse_square__Traite_976__Q-001,_4h,_5mm,_0,27g-s.jpg
Arcadia, Tegea, (cc. 5th. century B.C.), AR-Tetartemorion, Traite 976, -/-//--, Letter T, Scarce!59 viewsArcadia, Tegea, (cc. 5th. century B.C.), AR-Tetartemorion, Traite 976, -/-//--, Letter T, Scarce!
avers: Helmeted head of Athena left.
reverse: Letter T, a small dot on the top, within shallow incuse square.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 5,0mm, weight: 0,27g, axes: 4h,
mint: Arcadia, Tegea, date: cc. 5th. century B.C.,
ref: Traite 976, Scarce!
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans06/23/19 at 00:02Pharsalos: Nice one!
RIC_555_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0555 Domitianus69 viewsObv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII, Laureate head right
Rev: COS XIIII, across field, Minerva standing left, with spear
AR/Denarius - 20.86 mm 3.560 g 6h - Struck in Rome 88 A.D. (1st group)
RIC 555 (R2) - RSC 66 - BMCRE unlisted - BNF 113
ex Rauch Auction 108 Lot 160
5 commentsFlaviusDomitianus06/23/19 at 00:00Pharsalos: Beautiful example!
Vespasian_Sesterz.jpg
Roman Empire, Vespasian, Sestertius76 viewsObv. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M T P P P COS III, laureate head right.
Rev. S C, Mars, helmeted, naked except for cloak around waist, advancing right, holding transverse spear in right hand and trophy over left shoulder in left hand.
Mint: Rome, 71 AD.

34mm 25.46g

RIC 113

Ex Portuguese Collection, purchased 2019.
Ex A. E. Cahn, Auction 75, 30th May 1932, lot 1017.

Curtis Clay
This example: no. 102d (A139/P184) in Kraays unpublished die catalogue (Cahn 75, 1017).
Other examples of the same dies: BMC 570, Hall 1189, Fitzwilliam 59.

The reverse type of Mars advancing (and likely an image of Mars Ultor) is common to all three Flavians. The representation of Mars is different from the Augustan types but likely has a similar inference – here being that of avenging the rebellion of the Jews. Even so the connection to earlier Augustan issues was probably well recognized at the time. (NAC)
4 commentskc06/22/19 at 23:51David Atherton: Exceptional!
Trajan.jpg
35 viewsTrajan AR Denarius. Rome, AD 113-114. IMP TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, laureate and draped bust right / COS VI P P SPQR, Trajan's column surmounted by statue of the emperor; at base, two eagles. RIC 307; BMCRE 522; RSC 115. 3.53g, 20mm, 6h.
Of all of the truly monumental buildings and commemorative structures which the emperor Trajan built, only one, the Columna Traiani, has survived in a reasonable state of completeness. Indeed, it appears almost identical in person as it does on coins, except that the statue of Trajan that originally surmounted it was replaced in 1588 with a statue of St. Paul. When completed, the column occupied a prominent place between two libraries, the Basilica Ulpia and the Temple of Trajan and Plotina. The column was massive: it was over 12 feet in diameter at its base, and rose to a height of nearly 130 feet. Its core was comprised of 34 blocks of Carrara white marble that were made hollow so as to accommodate a circular staircase of 185 steps. The most remarkable feature of the column, however, was its ornamentation, for the friezes on its exterior are some of the most inspiring works of art ever produced. Monumental in scope and execution, they record Trajan’s two Dacian campaigns, from 101-3 and 104-6. All told, there are more than 2,500 individually sculpted figures distributed among more than 150 scenes. The emperor himself is represented no less than fifty times – not a surprise considering his penchant for commemorative architecture and his pride in having added Dacia to the provinces of the empire. “ Source: NAC”

Ex Michael Kelly Collection of Roman Silver Coins
4 commentspaul188806/22/19 at 23:31Pharsalos: Very nice column!
Treb-Gallus-RIC-032.jpg
29. Trebonianus Gallus.40 viewsAntoninianus, ca 252 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP CAES VIB TREB GALLVS AVG / Radiate bust of Gallus.
Reverse: APOLL SALVTARI / Apollo standing, holding branch and a lyre set on a rock.
3.82 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #32; Sear #9627.

In his book The Fate of Rome: Climate, Disease, & the End of an Empire, author Kyle Harper suggests the plague described by Cyprian, Bishop of Carthage, was not a localized plague of some sort, but was one and the same with the plague that ravaged the Roman Empire during the reign of Trebonianus Gallus and several of his successors.

The plague was first reported in Alexandria in 249 AD, and by 251 AD it had made its way to Rome where the boy emperor Hostilian died from it. Harper says (p, 138), “The Plague of Cyprian is in the background of imperial history from ca. AD 249 to AD 262, possibly with even later effects around AD 270.”

Harper also presents a case that the plague was either pandemic influenza (similar to that of 1918) or a viral hemorrhagic fever (similar to the Ebola virus of today).

Coins with the reverse legend APOLL SALVTARI (“Apollo the Healer”) exist on coins of Trebonianus Gallus, Volusian, Aemilian, and Valerian I. This reverse type is certainly to be interpreted as an appeal to Apollo for deliverance from the plague that was spreading through the Empire at this time.
3 commentsCallimachus06/22/19 at 23:26Pharsalos: Very interesting.
00774.jpg
Constantius Gallus (RIC 87, Coin #774)19 viewsRIC 87, AE2, Nicomedia, 351 - 355 AD
OBV: D N FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
REV: FEL TEMP REPARATIO (●SMNE), Soldier spearing fallen horseman.
SIZE: 22.9mm, 6.00g
1 commentsMaynardGee06/22/19 at 23:25Pharsalos: Nice one!
00775.jpg
Probus (RIC 157, Coin #775)15 viewsRIC 157, Silvered Antoninianus, Rom, 276 - 282 AD
OBV: IMP PROBVS AVG, Radiate and cuirassed bust right.
REV: ADVENTVS AVG (R * S), Probus on horseback left, raising right hand in salute, long
scepter in left hand, bound captive seated left in front of horse below raised right foreleg.
SIZE: 23.4mm, 3.86g
1 commentsMaynardGee06/22/19 at 23:24Pharsalos: Very nice example.
V1132.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-113266 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.45g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1132 (R). BMC 799.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: CAESAR AVG F DES IMP AVG F COS DES II; S C in exergue; Titus and Domitian stg. front, each with spear and parazonium
Acquired from Romae Aeternae, June 2019.

An iconic dynastic sestertius struck during Vespasian's great bronze issue of 71. The type was struck both at Rome and Lyon (ancient Lugdunum) and announced Vespasian's intention to found a dynasty. Mattingly in BMCRE II calls it a 'famous' type placing the figures on the reverse as Titus on the left and Domitian on the right. While that is a conventional numismatic placement for the two Caesares, here we see the figure on the left holding a parazonium an attribute of an imperator, which of the two could only be Titus. Conversely, the figure on the left is holding something smaller (a roll?) that does not appear to be a parazonium, despite the above RIC description. The reverse legend corresponds for this placement of the figures with the first half of the legend CAES AVG F DES for Domitian on the left, the second half IMP AVG F COS DES II for Titus on the right. The legend has caused confusion over the years with some numismatists creating the phantom title Designatus Imperator for Titus. The title COS is implied for Domitian after DES in the legend, a kind of numismatic shorthand if you will. Gunnar Seelentag attempted to clear up the matter up in Numismatic Chronicle, Vol 167 (2007), but doubts remain. Curtis Clay has proposed that the traditional view of Titus on the left and Domitian on the right is correct, pointing out that both are holding a parazonium, theorising Titus' is hidden behind his body with only the handle showing. His arguments in full can be read here: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=44488.0 The reverse type itself is fairly rare with only a handful of specimens coming to market each decade, this Lugdunese specimen is much scarcer than those from Rome. Flavian dynastic types are far more common in silver.

Fantastic style with old cabinet toning. Same reverse die as Gemini IX, lot 414.

NB: Special thanks to Curtis Clay for additional numismatic information.
7 commentsDavid Atherton06/22/19 at 23:23Pharsalos: Beautiful, tactile piece!
muse_astronomy.jpg
26 viewsQ. Pomponius Musa. 56 BC. AR Denarius (17.5mm, 3.82 g, 7h). Rome mint. Laureate head of Apollo right; star of eight rays to left / Urania, the Muse of Astronomy, wearing long flowing tunic and peplum, standing left, touching with wand held in right hand globe set on base. Crawford 410/8; Sydenham 823; Pomponia 22.

From the Fay Beth Wedig Collection.
2 commentspaul188806/22/19 at 23:21Pharsalos: Beautiful coin.
Larissa_Head_BCD_Thessaly_II_283_.jpg
Facing Head of Larissa28 viewsThessaly Greece, the City of Larissa

Obv: Head of the nymph Larissa facing slightly r., wearing ampyx, pendant earring, and wire necklace. Border of dots.
Rev: reverse horse crouching l., l. foreleg raised, preparing to roll and lie down. ΛAPI above horse and ΣAIΩN in the exergue.
Denomination: Silver Drachm; Mint: Larissa; Date: c. 380 - 365 BC1; Weight: 5.812g; Diameter: 20.8mm; Die axis: 90º; References, for example: BCD Thessaly I 1149; BCD Thessaly II 283; McClean 4623; HGC 4 441; Lorber - Shahar, Middle Series 1 Type A (O1/R42

Notes:
1This is the date range stated in BCD Thessaly I.
2Unfortunately this website no longer functions and it will not be brought back up (Catharine Lorber, personal communication, September 7, 2018).
The city of Larissa was named after the local water nymph, said to be the daughter of Pelasgos. He was said to be the ancestor of the pre-Greek Pelasgians. According to myth Larissa drowned while playing ball on the banks of the Peneios river. (HGC p. 130).

Photo credits: Forum Ancient Coins

Sources

BCD Thessaly I: Nomos AG, Auction 4. Coins of Thessaly, the BCD Collection. (10 May 2011, Zurich).
BCD Thessaly II: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. The BCD Collection of the Coinage of Thessaly. Triton XV Auction. (3 January 2012, New York).
HGC: Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Greece: Achaia Phthiotis, Ainis, Magnesia, Malis, Oita, Perrhaibia, Thessaly, Akarnania, Aitolia, Lokris, Phokis, Boiotia, Euboia, Attica, Megaris, and Corinthia, Sixth to First Centuries BC, The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Vol. 4. Lancaster/London: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc, 2014.
Lorber, Catharine and Shahar C. “The Silver Facing Head Coins of Larissa.” 2005. http://www.lightfigures.com/numismat/larissa/index.php. Note: this website no longer functions.
McClean: Grose, S. W. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Volume II The Greek Mainland, The Aegaean Islands, Crete. London: Cambridge University Press, 1926.
3 commentsTracy Aiello06/22/19 at 23:10quadrans: Great coin , and details,
Vespasian_Sesterz.jpg
Roman Empire, Vespasian, Sestertius76 viewsObv. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M T P P P COS III, laureate head right.
Rev. S C, Mars, helmeted, naked except for cloak around waist, advancing right, holding transverse spear in right hand and trophy over left shoulder in left hand.
Mint: Rome, 71 AD.

34mm 25.46g

RIC 113

Ex Portuguese Collection, purchased 2019.
Ex A. E. Cahn, Auction 75, 30th May 1932, lot 1017.

Curtis Clay
This example: no. 102d (A139/P184) in Kraays unpublished die catalogue (Cahn 75, 1017).
Other examples of the same dies: BMC 570, Hall 1189, Fitzwilliam 59.

The reverse type of Mars advancing (and likely an image of Mars Ultor) is common to all three Flavians. The representation of Mars is different from the Augustan types but likely has a similar inference – here being that of avenging the rebellion of the Jews. Even so the connection to earlier Augustan issues was probably well recognized at the time. (NAC)
4 commentskc06/22/19 at 21:28quadrans: wow, great coin,
Aurelian_2.png
Aurelian Antoninianus - RESTITVT ORBIS16 viewsAurelian Antoninianus

Obverse:
IMP AVRELIANVS P AVG
Radiate, cuirassed bust right

Reverse:
RESTITVT ORBIS
Aurelian standing left on right, holding scepter, being crowned by Orbis to left. K•A•B• in exergue.

RIC Vi 298f, C 197
1 commentsHarry G06/22/19 at 21:16quadrans: Nice piece..
1288Hadrian_RIC27.jpg
27 Anonymous issues. Time of Hadrian to Antoninus Pius. Rome Quadrans 117-161 AD34 viewsReference.
RIC 27; C. 39

Obv.
Griffin seated right

Rev. S-C
Tripod.

2.49 gr
15 mm
9h
2 commentsokidoki06/22/19 at 19:12Pharsalos: Very nice example.
Commodus_Bronze_Medaillon.jpg
Roman Empire, Commodus, Bronze Medallion103 viewsObv. M AUREL COMMODUS ANTONINVS AVG PIVS, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. P M TR P VIIII IMP VI COS IIII P P / TEMPORVM FELICITAS, Pomona seated right, holding corn ears and poppy in left hand, right hand raised to grapevine, below which two children in tub, and a third at feet of goddess.
Mint: Rome, 183 AD.

40mm 65.92g

Ex Tradart Sale 21, 15th February 2018, Lot 139.
Ex Ars Classica XVIII, Lucerne 1938, Lot 292.
Ex Dr. Jacob Hirsch, Auction 18, 27th May 1907, Lot 1031.
Ex Collection Dr. Friedrich Imhoof-Blumer.

Pomona, a goddess among the Romans, presiding over fruit -trees. Her worship was of long standing at Rome, where there was a Flamen Pomonalis who sacrificed to her every year for the preservation of the fruit. She lived in the time of Procas, king of Alba, devoted to the culture of gardens, to which she confined herself and shunning all society with the male deities.
Vertumnus, under various shapes, tried to win her hand, sometimes he came as a reaper, sometimes as a haymaker, another time as a ploughman or a wine-dresser, a soldier and a fisherman, but to equally little purpose. At length, under the guise of an old woman, he won the confidence of the goddess. And, by enlarging on the evils of a single life and the blessings of the wedded state, by launching out into the praises of Vertumnus, and relating a tale of the punishment of female cruelty to a lover, he moved the heart of Pomona; whereupon, resuming his real form, he obtained the hand of the no longer reluctant nymph.

Felicitas Temporum ("Prosperity of the Times"), reflecting a Golden Age ideology, was among the innovative virtues that began to appear during the reigns of Trajan and Antoninus Pius. Septimius Severus, whose reign followed the exceedingly brief tenure of Pertinax and unsatisfactory conditions under Commodus, used coinage to express his efforts toward restoring the Pax Romana, with themes such as Felicitas Temporum and Felicitas Saeculi, "Prosperity of the Age" (saeculum), prevalent in the years 200 to 202. Some Imperial coins use these phrases with images of women and children in the emperor's family.
6 commentskc06/22/19 at 19:11Pharsalos: Interesting, rare, and very beautiful!
1681141l.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Anonymous, AE Half-Litra - Crawford 26/422 viewsRome, The Republic.
Anonymous. 234-231 BCE.
AE Half Litra (1.58g; 12mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Head of Roma in Phrygian helmet, facing right.

Reverse: Dog prancing toward right; ROMA in exergue.

References: Crawford 26/4; BMCRR (Romano-Campanian) 44-48.

Provenance: Ex NAC 84 (20 May 2015), Lot 765; purchased privately from Or Gestion Numismatique (Paris) in 2009.
1 commentsCarausius06/22/19 at 19:00Pharsalos: Superb example!
ArriusSecundus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, M. Arrius Secundus, AR Denarius - Crawford 513/233 viewsRome, The Imperators.
M. Arrius Secundus. 41 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.82g; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: M. ARRIVS - SECVNDVS; bare head, with slight beard, facing right.

Reverse: Victory honors - wreath, spear and phalera.

References: Crawford 513/2; HCRI 319; Sydenham 1084; BMCRR 4210; Arria 2.

Provenance: Nomisma 59 (14 May 2019) Lot 134; Munzen und Medaillen XIX (5-6 Jun 1959) Lot 172; Munzhandlung Basel 10 (15 Mar 1938) Lot 486.

M. Arrius Secundus was likely son of Quintus Arrius, who had a victory in the Servile War against one of Spartacus’ lieutenants, but subsequently lost a battle to Spartacus himself. He was the only member of his gens to strike coins, and not much else is known about him.

The slightly-bearded, obverse portrait, while probably depicting the moneyer’s father, Quintus Arrius, also bears a striking resemblance to contemporaneous portraits of Octavian. However, without any inscription naming Caesar, a positive identification of the portrait remains debated by scholars. David Sear suggests that the portrait is deliberately ambiguous, as the political and military climate was very risky and the moneyer likely wanted plausible deniability that the portrait was Octavian. The reverse shows awards of victory granted to the moneyer’s father for his Servile War victory: a laurel wreath, golden spear and phalera (a military decoration attached to a harness and worn over a cuirass).
2 commentsCarausius06/22/19 at 18:59Pharsalos: Wonderful coin, beautiful tone.
190208018bz.jpg
Roman Empire, Maximus, Sestertius153 viewsObv. MAXIMVS CAES GERM, draped bust right.
Rev. PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS S C, emperor standing left, holding baton and spear, at the right two standards.
Mint: Rome, 236-238 AD.

32mm 21.38g

RIC 13; Cohen 14; BMC 213

Ex Münzenhandlung Manfred Olding, Lagerliste
Ex Reusing /Schürer Collection
Ex Münzenhandlung A. Riechman 1930 (65 Reichsmark)
6 commentskc06/22/19 at 18:54Pharsalos: Magnificent example.
Vespasian_Sesterz.jpg
Roman Empire, Vespasian, Sestertius76 viewsObv. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M T P P P COS III, laureate head right.
Rev. S C, Mars, helmeted, naked except for cloak around waist, advancing right, holding transverse spear in right hand and trophy over left shoulder in left hand.
Mint: Rome, 71 AD.

34mm 25.46g

RIC 113

Ex Portuguese Collection, purchased 2019.
Ex A. E. Cahn, Auction 75, 30th May 1932, lot 1017.

Curtis Clay
This example: no. 102d (A139/P184) in Kraays unpublished die catalogue (Cahn 75, 1017).
Other examples of the same dies: BMC 570, Hall 1189, Fitzwilliam 59.

The reverse type of Mars advancing (and likely an image of Mars Ultor) is common to all three Flavians. The representation of Mars is different from the Augustan types but likely has a similar inference – here being that of avenging the rebellion of the Jews. Even so the connection to earlier Augustan issues was probably well recognized at the time. (NAC)
4 commentskc06/22/19 at 18:40FlaviusDomitianus: Nice find, early Vespasian sestertii are always ra...
Antony___the_Caesars.jpg
Antony & the Caesar's123 viewsSince most of the 12 Caesar's were more closely related to Antony than to Augustus I thought it was appropriate to include Antony in my 12 Caesar's group shot. Individual coins can be seen in my galleries. While I have better portraits of some Emperor's I chose these for their interesting reverses and styles.

Clickable for a larger photo.
6 commentsJay GT406/22/19 at 17:02kc: Good series
MarsDomit.jpg
RIC 387 Domitian As68 viewsIMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P
Laureate head right with Aegis

SC
Mars advancing left with Victory and trophy

Rome, 85 AD

13.67g

RIC 387 (C)

Holed in antiquity and plugged in the late 19th century?

Ex-Manfred Olding 2019 n 184; Ex-Sammlung Heynen 1976;Ex-Paul Schürer (1890-1976); Ex-Fritz Reusing (1874-1956)

Comes with old tag probably from Heynen or Schürer. Olding tag incorrectly attributed to RIC 420 (different ending to legend)

Reusing was a German portrait painter of the early 20th Century whose portraits included Richard Strauss, Igor Strawinsky, Max Planck, and Albert Einstein. After Reusing's death his nephew Paul Schürer inherited and curated the collection. Heynen was a friend of Reusing's, and at an earlier date had evidently sold or exchanged or given a substantial number of coins to Reusing, this being one of those coins!

Thanks to David Atherton and Curtis Clay for the brief biography and info.
9 commentsJay GT406/22/19 at 16:59kc: This is really great, nice coin and good provenanc...
Vespasian_Sestertius_Trial.jpg
Roman Empire, Vespasian, Sestertius with As 90 viewsObv. IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG P M TR POT P P COS III, laureate head right.
Rev. FORTVNAE REDVCI S C, Fortuna standing left, holding cornucopiae and rudder on globe.
Mint: Rome, 71 AD.

32/33mm 26.61g

Cohen- RIC II¹- (cf. 422) RIC II²- (cf. 73) BMC- Sear- (cf. 2323

Ex Münzhandel Henzen, MA-Shops, 2019.

This is an extremely rare Sestertius of Vespasian which obverse was strucked with a die of an As.
A similar piece with the same As die but reverse type "LIBERTAS PVBLICA" is in the Mazzini collection, listed under no. 255.
This coin is uncommonly sharp for example looking at the SC.
It is an interesting coin, I will be pleased for additional informations.

Thank you to Curtis Clay for the excellent following write-up:

"Not a trial strike or a mint error in my opinion, but an intentional sestertius obv. die, though why the portrait and legend were cut in middle-bronze size is anyone's guess!

The mint of Rome may have begun its bronze coin production of 71 with two short issues, of which this was the second, before settling on its main first obv. legend of the year,

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M T P P P COS III.

The latest obv. legend on bronzes of the preceding year, 70 AD:

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M T P P P COS II DES III on sestertii (only 1 die), the same but CAES VESPASIAN and COS II D III on middle bronzes (also only 1 die, with bust laureate, draped, cuirassed r.). RIC 32-38. The middle bronzes of this issue might be dupondii or asses or both, since Vespasian had not yet restored the radiate crown as a denominational mark for his dupondii, as we will soon see. Kraay, a very competent practical numismatist, considered them asses; Carradice and Buttrey suggest dupondii, though without being able to assure us that at least one example is definitely in yellow orichalcum rather than red copper. Hopefully renewed examination of the few surviving specimens, or new specimens that are clearly either yellow or red, will eventually clarify the question.

My proposed first short issue of bronze coins in 71: with obv. legend omitting COS III, just

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M TR P, RIC 50-65. Three such obv. dies are known on sestertii. The middle bronzes all have laureate busts, and at least one type definitely occurs both as a yellow dupondius and as a red As (RIC 64 with note), showing that by the beginning of 71 Vespasian had not yet reintroduced the radiate crown as a mark of his dupondii.

The second short issue of early in 71, to which KC's new acquisition belongs: obv. legend

IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG P M TR POT P P COS III on sestertii (only 1 die, with portrait and legend in middle-bronze size, RIC 137-140 and KC's new piece).

On middle bronzes two slight variants of the same legend were used,

(a) CAES not CAESAR on the one known dupondius, RIC 141, Kraay plaster cast in Oxford, with Head radiate r. on obv., so Vespasian had now reintroduced the radiate crown as a mark of his dupondii, proving that this short issue was later than the other one that omits COS III.

(b) CAES not CAESAR as on the dupondius, but also T P instead of TR POT, Head laureate r., apparently an As, RIC 31, a unique coin in Oxford, formerly in my collection, ex Lanz Graz IV, 1974, Hohenkubin middle bronzes, lot 134. The obv. legend might appear to end just COS II, and Buttrey accepted this reading in RIC, though I had informed him that I believed it was just a slightly tooled COS III.

Coming at last to the point, the sestertius obv. die with middle-bronze-size portrait and legend cannot originally have been cut as an As obv. die, because the one certain As of this issue has a variant, slightly shorter, obv. legend, and because in that case no sestertius obv. dies at all would have been engraved for use in this short issue. I also suspect that the broad ring of empty space outside the dotted border on this obv. die, shown clearly by RIC pl. 20, 137, suggests that it was always meant to be a sestertius not a middle-bronze die.

The Fortuna Redux rev. die of KC's new coin had earlier been used in the COS II DES III issue of late 70 AD, RIC pl. 15, 33, giving some support to my suggestion that this second small issue of bronzes in 71 was probably produced quite early in the year. The same rev. die, as Kraay observed, was also used a little later with an obv. die of the main VESPASIANVS issue of 71, Paris pl. XLIV, 486. But it is not certain, of course, that these two small issues of bronze coins were produced one after the other early in 71, before the main VESPASIANVS issue had started, as I have here suggested. Perhaps they were instead produced early in 71 indeed, but as isolated experiments alongside the main VESPASIANVS issue."

Thanks to Alberto "FlaviusDomitianus"

"Your coin is apparently unpublished and belongs to a small issue of Sestertii described in RIC 2.1 page 69:

"(d) Variant group of sestertii with small (as) die ending VESPASIAN AVG P M TR POT COS III - Pl. 20".

As noted by Carradice and Buttrey the obverse die has not be found on any As.

They are numbered from 137 to 141; since your reverse would be the first one in alfabetical order, it would probably get number 136A.

This small series is also discussed in the introduction (page 23)."

5 commentskc06/22/19 at 16:31orfew: Wonderful piece
FF77372C-1673-46CE-AD8D-13C24C03F8A7.jpeg
32 viewsGordian III. AD 238-244. Æ Sestertius (27mm, 15.30 g, 12h). Rome mint, 5th officina. 12th emission, AD 243. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Victory standing left, holding palm frond and shield set on captive seated left. RIC IV 338a; Banti 106.2 commentspaul188806/22/19 at 16:01Pharsalos: Very attractive example.
Caligula_Three_Siste~0.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Brass Sestertius46 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT - Laureate head left
AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA - AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA, the three sisters of Caligula standing, in the guises of Securitas, Concordia, and Fortuna, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue
Exergue: SC


Mint: Rome (37-38AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 27.88g / 35.6mm / 180
Rarity: Rare
References:
RIC I 33
BMCRE p. 152, 36
BnF II 47
Cohen I 4
SRCV I 1800
Provenances:
Forvm Ancient Coins
Acquisition/Sale: Forvm Ancient Coins Internet

ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

From Numismatica Ars Classica:
Many aspects of Caligula's reign have captured the imagination of historians, but the sexual relationships he is said to have pursued with his sisters is perhaps most shocking of all. It is on par with the exploits of Elagabalus or the alleged seduction of young Nero by his deranged mother Agrippina Jr., who, by no mere coincidence, was one of Caligula's sisters.
Caligula's incestuous relationships with his sisters are alleged by the relatively contemporary historians Suetonius and Josephus. Much later, in the fourth and fifth centuries, these original claims were echoed by various writers, including Eutropius, Aurelius Victor, St. Jerome, Orosius and the anonymous compiler of the Epitome de caesaribus. The truth of the claims, of course, is impossible to confirm, and there is a healthy dose of scepticism among modern scholars.
Whatever personal or sexual affection Caligula may have felt toward his sisters, this coinage is purely political and dynastic in flavour. His sisters are each named and are shown in the guise of personifications: the eldest, Agrippina Junior, as Securitas, the middle-sister, Drusilla, as Concordia, and the youngest, Julia Livilla, as Fortuna.
This remarkable type was produced on two occasions, his initial coinage of 37-38, and again in 39-40. The example offered here belongs to the first coinage, which was issued when all three of the imperial women were alive. Drusilla, Caligula's favourite sister (and the one with whom he is said to have had an enduring incestuous relationship), died tragically on June 10, 38, nearly three months after the last coins of the initial issue were struck.
By the time the last issue was produced (beginning March 18, 39), Drusilla had been accorded the status of a goddess, providing the curious circumstance of a goddess being portrayed in the guise of a personification. Life in the palace worsened after Drusilla's death and Caligula's affection for his remaining two sisters declined.
The circumstances reported by the ancient sources are nothing short of bizarre: Drusilla had been married to Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, who had also been Caligula's lover. After Drusilla died, Lepidus extended his sexual liaisons to include Agrippina and Julia Livilla, his former sisters-in-law. By late in 39 this web of relationships seems to have evolved into a failed plot by Lepidus against Caligula, who executed Lepidus and sent his two sisters into exile out of their suspected complicity.
All of this palace intrigue occurred in the midst of the second issue of 'three sisters' sestertii, the production of which Caligula probably halted immediately since of the three sisters shown, one was dead and two were in exile for having plotted against his life.

From Wikisource:
It is easy to understand why the peace and harmony which had been reestablished for a moment in the troubled imperial family by the advent of Caligula should have been of brief duration. His grandmother and his sisters were Romans, educated in Roman ideals, and this exotic madness of his could inspire in them only an irresistible horror. This brought confusion into the imperial family, and after having suffered the persecutions of Sejanus and his party, the unhappy daughters of Germanicus found themselves in the toils of the exacting caprices of their brother. In fact, in 38, Caligula had already broken with his grandmother, whom the year before he had had proclaimed Augusta; and between the years 38 and 39, catastrophes followed one another in the family with frightful rapidity. His sister Drusilla, whom, as Suetonius tells us, he already treated as a lawful wife, died suddenly of some unknown malady while still very young. It is not improbable that her health may have been ruined by the horror of the wild adventure, which was neither human nor Roman, into which her brother sought to drag her by marriage. Caligula suddenly declared her a goddess, to whom all the cities must pay honors. He had a temple built for her, and appointed a body of twenty priests, ten men and ten women, to celebrate her worship; he decreed that her birthday should be a holiday, and he wished the statue of Venus in the Forum to be carved in her likeness.

But in proportion as Caligula became more and more fervid in this adoration of his dead sister, the disagreement between himself and his other two sisters became more embittered. Julia Livilla was exiled in 38; Agrippina, the wife of Domitius Enobarbus°, in 39, and about this same time the venerable Antonia died. It was noised about that Caligula had forced her to commit suicide, and that Agrippina and Livilla had taken part in a conspiracy against the life of the emperor. How much truth there may be in these reports it is difficult to say, but the reason for all these catastrophes may be affirmed with certainty. Life in the imperial palace was no longer possible, especially for women, with this madman who was transforming Rome into Alexandria and who wished to marry a sister. Even Tiberius, the son of Drusus and co-heir to the empire with Caligula, was at about this time defeated in some obscure suit and disappeared.

Many aspects of Caligula’s reign have captured the imagination of historians, but the sexual relationships he is said to
have pursued with his sisters is perhaps most shocking of all. It is on par with the exploits of Elagabalus or the alleged
seduction of young Nero by his deranged mother Agrippina Jr., who, by no mere coincidence, was one of Caligula’s
sisters.
Caligula’s incestuous relationships with his sisters are alleged by the relatively contemporary historians Suetonius and
Josephus. Much later, in the fourth and fifth centuries, these original claims were echoed by various writers, including
Eutropius, Aurelius Victor, St. Jerome, Orosius and the anonymous compiler of the Epitome de caesaribus. The truth of
the claims, of course, is impossible to confirm, and there is a healthy dose of skepticism among modern scholars.
Whatever personal or sexual affection Caligula may have felt toward his sisters, this coinage is purely political and
dynastic in flavour. His sisters are each named and are shown in the guise of personifications: the eldest, Agrippina Junior,
as Securitas, the middle-sister, Drusilla, as Concordia, and the youngest, Julia Livilla, as Fortuna.
This remarkable type was produced on two occasions, his initial coinage of 37-38, and again in 39-40. The example
offered here belongs to the first coinage, which was issued when all three of the imperial women were alive. Drusilla,
Caligula’s favourite sister (and the one with whom he is said to have had an enduring incestuous relationship), died
tragically on June 10, 38, nearly three months after the last coins of the initial issue were struck.
By the time the last issue was produced (beginning March 18, 39), Drusilla had been accorded the status of a goddess,
providing the curious circumstance of a goddess being portrayed in the guise of a personification. Life in the palace
worsened after Drusilla’s death and Caligula’s affection for his remaining two sisters declined.
The circumstances reported by the ancient sources are nothing short of bizarre: Drusilla had been married to Marcus
Aemilius Lepidus, who had also been Caligula’s lover. At least after Drusilla died, Lepidus extended his sexual liaisons to
include Agrippina and Julia Livilla, his former sisters-in-law. By late in 39 this web of relationships seems to have evolved
into a failed plot by Lepidus against Caligula, who executed Lepidus and sent his two sisters into exile out of their
suspected complicity.
All of this palace intrigue occurred in the midst of the second issue of ‘three sisters’ sestertii, the production of which
Caligula probably halted immediately since of the three sisters shown, one was dead and two were in exile for having
plotted against his life.

Per RIC-Rare
3 commentsGary W206/22/19 at 16:00Pharsalos: Beautiful, big example.
Calabria_Tarentum_SNG-ANS988.jpg
Calabria, Tarentum.16 viewsCalabria, Tarentum. 334-330 BC. AR Didrachm (7.78 gm). Helmeted horseman advancing r. with spear, holding shield and two spears; below magistrate ΦIΛI (Phili c. 290-281). / Taras (Phalanthos) on dolphin l., holding distaff and dolphin; ΦI to l. , ivy-leaf & TAPAΣ to r. , waves below. EF. Pegasi 121 #40. Ex Vlasto coll. SNG ANS 988-989 (same obverse die); Vlasto 589; HN Italy 934 (2); HGC 1 800; SNG Cop 842; Fischer-Bossert 1090.1 commentsChristian T06/22/19 at 15:55Pharsalos: Gorgeous example.
Bruttium_Kaulonia_SNG-ANS185.jpg
Bruttium, Kaulonia.17 viewsBruttium, Kaulonia. 470-440 BC. AR Stater (6.71 gm). Apollo Catharsius advancing r., laurel branch in hand, small figure running on outstretched arm. Stag in r. field, looking back, bucranium (wolf's head) in tree to l. / Stag stdg. r., KAVΛΩΝΙAΤA-N. VF. CNG 55 #71. SNG ANS 185 (same dies); HN Italy Type G 2049; HGC 1 1419var (℞ full legend); Noe Caulonia group G #108-109; SNG Lockett 588 (same dies); SNG Cop 1714.1 commentsChristian T06/22/19 at 15:53Pharsalos: Wonderful coin, never seen this obverse type befor...
Thrace_Abdera_SNG-Cop329.jpg
Thrace, Abdera.14 viewsThrace, Abdera. 353/2 BC. AR Tetrobol (2.82 gm) on Persic stdd. Eagle-Griffin rearing l. from its base, A to r. / ΙΡΟΜ−ΝΗ−ΜΩΝ (Magistrate Iromnemonos) around Kantharos in incuse square. Ivy leaf in field to r. VF. HGC 3.2 #1223 (R1); May (1966) Group CXVI 439-446; SNG Cop 329.1 commentsChristian T06/22/19 at 12:55Pharsalos: Beautiful and interesting.
6fGRD8x2pN49Sg3rb5Gmrd7JM2ztqK.jpg
PAMPHYLIA. Side. Ca. 5th century BC. AR stater (18mm, 10.81 gm, 9h)28 viewsPAMPHYLIA. Side. Ca. 5th century BC. AR stater (18mm, 10.81 gm, 9h). About VF. Ca. 430-400 BC. Pomegranate, beaded border / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet pushed back on head, all within shallow incuse square. SNG France 628-9. SNG von Aulock 4765. 3 commentsMark R106/22/19 at 12:55Mark R1: Thanks guys!
Thrace_Abdera_May447.jpg
Thrace, Abdera.18 viewsThrace, Abdera. c. 360-350 BC. AR Stater (11.38 gm) on Persic Stdd. Eagle-Griffin rearing l. from its base. ΑΒΔΗ above. / Hermes standing r. wearing petasos and chlamys, holding rod. Kantharos in field to r. EΠΙIΗΝΩΝΟΣ. EF. May, Abdera 447 (A301/P354); Weber 7378 (stempelgleich). HGC 3.2 #1206 (R2).1 commentsChristian T06/22/19 at 12:49Pharsalos: Absolutely stunning, wonderful coin.
Thessaly_Larissa_BCD-ThessalyII-171.jpg
Thessaly, Larissa.17 viewsThessaly, Larissa. 420-400 BC. AR Drachm (5.82 gm). Hero Thessalos stdg r., restraining unruly bull by the horns, petasos and chlamys over shoulder. / Bridled horse prancing r. ΛΑΡ-ΙΣΑΙ above and below. gVF. BCD Thessaly II #171; Herrmann Group III F; HGC 4 #418 (S); Lorber Thessalian 49.1 commentsChristian T06/22/19 at 12:48Pharsalos: Beautiful dies.
Thessaly_Pharsalos_BCD-Thessaly664.jpg
Thessaly, Pharsalos.16 viewsThessaly, Pharsalos. 440-420 BC. AR Hemidrachm (3.06 gm). Head of Athena in Attic helmet r. / Head of horse r., Φ-ΑR (ethnic). VF. Pegasi AXXI #96. BCD Thessaly 664.1 (same obv. die); HGC 4 #630; Lavva 31 (V21/R19), cf 34.1 commentsChristian T06/22/19 at 12:47Pharsalos: Very beautiful.
mytet.jpg
Pergamon, Mysia (133 - 67 B.C)25 viewsAR Cistophoric Tetradrachm
O:  Cista mystica with half-open lid, from which a snake emerges, all within wreath of ivy with berries.
R: Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; above, ME, prytaneis monogram, and A (controls), (Pergamon monogram) to left, serpent-entwined thyrsos to right.
11.36g
26mm
Kleiner, Hoard 40; SNG BN 1744

Ex. Glenn Schinke, March 1995
4 commentsMat06/22/19 at 12:00Jay GT4: Nice!
Vespasian_Sestertius_Trial.jpg
Roman Empire, Vespasian, Sestertius with As 90 viewsObv. IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG P M TR POT P P COS III, laureate head right.
Rev. FORTVNAE REDVCI S C, Fortuna standing left, holding cornucopiae and rudder on globe.
Mint: Rome, 71 AD.

32/33mm 26.61g

Cohen- RIC II¹- (cf. 422) RIC II²- (cf. 73) BMC- Sear- (cf. 2323

Ex Münzhandel Henzen, MA-Shops, 2019.

This is an extremely rare Sestertius of Vespasian which obverse was strucked with a die of an As.
A similar piece with the same As die but reverse type "LIBERTAS PVBLICA" is in the Mazzini collection, listed under no. 255.
This coin is uncommonly sharp for example looking at the SC.
It is an interesting coin, I will be pleased for additional informations.

Thank you to Curtis Clay for the excellent following write-up:

"Not a trial strike or a mint error in my opinion, but an intentional sestertius obv. die, though why the portrait and legend were cut in middle-bronze size is anyone's guess!

The mint of Rome may have begun its bronze coin production of 71 with two short issues, of which this was the second, before settling on its main first obv. legend of the year,

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M T P P P COS III.

The latest obv. legend on bronzes of the preceding year, 70 AD:

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M T P P P COS II DES III on sestertii (only 1 die), the same but CAES VESPASIAN and COS II D III on middle bronzes (also only 1 die, with bust laureate, draped, cuirassed r.). RIC 32-38. The middle bronzes of this issue might be dupondii or asses or both, since Vespasian had not yet restored the radiate crown as a denominational mark for his dupondii, as we will soon see. Kraay, a very competent practical numismatist, considered them asses; Carradice and Buttrey suggest dupondii, though without being able to assure us that at least one example is definitely in yellow orichalcum rather than red copper. Hopefully renewed examination of the few surviving specimens, or new specimens that are clearly either yellow or red, will eventually clarify the question.

My proposed first short issue of bronze coins in 71: with obv. legend omitting COS III, just

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M TR P, RIC 50-65. Three such obv. dies are known on sestertii. The middle bronzes all have laureate busts, and at least one type definitely occurs both as a yellow dupondius and as a red As (RIC 64 with note), showing that by the beginning of 71 Vespasian had not yet reintroduced the radiate crown as a mark of his dupondii.

The second short issue of early in 71, to which KC's new acquisition belongs: obv. legend

IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG P M TR POT P P COS III on sestertii (only 1 die, with portrait and legend in middle-bronze size, RIC 137-140 and KC's new piece).

On middle bronzes two slight variants of the same legend were used,

(a) CAES not CAESAR on the one known dupondius, RIC 141, Kraay plaster cast in Oxford, with Head radiate r. on obv., so Vespasian had now reintroduced the radiate crown as a mark of his dupondii, proving that this short issue was later than the other one that omits COS III.

(b) CAES not CAESAR as on the dupondius, but also T P instead of TR POT, Head laureate r., apparently an As, RIC 31, a unique coin in Oxford, formerly in my collection, ex Lanz Graz IV, 1974, Hohenkubin middle bronzes, lot 134. The obv. legend might appear to end just COS II, and Buttrey accepted this reading in RIC, though I had informed him that I believed it was just a slightly tooled COS III.

Coming at last to the point, the sestertius obv. die with middle-bronze-size portrait and legend cannot originally have been cut as an As obv. die, because the one certain As of this issue has a variant, slightly shorter, obv. legend, and because in that case no sestertius obv. dies at all would have been engraved for use in this short issue. I also suspect that the broad ring of empty space outside the dotted border on this obv. die, shown clearly by RIC pl. 20, 137, suggests that it was always meant to be a sestertius not a middle-bronze die.

The Fortuna Redux rev. die of KC's new coin had earlier been used in the COS II DES III issue of late 70 AD, RIC pl. 15, 33, giving some support to my suggestion that this second small issue of bronzes in 71 was probably produced quite early in the year. The same rev. die, as Kraay observed, was also used a little later with an obv. die of the main VESPASIANVS issue of 71, Paris pl. XLIV, 486. But it is not certain, of course, that these two small issues of bronze coins were produced one after the other early in 71, before the main VESPASIANVS issue had started, as I have here suggested. Perhaps they were instead produced early in 71 indeed, but as isolated experiments alongside the main VESPASIANVS issue."

Thanks to Alberto "FlaviusDomitianus"

"Your coin is apparently unpublished and belongs to a small issue of Sestertii described in RIC 2.1 page 69:

"(d) Variant group of sestertii with small (as) die ending VESPASIAN AVG P M TR POT COS III - Pl. 20".

As noted by Carradice and Buttrey the obverse die has not be found on any As.

They are numbered from 137 to 141; since your reverse would be the first one in alfabetical order, it would probably get number 136A.

This small series is also discussed in the introduction (page 23)."

5 commentskc06/22/19 at 10:45*Alex: Interesting coin.
Vespasian_Sestertius_Trial.jpg
Roman Empire, Vespasian, Sestertius with As 90 viewsObv. IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG P M TR POT P P COS III, laureate head right.
Rev. FORTVNAE REDVCI S C, Fortuna standing left, holding cornucopiae and rudder on globe.
Mint: Rome, 71 AD.

32/33mm 26.61g

Cohen- RIC II¹- (cf. 422) RIC II²- (cf. 73) BMC- Sear- (cf. 2323

Ex Münzhandel Henzen, MA-Shops, 2019.

This is an extremely rare Sestertius of Vespasian which obverse was strucked with a die of an As.
A similar piece with the same As die but reverse type "LIBERTAS PVBLICA" is in the Mazzini collection, listed under no. 255.
This coin is uncommonly sharp for example looking at the SC.
It is an interesting coin, I will be pleased for additional informations.

Thank you to Curtis Clay for the excellent following write-up:

"Not a trial strike or a mint error in my opinion, but an intentional sestertius obv. die, though why the portrait and legend were cut in middle-bronze size is anyone's guess!

The mint of Rome may have begun its bronze coin production of 71 with two short issues, of which this was the second, before settling on its main first obv. legend of the year,

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M T P P P COS III.

The latest obv. legend on bronzes of the preceding year, 70 AD:

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M T P P P COS II DES III on sestertii (only 1 die), the same but CAES VESPASIAN and COS II D III on middle bronzes (also only 1 die, with bust laureate, draped, cuirassed r.). RIC 32-38. The middle bronzes of this issue might be dupondii or asses or both, since Vespasian had not yet restored the radiate crown as a denominational mark for his dupondii, as we will soon see. Kraay, a very competent practical numismatist, considered them asses; Carradice and Buttrey suggest dupondii, though without being able to assure us that at least one example is definitely in yellow orichalcum rather than red copper. Hopefully renewed examination of the few surviving specimens, or new specimens that are clearly either yellow or red, will eventually clarify the question.

My proposed first short issue of bronze coins in 71: with obv. legend omitting COS III, just

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M TR P, RIC 50-65. Three such obv. dies are known on sestertii. The middle bronzes all have laureate busts, and at least one type definitely occurs both as a yellow dupondius and as a red As (RIC 64 with note), showing that by the beginning of 71 Vespasian had not yet reintroduced the radiate crown as a mark of his dupondii.

The second short issue of early in 71, to which KC's new acquisition belongs: obv. legend

IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG P M TR POT P P COS III on sestertii (only 1 die, with portrait and legend in middle-bronze size, RIC 137-140 and KC's new piece).

On middle bronzes two slight variants of the same legend were used,

(a) CAES not CAESAR on the one known dupondius, RIC 141, Kraay plaster cast in Oxford, with Head radiate r. on obv., so Vespasian had now reintroduced the radiate crown as a mark of his dupondii, proving that this short issue was later than the other one that omits COS III.

(b) CAES not CAESAR as on the dupondius, but also T P instead of TR POT, Head laureate r., apparently an As, RIC 31, a unique coin in Oxford, formerly in my collection, ex Lanz Graz IV, 1974, Hohenkubin middle bronzes, lot 134. The obv. legend might appear to end just COS II, and Buttrey accepted this reading in RIC, though I had informed him that I believed it was just a slightly tooled COS III.

Coming at last to the point, the sestertius obv. die with middle-bronze-size portrait and legend cannot originally have been cut as an As obv. die, because the one certain As of this issue has a variant, slightly shorter, obv. legend, and because in that case no sestertius obv. dies at all would have been engraved for use in this short issue. I also suspect that the broad ring of empty space outside the dotted border on this obv. die, shown clearly by RIC pl. 20, 137, suggests that it was always meant to be a sestertius not a middle-bronze die.

The Fortuna Redux rev. die of KC's new coin had earlier been used in the COS II DES III issue of late 70 AD, RIC pl. 15, 33, giving some support to my suggestion that this second small issue of bronzes in 71 was probably produced quite early in the year. The same rev. die, as Kraay observed, was also used a little later with an obv. die of the main VESPASIANVS issue of 71, Paris pl. XLIV, 486. But it is not certain, of course, that these two small issues of bronze coins were produced one after the other early in 71, before the main VESPASIANVS issue had started, as I have here suggested. Perhaps they were instead produced early in 71 indeed, but as isolated experiments alongside the main VESPASIANVS issue."

Thanks to Alberto "FlaviusDomitianus"

"Your coin is apparently unpublished and belongs to a small issue of Sestertii described in RIC 2.1 page 69:

"(d) Variant group of sestertii with small (as) die ending VESPASIAN AVG P M TR POT COS III - Pl. 20".

As noted by Carradice and Buttrey the obverse die has not be found on any As.

They are numbered from 137 to 141; since your reverse would be the first one in alfabetical order, it would probably get number 136A.

This small series is also discussed in the introduction (page 23)."

5 commentskc06/22/19 at 10:25quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
mytet.jpg
Pergamon, Mysia (133 - 67 B.C)25 viewsAR Cistophoric Tetradrachm
O:  Cista mystica with half-open lid, from which a snake emerges, all within wreath of ivy with berries.
R: Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; above, ME, prytaneis monogram, and A (controls), (Pergamon monogram) to left, serpent-entwined thyrsos to right.
11.36g
26mm
Kleiner, Hoard 40; SNG BN 1744

Ex. Glenn Schinke, March 1995
4 commentsMat06/22/19 at 07:24quadrans: Nice one
mytet.jpg
Pergamon, Mysia (133 - 67 B.C)25 viewsAR Cistophoric Tetradrachm
O:  Cista mystica with half-open lid, from which a snake emerges, all within wreath of ivy with berries.
R: Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; above, ME, prytaneis monogram, and A (controls), (Pergamon monogram) to left, serpent-entwined thyrsos to right.
11.36g
26mm
Kleiner, Hoard 40; SNG BN 1744

Ex. Glenn Schinke, March 1995
4 commentsMat06/22/19 at 07:01Steve P: winna-winna
RIC_555_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0555 Domitianus69 viewsObv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII, Laureate head right
Rev: COS XIIII, across field, Minerva standing left, with spear
AR/Denarius - 20.86 mm 3.560 g 6h - Struck in Rome 88 A.D. (1st group)
RIC 555 (R2) - RSC 66 - BMCRE unlisted - BNF 113
ex Rauch Auction 108 Lot 160
5 commentsFlaviusDomitianus06/22/19 at 02:03orfew: Wonderful!
zzz.JPG
ARCADIA. Cleitor. Ca. 370-350 BC. AR obol (12mm, 0.85 gm, 3h). 19 viewsARCADIA. Cleitor. Ca. 370-350 BC. AR obol (12mm, 0.85 gm, 3h). NGC MS 4/5 - 3/5. Head of Athena right wearing crested Attic helmet with upturned cheek flap; Λ behind / Κ-Λ-H, horse galloping right, trailing rein. BCD Peloponnesos 1420-1. 2 commentsMark R106/22/19 at 01:14Mark R1: Thanks! I like it too..
zzz.JPG
ARCADIA. Cleitor. Ca. 370-350 BC. AR obol (12mm, 0.85 gm, 3h). 19 viewsARCADIA. Cleitor. Ca. 370-350 BC. AR obol (12mm, 0.85 gm, 3h). NGC MS 4/5 - 3/5. Head of Athena right wearing crested Attic helmet with upturned cheek flap; Λ behind / Κ-Λ-H, horse galloping right, trailing rein. BCD Peloponnesos 1420-1. 2 commentsMark R106/21/19 at 23:52quadrans: Wow, nice piece..
6fGRD8x2pN49Sg3rb5Gmrd7JM2ztqK.jpg
PAMPHYLIA. Side. Ca. 5th century BC. AR stater (18mm, 10.81 gm, 9h)28 viewsPAMPHYLIA. Side. Ca. 5th century BC. AR stater (18mm, 10.81 gm, 9h). About VF. Ca. 430-400 BC. Pomegranate, beaded border / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet pushed back on head, all within shallow incuse square. SNG France 628-9. SNG von Aulock 4765. 3 commentsMark R106/21/19 at 23:52quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
RIC_555_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0555 Domitianus69 viewsObv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII, Laureate head right
Rev: COS XIIII, across field, Minerva standing left, with spear
AR/Denarius - 20.86 mm 3.560 g 6h - Struck in Rome 88 A.D. (1st group)
RIC 555 (R2) - RSC 66 - BMCRE unlisted - BNF 113
ex Rauch Auction 108 Lot 160
5 commentsFlaviusDomitianus06/21/19 at 23:51quadrans: Nice piece..
2.JPG
I made this.43 viewsI thought I would post this here since my coin collecting led me to do it. This is a coin for Takeda Hamono who is a 60-year-old blacksmith from Niimi Japan. He makes fantastic knives by hand with his family. He had this design made for him to use on stickers and some other things and he was kind enough to allow me to use it. This is the first prototype and it's not quite complete. It's going to take a bath in acid next (it's made with carbon steel) to give it a black finish and then we're burnishing it to make the design pop. The mint that did this for us is Shire Post. 1 commentsMark R106/21/19 at 18:32Tracy Aiello: That's pretty neat.
RIC_555_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0555 Domitianus69 viewsObv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII, Laureate head right
Rev: COS XIIII, across field, Minerva standing left, with spear
AR/Denarius - 20.86 mm 3.560 g 6h - Struck in Rome 88 A.D. (1st group)
RIC 555 (R2) - RSC 66 - BMCRE unlisted - BNF 113
ex Rauch Auction 108 Lot 160
5 commentsFlaviusDomitianus06/21/19 at 17:50Jay GT4: That's a great coin Alberto, Congrats!
DSC_2172.JPG
PAMPHYLIA. Aspendus. Ca. mid-5th century BC. AR stater 19 viewsPAMPHYLIA. Aspendus. Ca. mid-5th century BC. AR stater (19mm, 10.79 gm). Choice VF, Fine Style. Ca. 465-430 BC. Helmeted nude hoplite advancing right, spear forward in right hand, oval shield in left / Triskeles clockwise within incuse square. cf. Classical Numismatic Group, Electronic Auction 429 (26 September 2018), lot 167, otherwise unpublished. Fine style for the series. 2 commentsMark R106/21/19 at 17:44Mark R1: Yeah I see a lot of these and this one had some ni...
Indo-Scythian_Kings__Azes_II_,_(35_BC-5_AD_)_AR_Tetradracm,Taxila_Sirsukh,_Mitchiner_VI,_S__573,_867a_,_Q-001,_5h,_22mm,_9,77g-s.jpg
Indo-Scythian Kings, Azes II, (35 B.C.-5 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, Mitchiner VI, S. 573, Typ 867a., Athena holding spear and shield, #1138 viewsIndo-Scythian Kings, Azes II, (35 B.C.-5 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, Mitchiner VI, S. 573, Typ 867a., Athena holding spear and shield, #1
avers: BAΣIΛEΩΣ BAΣIΛEΩN MEΓAΛOY / AZOY (Greek legend "of the Great King of Kings Azes"), Azes II. in military dress, on a horse, holding whip and spear.
reverse: Athena standing right, holding spear and shield, monogram at left and right, Kharoshthi legend around: maharajasa rajarajasa mahatasa / ayasa.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 22,0mm, weight: 9,773g, axes: 5h,
mint: Azes II, Taxila, Sirsukh, date: 35B.C.-5A.D., ref: Mitchiner VI, S. 5739, Typ 867a., HGC12 #716, MIG ???, Sen ???,
Probably struck under Vijayamitra c. 12 B.C.-A.D. 15.
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans06/21/19 at 17:14Mark R1: Cool Coin. I like these east/greek designs.
Indo-Scythian_Kings_Azes_II_(35_B_C_-5_A_D_)_AR_Tetradracm,_Mitchiner_VI,__,_Q-001,_3h,_23-25mm,_9,67g-s.jpg
Indo-Scythian Kings, Azes II, (35 B.C.-5 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, Mitchiner (MIG) VI, Azes II (G) Type 848h, Athena holding spear and shield, #174 viewsIndo-Scythian Kings, Azes II, (35 B.C.-5 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, Mitchiner (MIG) VI, Azes II (G) Type 848h, Athena holding spear and shield, #1
avers: BAΣIΛEΩΣ BAΣIΛEΩN MEΓAΛOY / AZOY (Greek legend "of the Great King of Kings Azes"), Azes II. in military dress, on a horse, holding whip and spear.
reverse: Athena standing right, holding spear and shield, monogram at left and right, Kharoshthi legend around: maharajasa rajadirasa mahatasa / ayasa.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 23,0-25,0mm, weight: 9,67g, axes: 3h,
mint: Azes II, date: 35 B.C.-5 A.D., ref: Mitchiner (MIG) VI, Azes II (G) Type 848h. Taxila Sirsukh B., Chapter 18, page 552, the 21st coin.
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans06/21/19 at 17:11Mark R1: Love it!
nerosnake.jpg
Nero (54 - 68 A.D.)53 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm 
O: NEΡΩ KΛAY KAIS SEBA GEP AVTO, laureate head right.
R: NEO AGAQ DAIM, Agathodaemon serpent, coiled with head up, holding poppies and grain ears, L ς (date) to right. Year 6.
23mm
13.11g
Milne 203; Emmett 106.6 (R4) ; RPC 5260

The Agathodaemon was a good spirit/demon that was worshipped by the ancient Egyptians. 
He had the shape of a serpent with a human head. 
The Greek inscription on the reverse of this coin shows that this is the "neo" or "new" agathodaemon serpent, or, in other words, the new good spirit (of rule by Nero). 

Pending Wildwinds Publishing!
8 commentsMat06/21/19 at 13:07David Atherton: Love the reverse!
DSC_2172.JPG
PAMPHYLIA. Aspendus. Ca. mid-5th century BC. AR stater 19 viewsPAMPHYLIA. Aspendus. Ca. mid-5th century BC. AR stater (19mm, 10.79 gm). Choice VF, Fine Style. Ca. 465-430 BC. Helmeted nude hoplite advancing right, spear forward in right hand, oval shield in left / Triskeles clockwise within incuse square. cf. Classical Numismatic Group, Electronic Auction 429 (26 September 2018), lot 167, otherwise unpublished. Fine style for the series. 2 commentsMark R106/21/19 at 12:44Jay GT4: Great detail in the face and helmet. Classic coin
nerosnake.jpg
Nero (54 - 68 A.D.)53 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm 
O: NEΡΩ KΛAY KAIS SEBA GEP AVTO, laureate head right.
R: NEO AGAQ DAIM, Agathodaemon serpent, coiled with head up, holding poppies and grain ears, L ς (date) to right. Year 6.
23mm
13.11g
Milne 203; Emmett 106.6 (R4) ; RPC 5260

The Agathodaemon was a good spirit/demon that was worshipped by the ancient Egyptians. 
He had the shape of a serpent with a human head. 
The Greek inscription on the reverse of this coin shows that this is the "neo" or "new" agathodaemon serpent, or, in other words, the new good spirit (of rule by Nero). 

Pending Wildwinds Publishing!
8 commentsMat06/21/19 at 12:28Steve P: Cha-ching! ... yup, ya gotta love the animal coins...
Trajan.jpg
35 viewsTrajan AR Denarius. Rome, AD 113-114. IMP TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, laureate and draped bust right / COS VI P P SPQR, Trajan's column surmounted by statue of the emperor; at base, two eagles. RIC 307; BMCRE 522; RSC 115. 3.53g, 20mm, 6h.
Of all of the truly monumental buildings and commemorative structures which the emperor Trajan built, only one, the Columna Traiani, has survived in a reasonable state of completeness. Indeed, it appears almost identical in person as it does on coins, except that the statue of Trajan that originally surmounted it was replaced in 1588 with a statue of St. Paul. When completed, the column occupied a prominent place between two libraries, the Basilica Ulpia and the Temple of Trajan and Plotina. The column was massive: it was over 12 feet in diameter at its base, and rose to a height of nearly 130 feet. Its core was comprised of 34 blocks of Carrara white marble that were made hollow so as to accommodate a circular staircase of 185 steps. The most remarkable feature of the column, however, was its ornamentation, for the friezes on its exterior are some of the most inspiring works of art ever produced. Monumental in scope and execution, they record Trajan’s two Dacian campaigns, from 101-3 and 104-6. All told, there are more than 2,500 individually sculpted figures distributed among more than 150 scenes. The emperor himself is represented no less than fifty times – not a surprise considering his penchant for commemorative architecture and his pride in having added Dacia to the provinces of the empire. “ Source: NAC”

Ex Michael Kelly Collection of Roman Silver Coins
4 commentspaul188806/21/19 at 04:24Matt Inglima: One of the nicest I've seen! Congratulations!
86.jpg
hj6.26.10.0621 viewsElagabalus
Marcianopolis

Obv: AVT K M AVPHΛI. ANTΩNEINOC, laureate head right
Rev: (...)KOV MAPKIANOΠOΛIT(ΩN), Hermes standing left, holding purse and caduceus.
26 mm, 9.68 gms

Hristova-Jekov 6.26.10.6
1 commentsCharles M06/21/19 at 01:08Charles M: needs correction--Charles M.
TitusPontif.jpg
RIC 554 Titus63 viewsT CAES IMP VESP CENS
Laureate bust right

PONTIF MAXIM
Vespasian seated right on curule chair, with sceptre and branch

Rome, 73 AD

RIC 554 (R) A mule with reverse type of Vespasian

3.03g

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya
7 commentsJay GT406/21/19 at 00:52Randygeki(h2): Awesome coin!
Trajan.jpg
35 viewsTrajan AR Denarius. Rome, AD 113-114. IMP TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, laureate and draped bust right / COS VI P P SPQR, Trajan's column surmounted by statue of the emperor; at base, two eagles. RIC 307; BMCRE 522; RSC 115. 3.53g, 20mm, 6h.
Of all of the truly monumental buildings and commemorative structures which the emperor Trajan built, only one, the Columna Traiani, has survived in a reasonable state of completeness. Indeed, it appears almost identical in person as it does on coins, except that the statue of Trajan that originally surmounted it was replaced in 1588 with a statue of St. Paul. When completed, the column occupied a prominent place between two libraries, the Basilica Ulpia and the Temple of Trajan and Plotina. The column was massive: it was over 12 feet in diameter at its base, and rose to a height of nearly 130 feet. Its core was comprised of 34 blocks of Carrara white marble that were made hollow so as to accommodate a circular staircase of 185 steps. The most remarkable feature of the column, however, was its ornamentation, for the friezes on its exterior are some of the most inspiring works of art ever produced. Monumental in scope and execution, they record Trajan’s two Dacian campaigns, from 101-3 and 104-6. All told, there are more than 2,500 individually sculpted figures distributed among more than 150 scenes. The emperor himself is represented no less than fifty times – not a surprise considering his penchant for commemorative architecture and his pride in having added Dacia to the provinces of the empire. “ Source: NAC”

Ex Michael Kelly Collection of Roman Silver Coins
4 commentspaul188806/20/19 at 23:57Jay GT4: Great one Paul
IMG_5249.jpg
05 Constantius II18 viewsConstantius II. AE2. Arles. DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, soldier standing left, one knee drawn up, about to spear falling horseman wearing a Phrygian helmet and is sitting on ground, arms raised. A in left field. Mintmark PARL
RIC Arles 103 variant?
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)06/20/19 at 22:54Mat: Nice one
IMG_5249.jpg
05 Constantius II18 viewsConstantius II. AE2. Arles. DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, soldier standing left, one knee drawn up, about to spear falling horseman wearing a Phrygian helmet and is sitting on ground, arms raised. A in left field. Mintmark PARL
RIC Arles 103 variant?
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)06/20/19 at 22:26Jay GT4: Cool!
Indo-Scythian_Kings_Azes_II_(35_B_C_-5_A_D_)_AR_Tetradracm,_Mitchiner_VI,__,_Q-001,_3h,_23-25mm,_9,67g-s.jpg
Indo-Scythian Kings, Azes II, (35 B.C.-5 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, Mitchiner (MIG) VI, Azes II (G) Type 848h, Athena holding spear and shield, #174 viewsIndo-Scythian Kings, Azes II, (35 B.C.-5 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, Mitchiner (MIG) VI, Azes II (G) Type 848h, Athena holding spear and shield, #1
avers: BAΣIΛEΩΣ BAΣIΛEΩN MEΓAΛOY / AZOY (Greek legend "of the Great King of Kings Azes"), Azes II. in military dress, on a horse, holding whip and spear.
reverse: Athena standing right, holding spear and shield, monogram at left and right, Kharoshthi legend around: maharajasa rajadirasa mahatasa / ayasa.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 23,0-25,0mm, weight: 9,67g, axes: 3h,
mint: Azes II, date: 35 B.C.-5 A.D., ref: Mitchiner (MIG) VI, Azes II (G) Type 848h. Taxila Sirsukh B., Chapter 18, page 552, the 21st coin.
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans06/20/19 at 21:56RL: Great example
Indo-Scythian_Kings_Azes_II_(35_B_C_-5_A_D_)_AR_Tetradracm,_Mitchiner_VI,__,_Q-001,_3h,_23-25mm,_9,67g-s.jpg
Indo-Scythian Kings, Azes II, (35 B.C.-5 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, Mitchiner (MIG) VI, Azes II (G) Type 848h, Athena holding spear and shield, #174 viewsIndo-Scythian Kings, Azes II, (35 B.C.-5 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, Mitchiner (MIG) VI, Azes II (G) Type 848h, Athena holding spear and shield, #1
avers: BAΣIΛEΩΣ BAΣIΛEΩN MEΓAΛOY / AZOY (Greek legend "of the Great King of Kings Azes"), Azes II. in military dress, on a horse, holding whip and spear.
reverse: Athena standing right, holding spear and shield, monogram at left and right, Kharoshthi legend around: maharajasa rajadirasa mahatasa / ayasa.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 23,0-25,0mm, weight: 9,67g, axes: 3h,
mint: Azes II, date: 35 B.C.-5 A.D., ref: Mitchiner (MIG) VI, Azes II (G) Type 848h. Taxila Sirsukh B., Chapter 18, page 552, the 21st coin.
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans06/20/19 at 21:56Mat: Very nice
V1132.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-113266 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.45g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1132 (R). BMC 799.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: CAESAR AVG F DES IMP AVG F COS DES II; S C in exergue; Titus and Domitian stg. front, each with spear and parazonium
Acquired from Romae Aeternae, June 2019.

An iconic dynastic sestertius struck during Vespasian's great bronze issue of 71. The type was struck both at Rome and Lyon (ancient Lugdunum) and announced Vespasian's intention to found a dynasty. Mattingly in BMCRE II calls it a 'famous' type placing the figures on the reverse as Titus on the left and Domitian on the right. While that is a conventional numismatic placement for the two Caesares, here we see the figure on the left holding a parazonium an attribute of an imperator, which of the two could only be Titus. Conversely, the figure on the left is holding something smaller (a roll?) that does not appear to be a parazonium, despite the above RIC description. The reverse legend corresponds for this placement of the figures with the first half of the legend CAES AVG F DES for Domitian on the left, the second half IMP AVG F COS DES II for Titus on the right. The legend has caused confusion over the years with some numismatists creating the phantom title Designatus Imperator for Titus. The title COS is implied for Domitian after DES in the legend, a kind of numismatic shorthand if you will. Gunnar Seelentag attempted to clear up the matter up in Numismatic Chronicle, Vol 167 (2007), but doubts remain. Curtis Clay has proposed that the traditional view of Titus on the left and Domitian on the right is correct, pointing out that both are holding a parazonium, theorising Titus' is hidden behind his body with only the handle showing. His arguments in full can be read here: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=44488.0 The reverse type itself is fairly rare with only a handful of specimens coming to market each decade, this Lugdunese specimen is much scarcer than those from Rome. Flavian dynastic types are far more common in silver.

Fantastic style with old cabinet toning. Same reverse die as Gemini IX, lot 414.

NB: Special thanks to Curtis Clay for additional numismatic information.
7 commentsDavid Atherton06/20/19 at 21:55Randygeki(h2): Awesome coin!
6fGRD8x2pN49Sg3rb5Gmrd7JM2ztqK.jpg
PAMPHYLIA. Side. Ca. 5th century BC. AR stater (18mm, 10.81 gm, 9h)28 viewsPAMPHYLIA. Side. Ca. 5th century BC. AR stater (18mm, 10.81 gm, 9h). About VF. Ca. 430-400 BC. Pomegranate, beaded border / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet pushed back on head, all within shallow incuse square. SNG France 628-9. SNG von Aulock 4765. 3 commentsMark R106/20/19 at 21:37Tracy Aiello: Great coin.
Indo-Scythian_Kings_Azes_II_(35_B_C_-5_A_D_)_AR_Tetradracm,_Mitchiner_VI,__,_Q-001,_3h,_23-25mm,_9,67g-s.jpg
Indo-Scythian Kings, Azes II, (35 B.C.-5 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, Mitchiner (MIG) VI, Azes II (G) Type 848h, Athena holding spear and shield, #174 viewsIndo-Scythian Kings, Azes II, (35 B.C.-5 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, Mitchiner (MIG) VI, Azes II (G) Type 848h, Athena holding spear and shield, #1
avers: BAΣIΛEΩΣ BAΣIΛEΩN MEΓAΛOY / AZOY (Greek legend "of the Great King of Kings Azes"), Azes II. in military dress, on a horse, holding whip and spear.
reverse: Athena standing right, holding spear and shield, monogram at left and right, Kharoshthi legend around: maharajasa rajadirasa mahatasa / ayasa.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 23,0-25,0mm, weight: 9,67g, axes: 3h,
mint: Azes II, date: 35 B.C.-5 A.D., ref: Mitchiner (MIG) VI, Azes II (G) Type 848h. Taxila Sirsukh B., Chapter 18, page 552, the 21st coin.
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans06/20/19 at 21:31Tracy Aiello: Awesome!
Trajan.jpg
35 viewsTrajan AR Denarius. Rome, AD 113-114. IMP TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, laureate and draped bust right / COS VI P P SPQR, Trajan's column surmounted by statue of the emperor; at base, two eagles. RIC 307; BMCRE 522; RSC 115. 3.53g, 20mm, 6h.
Of all of the truly monumental buildings and commemorative structures which the emperor Trajan built, only one, the Columna Traiani, has survived in a reasonable state of completeness. Indeed, it appears almost identical in person as it does on coins, except that the statue of Trajan that originally surmounted it was replaced in 1588 with a statue of St. Paul. When completed, the column occupied a prominent place between two libraries, the Basilica Ulpia and the Temple of Trajan and Plotina. The column was massive: it was over 12 feet in diameter at its base, and rose to a height of nearly 130 feet. Its core was comprised of 34 blocks of Carrara white marble that were made hollow so as to accommodate a circular staircase of 185 steps. The most remarkable feature of the column, however, was its ornamentation, for the friezes on its exterior are some of the most inspiring works of art ever produced. Monumental in scope and execution, they record Trajan’s two Dacian campaigns, from 101-3 and 104-6. All told, there are more than 2,500 individually sculpted figures distributed among more than 150 scenes. The emperor himself is represented no less than fifty times – not a surprise considering his penchant for commemorative architecture and his pride in having added Dacia to the provinces of the empire. “ Source: NAC”

Ex Michael Kelly Collection of Roman Silver Coins
4 commentspaul188806/20/19 at 19:22Mark R1: Very nice portrait.
Larissa_Head_BCD_Thessaly_II_323_var.jpg
Facing Head of Larissa37 viewsThessaly Greece, the City of Larissa
Obv: Head of the nymph Larissa facing slightly l., round curl to the l. of he head, wearing ampyx flanked by two hornlike locks, a pendant earring represented by three pellets in a vertical line, and a simple necklace.
Rev: Horse crouching r., l. foreleg raised and bent (almost parallel with belly/ground), preparing to roll, small plant (control mark) below. ΛAPIΣ above horse and AIΩN in the exergue.
Denomination: Silver Drachm; Mint: Larissa; Date: c. 356 - 342 BC1; Weight: 5.869g; Diameter: 18.3mm; Die axis: 0 º; References, for example: BMC Thessaly p. 30, 61; BCD Thessaly I 1156; BCD Thessaly II 323 var. [same obv. die, but no trident (control mark) below the horse pointing to the left].

Notes:
1This is the date range stated in BCD Thessaly I. This coin appears to fall within Lorber’s Phase Late II or Phase Late III. See Lorber Hoard and Lorber 2008.
The city of Larissa was named after the local water nymph, said to be the daughter of Pelasgos. He was said to be the ancestor of the pre-Greek Pelasgians. According to myth Larissa drowned while playing ball on the banks of the Peneios river. (HGC p. 130).

Provenance: from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins.

Photo credits: Forum Ancient Coins

Sources

BCD Thessaly I: Nomos AG, Auction 4. Coins of Thessaly, the BCD Collection. (10 May 2011, Zurich).
BCD Thessaly II: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. The BCD Collection of the Coinage of Thessaly. Triton XV Auction. (3 January 2012, New York).
BMC Thessaly: Gardner, Percy. A Catalogue of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thessaly to Aetolia. London, 1883.
HGC: Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Greece: Achaia Phthiotis, Ainis, Magnesia, Malis, Oita, Perrhaibia, Thessaly, Akarnania, Aitolia, Lokris, Phokis, Boiotia, Euboia, Attica, Megaris, and Corinthia, Sixth to First Centuries BC, The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Vol. 4. Lancaster/London: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc, 2014.
Lorber Hoard: Lorber, Catharine C. “A Hoard of Facing Head Larissa Drachms” in Schweizerische Numismatische Rundschau, vol. 79 (2000): 7 - 15.
Lorber, Catharine C. “Thessalian Hoards and the Coinage of Larissa” in American Journal of Numismatics, second series 20 (2008): 119 - 142.

3 commentsTracy Aiello06/20/19 at 18:01Steve P: I love Larissa horse-coins (congrats)
Vespasian_RIC_29.jpg
Vespasian AR Denarius26 viewsVespasian AR Denarius (70 CE Jan-June)
Weight: 2.95 g 17.5 mm
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head of Vespasian right
Rev: COS ITER TR POT, Pax seated left, holding olive branch and caduceus
RIC 29
Purchased from Germania Inferior Numismatics on Vcoins June 16, 2019
2 commentsorfew06/20/19 at 17:00okidoki: excellent
00780.jpg
Vespasian (RIC 75, Coin #780)16 viewsRIC 75, AR Denarius, Rome, 74 AD
OBV: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head right.
REV: TR P COS V PON MAX, Winged caduceus.
SIZE: 20.0mm, 3.18g
1 commentsMaynardGee06/20/19 at 16:59okidoki: very nice reverse
ZomboDroid_20062019183323.jpg
PHILISTIA (PALESTINE), Uncertain mint. Mid 5th century-333 BC. AR Obol16 viewsObv. Helmeted head of Athena right with profile eye.
Rev. Owl standing right, head facing; olive spray and crescent behind; [all within incuse square].
Gitler & Tal IX.1O.
(9.5mm, 0.85g). Nice brown toning
1 commentsCanaan06/20/19 at 16:33okidoki: very nice
Treb-Gallus-RIC-032.jpg
29. Trebonianus Gallus.40 viewsAntoninianus, ca 252 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP CAES VIB TREB GALLVS AVG / Radiate bust of Gallus.
Reverse: APOLL SALVTARI / Apollo standing, holding branch and a lyre set on a rock.
3.82 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #32; Sear #9627.

In his book The Fate of Rome: Climate, Disease, & the End of an Empire, author Kyle Harper suggests the plague described by Cyprian, Bishop of Carthage, was not a localized plague of some sort, but was one and the same with the plague that ravaged the Roman Empire during the reign of Trebonianus Gallus and several of his successors.

The plague was first reported in Alexandria in 249 AD, and by 251 AD it had made its way to Rome where the boy emperor Hostilian died from it. Harper says (p, 138), “The Plague of Cyprian is in the background of imperial history from ca. AD 249 to AD 262, possibly with even later effects around AD 270.”

Harper also presents a case that the plague was either pandemic influenza (similar to that of 1918) or a viral hemorrhagic fever (similar to the Ebola virus of today).

Coins with the reverse legend APOLL SALVTARI (“Apollo the Healer”) exist on coins of Trebonianus Gallus, Volusian, Aemilian, and Valerian I. This reverse type is certainly to be interpreted as an appeal to Apollo for deliverance from the plague that was spreading through the Empire at this time.
3 commentsCallimachus06/20/19 at 11:04*Alex: Interesting commentary on a great coin.
TitusPontif.jpg
RIC 554 Titus63 viewsT CAES IMP VESP CENS
Laureate bust right

PONTIF MAXIM
Vespasian seated right on curule chair, with sceptre and branch

Rome, 73 AD

RIC 554 (R) A mule with reverse type of Vespasian

3.03g

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya
7 commentsJay GT406/20/19 at 07:43FlaviusDomitianus: Well spotted!
Treb-Gallus-RIC-032.jpg
29. Trebonianus Gallus.40 viewsAntoninianus, ca 252 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP CAES VIB TREB GALLVS AVG / Radiate bust of Gallus.
Reverse: APOLL SALVTARI / Apollo standing, holding branch and a lyre set on a rock.
3.82 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #32; Sear #9627.

In his book The Fate of Rome: Climate, Disease, & the End of an Empire, author Kyle Harper suggests the plague described by Cyprian, Bishop of Carthage, was not a localized plague of some sort, but was one and the same with the plague that ravaged the Roman Empire during the reign of Trebonianus Gallus and several of his successors.

The plague was first reported in Alexandria in 249 AD, and by 251 AD it had made its way to Rome where the boy emperor Hostilian died from it. Harper says (p, 138), “The Plague of Cyprian is in the background of imperial history from ca. AD 249 to AD 262, possibly with even later effects around AD 270.”

Harper also presents a case that the plague was either pandemic influenza (similar to that of 1918) or a viral hemorrhagic fever (similar to the Ebola virus of today).

Coins with the reverse legend APOLL SALVTARI (“Apollo the Healer”) exist on coins of Trebonianus Gallus, Volusian, Aemilian, and Valerian I. This reverse type is certainly to be interpreted as an appeal to Apollo for deliverance from the plague that was spreading through the Empire at this time.
3 commentsCallimachus06/20/19 at 03:21Jay GT4: Great looking coin
TitusPontif.jpg
RIC 554 Titus63 viewsT CAES IMP VESP CENS
Laureate bust right

PONTIF MAXIM
Vespasian seated right on curule chair, with sceptre and branch

Rome, 73 AD

RIC 554 (R) A mule with reverse type of Vespasian

3.03g

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya
7 commentsJay GT406/20/19 at 02:02RL: A good catch
TitusPontif.jpg
RIC 554 Titus63 viewsT CAES IMP VESP CENS
Laureate bust right

PONTIF MAXIM
Vespasian seated right on curule chair, with sceptre and branch

Rome, 73 AD

RIC 554 (R) A mule with reverse type of Vespasian

3.03g

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya
7 commentsJay GT406/20/19 at 01:59Nemonater: A great type!
C48C31BD-2804-4730-B4C6-3A72B7F77FEC.jpeg
Argolis. Argos AR Hemidrachm / Wolf25 viewsAttribution: BCD Peloponnesos 1177
Date: 90-40BC
Obverse: Forepart of wolf left
Reverse: Large A, eagle standing right below
Size: 13.66 mm
Weight: 1.91 grams
Description: VF off center strike
3 commentsMark R106/20/19 at 01:01Mark R1: Thanks guys
TitusPontif.jpg
RIC 554 Titus63 viewsT CAES IMP VESP CENS
Laureate bust right

PONTIF MAXIM
Vespasian seated right on curule chair, with sceptre and branch

Rome, 73 AD

RIC 554 (R) A mule with reverse type of Vespasian

3.03g

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya
7 commentsJay GT406/19/19 at 23:22orfew: Nice pick up
TitusPontif.jpg
RIC 554 Titus63 viewsT CAES IMP VESP CENS
Laureate bust right

PONTIF MAXIM
Vespasian seated right on curule chair, with sceptre and branch

Rome, 73 AD

RIC 554 (R) A mule with reverse type of Vespasian

3.03g

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya
7 commentsJay GT406/19/19 at 21:57David Atherton: Wonderful!
TitusPontif.jpg
RIC 554 Titus63 viewsT CAES IMP VESP CENS
Laureate bust right

PONTIF MAXIM
Vespasian seated right on curule chair, with sceptre and branch

Rome, 73 AD

RIC 554 (R) A mule with reverse type of Vespasian

3.03g

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya
7 commentsJay GT406/19/19 at 21:38quadrans: Interesting piece..
V1132.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-113266 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.45g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1132 (R). BMC 799.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: CAESAR AVG F DES IMP AVG F COS DES II; S C in exergue; Titus and Domitian stg. front, each with spear and parazonium
Acquired from Romae Aeternae, June 2019.

An iconic dynastic sestertius struck during Vespasian's great bronze issue of 71. The type was struck both at Rome and Lyon (ancient Lugdunum) and announced Vespasian's intention to found a dynasty. Mattingly in BMCRE II calls it a 'famous' type placing the figures on the reverse as Titus on the left and Domitian on the right. While that is a conventional numismatic placement for the two Caesares, here we see the figure on the left holding a parazonium an attribute of an imperator, which of the two could only be Titus. Conversely, the figure on the left is holding something smaller (a roll?) that does not appear to be a parazonium, despite the above RIC description. The reverse legend corresponds for this placement of the figures with the first half of the legend CAES AVG F DES for Domitian on the left, the second half IMP AVG F COS DES II for Titus on the right. The legend has caused confusion over the years with some numismatists creating the phantom title Designatus Imperator for Titus. The title COS is implied for Domitian after DES in the legend, a kind of numismatic shorthand if you will. Gunnar Seelentag attempted to clear up the matter up in Numismatic Chronicle, Vol 167 (2007), but doubts remain. Curtis Clay has proposed that the traditional view of Titus on the left and Domitian on the right is correct, pointing out that both are holding a parazonium, theorising Titus' is hidden behind his body with only the handle showing. His arguments in full can be read here: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=44488.0 The reverse type itself is fairly rare with only a handful of specimens coming to market each decade, this Lugdunese specimen is much scarcer than those from Rome. Flavian dynastic types are far more common in silver.

Fantastic style with old cabinet toning. Same reverse die as Gemini IX, lot 414.

NB: Special thanks to Curtis Clay for additional numismatic information.
7 commentsDavid Atherton06/19/19 at 20:59Nemonater: Excellent!
AD1C5964-188E-4520-A92F-1C6C30EE0E36.jpeg
Bruttium Kroton AR Nomos / Tripod25 viewsAttribution: SNG ANS 264
Date: 480-430 BC
Obverse: Tripod with legs terminating in lions feet
Reverse: Incuse of obverse
Size: 19.07mm
Weight: 7.94 grams
Description: A nice nomos with sharp detail
2 commentsMark R106/19/19 at 20:15quadrans: Another nice piece
r45JdYx2kr4RZ6ZgeKC7M9wx8tMEH3.jpg
Thrace. PANTIKAPAION. Ae 21. 310-303 B.C.28 viewsObverse: Bearded head of Satyr (or Pan) right.

Reverse: Forepart of griffin left, sturgeon below.

Weight: 6.91 grams.

Diameter: 21.69 mm.
3 commentsMark R106/19/19 at 20:15quadrans: Interesting piece..
7289D554-9087-4813-A446-9D6B8C23AD8D.jpeg
Baktria, Indo-Greek kingdom. MENANDER I Soter AR Drachm. EF+. Bust to left holding spear.50 viewsObverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΟΤΗΡΟΣ / ΜΕΝΑΝΔΡΟΥ. Diademed heroic bust of Menander I to left, seen from behind, wearing aegis over shoulder and brandishing spear.
Reverse: Athena Alkidemos advancing left, shield decorated with aegis over arm, hurling thunderbolt; monogram to right; Karosthi inscription around.

Issued by the mythic king Menander I, the most poweful ruler of the indo-greek kingdom of Baktria and the first western ruler to be converted to Buda´s faith.

EF+ condition, practically uncircullated, conserving absolutely full details in both sides, very bold relief relief and high quality silver.

Bopearachchi 7B. Circa 155-130 b.C. 2,4 g - 16,5 mm
5 commentsMark R106/19/19 at 20:15quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..
C48C31BD-2804-4730-B4C6-3A72B7F77FEC.jpeg
Argolis. Argos AR Hemidrachm / Wolf25 viewsAttribution: BCD Peloponnesos 1177
Date: 90-40BC
Obverse: Forepart of wolf left
Reverse: Large A, eagle standing right below
Size: 13.66 mm
Weight: 1.91 grams
Description: VF off center strike
3 commentsMark R106/19/19 at 20:14quadrans: Wow, nice piece..
V1132.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-113266 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.45g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1132 (R). BMC 799.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: CAESAR AVG F DES IMP AVG F COS DES II; S C in exergue; Titus and Domitian stg. front, each with spear and parazonium
Acquired from Romae Aeternae, June 2019.

An iconic dynastic sestertius struck during Vespasian's great bronze issue of 71. The type was struck both at Rome and Lyon (ancient Lugdunum) and announced Vespasian's intention to found a dynasty. Mattingly in BMCRE II calls it a 'famous' type placing the figures on the reverse as Titus on the left and Domitian on the right. While that is a conventional numismatic placement for the two Caesares, here we see the figure on the left holding a parazonium an attribute of an imperator, which of the two could only be Titus. Conversely, the figure on the left is holding something smaller (a roll?) that does not appear to be a parazonium, despite the above RIC description. The reverse legend corresponds for this placement of the figures with the first half of the legend CAES AVG F DES for Domitian on the left, the second half IMP AVG F COS DES II for Titus on the right. The legend has caused confusion over the years with some numismatists creating the phantom title Designatus Imperator for Titus. The title COS is implied for Domitian after DES in the legend, a kind of numismatic shorthand if you will. Gunnar Seelentag attempted to clear up the matter up in Numismatic Chronicle, Vol 167 (2007), but doubts remain. Curtis Clay has proposed that the traditional view of Titus on the left and Domitian on the right is correct, pointing out that both are holding a parazonium, theorising Titus' is hidden behind his body with only the handle showing. His arguments in full can be read here: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=44488.0 The reverse type itself is fairly rare with only a handful of specimens coming to market each decade, this Lugdunese specimen is much scarcer than those from Rome. Flavian dynastic types are far more common in silver.

Fantastic style with old cabinet toning. Same reverse die as Gemini IX, lot 414.

NB: Special thanks to Curtis Clay for additional numismatic information.
7 commentsDavid Atherton06/19/19 at 18:39kc: I bet it feels pleasant in hand
V1132.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-113266 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.45g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1132 (R). BMC 799.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: CAESAR AVG F DES IMP AVG F COS DES II; S C in exergue; Titus and Domitian stg. front, each with spear and parazonium
Acquired from Romae Aeternae, June 2019.

An iconic dynastic sestertius struck during Vespasian's great bronze issue of 71. The type was struck both at Rome and Lyon (ancient Lugdunum) and announced Vespasian's intention to found a dynasty. Mattingly in BMCRE II calls it a 'famous' type placing the figures on the reverse as Titus on the left and Domitian on the right. While that is a conventional numismatic placement for the two Caesares, here we see the figure on the left holding a parazonium an attribute of an imperator, which of the two could only be Titus. Conversely, the figure on the left is holding something smaller (a roll?) that does not appear to be a parazonium, despite the above RIC description. The reverse legend corresponds for this placement of the figures with the first half of the legend CAES AVG F DES for Domitian on the left, the second half IMP AVG F COS DES II for Titus on the right. The legend has caused confusion over the years with some numismatists creating the phantom title Designatus Imperator for Titus. The title COS is implied for Domitian after DES in the legend, a kind of numismatic shorthand if you will. Gunnar Seelentag attempted to clear up the matter up in Numismatic Chronicle, Vol 167 (2007), but doubts remain. Curtis Clay has proposed that the traditional view of Titus on the left and Domitian on the right is correct, pointing out that both are holding a parazonium, theorising Titus' is hidden behind his body with only the handle showing. His arguments in full can be read here: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=44488.0 The reverse type itself is fairly rare with only a handful of specimens coming to market each decade, this Lugdunese specimen is much scarcer than those from Rome. Flavian dynastic types are far more common in silver.

Fantastic style with old cabinet toning. Same reverse die as Gemini IX, lot 414.

NB: Special thanks to Curtis Clay for additional numismatic information.
7 commentsDavid Atherton06/19/19 at 17:29Tracy Aiello: Great coin and write-up.
V1132.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-113266 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.45g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1132 (R). BMC 799.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: CAESAR AVG F DES IMP AVG F COS DES II; S C in exergue; Titus and Domitian stg. front, each with spear and parazonium
Acquired from Romae Aeternae, June 2019.

An iconic dynastic sestertius struck during Vespasian's great bronze issue of 71. The type was struck both at Rome and Lyon (ancient Lugdunum) and announced Vespasian's intention to found a dynasty. Mattingly in BMCRE II calls it a 'famous' type placing the figures on the reverse as Titus on the left and Domitian on the right. While that is a conventional numismatic placement for the two Caesares, here we see the figure on the left holding a parazonium an attribute of an imperator, which of the two could only be Titus. Conversely, the figure on the left is holding something smaller (a roll?) that does not appear to be a parazonium, despite the above RIC description. The reverse legend corresponds for this placement of the figures with the first half of the legend CAES AVG F DES for Domitian on the left, the second half IMP AVG F COS DES II for Titus on the right. The legend has caused confusion over the years with some numismatists creating the phantom title Designatus Imperator for Titus. The title COS is implied for Domitian after DES in the legend, a kind of numismatic shorthand if you will. Gunnar Seelentag attempted to clear up the matter up in Numismatic Chronicle, Vol 167 (2007), but doubts remain. Curtis Clay has proposed that the traditional view of Titus on the left and Domitian on the right is correct, pointing out that both are holding a parazonium, theorising Titus' is hidden behind his body with only the handle showing. His arguments in full can be read here: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=44488.0 The reverse type itself is fairly rare with only a handful of specimens coming to market each decade, this Lugdunese specimen is much scarcer than those from Rome. Flavian dynastic types are far more common in silver.

Fantastic style with old cabinet toning. Same reverse die as Gemini IX, lot 414.

NB: Special thanks to Curtis Clay for additional numismatic information.
7 commentsDavid Atherton06/19/19 at 16:37Mat: Great addition, David
V1132.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-113266 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.45g
Lyon mint, 71 AD
RIC 1132 (R). BMC 799.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: CAESAR AVG F DES IMP AVG F COS DES II; S C in exergue; Titus and Domitian stg. front, each with spear and parazonium
Acquired from Romae Aeternae, June 2019.

An iconic dynastic sestertius struck during Vespasian's great bronze issue of 71. The type was struck both at Rome and Lyon (ancient Lugdunum) and announced Vespasian's intention to found a dynasty. Mattingly in BMCRE II calls it a 'famous' type placing the figures on the reverse as Titus on the left and Domitian on the right. While that is a conventional numismatic placement for the two Caesares, here we see the figure on the left holding a parazonium an attribute of an imperator, which of the two could only be Titus. Conversely, the figure on the left is holding something smaller (a roll?) that does not appear to be a parazonium, despite the above RIC description. The reverse legend corresponds for this placement of the figures with the first half of the legend CAES AVG F DES for Domitian on the left, the second half IMP AVG F COS DES II for Titus on the right. The legend has caused confusion over the years with some numismatists creating the phantom title Designatus Imperator for Titus. The title COS is implied for Domitian after DES in the legend, a kind of numismatic shorthand if you will. Gunnar Seelentag attempted to clear up the matter up in Numismatic Chronicle, Vol 167 (2007), but doubts remain. Curtis Clay has proposed that the traditional view of Titus on the left and Domitian on the right is correct, pointing out that both are holding a parazonium, theorising Titus' is hidden behind his body with only the handle showing. His arguments in full can be read here: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=44488.0 The reverse type itself is fairly rare with only a handful of specimens coming to market each decade, this Lugdunese specimen is much scarcer than those from Rome. Flavian dynastic types are far more common in silver.

Fantastic style with old cabinet toning. Same reverse die as Gemini IX, lot 414.

NB: Special thanks to Curtis Clay for additional numismatic information.
7 commentsDavid Atherton06/19/19 at 16:29Jay GT4: Amazing!
Vespasian_RIC_29.jpg
Vespasian AR Denarius26 viewsVespasian AR Denarius (70 CE Jan-June)
Weight: 2.95 g 17.5 mm
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head of Vespasian right
Rev: COS ITER TR POT, Pax seated left, holding olive branch and caduceus
RIC 29
Purchased from Germania Inferior Numismatics on Vcoins June 16, 2019
2 commentsorfew06/19/19 at 12:22nummis durensis: A very good young portrait
Larissa_Head_BCD_Thessaly_II_323_var.jpg
Facing Head of Larissa37 viewsThessaly Greece, the City of Larissa
Obv: Head of the nymph Larissa facing slightly l., round curl to the l. of he head, wearing ampyx flanked by two hornlike locks, a pendant earring represented by three pellets in a vertical line, and a simple necklace.
Rev: Horse crouching r., l. foreleg raised and bent (almost parallel with belly/ground), preparing to roll, small plant (control mark) below. ΛAPIΣ above horse and AIΩN in the exergue.
Denomination: Silver Drachm; Mint: Larissa; Date: c. 356 - 342 BC1; Weight: 5.869g; Diameter: 18.3mm; Die axis: 0 º; References, for example: BMC Thessaly p. 30, 61; BCD Thessaly I 1156; BCD Thessaly II 323 var. [same obv. die, but no trident (control mark) below the horse pointing to the left].

Notes:
1This is the date range stated in BCD Thessaly I. This coin appears to fall within Lorber’s Phase Late II or Phase Late III. See Lorber Hoard and Lorber 2008.
The city of Larissa was named after the local water nymph, said to be the daughter of Pelasgos. He was said to be the ancestor of the pre-Greek Pelasgians. According to myth Larissa drowned while playing ball on the banks of the Peneios river. (HGC p. 130).

Provenance: from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins.

Photo credits: Forum Ancient Coins

Sources

BCD Thessaly I: Nomos AG, Auction 4. Coins of Thessaly, the BCD Collection. (10 May 2011, Zurich).
BCD Thessaly II: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. The BCD Collection of the Coinage of Thessaly. Triton XV Auction. (3 January 2012, New York).
BMC Thessaly: Gardner, Percy. A Catalogue of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thessaly to Aetolia. London, 1883.
HGC: Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Greece: Achaia Phthiotis, Ainis, Magnesia, Malis, Oita, Perrhaibia, Thessaly, Akarnania, Aitolia, Lokris, Phokis, Boiotia, Euboia, Attica, Megaris, and Corinthia, Sixth to First Centuries BC, The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Vol. 4. Lancaster/London: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc, 2014.
Lorber Hoard: Lorber, Catharine C. “A Hoard of Facing Head Larissa Drachms” in Schweizerische Numismatische Rundschau, vol. 79 (2000): 7 - 15.
Lorber, Catharine C. “Thessalian Hoards and the Coinage of Larissa” in American Journal of Numismatics, second series 20 (2008): 119 - 142.

3 commentsTracy Aiello06/19/19 at 06:53shanxi: very nice
Larissa_Head_BCD_Thessaly_II_323_var.jpg
Facing Head of Larissa37 viewsThessaly Greece, the City of Larissa
Obv: Head of the nymph Larissa facing slightly l., round curl to the l. of he head, wearing ampyx flanked by two hornlike locks, a pendant earring represented by three pellets in a vertical line, and a simple necklace.
Rev: Horse crouching r., l. foreleg raised and bent (almost parallel with belly/ground), preparing to roll, small plant (control mark) below. ΛAPIΣ above horse and AIΩN in the exergue.
Denomination: Silver Drachm; Mint: Larissa; Date: c. 356 - 342 BC1; Weight: 5.869g; Diameter: 18.3mm; Die axis: 0 º; References, for example: BMC Thessaly p. 30, 61; BCD Thessaly I 1156; BCD Thessaly II 323 var. [same obv. die, but no trident (control mark) below the horse pointing to the left].

Notes:
1This is the date range stated in BCD Thessaly I. This coin appears to fall within Lorber’s Phase Late II or Phase Late III. See Lorber Hoard and Lorber 2008.
The city of Larissa was named after the local water nymph, said to be the daughter of Pelasgos. He was said to be the ancestor of the pre-Greek Pelasgians. According to myth Larissa drowned while playing ball on the banks of the Peneios river. (HGC p. 130).

Provenance: from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins.

Photo credits: Forum Ancient Coins

Sources

BCD Thessaly I: Nomos AG, Auction 4. Coins of Thessaly, the BCD Collection. (10 May 2011, Zurich).
BCD Thessaly II: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. The BCD Collection of the Coinage of Thessaly. Triton XV Auction. (3 January 2012, New York).
BMC Thessaly: Gardner, Percy. A Catalogue of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thessaly to Aetolia. London, 1883.
HGC: Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Greece: Achaia Phthiotis, Ainis, Magnesia, Malis, Oita, Perrhaibia, Thessaly, Akarnania, Aitolia, Lokris, Phokis, Boiotia, Euboia, Attica, Megaris, and Corinthia, Sixth to First Centuries BC, The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Vol. 4. Lancaster/London: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc, 2014.
Lorber Hoard: Lorber, Catharine C. “A Hoard of Facing Head Larissa Drachms” in Schweizerische Numismatische Rundschau, vol. 79 (2000): 7 - 15.
Lorber, Catharine C. “Thessalian Hoards and the Coinage of Larissa” in American Journal of Numismatics, second series 20 (2008): 119 - 142.

3 commentsTracy Aiello06/19/19 at 02:18Jay GT4: Sweet
C48C31BD-2804-4730-B4C6-3A72B7F77FEC.jpeg
Argolis. Argos AR Hemidrachm / Wolf25 viewsAttribution: BCD Peloponnesos 1177
Date: 90-40BC
Obverse: Forepart of wolf left
Reverse: Large A, eagle standing right below
Size: 13.66 mm
Weight: 1.91 grams
Description: VF off center strike
3 commentsMark R106/18/19 at 19:44Tracy Aiello: That is a great reverse.
G_233_Larissa_fac.jpg
Thessaly, Larissa, Thessalos, Horse, Drachm19 viewsLarissa, Thessaly
AR Drachm, 440-420 BC
Obv.: The hero Thessalos, nude but for chlamys, his petasos flying out behind him, holding band around the head of a bull charging right
Rev.: Bridled horse prancing right; ΛAP above, IΣA below; all within shallow incuse square.
Ag, 6.01g, 20mm, 12h
Ref.: Herrmann pl. 3, 2 (same dies); SNG Lockett 1560 (same dies)
Ex Roma Numismatics, E-SALE 46, Lot 89
2 commentsshanxi06/18/19 at 15:20Tracy Aiello: Another great one.
G_350_Pharkadon_fac.jpg
Thessaly, Pharkadon - Thessalos, Horse21 viewsThessaly, Pharkadon
Hemidrachm, circa 440-400 BC
Obv.: Thessalos, petasos and cloak tied at neck, holding band around head of forepart of bull right
Rev.: Φ A P/K AΔ O around from upper left (K retrograde), forepart of bridled horse right; all within incuse square
Ag, 2.70g, 16mm
Ref.: BCD Thessaly II 603
1 commentsshanxi06/18/19 at 15:14Tracy Aiello: Very nice!
nerosnake.jpg
Nero (54 - 68 A.D.)53 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm 
O: NEΡΩ KΛAY KAIS SEBA GEP AVTO, laureate head right.
R: NEO AGAQ DAIM, Agathodaemon serpent, coiled with head up, holding poppies and grain ears, L ς (date) to right. Year 6.
23mm
13.11g
Milne 203; Emmett 106.6 (R4) ; RPC 5260

The Agathodaemon was a good spirit/demon that was worshipped by the ancient Egyptians. 
He had the shape of a serpent with a human head. 
The Greek inscription on the reverse of this coin shows that this is the "neo" or "new" agathodaemon serpent, or, in other words, the new good spirit (of rule by Nero). 

Pending Wildwinds Publishing!
8 commentsMat06/18/19 at 14:34quadrans: Wow, nice...
nerosnake.jpg
Nero (54 - 68 A.D.)53 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm 
O: NEΡΩ KΛAY KAIS SEBA GEP AVTO, laureate head right.
R: NEO AGAQ DAIM, Agathodaemon serpent, coiled with head up, holding poppies and grain ears, L ς (date) to right. Year 6.
23mm
13.11g
Milne 203; Emmett 106.6 (R4) ; RPC 5260

The Agathodaemon was a good spirit/demon that was worshipped by the ancient Egyptians. 
He had the shape of a serpent with a human head. 
The Greek inscription on the reverse of this coin shows that this is the "neo" or "new" agathodaemon serpent, or, in other words, the new good spirit (of rule by Nero). 

Pending Wildwinds Publishing!
8 commentsMat06/18/19 at 11:01FlaviusDomitianus: Nice catch, congrats!
muse_astronomy.jpg
26 viewsQ. Pomponius Musa. 56 BC. AR Denarius (17.5mm, 3.82 g, 7h). Rome mint. Laureate head of Apollo right; star of eight rays to left / Urania, the Muse of Astronomy, wearing long flowing tunic and peplum, standing left, touching with wand held in right hand globe set on base. Crawford 410/8; Sydenham 823; Pomponia 22.

From the Fay Beth Wedig Collection.
2 commentspaul188806/18/19 at 09:42shanxi: nice
FullSizeRender~3.jpg
Trajan Denarius Annona19 viewsAR Denarius
Trajan 98-117 CE
Diameter: 19 mm, Weight: 3.56 grams, Die axis: 7h

Obverse: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC PM TR P COS V PP
Laureate bust to right, with medusa aegis

Reverse: SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI
Annona standing left, holding grain ears in her right hand and cornucopiae with her left, modius to left, stern of galley to right.

Mint: Rome

Notes:
- Dates between 103 and 111 CE

Ex Silbury Coins
1 commentsPharsalos06/18/19 at 09:38shanxi: nice details
nerosnake.jpg
Nero (54 - 68 A.D.)53 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm 
O: NEΡΩ KΛAY KAIS SEBA GEP AVTO, laureate head right.
R: NEO AGAQ DAIM, Agathodaemon serpent, coiled with head up, holding poppies and grain ears, L ς (date) to right. Year 6.
23mm
13.11g
Milne 203; Emmett 106.6 (R4) ; RPC 5260

The Agathodaemon was a good spirit/demon that was worshipped by the ancient Egyptians. 
He had the shape of a serpent with a human head. 
The Greek inscription on the reverse of this coin shows that this is the "neo" or "new" agathodaemon serpent, or, in other words, the new good spirit (of rule by Nero). 

Pending Wildwinds Publishing!
8 commentsMat06/18/19 at 09:37shanxi: nice example
V627.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-62761 viewsÆ As, 10.28g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
RIC 627 (R). BMC p. 153 note.
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 164. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), acquired from O. Helbing of Munich, 1929; inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

Pax in various guises and types was struck repeatedly throughout Vespasian's reign for both himself and Titus Caesar. This variant with Pax leaning on a column was a perennial favourite. Pax's popularity on the coinage can perhaps be explained by Vespasian's construction of the Temple of Peace which was completed in 75.

Nice old cabinet toning.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/18/19 at 06:09Vincent: Exceptional! Best portrait yet of his I've see...
nerosnake.jpg
Nero (54 - 68 A.D.)53 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm 
O: NEΡΩ KΛAY KAIS SEBA GEP AVTO, laureate head right.
R: NEO AGAQ DAIM, Agathodaemon serpent, coiled with head up, holding poppies and grain ears, L ς (date) to right. Year 6.
23mm
13.11g
Milne 203; Emmett 106.6 (R4) ; RPC 5260

The Agathodaemon was a good spirit/demon that was worshipped by the ancient Egyptians. 
He had the shape of a serpent with a human head. 
The Greek inscription on the reverse of this coin shows that this is the "neo" or "new" agathodaemon serpent, or, in other words, the new good spirit (of rule by Nero). 

Pending Wildwinds Publishing!
8 commentsMat06/18/19 at 05:33Canaan: Nice one Mat
volgasiii.jpg
Vologases III (Sellwood; Shore)/Pacorus I (Assar)37 viewsAR Drachm
O: Diademed bust left, wearing longer pointed, beard.
R: ⧠ΛIIΛͰΛC ⧠ΛIIΛͰΛͶ ΛͰIΛNO(V) ΛIXΛIOV (E)ΠIΦΛͶOVC (ΦI)ΛIΛΛHX(OC), Archer (Arsakes I) seated right on throne, holding bow; monogram below bow.
Ekbatana mint
3.75g
20mm
Sellwood 78.5 (Vologases III); Sunrise –; Shore 415 (Vologases III).
2 commentsMat06/18/19 at 04:25Randygeki(h2): Cool. I like the toning on this one
280-228_litra.jpg
Calabria, Tarentum. Ca. 280-228 B.C. AR litra32 views10.8 mm, .59 g, 11 h
Cockle-shell / Dolphin right; elephant below.
HN Italy -; SNG ANS -; Vlasto -.
Nice VF. Apparently unpublished control mark. "
4 commentsLeo06/18/19 at 02:33Jay GT4: Beautiful
F7B99948-A602-46AF-A885-000024EB94CB.jpeg
Lucania. Metapontum AR Nomos / Barley Ear18 viewsAttribution: HN Italy 1589
Date: 340-330 BC
Obverse: Wreathed head of Demeter left
Reverse: META, Ear of barley with leaf to left, Griffin above leaf
Size: 18.72 mm
Weight: 7.16 grams
Description: VF.
1 commentsMark R106/18/19 at 02:33Jay GT4: Great reverse
AD1C5964-188E-4520-A92F-1C6C30EE0E36.jpeg
Bruttium Kroton AR Nomos / Tripod25 viewsAttribution: SNG ANS 264
Date: 480-430 BC
Obverse: Tripod with legs terminating in lions feet
Reverse: Incuse of obverse
Size: 19.07mm
Weight: 7.94 grams
Description: A nice nomos with sharp detail
2 commentsMark R106/18/19 at 02:32Jay GT4: Classic Kroton
nerosnake.jpg
Nero (54 - 68 A.D.)53 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm 
O: NEΡΩ KΛAY KAIS SEBA GEP AVTO, laureate head right.
R: NEO AGAQ DAIM, Agathodaemon serpent, coiled with head up, holding poppies and grain ears, L ς (date) to right. Year 6.
23mm
13.11g
Milne 203; Emmett 106.6 (R4) ; RPC 5260

The Agathodaemon was a good spirit/demon that was worshipped by the ancient Egyptians. 
He had the shape of a serpent with a human head. 
The Greek inscription on the reverse of this coin shows that this is the "neo" or "new" agathodaemon serpent, or, in other words, the new good spirit (of rule by Nero). 

Pending Wildwinds Publishing!
8 commentsMat06/18/19 at 02:32Jay GT4: Sweet!
Lydia,_Kings,_Sardes,_Cyrus_to_Darios_I_(Circa_550-539-520_BC),_AR-Siglos,_Confronted_Lion_and_Bull,_Berk_22,_BMC-,_Q-001,_0h,_12-16mm,_5,20g-s.jpg
Lydia, Kings, Sardes, Cyrus to Darius I., (cc. 550/539-520 B.C.), Berk 22, AR-Siglos, Incuse punch, #169 viewsLydia, Kings, Sardes, Cyrus to Darius I., (cc. 550/539-520 B.C.), Berk 22, AR-Siglos, Incuse punch, #1
avers: Confronted heads of a lion right and a bull left.
reverse: Incuse punch.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 12,0-16,0mm, weight: 5,20g, axis: 0h,
mint: Lydia, Kings, Sardes, date: time of Cyrus to Darius I., cc.550/539-520 B.C.,
ref: Berk 22, Traité I 409-11, SNG Kayhan I 1024-6,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans06/18/19 at 01:50Mark R1: I like these Lydia coins.
BCC_G28_Eros_Torch_Gem.jpg
BCC G2860 viewsRoman Gem Stone
Caesarea Maritima
Intaglio 1st-3rd cent.CE
Eros standing to left, leg crossed,
resting on inverted torch over altar.
Carnelian/Sard with iron oxide
remnants of setting. Profile type: CA8,
convex top and flat bottom, upright oval.
10.5 x 8.5 x 3.0mm. wt:0.5gm.
cf. Hamburger #101, and Getty #449.
This particular type is well-known
from provincial coins of the Severan
period, though it is not found on
coins from the Caesarea mint. The
gem collections of Anit Hamburger
and the Hendler family both illustrate
a number of Caesarea gems related
to various depictions of Eros.
Surface find 1973.
J. Berlin Caesarea Collection
(click for higher resolution)
3 commentsv-drome06/17/19 at 21:51okidoki: excellent and stylistic
AAAMb_small.png
Constantius Gallus AE326 viewsConstantius Gallus. 352-354 AD.

Unknown mint.

18 mm., 2.17 g.

D N FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES. Bust of Constantius Gallus, bareheaded, draped, cuirassed, right

FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO. Soldier, helmeted, draped, cuirassed, advancing left, spearing fallen horseman with right hand and wearing shield on left arm; shield on ground to right; horseman facing soldier, extending left arm

References: RIC VIII 274 or 278

AAAM
2 commentsRL06/17/19 at 21:38RL: Thanks Randygeki(h2) I think you are right
280-228_litra.jpg
Calabria, Tarentum. Ca. 280-228 B.C. AR litra32 views10.8 mm, .59 g, 11 h
Cockle-shell / Dolphin right; elephant below.
HN Italy -; SNG ANS -; Vlasto -.
Nice VF. Apparently unpublished control mark. "
4 commentsLeo06/17/19 at 15:57Tracy Aiello: That is an awesome reverse.
280-228_litra.jpg
Calabria, Tarentum. Ca. 280-228 B.C. AR litra32 views10.8 mm, .59 g, 11 h
Cockle-shell / Dolphin right; elephant below.
HN Italy -; SNG ANS -; Vlasto -.
Nice VF. Apparently unpublished control mark. "
4 commentsLeo06/17/19 at 15:37Mat: Wonderful & cool!
280-228_litra.jpg
Calabria, Tarentum. Ca. 280-228 B.C. AR litra32 views10.8 mm, .59 g, 11 h
Cockle-shell / Dolphin right; elephant below.
HN Italy -; SNG ANS -; Vlasto -.
Nice VF. Apparently unpublished control mark. "
4 commentsLeo06/17/19 at 10:04shanxi: amazing coin
75FA6AD6-1BFA-4304-A0A2-754ECC025DE3.jpeg
THESSALIAN LEAGUE AR Drachm. VF+. Apollo - Athena Itonia.29 viewsObverse: Laureate head of Apollo to right; to left, monogram of ΛΕΥ.
Reverse: ΘΕΣΣΑ / ΛΩΝ. Athena Itonia striding right, hurling spear with her right hand and extending shield in her left; in field to left and right, Α-Ν.

Very nice thessalian drachm, in VF+ condition.

BMC 41, SNG Munich 212. Thessalian mint, Second half 2nd century BC. 4,1 g - 19 mm
2 commentsMark R106/16/19 at 21:11Mark R1: Thanks
Lydia,_Kings,_Sardes,_Cyrus_to_Darios_I_(Circa_550-539-520_BC),_AR-Siglos,_Confronted_Lion_and_Bull,_Berk_22,_BMC-,_Q-001,_0h,_12-16mm,_5,20g-s.jpg
Lydia, Kings, Sardes, Cyrus to Darius I., (cc. 550/539-520 B.C.), Berk 22, AR-Siglos, Incuse punch, #169 viewsLydia, Kings, Sardes, Cyrus to Darius I., (cc. 550/539-520 B.C.), Berk 22, AR-Siglos, Incuse punch, #1
avers: Confronted heads of a lion right and a bull left.
reverse: Incuse punch.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 12,0-16,0mm, weight: 5,20g, axis: 0h,
mint: Lydia, Kings, Sardes, date: time of Cyrus to Darius I., cc.550/539-520 B.C.,
ref: Berk 22, Traité I 409-11, SNG Kayhan I 1024-6,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans06/16/19 at 21:08Enodia: Nice early coin.
V627.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-62761 viewsÆ As, 10.28g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
RIC 627 (R). BMC p. 153 note.
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 164. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), acquired from O. Helbing of Munich, 1929; inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

Pax in various guises and types was struck repeatedly throughout Vespasian's reign for both himself and Titus Caesar. This variant with Pax leaning on a column was a perennial favourite. Pax's popularity on the coinage can perhaps be explained by Vespasian's construction of the Temple of Peace which was completed in 75.

Nice old cabinet toning.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/16/19 at 17:52okidoki: very nice
V627.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-62761 viewsÆ As, 10.28g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
RIC 627 (R). BMC p. 153 note.
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 164. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), acquired from O. Helbing of Munich, 1929; inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

Pax in various guises and types was struck repeatedly throughout Vespasian's reign for both himself and Titus Caesar. This variant with Pax leaning on a column was a perennial favourite. Pax's popularity on the coinage can perhaps be explained by Vespasian's construction of the Temple of Peace which was completed in 75.

Nice old cabinet toning.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/16/19 at 16:56FlaviusDomitianus: Nice coin with a great provenance
V627.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-62761 viewsÆ As, 10.28g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
RIC 627 (R). BMC p. 153 note.
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 164. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), acquired from O. Helbing of Munich, 1929; inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

Pax in various guises and types was struck repeatedly throughout Vespasian's reign for both himself and Titus Caesar. This variant with Pax leaning on a column was a perennial favourite. Pax's popularity on the coinage can perhaps be explained by Vespasian's construction of the Temple of Peace which was completed in 75.

Nice old cabinet toning.
4 commentsDavid Atherton06/16/19 at 16:40Jay GT4: Great addition
Vespasian_Sestertius_Trial.jpg
Roman Empire, Vespasian, Sestertius with As 90 viewsObv. IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG P M TR POT P P COS III, laureate head right.
Rev. FORTVNAE REDVCI S C, Fortuna standing left, holding cornucopiae and rudder on globe.
Mint: Rome, 71 AD.

32/33mm 26.61g

Cohen- RIC II¹- (cf. 422) RIC II²- (cf. 73) BMC- Sear- (cf. 2323

Ex Münzhandel Henzen, MA-Shops, 2019.

This is an extremely rare Sestertius of Vespasian which obverse was strucked with a die of an As.
A similar piece with the same As die but reverse type "LIBERTAS PVBLICA" is in the Mazzini collection, listed under no. 255.
This coin is uncommonly sharp for example looking at the SC.
It is an interesting coin, I will be pleased for additional informations.

Thank you to Curtis Clay for the excellent following write-up:

"Not a trial strike or a mint error in my opinion, but an intentional sestertius obv. die, though why the portrait and legend were cut in middle-bronze size is anyone's guess!

The mint of Rome may have begun its bronze coin production of 71 with two short issues, of which this was the second, before settling on its main first obv. legend of the year,

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M T P P P COS III.

The latest obv. legend on bronzes of the preceding year, 70 AD:

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M T P P P COS II DES III on sestertii (only 1 die), the same but CAES VESPASIAN and COS II D III on middle bronzes (also only 1 die, with bust laureate, draped, cuirassed r.). RIC 32-38. The middle bronzes of this issue might be dupondii or asses or both, since Vespasian had not yet restored the radiate crown as a denominational mark for his dupondii, as we will soon see. Kraay, a very competent practical numismatist, considered them asses; Carradice and Buttrey suggest dupondii, though without being able to assure us that at least one example is definitely in yellow orichalcum rather than red copper. Hopefully renewed examination of the few surviving specimens, or new specimens that are clearly either yellow or red, will eventually clarify the question.

My proposed first short issue of bronze coins in 71: with obv. legend omitting COS III, just

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M TR P, RIC 50-65. Three such obv. dies are known on sestertii. The middle bronzes all have laureate busts, and at least one type definitely occurs both as a yellow dupondius and as a red As (RIC 64 with note), showing that by the beginning of 71 Vespasian had not yet reintroduced the radiate crown as a mark of his dupondii.

The second short issue of early in 71, to which KC's new acquisition belongs: obv. legend

IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG P M TR POT P P COS III on sestertii (only 1 die, with portrait and legend in middle-bronze size, RIC 137-140 and KC's new piece).

On middle bronzes two slight variants of the same legend were used,

(a) CAES not CAESAR on the one known dupondius, RIC 141, Kraay plaster cast in Oxford, with Head radiate r. on obv., so Vespasian had now reintroduced the radiate crown as a mark of his dupondii, proving that this short issue was later than the other one that omits COS III.

(b) CAES not CAESAR as on the dupondius, but also T P instead of TR POT, Head laureate r., apparently an As, RIC 31, a unique coin in Oxford, formerly in my collection, ex Lanz Graz IV, 1974, Hohenkubin middle bronzes, lot 134. The obv. legend might appear to end just COS II, and Buttrey accepted this reading in RIC, though I had informed him that I believed it was just a slightly tooled COS III.

Coming at last to the point, the sestertius obv. die with middle-bronze-size portrait and legend cannot originally have been cut as an As obv. die, because the one certain As of this issue has a variant, slightly shorter, obv. legend, and because in that case no sestertius obv. dies at all would have been engraved for use in this short issue. I also suspect that the broad ring of empty space outside the dotted border on this obv. die, shown clearly by RIC pl. 20, 137, suggests that it was always meant to be a sestertius not a middle-bronze die.

The Fortuna Redux rev. die of KC's new coin had earlier been used in the COS II DES III issue of late 70 AD, RIC pl. 15, 33, giving some support to my suggestion that this second small issue of bronzes in 71 was probably produced quite early in the year. The same rev. die, as Kraay observed, was also used a little later with an obv. die of the main VESPASIANVS issue of 71, Paris pl. XLIV, 486. But it is not certain, of course, that these two small issues of bronze coins were produced one after the other early in 71, before the main VESPASIANVS issue had started, as I have here suggested. Perhaps they were instead produced early in 71 indeed, but as isolated experiments alongside the main VESPASIANVS issue."

Thanks to Alberto "FlaviusDomitianus"

"Your coin is apparently unpublished and belongs to a small issue of Sestertii described in RIC 2.1 page 69:

"(d) Variant group of sestertii with small (as) die ending VESPASIAN AVG P M TR POT COS III - Pl. 20".

As noted by Carradice and Buttrey the obverse die has not be found on any As.

They are numbered from 137 to 141; since your reverse would be the first one in alfabetical order, it would probably get number 136A.

This small series is also discussed in the introduction (page 23)."

5 commentskc06/16/19 at 15:20okidoki: excellent
1288Hadrian_RIC27.jpg
27 Anonymous issues. Time of Hadrian to Antoninus Pius. Rome Quadrans 117-161 AD34 viewsReference.
RIC 27; C. 39

Obv.
Griffin seated right

Rev. S-C
Tripod.

2.49 gr
15 mm
9h
2 commentsokidoki06/15/19 at 22:51quadrans: Wow, great Griffin,
06g-Constantine-Tre-RIC-719b.jpg
06g. Constantine as Caesar: Treveri follis.30 viewsFollis, Summer 307, Treveri mint.
Obverse: FL VAL CONSTANTINVS NOB C / Laureate bust of Constantine.
Reverse: GENIO POP ROM / Genius standing, holding patera and cornucopia. S in left field; A in right field.
Mint mark: PTR
7.75 gm., 27 mm.
RIC #719b; PBCC #122; Sear #15520.
1 commentsCallimachus06/15/19 at 17:49quadrans: Nice piece..
Vespasian_Sestertius_Trial.jpg
Roman Empire, Vespasian, Sestertius with As 90 viewsObv. IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG P M TR POT P P COS III, laureate head right.
Rev. FORTVNAE REDVCI S C, Fortuna standing left, holding cornucopiae and rudder on globe.
Mint: Rome, 71 AD.

32/33mm 26.61g

Cohen- RIC II¹- (cf. 422) RIC II²- (cf. 73) BMC- Sear- (cf. 2323

Ex Münzhandel Henzen, MA-Shops, 2019.

This is an extremely rare Sestertius of Vespasian which obverse was strucked with a die of an As.
A similar piece with the same As die but reverse type "LIBERTAS PVBLICA" is in the Mazzini collection, listed under no. 255.
This coin is uncommonly sharp for example looking at the SC.
It is an interesting coin, I will be pleased for additional informations.

Thank you to Curtis Clay for the excellent following write-up:

"Not a trial strike or a mint error in my opinion, but an intentional sestertius obv. die, though why the portrait and legend were cut in middle-bronze size is anyone's guess!

The mint of Rome may have begun its bronze coin production of 71 with two short issues, of which this was the second, before settling on its main first obv. legend of the year,

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M T P P P COS III.

The latest obv. legend on bronzes of the preceding year, 70 AD:

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M T P P P COS II DES III on sestertii (only 1 die), the same but CAES VESPASIAN and COS II D III on middle bronzes (also only 1 die, with bust laureate, draped, cuirassed r.). RIC 32-38. The middle bronzes of this issue might be dupondii or asses or both, since Vespasian had not yet restored the radiate crown as a denominational mark for his dupondii, as we will soon see. Kraay, a very competent practical numismatist, considered them asses; Carradice and Buttrey suggest dupondii, though without being able to assure us that at least one example is definitely in yellow orichalcum rather than red copper. Hopefully renewed examination of the few surviving specimens, or new specimens that are clearly either yellow or red, will eventually clarify the question.

My proposed first short issue of bronze coins in 71: with obv. legend omitting COS III, just

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M TR P, RIC 50-65. Three such obv. dies are known on sestertii. The middle bronzes all have laureate busts, and at least one type definitely occurs both as a yellow dupondius and as a red As (RIC 64 with note), showing that by the beginning of 71 Vespasian had not yet reintroduced the radiate crown as a mark of his dupondii.

The second short issue of early in 71, to which KC's new acquisition belongs: obv. legend

IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG P M TR POT P P COS III on sestertii (only 1 die, with portrait and legend in middle-bronze size, RIC 137-140 and KC's new piece).

On middle bronzes two slight variants of the same legend were used,

(a) CAES not CAESAR on the one known dupondius, RIC 141, Kraay plaster cast in Oxford, with Head radiate r. on obv., so Vespasian had now reintroduced the radiate crown as a mark of his dupondii, proving that this short issue was later than the other one that omits COS III.

(b) CAES not CAESAR as on the dupondius, but also T P instead of TR POT, Head laureate r., apparently an As, RIC 31, a unique coin in Oxford, formerly in my collection, ex Lanz Graz IV, 1974, Hohenkubin middle bronzes, lot 134. The obv. legend might appear to end just COS II, and Buttrey accepted this reading in RIC, though I had informed him that I believed it was just a slightly tooled COS III.

Coming at last to the point, the sestertius obv. die with middle-bronze-size portrait and legend cannot originally have been cut as an As obv. die, because the one certain As of this issue has a variant, slightly shorter, obv. legend, and because in that case no sestertius obv. dies at all would have been engraved for use in this short issue. I also suspect that the broad ring of empty space outside the dotted border on this obv. die, shown clearly by RIC pl. 20, 137, suggests that it was always meant to be a sestertius not a middle-bronze die.

The Fortuna Redux rev. die of KC's new coin had earlier been used in the COS II DES III issue of late 70 AD, RIC pl. 15, 33, giving some support to my suggestion that this second small issue of bronzes in 71 was probably produced quite early in the year. The same rev. die, as Kraay observed, was also used a little later with an obv. die of the main VESPASIANVS issue of 71, Paris pl. XLIV, 486. But it is not certain, of course, that these two small issues of bronze coins were produced one after the other early in 71, before the main VESPASIANVS issue had started, as I have here suggested. Perhaps they were instead produced early in 71 indeed, but as isolated experiments alongside the main VESPASIANVS issue."

Thanks to Alberto "FlaviusDomitianus"

"Your coin is apparently unpublished and belongs to a small issue of Sestertii described in RIC 2.1 page 69:

"(d) Variant group of sestertii with small (as) die ending VESPASIAN AVG P M TR POT COS III - Pl. 20".

As noted by Carradice and Buttrey the obverse die has not be found on any As.

They are numbered from 137 to 141; since your reverse would be the first one in alfabetical order, it would probably get number 136A.

This small series is also discussed in the introduction (page 23)."

5 commentskc06/15/19 at 16:08Jay GT4:
Commodus_Bronze_Medaillon.jpg
Roman Empire, Commodus, Bronze Medallion103 viewsObv. M AUREL COMMODUS ANTONINVS AVG PIVS, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. P M TR P VIIII IMP VI COS IIII P P / TEMPORVM FELICITAS, Pomona seated right, holding corn ears and poppy in left hand, right hand raised to grapevine, below which two children in tub, and a third at feet of goddess.
Mint: Rome, 183 AD.

40mm 65.92g

Ex Tradart Sale 21, 15th February 2018, Lot 139.
Ex Ars Classica XVIII, Lucerne 1938, Lot 292.
Ex Dr. Jacob Hirsch, Auction 18, 27th May 1907, Lot 1031.
Ex Collection Dr. Friedrich Imhoof-Blumer.

Pomona, a goddess among the Romans, presiding over fruit -trees. Her worship was of long standing at Rome, where there was a Flamen Pomonalis who sacrificed to her every year for the preservation of the fruit. She lived in the time of Procas, king of Alba, devoted to the culture of gardens, to which she confined herself and shunning all society with the male deities.
Vertumnus, under various shapes, tried to win her hand, sometimes he came as a reaper, sometimes as a haymaker, another time as a ploughman or a wine-dresser, a soldier and a fisherman, but to equally little purpose. At length, under the guise of an old woman, he won the confidence of the goddess. And, by enlarging on the evils of a single life and the blessings of the wedded state, by launching out into the praises of Vertumnus, and relating a tale of the punishment of female cruelty to a lover, he moved the heart of Pomona; whereupon, resuming his real form, he obtained the hand of the no longer reluctant nymph.

Felicitas Temporum ("Prosperity of the Times"), reflecting a Golden Age ideology, was among the innovative virtues that began to appear during the reigns of Trajan and Antoninus Pius. Septimius Severus, whose reign followed the exceedingly brief tenure of Pertinax and unsatisfactory conditions under Commodus, used coinage to express his efforts toward restoring the Pax Romana, with themes such as Felicitas Temporum and Felicitas Saeculi, "Prosperity of the Age" (saeculum), prevalent in the years 200 to 202. Some Imperial coins use these phrases with images of women and children in the emperor's family.
6 commentskc06/15/19 at 13:18okidoki: COD
volgasiii.jpg
Vologases III (Sellwood; Shore)/Pacorus I (Assar)37 viewsAR Drachm
O: Diademed bust left, wearing longer pointed, beard.
R: ⧠ΛIIΛͰΛC ⧠ΛIIΛͰΛͶ ΛͰIΛNO(V) ΛIXΛIOV (E)ΠIΦΛͶOVC (ΦI)ΛIΛΛHX(OC), Archer (Arsakes I) seated right on throne, holding bow; monogram below bow.
Ekbatana mint
3.75g
20mm
Sellwood 78.5 (Vologases III); Sunrise –; Shore 415 (Vologases III).
2 commentsMat06/15/19 at 12:43quadrans: Nice
rr_1074_revised_Large.jpg
Sextus Pompey -- Pompey the Great and Neptune with Catanaean Brothers27 viewsSextus Pompey, Imperator and Prefect of the Fleet
[Youngest Son of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (Pompey the Great)]

Obv: [MAG⦁PIVS⦁IMP⦁ITER]; portrait of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus r.; behind jug; before lituus. Border of dots.
Rev: above, [PRAE (AE ligatured) F]; in exergue, CLAS⦁ET⦁[ORAE (AE ligatured)⦁MAR (ligatured) IT⦁EX⦁S⦁C]; Neptune standing l., wearing diadem, aplustre in r. hand, cloak over l. arm, r. foot on prow,; on either side a Catanaean brother bearing one of his parents on his shoulders1. Border of dots.
Denomination: silver denarius; Mint: Sicily, uncertain location2; Date: summer 42 - summer 39 BC3; Weight: 3.68g; Diameter: 17mm; Die axis: 30º; References, for example: Sear CRI 334; BMCRR v. II Sicily 7, 8, 9, and 10; Sydenham 1344; Crawford RRC 511/3a.

Notes:

Obverse legend: MAG[NUS]⦁PIVS⦁IMP[ERATOR]⦁ITER[UM]
Reverse legend: PRAEF[ECTUS]⦁CLAS[SIS]⦁ET⦁ORAE⦁MARIT[IMAE]⦁EX⦁S[ENATUS]⦁C[ONSULTO]

1Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily appears a bit hesitant in his pronouncement that the representation of the Catanaean brothers in fact refers to Sextus’ title Pius (p. 561), but Sear CRI appears to have no such hesitation when he states “...the type illustrates the theme of ‘Pietas’ in connection with the assumption of the name Pius.” (p.203). DeRose Evans (1987) goes further (pp. 115 - 116), arguing that Sextus chose the Catanaean brothers (“...he consciously identifies himself with the south Italian heroes”) as a way to deliberately contrast his Pietas with that of Octavian’s.
2Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily tentatively suggests Catana as a possible location and Sear CRI follows suit.
3This is the date range argued for in Estiot 2006 (p. 145). Estiot recommends returning to Crawford’s proposal of 42 - 40 BC. Crawford RRC, p. 521 suggests the period in 42 BC after Sextus Pompey defeated Q. Salvidienus Rufus. Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily, p.560 proposes 42 - 38 BC and Sydenham, p. 210 follows suit. DeRose Evans (1987), p. 129 offers a time between late summer 36 and September 36 BC.

Provenance: From the collection of W. F. Stoecklin, Amriswil, Switzerland, acquired from Hess AG in Luzern prior to 1975. Ex Dr. Jacob Hirsch 33, 17 November 1913, lot 1058

Photo credits: Shanna Schmidt Numismatics

Sources

BMCRR: Grueber, H. A. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum v. II. London: 1910.
Crawford, Michael H. Roman Republican Coinage v. I. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019 reprint with the 1982 corrections.
DeRose Evans, Jane. "The Sicilian Coinage of Sextus Pompeius (Crawford 511)" in Museum Notes (American Numismatic Society), vol. 32 (1987): 97 - 157.
Estiot, Sylviane. “Sex. Pompée, La Sicile et La Monnaie: Problèmes de Datation.” In Aere Perennivs, en hommage á Hubert Zehnacker, édité par Jacqueline Champeaux et Martine Chassignet. Paris: L’Université Paris - Sorbonne, 2006.
Sear, David R. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. London: Spink, 1998.
Sydenham, Edward A. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. New York: Arno Press, 1975, rev. ed.
2 commentsTracy Aiello06/15/19 at 12:41quadrans: Great
Diocletian_antoninianus.png
Diocletian Antoninianus28 viewsDiocletian Antoninianus

Obverse:
IMP CC VAL DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right

Reverse:
CONCORDIA MILITVM
Emperor receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter holding sceptre. KΓ between

Cyzicus

RIC VI Cyzicus 16A

3.60g
2 commentsHarry G06/15/19 at 12:39quadrans: I agree...
rr_1074_revised_Large.jpg
Sextus Pompey -- Pompey the Great and Neptune with Catanaean Brothers27 viewsSextus Pompey, Imperator and Prefect of the Fleet
[Youngest Son of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (Pompey the Great)]

Obv: [MAG⦁PIVS⦁IMP⦁ITER]; portrait of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus r.; behind jug; before lituus. Border of dots.
Rev: above, [PRAE (AE ligatured) F]; in exergue, CLAS⦁ET⦁[ORAE (AE ligatured)⦁MAR (ligatured) IT⦁EX⦁S⦁C]; Neptune standing l., wearing diadem, aplustre in r. hand, cloak over l. arm, r. foot on prow,; on either side a Catanaean brother bearing one of his parents on his shoulders1. Border of dots.
Denomination: silver denarius; Mint: Sicily, uncertain location2; Date: summer 42 - summer 39 BC3; Weight: 3.68g; Diameter: 17mm; Die axis: 30º; References, for example: Sear CRI 334; BMCRR v. II Sicily 7, 8, 9, and 10; Sydenham 1344; Crawford RRC 511/3a.

Notes:

Obverse legend: MAG[NUS]⦁PIVS⦁IMP[ERATOR]⦁ITER[UM]
Reverse legend: PRAEF[ECTUS]⦁CLAS[SIS]⦁ET⦁ORAE⦁MARIT[IMAE]⦁EX⦁S[ENATUS]⦁C[ONSULTO]

1Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily appears a bit hesitant in his pronouncement that the representation of the Catanaean brothers in fact refers to Sextus’ title Pius (p. 561), but Sear CRI appears to have no such hesitation when he states “...the type illustrates the theme of ‘Pietas’ in connection with the assumption of the name Pius.” (p.203). DeRose Evans (1987) goes further (pp. 115 - 116), arguing that Sextus chose the Catanaean brothers (“...he consciously identifies himself with the south Italian heroes”) as a way to deliberately contrast his Pietas with that of Octavian’s.
2Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily tentatively suggests Catana as a possible location and Sear CRI follows suit.
3This is the date range argued for in Estiot 2006 (p. 145). Estiot recommends returning to Crawford’s proposal of 42 - 40 BC. Crawford RRC, p. 521 suggests the period in 42 BC after Sextus Pompey defeated Q. Salvidienus Rufus. Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily, p.560 proposes 42 - 38 BC and Sydenham, p. 210 follows suit. DeRose Evans (1987), p. 129 offers a time between late summer 36 and September 36 BC.

Provenance: From the collection of W. F. Stoecklin, Amriswil, Switzerland, acquired from Hess AG in Luzern prior to 1975. Ex Dr. Jacob Hirsch 33, 17 November 1913, lot 1058

Photo credits: Shanna Schmidt Numismatics

Sources

BMCRR: Grueber, H. A. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum v. II. London: 1910.
Crawford, Michael H. Roman Republican Coinage v. I. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019 reprint with the 1982 corrections.
DeRose Evans, Jane. "The Sicilian Coinage of Sextus Pompeius (Crawford 511)" in Museum Notes (American Numismatic Society), vol. 32 (1987): 97 - 157.
Estiot, Sylviane. “Sex. Pompée, La Sicile et La Monnaie: Problèmes de Datation.” In Aere Perennivs, en hommage á Hubert Zehnacker, édité par Jacqueline Champeaux et Martine Chassignet. Paris: L’Université Paris - Sorbonne, 2006.
Sear, David R. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. London: Spink, 1998.
Sydenham, Edward A. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. New York: Arno Press, 1975, rev. ed.
2 commentsTracy Aiello06/15/19 at 10:56*Alex: Superb coin.
Commodus_Bronze_Medaillon.jpg
Roman Empire, Commodus, Bronze Medallion103 viewsObv. M AUREL COMMODUS ANTONINVS AVG PIVS, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. P M TR P VIIII IMP VI COS IIII P P / TEMPORVM FELICITAS, Pomona seated right, holding corn ears and poppy in left hand, right hand raised to grapevine, below which two children in tub, and a third at feet of goddess.
Mint: Rome, 183 AD.

40mm 65.92g

Ex Tradart Sale 21, 15th February 2018, Lot 139.
Ex Ars Classica XVIII, Lucerne 1938, Lot 292.
Ex Dr. Jacob Hirsch, Auction 18, 27th May 1907, Lot 1031.
Ex Collection Dr. Friedrich Imhoof-Blumer.

Pomona, a goddess among the Romans, presiding over fruit -trees. Her worship was of long standing at Rome, where there was a Flamen Pomonalis who sacrificed to her every year for the preservation of the fruit. She lived in the time of Procas, king of Alba, devoted to the culture of gardens, to which she confined herself and shunning all society with the male deities.
Vertumnus, under various shapes, tried to win her hand, sometimes he came as a reaper, sometimes as a haymaker, another time as a ploughman or a wine-dresser, a soldier and a fisherman, but to equally little purpose. At length, under the guise of an old woman, he won the confidence of the goddess. And, by enlarging on the evils of a single life and the blessings of the wedded state, by launching out into the praises of Vertumnus, and relating a tale of the punishment of female cruelty to a lover, he moved the heart of Pomona; whereupon, resuming his real form, he obtained the hand of the no longer reluctant nymph.

Felicitas Temporum ("Prosperity of the Times"), reflecting a Golden Age ideology, was among the innovative virtues that began to appear during the reigns of Trajan and Antoninus Pius. Septimius Severus, whose reign followed the exceedingly brief tenure of Pertinax and unsatisfactory conditions under Commodus, used coinage to express his efforts toward restoring the Pax Romana, with themes such as Felicitas Temporum and Felicitas Saeculi, "Prosperity of the Age" (saeculum), prevalent in the years 200 to 202. Some Imperial coins use these phrases with images of women and children in the emperor's family.
6 commentskc06/15/19 at 10:54*Alex: Fantastic!
Commodus_Bronze_Medaillon.jpg
Roman Empire, Commodus, Bronze Medallion103 viewsObv. M AUREL COMMODUS ANTONINVS AVG PIVS, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. P M TR P VIIII IMP VI COS IIII P P / TEMPORVM FELICITAS, Pomona seated right, holding corn ears and poppy in left hand, right hand raised to grapevine, below which two children in tub, and a third at feet of goddess.
Mint: Rome, 183 AD.

40mm 65.92g

Ex Tradart Sale 21, 15th February 2018, Lot 139.
Ex Ars Classica XVIII, Lucerne 1938, Lot 292.
Ex Dr. Jacob Hirsch, Auction 18, 27th May 1907, Lot 1031.
Ex Collection Dr. Friedrich Imhoof-Blumer.

Pomona, a goddess among the Romans, presiding over fruit -trees. Her worship was of long standing at Rome, where there was a Flamen Pomonalis who sacrificed to her every year for the preservation of the fruit. She lived in the time of Procas, king of Alba, devoted to the culture of gardens, to which she confined herself and shunning all society with the male deities.
Vertumnus, under various shapes, tried to win her hand, sometimes he came as a reaper, sometimes as a haymaker, another time as a ploughman or a wine-dresser, a soldier and a fisherman, but to equally little purpose. At length, under the guise of an old woman, he won the confidence of the goddess. And, by enlarging on the evils of a single life and the blessings of the wedded state, by launching out into the praises of Vertumnus, and relating a tale of the punishment of female cruelty to a lover, he moved the heart of Pomona; whereupon, resuming his real form, he obtained the hand of the no longer reluctant nymph.

Felicitas Temporum ("Prosperity of the Times"), reflecting a Golden Age ideology, was among the innovative virtues that began to appear during the reigns of Trajan and Antoninus Pius. Septimius Severus, whose reign followed the exceedingly brief tenure of Pertinax and unsatisfactory conditions under Commodus, used coinage to express his efforts toward restoring the Pax Romana, with themes such as Felicitas Temporum and Felicitas Saeculi, "Prosperity of the Age" (saeculum), prevalent in the years 200 to 202. Some Imperial coins use these phrases with images of women and children in the emperor's family.
6 commentskc06/14/19 at 21:17FlaviusDomitianus: Impressive!
Vespasian_Ric_6.jpg
Vespasian AR Denarius21 viewsVespasian AR Denarius 20 Dec 69 CE to early 70 CE
18 mm 3.25 g
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG TR P; laureate head of Vespasian r
Rev: TITVS ET DOMITIAN CAESARES PRIN IVEN; Titus and Domitian seated left on curule chairs, each holding a branch
RIC 1124 (R)
Purchased from Germania Inferior Numismatics on Vcoins June 14, 2019

1 commentsorfew06/14/19 at 21:02Jay GT4: Nice find
Nerva_Sesterz.jpg
Nerva Sestertius65 viewsObv. IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS II DESIGN III P P, laureate head right.
Rev. CONCORDIA EXERCITVVM S C, clasped hands in front of legionary standard.
Mint: Rome, 96-98 AD.

33.5mm 26.40g

RIC 70

Ex CNG, Electronic Auction 156, 2007, Lot 173.
Ex CNG, Mail Bid Sale 67, 22.09.2004, Lot 1402.
EX Tony Hardy Collection
Ex Mazzini Collection

This sestertius shows the clasped hands of unity holding a legionary aquila set on a prow, the latter symbolizing the imperial navy.
3 commentskc06/14/19 at 20:58Jay GT4: Great coin
Commodus_Bronze_Medaillon.jpg
Roman Empire, Commodus, Bronze Medallion103 viewsObv. M AUREL COMMODUS ANTONINVS AVG PIVS, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. P M TR P VIIII IMP VI COS IIII P P / TEMPORVM FELICITAS, Pomona seated right, holding corn ears and poppy in left hand, right hand raised to grapevine, below which two children in tub, and a third at feet of goddess.
Mint: Rome, 183 AD.

40mm 65.92g

Ex Tradart Sale 21, 15th February 2018, Lot 139.
Ex Ars Classica XVIII, Lucerne 1938, Lot 292.
Ex Dr. Jacob Hirsch, Auction 18, 27th May 1907, Lot 1031.
Ex Collection Dr. Friedrich Imhoof-Blumer.

Pomona, a goddess among the Romans, presiding over fruit -trees. Her worship was of long standing at Rome, where there was a Flamen Pomonalis who sacrificed to her every year for the preservation of the fruit. She lived in the time of Procas, king of Alba, devoted to the culture of gardens, to which she confined herself and shunning all society with the male deities.
Vertumnus, under various shapes, tried to win her hand, sometimes he came as a reaper, sometimes as a haymaker, another time as a ploughman or a wine-dresser, a soldier and a fisherman, but to equally little purpose. At length, under the guise of an old woman, he won the confidence of the goddess. And, by enlarging on the evils of a single life and the blessings of the wedded state, by launching out into the praises of Vertumnus, and relating a tale of the punishment of female cruelty to a lover, he moved the heart of Pomona; whereupon, resuming his real form, he obtained the hand of the no longer reluctant nymph.

Felicitas Temporum ("Prosperity of the Times"), reflecting a Golden Age ideology, was among the innovative virtues that began to appear during the reigns of Trajan and Antoninus Pius. Septimius Severus, whose reign followed the exceedingly brief tenure of Pertinax and unsatisfactory conditions under Commodus, used coinage to express his efforts toward restoring the Pax Romana, with themes such as Felicitas Temporum and Felicitas Saeculi, "Prosperity of the Age" (saeculum), prevalent in the years 200 to 202. Some Imperial coins use these phrases with images of women and children in the emperor's family.
6 commentskc06/14/19 at 20:56Jay GT4: Wonderful! And great provenance!
Diocletian_antoninianus.png
Diocletian Antoninianus28 viewsDiocletian Antoninianus

Obverse:
IMP CC VAL DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right

Reverse:
CONCORDIA MILITVM
Emperor receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter holding sceptre. KΓ between

Cyzicus

RIC VI Cyzicus 16A

3.60g
2 commentsHarry G06/14/19 at 20:45Jay GT4: Wonderful portrait, must have been lying face up f...
Commodus_Bronze_Medaillon.jpg
Roman Empire, Commodus, Bronze Medallion103 viewsObv. M AUREL COMMODUS ANTONINVS AVG PIVS, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. P M TR P VIIII IMP VI COS IIII P P / TEMPORVM FELICITAS, Pomona seated right, holding corn ears and poppy in left hand, right hand raised to grapevine, below which two children in tub, and a third at feet of goddess.
Mint: Rome, 183 AD.

40mm 65.92g

Ex Tradart Sale 21, 15th February 2018, Lot 139.
Ex Ars Classica XVIII, Lucerne 1938, Lot 292.
Ex Dr. Jacob Hirsch, Auction 18, 27th May 1907, Lot 1031.
Ex Collection Dr. Friedrich Imhoof-Blumer.

Pomona, a goddess among the Romans, presiding over fruit -trees. Her worship was of long standing at Rome, where there was a Flamen Pomonalis who sacrificed to her every year for the preservation of the fruit. She lived in the time of Procas, king of Alba, devoted to the culture of gardens, to which she confined herself and shunning all society with the male deities.
Vertumnus, under various shapes, tried to win her hand, sometimes he came as a reaper, sometimes as a haymaker, another time as a ploughman or a wine-dresser, a soldier and a fisherman, but to equally little purpose. At length, under the guise of an old woman, he won the confidence of the goddess. And, by enlarging on the evils of a single life and the blessings of the wedded state, by launching out into the praises of Vertumnus, and relating a tale of the punishment of female cruelty to a lover, he moved the heart of Pomona; whereupon, resuming his real form, he obtained the hand of the no longer reluctant nymph.

Felicitas Temporum ("Prosperity of the Times"), reflecting a Golden Age ideology, was among the innovative virtues that began to appear during the reigns of Trajan and Antoninus Pius. Septimius Severus, whose reign followed the exceedingly brief tenure of Pertinax and unsatisfactory conditions under Commodus, used coinage to express his efforts toward restoring the Pax Romana, with themes such as Felicitas Temporum and Felicitas Saeculi, "Prosperity of the Age" (saeculum), prevalent in the years 200 to 202. Some Imperial coins use these phrases with images of women and children in the emperor's family.
6 commentskc06/14/19 at 20:42Mat: Wow, sweet piece, KC
Hadrian_Sestertius_1.jpg
Hadrian Sestertius70 viewsObv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, draped bust right.
Rev. DACIA S C, Dacia seated left on rock, holding vexillum in right hand, curved sword in left.
Mint: Rome, 134-138 AD.

32/33mm 23.71g

RIC 849

Ex Kölner Münzkabinett, MA-Shops 2019
Ex Heidelberger Münzhandlung, Auction 76, 14th May 2018, lot 202.
Ex Thierry Parsy, Paris Auction 13/14th February 2018, lot 148.
Ex Collection Note (1910-1982)

This sestertius belongs to Hadrian's much-beloved travel series of coins depicting the provinces and cities he visited on his several tours throughout the empire. Earlier in his reign, Hadrian had reorganized the Dacian territories so recently conquered by his predecessor, Trajan, giving up to the Roxolani Sarmatians to rule as a client kingdom on behalf of Rome much of the Dacian territory that had been added to Moesia Inferior. Trajan's sweeping conquests along the Danube frontier as well as in the East had greatly extended Rome's borders, but Hadrian correctly saw the impractical nature of the additional strain this imposed on the Empire and quickly shored them.
4 commentskc06/14/19 at 19:38Gary W2: Outstanding! Love the patina/toning highlights.
Hadrian_Sestertius_1.jpg
Hadrian Sestertius70 viewsObv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, draped bust right.
Rev. DACIA S C, Dacia seated left on rock, holding vexillum in right hand, curved sword in left.
Mint: Rome, 134-138 AD.

32/33mm 23.71g

RIC 849

Ex Kölner Münzkabinett, MA-Shops 2019
Ex Heidelberger Münzhandlung, Auction 76, 14th May 2018, lot 202.
Ex Thierry Parsy, Paris Auction 13/14th February 2018, lot 148.
Ex Collection Note (1910-1982)

This sestertius belongs to Hadrian's much-beloved travel series of coins depicting the provinces and cities he visited on his several tours throughout the empire. Earlier in his reign, Hadrian had reorganized the Dacian territories so recently conquered by his predecessor, Trajan, giving up to the Roxolani Sarmatians to rule as a client kingdom on behalf of Rome much of the Dacian territory that had been added to Moesia Inferior. Trajan's sweeping conquests along the Danube frontier as well as in the East had greatly extended Rome's borders, but Hadrian correctly saw the impractical nature of the additional strain this imposed on the Empire and quickly shored them.
4 commentskc06/14/19 at 18:00Tracy Aiello: That is an amazing obv portrait.
Hadrian_Sestertius_1.jpg
Hadrian Sestertius70 viewsObv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, draped bust right.
Rev. DACIA S C, Dacia seated left on rock, holding vexillum in right hand, curved sword in left.
Mint: Rome, 134-138 AD.

32/33mm 23.71g

RIC 849

Ex Kölner Münzkabinett, MA-Shops 2019
Ex Heidelberger Münzhandlung, Auction 76, 14th May 2018, lot 202.
Ex Thierry Parsy, Paris Auction 13/14th February 2018, lot 148.
Ex Collection Note (1910-1982)

This sestertius belongs to Hadrian's much-beloved travel series of coins depicting the provinces and cities he visited on his several tours throughout the empire. Earlier in his reign, Hadrian had reorganized the Dacian territories so recently conquered by his predecessor, Trajan, giving up to the Roxolani Sarmatians to rule as a client kingdom on behalf of Rome much of the Dacian territory that had been added to Moesia Inferior. Trajan's sweeping conquests along the Danube frontier as well as in the East had greatly extended Rome's borders, but Hadrian correctly saw the impractical nature of the additional strain this imposed on the Empire and quickly shored them.
4 commentskc06/14/19 at 17:59FlaviusDomitianus: Beautiful indeed.
477.jpg
hj6.26.05.1019 viewsElagabalus
Marcianopolis

Obv: AVT K M AVP ANT(ΩNE)INOC, laureate head right
Rev: MAPKIANO-ΠOΛITΩN, Demeter standing left, holding corn ears and long torch
17 mm, 2.5 gms

Hristova-Jekov 6.26.5.10
1 commentsCharles M06/14/19 at 17:32Charles M: error--needs reattribution Charles M
OctavianCuriaRaw.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Octavian, AR Denarius23 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Octavian, 44-27 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.92g; 20mm).
Italian Mint, Summer 30-29 BCE.

Obverse: Octavian’s bare head, facing right.

Reverse: Roman Senate House; IMP CAESAR on architrave.

References: RIC 266; HCRI 421; BMCRR 4358; Julia 161.

Provenance: Ex Heritage Auction 3063 (16 Jan 2018) Lot 33381; Spink Num. Circ. Vol LXXVIII, No. 6 (June 1970), inv. #6871, pl. 11.

The coin celebrates the dedication of the Curia Julia, a new meeting house for the Roman Senate, construction of which was commenced under Julius Caesar and completed by Octavian circa 29 BCE. Julius Caesar was assassinated at the Theater of Pompey where the Senate was meeting while construction of this new Senate house was underway. It is both ironic and politically astute that Octavian should commemorate this new Senate house on a coin, given that his hold on power made the Senate effectively irrelevant. The structure still stands today, having been restored through the imperial period and later converted to a church.
3 commentsCarausius06/14/19 at 16:18kc: Wow, a great example!
Hadrian_Sestertius_1.jpg
Hadrian Sestertius70 viewsObv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, draped bust right.
Rev. DACIA S C, Dacia seated left on rock, holding vexillum in right hand, curved sword in left.
Mint: Rome, 134-138 AD.

32/33mm 23.71g

RIC 849

Ex Kölner Münzkabinett, MA-Shops 2019
Ex Heidelberger Münzhandlung, Auction 76, 14th May 2018, lot 202.
Ex Thierry Parsy, Paris Auction 13/14th February 2018, lot 148.
Ex Collection Note (1910-1982)

This sestertius belongs to Hadrian's much-beloved travel series of coins depicting the provinces and cities he visited on his several tours throughout the empire. Earlier in his reign, Hadrian had reorganized the Dacian territories so recently conquered by his predecessor, Trajan, giving up to the Roxolani Sarmatians to rule as a client kingdom on behalf of Rome much of the Dacian territory that had been added to Moesia Inferior. Trajan's sweeping conquests along the Danube frontier as well as in the East had greatly extended Rome's borders, but Hadrian correctly saw the impractical nature of the additional strain this imposed on the Empire and quickly shored them.
4 commentskc06/14/19 at 15:52Jay GT4: Really great coin
4948493l.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Anonymous, AE Litra - Crawford 16/1a26 viewsRome, The Republic.
Anonymous. 275-270 BCE.
AE Litra (9.89g; 22mm).
Southern Italian Mint.

Obverse: Nymph’s head, facing right, wearing diadem.

Reverse: Lion walking right, head facing; ROMANO in exergue.

References: Crawford 16/1a; Syd 5; BMCRR (Romano-Campanian) 23-27; RBW 10; HN1 276.

Provenance: NAC 114 (7 May 2019) Lot 1241; Hoskier Collection [Hess (15 Feb 1934) Lot 543].

This is one of the larger issues of early Roman struck bronzes. Hoard evidence suggests a mint south of Rome. Fabric and style also support a South Italian mint, as the flan, which appears to have been cast with hemispheric molds that leave characteristic edge sprues, is typical of Neapolitan coins of similar age. The lion on the reverse is sometimes shown with a spear in its mouth and sometimes not. There is no spear evident on this coin. There does not seem to be any direct connection between this issue and contemporaneous silver issues. Connections to contemporaneous silver would be evidenced on later struck bronze coins by common devices and symbols (i.e. club and sickle series).
1 commentsCarausius06/14/19 at 15:12Tracy Aiello: That lion's face and it's expression is pr...
190208018bz.jpg
Roman Empire, Maximus, Sestertius153 viewsObv. MAXIMVS CAES GERM, draped bust right.
Rev. PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS S C, emperor standing left, holding baton and spear, at the right two standards.
Mint: Rome, 236-238 AD.

32mm 21.38g

RIC 13; Cohen 14; BMC 213

Ex Münzenhandlung Manfred Olding, Lagerliste
Ex Reusing /Schürer Collection
Ex Münzenhandlung A. Riechman 1930 (65 Reichsmark)
6 commentskc06/14/19 at 14:31OldMoney: Outstanding!
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-UY8Ftdm9LPrma-Divi_Vesp_Titus~0.jpg
Titus (Augustus) Coin: Brass Sestertius35 viewsDIVVS AVGVSTVS VESP - Radiate Vespasian seated left holding branch and scepter.
IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII Around large S C - Legend surrounding large S C
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (80 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 24.10g / 35mm / 12h
Rarity: Rare
References:
RIC II 145
Sear 2573
Cohen 207
Provenances:
Father Wilbur B. Dexter Collection
CNG
Acquisition/Sale: fvrivs.rvfvs eBay CNG Electronic/137 #216 $0.00 11/18
Notes: Jan 5, 19 - The Gary R. Wilson Collection

Per RIC-Rare
2 commentsGary W206/14/19 at 13:34Gary W2: Thanks Jay. I had this same coin some years ago, s...
Caligula_Three_Siste~0.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Brass Sestertius46 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT - Laureate head left
AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA - AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA, the three sisters of Caligula standing, in the guises of Securitas, Concordia, and Fortuna, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue
Exergue: SC


Mint: Rome (37-38AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 27.88g / 35.6mm / 180
Rarity: Rare
References:
RIC I 33
BMCRE p. 152, 36
BnF II 47
Cohen I 4
SRCV I 1800
Provenances:
Forvm Ancient Coins
Acquisition/Sale: Forvm Ancient Coins Internet

ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

From Numismatica Ars Classica:
Many aspects of Caligula's reign have captured the imagination of historians, but the sexual relationships he is said to have pursued with his sisters is perhaps most shocking of all. It is on par with the exploits of Elagabalus or the alleged seduction of young Nero by his deranged mother Agrippina Jr., who, by no mere coincidence, was one of Caligula's sisters.
Caligula's incestuous relationships with his sisters are alleged by the relatively contemporary historians Suetonius and Josephus. Much later, in the fourth and fifth centuries, these original claims were echoed by various writers, including Eutropius, Aurelius Victor, St. Jerome, Orosius and the anonymous compiler of the Epitome de caesaribus. The truth of the claims, of course, is impossible to confirm, and there is a healthy dose of scepticism among modern scholars.
Whatever personal or sexual affection Caligula may have felt toward his sisters, this coinage is purely political and dynastic in flavour. His sisters are each named and are shown in the guise of personifications: the eldest, Agrippina Junior, as Securitas, the middle-sister, Drusilla, as Concordia, and the youngest, Julia Livilla, as Fortuna.
This remarkable type was produced on two occasions, his initial coinage of 37-38, and again in 39-40. The example offered here belongs to the first coinage, which was issued when all three of the imperial women were alive. Drusilla, Caligula's favourite sister (and the one with whom he is said to have had an enduring incestuous relationship), died tragically on June 10, 38, nearly three months after the last coins of the initial issue were struck.
By the time the last issue was produced (beginning March 18, 39), Drusilla had been accorded the status of a goddess, providing the curious circumstance of a goddess being portrayed in the guise of a personification. Life in the palace worsened after Drusilla's death and Caligula's affection for his remaining two sisters declined.
The circumstances reported by the ancient sources are nothing short of bizarre: Drusilla had been married to Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, who had also been Caligula's lover. After Drusilla died, Lepidus extended his sexual liaisons to include Agrippina and Julia Livilla, his former sisters-in-law. By late in 39 this web of relationships seems to have evolved into a failed plot by Lepidus against Caligula, who executed Lepidus and sent his two sisters into exile out of their suspected complicity.
All of this palace intrigue occurred in the midst of the second issue of 'three sisters' sestertii, the production of which Caligula probably halted immediately since of the three sisters shown, one was dead and two were in exile for having plotted against his life.

From Wikisource:
It is easy to understand why the peace and harmony which had been reestablished for a moment in the troubled imperial family by the advent of Caligula should have been of brief duration. His grandmother and his sisters were Romans, educated in Roman ideals, and this exotic madness of his could inspire in them only an irresistible horror. This brought confusion into the imperial family, and after having suffered the persecutions of Sejanus and his party, the unhappy daughters of Germanicus found themselves in the toils of the exacting caprices of their brother. In fact, in 38, Caligula had already broken with his grandmother, whom the year before he had had proclaimed Augusta; and between the years 38 and 39, catastrophes followed one another in the family with frightful rapidity. His sister Drusilla, whom, as Suetonius tells us, he already treated as a lawful wife, died suddenly of some unknown malady while still very young. It is not improbable that her health may have been ruined by the horror of the wild adventure, which was neither human nor Roman, into which her brother sought to drag her by marriage. Caligula suddenly declared her a goddess, to whom all the cities must pay honors. He had a temple built for her, and appointed a body of twenty priests, ten men and ten women, to celebrate her worship; he decreed that her birthday should be a holiday, and he wished the statue of Venus in the Forum to be carved in her likeness.

But in proportion as Caligula became more and more fervid in this adoration of his dead sister, the disagreement between himself and his other two sisters became more embittered. Julia Livilla was exiled in 38; Agrippina, the wife of Domitius Enobarbus°, in 39, and about this same time the venerable Antonia died. It was noised about that Caligula had forced her to commit suicide, and that Agrippina and Livilla had taken part in a conspiracy against the life of the emperor. How much truth there may be in these reports it is difficult to say, but the reason for all these catastrophes may be affirmed with certainty. Life in the imperial palace was no longer possible, especially for women, with this madman who was transforming Rome into Alexandria and who wished to marry a sister. Even Tiberius, the son of Drusus and co-heir to the empire with Caligula, was at about this time defeated in some obscure suit and disappeared.

Many aspects of Caligula’s reign have captured the imagination of historians, but the sexual relationships he is said to
have pursued with his sisters is perhaps most shocking of all. It is on par with the exploits of Elagabalus or the alleged
seduction of young Nero by his deranged mother Agrippina Jr., who, by no mere coincidence, was one of Caligula’s
sisters.
Caligula’s incestuous relationships with his sisters are alleged by the relatively contemporary historians Suetonius and
Josephus. Much later, in the fourth and fifth centuries, these original claims were echoed by various writers, including
Eutropius, Aurelius Victor, St. Jerome, Orosius and the anonymous compiler of the Epitome de caesaribus. The truth of
the claims, of course, is impossible to confirm, and there is a healthy dose of skepticism among modern scholars.
Whatever personal or sexual affection Caligula may have felt toward his sisters, this coinage is purely political and
dynastic in flavour. His sisters are each named and are shown in the guise of personifications: the eldest, Agrippina Junior,
as Securitas, the middle-sister, Drusilla, as Concordia, and the youngest, Julia Livilla, as Fortuna.
This remarkable type was produced on two occasions, his initial coinage of 37-38, and again in 39-40. The example
offered here belongs to the first coinage, which was issued when all three of the imperial women were alive. Drusilla,
Caligula’s favourite sister (and the one with whom he is said to have had an enduring incestuous relationship), died
tragically on June 10, 38, nearly three months after the last coins of the initial issue were struck.
By the time the last issue was produced (beginning March 18, 39), Drusilla had been accorded the status of a goddess,
providing the curious circumstance of a goddess being portrayed in the guise of a personification. Life in the palace
worsened after Drusilla’s death and Caligula’s affection for his remaining two sisters declined.
The circumstances reported by the ancient sources are nothing short of bizarre: Drusilla had been married to Marcus
Aemilius Lepidus, who had also been Caligula’s lover. At least after Drusilla died, Lepidus extended his sexual liaisons to
include Agrippina and Julia Livilla, his former sisters-in-law. By late in 39 this web of relationships seems to have evolved
into a failed plot by Lepidus against Caligula, who executed Lepidus and sent his two sisters into exile out of their
suspected complicity.
All of this palace intrigue occurred in the midst of the second issue of ‘three sisters’ sestertii, the production of which
Caligula probably halted immediately since of the three sisters shown, one was dead and two were in exile for having
plotted against his life.

Per RIC-Rare
3 commentsGary W206/14/19 at 13:32Gary W2: Thanks Jay. One of Joe's.
CassiusTripod.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Cassius, AR Denarius - Crawford 500/125 viewsRome, The Imperators.
C. Cassius Longinus. 44-42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.38g; 20mm).
Military Mint in Smyrna.

Obverse: C. CASSI – IMP; tripod with cauldron and laurel fillets.

Reverse: LENTVLVS SPINT; jug and lituus.

References: Crawford 500/1; HCRI 219; Sydenham 1308; BMCRR (East) 79; Cassia 14.

Provenance: Nomisma 59 (14 May 2019) Lot 121; P&P Santamaria (4 May 1961) Lot 168.

This coin was struck for Cassius, one of the chief assassins of Julius Caesar, when Brutus and Cassius met in Smyrna, circa early 42 BCE. The tripod obverse type was borrowed from a slightly earlier Aureus produced for Cassius by his legate, M. Aquinus. The tripod may reference Cassius’ membership in one of the sacred colleges. Cassius was elected to the augurate in 57 BCE, to which the implements on the reverse of this coin certainly allude. The coin was produced on Cassius’ behalf by P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther, who also produced coins for Brutus at the same time. For more information on Spinther, see my example of his Brutus denarius at: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-145289

Until the discovery of a large, mint-state, hoard in the early 2000’s, this was one of the rarest types in the Roman Republican series. While recent hoard examples of the type are scarce, old provenanced examples, like this, remain extremely rare.
2 commentsCarausius06/14/19 at 12:30Tracy Aiello: wow, that is an outstanding coin.
CassiusTripod.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Cassius, AR Denarius - Crawford 500/125 viewsRome, The Imperators.
C. Cassius Longinus. 44-42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.38g; 20mm).
Military Mint in Smyrna.

Obverse: C. CASSI – IMP; tripod with cauldron and laurel fillets.

Reverse: LENTVLVS SPINT; jug and lituus.

References: Crawford 500/1; HCRI 219; Sydenham 1308; BMCRR (East) 79; Cassia 14.

Provenance: Nomisma 59 (14 May 2019) Lot 121; P&P Santamaria (4 May 1961) Lot 168.

This coin was struck for Cassius, one of the chief assassins of Julius Caesar, when Brutus and Cassius met in Smyrna, circa early 42 BCE. The tripod obverse type was borrowed from a slightly earlier Aureus produced for Cassius by his legate, M. Aquinus. The tripod may reference Cassius’ membership in one of the sacred colleges. Cassius was elected to the augurate in 57 BCE, to which the implements on the reverse of this coin certainly allude. The coin was produced on Cassius’ behalf by P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther, who also produced coins for Brutus at the same time. For more information on Spinther, see my example of his Brutus denarius at: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-145289

Until the discovery of a large, mint-state, hoard in the early 2000’s, this was one of the rarest types in the Roman Republican series. While recent hoard examples of the type are scarce, old provenanced examples, like this, remain extremely rare.
2 commentsCarausius06/14/19 at 04:34Jay GT4: Exceptional
ArriusSecundus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, M. Arrius Secundus, AR Denarius - Crawford 513/233 viewsRome, The Imperators.
M. Arrius Secundus. 41 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.82g; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: M. ARRIVS - SECVNDVS; bare head, with slight beard, facing right.

Reverse: Victory honors - wreath, spear and phalera.

References: Crawford 513/2; HCRI 319; Sydenham 1084; BMCRR 4210; Arria 2.

Provenance: Nomisma 59 (14 May 2019) Lot 134; Munzen und Medaillen XIX (5-6 Jun 1959) Lot 172; Munzhandlung Basel 10 (15 Mar 1938) Lot 486.

M. Arrius Secundus was likely son of Quintus Arrius, who had a victory in the Servile War against one of Spartacus’ lieutenants, but subsequently lost a battle to Spartacus himself. He was the only member of his gens to strike coins, and not much else is known about him.

The slightly-bearded, obverse portrait, while probably depicting the moneyer’s father, Quintus Arrius, also bears a striking resemblance to contemporaneous portraits of Octavian. However, without any inscription naming Caesar, a positive identification of the portrait remains debated by scholars. David Sear suggests that the portrait is deliberately ambiguous, as the political and military climate was very risky and the moneyer likely wanted plausible deniability that the portrait was Octavian. The reverse shows awards of victory granted to the moneyer’s father for his Servile War victory: a laurel wreath, golden spear and phalera (a military decoration attached to a harness and worn over a cuirass).
2 commentsCarausius06/14/19 at 04:33Jay GT4: Lovely portrait
1879890l.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L Series, AE As - Crawford 97/22a21 viewsRome, The Republic.
L Series. 211-208 BCE.
AE As (27.67g; 37mm).
Luceria Mint.

Obverse: Janus head; --- (mark of values) above; L below.

Reverse: Prow to right; ROMA below; I (mark of value) above.

References: Crawford 97/22a; RBW 417-419.

Provenance: Ex Ambrose Collection [Roma X (9 Sept 2015), Lot 659]; Bombarda Collection [Tkalec AG (8 Sept 2008), Lot 236].

Possibly over-struck, though the under-type is not attributable.

1 commentsCarausius06/14/19 at 04:33Jay GT4: That's a beauty
190208018bz.jpg
Roman Empire, Maximus, Sestertius153 viewsObv. MAXIMVS CAES GERM, draped bust right.
Rev. PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS S C, emperor standing left, holding baton and spear, at the right two standards.
Mint: Rome, 236-238 AD.

32mm 21.38g

RIC 13; Cohen 14; BMC 213

Ex Münzenhandlung Manfred Olding, Lagerliste
Ex Reusing /Schürer Collection
Ex Münzenhandlung A. Riechman 1930 (65 Reichsmark)
6 commentskc06/14/19 at 03:32Callimachus: Beautiful coin. Stil on my want list.
AAAMb_small.png
Constantius Gallus AE326 viewsConstantius Gallus. 352-354 AD.

Unknown mint.

18 mm., 2.17 g.

D N FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES. Bust of Constantius Gallus, bareheaded, draped, cuirassed, right

FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO. Soldier, helmeted, draped, cuirassed, advancing left, spearing fallen horseman with right hand and wearing shield on left arm; shield on ground to right; horseman facing soldier, extending left arm

References: RIC VIII 274 or 278

AAAM
2 commentsRL06/14/19 at 01:25Randygeki(h2): Looks like RIC Rome 274 or 278
RI_076e_img.jpg
076 - Julia Maesa denarius - RIC 26640 viewsDenarius
Obv:– IVLIA MAESA AVG Draped bust of Julia Maesa to right, her hair bound in a bun at the back
Rev:– PIETAS AVG Pietas standing facing, her head turned to left, raising both hands in prayer; at her feet to left, altar
Minted in Rome. A.D. 218-220
Reference– Cohen 34a. RIC 266

3.88g, 20.04mm, 180o
3 commentsmaridvnvm06/14/19 at 01:20Randygeki(h2): Neat addition
RI_064nk_img~0.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 494a corr. 27 viewsObv:– L SEP SEVERVS PER AVG PIV IMP XI PAR P M, laureate head right
Rev:– AR AD [T]R P VI COS II P P, Victory walking left, holding wreath in right hand, palm in left
Eastern mint. A.D. 198
Reference:– BMCRE page 280 *, citing RD page 105. RIC 494a corr.

Very rare.
2 commentsmaridvnvm06/14/19 at 01:20Randygeki(h2): Nice!
IMG_5147.jpg
10 Constantius II37 viewsConstantius II. AE2. Lyons. DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl-diademe, draped, cuirassed bust right, A behind head / FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, soldier standing left, one knee drawn up, about to spear fallen horseman wearing a Phrygian helmet and is sitting on ground, arms raised. A in left field. Mintmark SLG

RIC Lyons 100
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)06/14/19 at 01:15RL: Seconded
FF77372C-1673-46CE-AD8D-13C24C03F8A7.jpeg
32 viewsGordian III. AD 238-244. Æ Sestertius (27mm, 15.30 g, 12h). Rome mint, 5th officina. 12th emission, AD 243. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Victory standing left, holding palm frond and shield set on captive seated left. RIC IV 338a; Banti 106.2 commentspaul188806/13/19 at 23:58Jay GT4: Nice coin!
Larissa_Head_BCD_Thessaly_II_316_.jpg
Facing Head of Larissa29 viewsThessaly Greece, the City of Larissa
Obv: Head of the nymph Larissa facing slightly l., round curl to the l. of the head, wearing ampyx flanked by two hornlike locks, a pendant earring, and a simple necklace.
Rev: Horse crouching r., l. foreleg raised and bent (almost parallel with belly/ground), preparing to roll. ΛAPIΣ above horse and AIΩN in the exergue.
Denomination: Silver Drachm; Mint: Larissa; Date: c. 356 - 342 BC1; Weight: 5.920g; Diameter: 19.2mm; Die axis: 135º; References, for example: Lorber Hoard, pl. 3, 27 (same dies); BCD Thessaly I 11582; BCD Thessaly II 316; HGC 4 4543.

Notes:
1This is the date range stated in BCD Thessaly I. This coin appears to fall within Lorber’s Phase Late II or Phase Late III. See Lorber Hoard and Lorber 2008.
2The coin referenced in this auction catalogue is actually a silver stater, but in discussing the coin the catalogue states that the earliest Larissian staters “...bear the normal types of a drachm….”
3The picture of the coin in this reference does not show the foreleg raised and bent, but the entry does reference BCD Thessaly II, lots 312 - 320, which matches one of the references here.
The city of Larissa was named after the local water nymph, said to be the daughter of Pelasgos. He was said to be the ancestor of the pre-Greek Pelasgians. According to myth Larissa drowned while playing ball on the banks of the Peneios river. (HGC p. 130).

Provenance: from the BCD collection, with his tag noting "Thz. G/ni ex Thess., Apr. 94, SFr. 100.-"

Photo credits: Forum Ancient Coins

Sources

BCD Thessaly I: Nomos AG, Auction 4. Coins of Thessaly, the BCD Collection. (10 May 2011, Zurich).
BCD Thessaly II: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. The BCD Collection of the Coinage of Thessaly. Triton XV Auction. (3 January 2012, New York).
HGC: Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Greece: Achaia Phthiotis, Ainis, Magnesia, Malis, Oita, Perrhaibia, Thessaly, Akarnania, Aitolia, Lokris, Phokis, Boiotia, Euboia, Attica, Megaris, and Corinthia, Sixth to First Centuries BC, The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Vol. 4. Lancaster/London: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc, 2014.
Lorber Hoard: Lorber, Catharine C. “A Hoard of Facing Head Larissa Drachms” in Schweizerische Numismatische Rundschau, vol. 79 (2000): 7 - 15.
Lorber, Catharine C. “Thessalian Hoards and the Coinage of Larissa” in American Journal of Numismatics, second series 20 (2008): 119 - 142.
1 commentsTracy Aiello06/13/19 at 23:57Jay GT4: Nice one. This was in my watch list until you bou...
RIC_T_99A_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0099A Domitianus69 viewsObv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIAN COS VII, Laureate head right
Rev: S C (in exergue), Domitian on horseback galloping to left, raising right hand and holding eagle-tipped sceptre with left hand
AE/Sestertius (25.99 g 35.14 mm 6h) Struck in Rome 80 A.D.
Unpublished; Provisionally referenced as 99A (Titus)
ex NAC Auction 114 Lot 1490, ex Roma Numismatics Auction 7 Lot 1039
3 commentsFlaviusDomitianus06/13/19 at 22:05kc: It is a great coin, it was one of my favourite, es...
190208018bz.jpg
Roman Empire, Maximus, Sestertius153 viewsObv. MAXIMVS CAES GERM, draped bust right.
Rev. PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS S C, emperor standing left, holding baton and spear, at the right two standards.
Mint: Rome, 236-238 AD.

32mm 21.38g

RIC 13; Cohen 14; BMC 213

Ex Münzenhandlung Manfred Olding, Lagerliste
Ex Reusing /Schürer Collection
Ex Münzenhandlung A. Riechman 1930 (65 Reichsmark)
6 commentskc06/13/19 at 21:47okidoki: Congrats very nice
190208018bz.jpg
Roman Empire, Maximus, Sestertius153 viewsObv. MAXIMVS CAES GERM, draped bust right.
Rev. PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS S C, emperor standing left, holding baton and spear, at the right two standards.
Mint: Rome, 236-238 AD.

32mm 21.38g

RIC 13; Cohen 14; BMC 213

Ex Münzenhandlung Manfred Olding, Lagerliste
Ex Reusing /Schürer Collection
Ex Münzenhandlung A. Riechman 1930 (65 Reichsmark)
6 commentskc06/13/19 at 21:42quadrans: Nice one
190208018bz.jpg
Roman Empire, Maximus, Sestertius153 viewsObv. MAXIMVS CAES GERM, draped bust right.
Rev. PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS S C, emperor standing left, holding baton and spear, at the right two standards.
Mint: Rome, 236-238 AD.

32mm 21.38g

RIC 13; Cohen 14; BMC 213

Ex Münzenhandlung Manfred Olding, Lagerliste
Ex Reusing /Schürer Collection
Ex Münzenhandlung A. Riechman 1930 (65 Reichsmark)
6 commentskc06/13/19 at 21:41Jay GT4: Love this reverse type. I have 2 from the Reusing...
vlasto_842.jpg
CALABRIA, Taras, c. 272-240 BC. AR Nomos 29 views6.57g, 3h
Nude rider on horse standing to left, crowning his horse; to right, ; below, .
Rev. Phalanthos, nude, riding on dolphin to left, holding Nike with his right hand and trident with his left; to right, bunch of grapes.
Evans VIII A, 10. HN III 1026. SNG Paris 2006 ff. Vlasto 842-4.
Extremely fine.
1 commentsLeo06/13/19 at 20:41Jay GT4: Amazing details
RIC_515_Titus.jpg
RIC 0515 Titus86 viewsObv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, Laureate head of Titus, right
Rev : CA-PIT (across field) RESTIT (in exergue), Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minerva
AR/Cistophorus (26.81 mm 10.174 g 6h) Struck in Rome for circulation in Asia Minor 80-81 A.D.
RIC 515 (R), RSC-BMCRE-BNF unlisted, RPC II 860
Numismatik Naumann Auction 78 Lot 735
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus06/13/19 at 15:54Vincent: What a neat coin and minted in Rome for the East.....
8584_8585.jpg
Provincial, Antioch, Pisidia, AE24, ANTIOCHE GEN COL C12 viewsAE24
Julia Domna
Born: circa 170 AD - Died: 217AD
Augusta: 193 - 217AD
24.0 x 21.5mm 3.10gr 5h
O: IVLIA AVGVSTA; Draped bust, right.
R: ANT-IOCHE G-EN COL C; Tyche standing left, holding branch in outstretched right hand, cornucopia on left arm.
Antioch, Pisidia Mint
SNG France 1126-34; BMC 36 var. (reverse legend); Kryz 44 var. (no L).
Timeline Auctions Auction 112, Lot 3584
3/3/19 3/25/19
1 commentsNicholas Z06/13/19 at 14:27Mat: A great coin overall
8586_8587.jpg
Septimius Severus, Denarius, IOVI PROPVGNATORI12 viewsAR Denarius
Septimius Severus
Augustus: 193 - 211AD
Issued: 199AD
19.5 x 17.0mm 3.26gr 7h
O: L SEPT SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX; Laureate head, right.
R: IOVI PRO-P-VG-NATORI; Jupiter standing right, aiming thunderbolt and raising hand.
Rome Mint
Sear 6291; BMC 132; RSC 243; RIC IV Rome 131; Aorta: 493: B3, O45, R137, T103, M4.
gVF
Naville Numismatics Auction 47, Lot 525.
3/4/19 3/25/19
1 commentsNicholas Z06/13/19 at 14:27Mat: wonderful reverse
8638_8639.jpg
Septimius Severus, Denarius, FELICIT TEMPOR11 viewsAR Denarius
Septimius Severus
Augustus: 193 - 211AD
Issued: 194AD
16.0mm 3.26gr 0h
O: IMP CAE L SEP SE-V PERT AVG COS II; Laureate head, right.
R: FELI-CIT TE-M-POR; Two cornucopiae, crossed, corn ear standing between.
Emesa Mint
BMC 347; Cohen 192; RIC 373; Sear (2000) 6274.
Aorta: 357: B3, O20, R77, T36, M2.
VF
Savoca Auctions/Claudia Savoca 18th Blue, Lot 1531.
3/31/19 4/10/19
1 commentsNicholas Z06/13/19 at 14:27Mat: I have the same type, nice!
8609_8610.jpg
Provincial, Antioch, Pisidia, AE22, ANTIOCH MENCIS CO12 viewsAE22
Roman Provincial: Antioch, Pisidia
Julia Domna
Born circa: 170AD - Died: 217AD
Augusta: 193 - 217AD
22.0mm 5.09gr 7h
O: IVLIA DO-MNA AC; Draped bust, right.
R: ANTIOC-H (MEN)CIS CO; Men, draped and wearing Phrygian cap, standing facing, head right, left foot on bucranium, crescents on shoulders, holding scepter with right hand, Nike on globe in left hand, resting on cippus, rooster at left foot.
Antioch, Pisidia Mint
Krzyanowska DOM1.1 & plate XV, 1.
aVF
Featured on Wildwinds, April, 2019.
Savoca Auctions London/Philipp Eckhert 1st Blue, Lot 748
3/23/19 4/10/19
1 commentsNicholas Z06/13/19 at 14:26Mat: Interesting portrait of her.
8640_8641.jpg
Provincial, Caesarea, Cappadocia, AE30, ΜΗΤΡΟΠ KAICAPC13 viewsAE30
Roman Provincial: Caesarea, Cappadocia
Julia Domna
Born circa: 170AD - Died: 217AD
Augusta: 193 - 217AD
Issued: 205AD
30.0mm 17.19gr 0h
O: IOYΛΙΑ ΔΟΜΝΑ ΑΥ; Draped bust, right.
R: ΜΗΤΡΟΠ KAICAPC; (MH ligate) Agama of Mt. Argaeus, surmounted by star, placed on altar.
Exergue: εΤΙΓ (Regnal Year = 13; 205AD)
Hunter 75; BMC Galatia 26 var. (legend and date); Huntarian 2259
aVF
Featured on Wildwinds, April, 2019.
Savoca Auctions/Claudia Savoca 18th Blue, Lot 960
3/30/19 4/10/19
1 commentsNicholas Z06/13/19 at 14:26Mat: Very nice, love the reverse
cartet.jpg
Caracalla (198 - 217 A.D.)40 viewsAR Tetradrachm
Mesopotamia, Carrhae
O: AVT·K·M·A ANTONЄINOC ·C-EB · ·, laureate head of Caracalla right; two pellets beneath rear truncation.
R: ΔΗΜΑΡΧ ΕΞ ΥΠΑΤΟ Δ, eagle standing facing on bucranium, dot to each side, wings spread, head right, wreath in beak.
28mm
17.10g
Prieur 820, Bellinger 160, SGI 2701

Ex. Agora Auctions, lot 184, Sale 81
5 commentsMat06/13/19 at 14:08Nicholas Z: Very nice portrait of Caracalla.
New_Project_(1).jpg
MYSIA,Pergamon (200 - 133 B.C.)42 viewsÆ16
O: Helmeted head of Athena right.
R: AΘΗ-ΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ, owl standing facing on palm, with wings spread, A monogram left and AP right.
3.6g
16mm
SNG von Aulock 1375-6 var; SNG Copenhagen 388 var
6 commentsMat06/13/19 at 14:07Nicholas Z: I love these little owls.
sev33.jpg
Severus Alexander (222 - 235 A.D.)47 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm
O: Α ΚΑΙ ΜΑΡ ΑΥΡ СƐΥ ΑΛƐΞΑΝΔΡΟС ƐΥ laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Severus Alexander, r., seen from rear.
R: Nilus bust r., draped and wearing lotus wreath; to l., cornucopia on shoulder, r.; in front, palm branch L I = 10
Alexandria Mint
23mm
13.7g
Emmett 3122.10 (R3), Milne 3031; Dattari 4331

Rare

Published on Wildwinds!
8 commentsMat06/13/19 at 14:06Nicholas Z: This could be one of the nicest tets I’ve ever see...
vestit.jpg
Vespasian (69 - 79 A.D.)46 viewsAntioch, Syria
AR Tetradrachm
O: AYTOKPAT KAIΣA OYEΣΠAΣIANOY; Head of Vespasian, laureate head right.
R: (T) ΦΛAYI OYEΣΠ KAIΣ ETOYΣ NEOY IEPOY; Laureate Head of Titus, r.; in r. field, B=Year 2 ( 69-70 AD)
11.37g
25mm
RPC 1941 (2 spec.)., Cf. Prieur 107-107A

A RPC group 2 tetradrachm attributed to Antioch, but style wise very similar to Alexandria. RPC speculates the Alexandria style tetradrachms were either struck in Alexandria and then shipped to Antioch, or less likely Alexandrian mint workers were sent to Antioch and produced the coins there. Kevin Butcher speculates these Alexandria style tetradrachms were ordered by the southern Syrian cities from the Alexandria mint for circulation in that part of the province. Of note, Galilee, Samaria, and Judaea were a part of the province of Syria at the time. Interestingly, these tetradrachms in which Titus' portrait is featured on the reverse may have been circulating in the very region where he commanded the legions fighting the Jewish War. Most likely they were struck during the massive military build up before the siege of Jerusalem, providing strong evidence of the important role Titus Caesar held at the time.

This regnal year 2 type is more commonly seen with a star behind Titus' portrait on the reverse. This is the rarer variant lacking the star.
9 commentsMat06/13/19 at 14:06Nicholas Z: Impressive!
parthtet.jpg
Phraates IV (38 - 2 B.C.)51 viewsAR Tetradrachm
O: Diademed and draped bust left, wart on forehead, wearing pointed beard and torque with no end visible; all within pelleted border.
R: BACILE[WS] BACILEWN ARSAKO[U] EUERGETOU DIKAIOU EPIFANOU[S] FILELLHN[OS], Phraates seated right on throne, Tyche standing left before him, presenting a palm and holding cornucopiae; year between throne legs, [month in exergue]
Seleukeia on the Tigris mint.
30mm
15g
Sellwood 51
6 commentsMat06/13/19 at 14:04Nicholas Z: Great portrait of PIV.
robertanjou.jpg
Robert of Anjou (1309 - 1343 A.D.)40 viewsAR Gigliato
O: + ROBЄRTUS DЄI GRA IЄRL ЄT SICIL RЄX. King enthroned holding sceptre in right hand and globus cruciger in left, cross at neck.
R: + ҺOҺOR RЄGIS IUDICIU DILIGIT., cross fleury with lys in each quarter.
3.85g
24.5mm
Naples Mint, Italy
Biaggi 1634 MIR (Varesi) 28
3 commentsMat06/13/19 at 14:03Nicholas Z: Apparently Robert and the Henries of England had t...
sev11.jpg
Severus II (305 - 307 A.D.)59 viewsÆ Follis
O:SEVERVS NOB C, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
R:  GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae; altar left, star right: PLC in exergue.
Lugdunum (Lyon) mint
8.83g
39mm
Seltz Hoard 9; RIC VI Lyons 193 var (star type)

Ex CNG Electric Auction, Lot 372, 1/10/2008

Ex. Gordon S. Parry Collection

Published on Wildwinds
4 commentsMat06/13/19 at 14:01Nicholas Z: Very sharp strike and great coin!
Caligula_Three_Siste~0.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Brass Sestertius46 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT - Laureate head left
AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA - AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA, the three sisters of Caligula standing, in the guises of Securitas, Concordia, and Fortuna, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue
Exergue: SC


Mint: Rome (37-38AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 27.88g / 35.6mm / 180
Rarity: Rare
References:
RIC I 33
BMCRE p. 152, 36
BnF II 47
Cohen I 4
SRCV I 1800
Provenances:
Forvm Ancient Coins
Acquisition/Sale: Forvm Ancient Coins Internet

ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

From Numismatica Ars Classica:
Many aspects of Caligula's reign have captured the imagination of historians, but the sexual relationships he is said to have pursued with his sisters is perhaps most shocking of all. It is on par with the exploits of Elagabalus or the alleged seduction of young Nero by his deranged mother Agrippina Jr., who, by no mere coincidence, was one of Caligula's sisters.
Caligula's incestuous relationships with his sisters are alleged by the relatively contemporary historians Suetonius and Josephus. Much later, in the fourth and fifth centuries, these original claims were echoed by various writers, including Eutropius, Aurelius Victor, St. Jerome, Orosius and the anonymous compiler of the Epitome de caesaribus. The truth of the claims, of course, is impossible to confirm, and there is a healthy dose of scepticism among modern scholars.
Whatever personal or sexual affection Caligula may have felt toward his sisters, this coinage is purely political and dynastic in flavour. His sisters are each named and are shown in the guise of personifications: the eldest, Agrippina Junior, as Securitas, the middle-sister, Drusilla, as Concordia, and the youngest, Julia Livilla, as Fortuna.
This remarkable type was produced on two occasions, his initial coinage of 37-38, and again in 39-40. The example offered here belongs to the first coinage, which was issued when all three of the imperial women were alive. Drusilla, Caligula's favourite sister (and the one with whom he is said to have had an enduring incestuous relationship), died tragically on June 10, 38, nearly three months after the last coins of the initial issue were struck.
By the time the last issue was produced (beginning March 18, 39), Drusilla had been accorded the status of a goddess, providing the curious circumstance of a goddess being portrayed in the guise of a personification. Life in the palace worsened after Drusilla's death and Caligula's affection for his remaining two sisters declined.
The circumstances reported by the ancient sources are nothing short of bizarre: Drusilla had been married to Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, who had also been Caligula's lover. After Drusilla died, Lepidus extended his sexual liaisons to include Agrippina and Julia Livilla, his former sisters-in-law. By late in 39 this web of relationships seems to have evolved into a failed plot by Lepidus against Caligula, who executed Lepidus and sent his two sisters into exile out of their suspected complicity.
All of this palace intrigue occurred in the midst of the second issue of 'three sisters' sestertii, the production of which Caligula probably halted immediately since of the three sisters shown, one was dead and two were in exile for having plotted against his life.

From Wikisource:
It is easy to understand why the peace and harmony which had been reestablished for a moment in the troubled imperial family by the advent of Caligula should have been of brief duration. His grandmother and his sisters were Romans, educated in Roman ideals, and this exotic madness of his could inspire in them only an irresistible horror. This brought confusion into the imperial family, and after having suffered the persecutions of Sejanus and his party, the unhappy daughters of Germanicus found themselves in the toils of the exacting caprices of their brother. In fact, in 38, Caligula had already broken with his grandmother, whom the year before he had had proclaimed Augusta; and between the years 38 and 39, catastrophes followed one another in the family with frightful rapidity. His sister Drusilla, whom, as Suetonius tells us, he already treated as a lawful wife, died suddenly of some unknown malady while still very young. It is not improbable that her health may have been ruined by the horror of the wild adventure, which was neither human nor Roman, into which her brother sought to drag her by marriage. Caligula suddenly declared her a goddess, to whom all the cities must pay honors. He had a temple built for her, and appointed a body of twenty priests, ten men and ten women, to celebrate her worship; he decreed that her birthday should be a holiday, and he wished the statue of Venus in the Forum to be carved in her likeness.

But in proportion as Caligula became more and more fervid in this adoration of his dead sister, the disagreement between himself and his other two sisters became more embittered. Julia Livilla was exiled in 38; Agrippina, the wife of Domitius Enobarbus°, in 39, and about this same time the venerable Antonia died. It was noised about that Caligula had forced her to commit suicide, and that Agrippina and Livilla had taken part in a conspiracy against the life of the emperor. How much truth there may be in these reports it is difficult to say, but the reason for all these catastrophes may be affirmed with certainty. Life in the imperial palace was no longer possible, especially for women, with this madman who was transforming Rome into Alexandria and who wished to marry a sister. Even Tiberius, the son of Drusus and co-heir to the empire with Caligula, was at about this time defeated in some obscure suit and disappeared.

Many aspects of Caligula’s reign have captured the imagination of historians, but the sexual relationships he is said to
have pursued with his sisters is perhaps most shocking of all. It is on par with the exploits of Elagabalus or the alleged
seduction of young Nero by his deranged mother Agrippina Jr., who, by no mere coincidence, was one of Caligula’s
sisters.
Caligula’s incestuous relationships with his sisters are alleged by the relatively contemporary historians Suetonius and
Josephus. Much later, in the fourth and fifth centuries, these original claims were echoed by various writers, including
Eutropius, Aurelius Victor, St. Jerome, Orosius and the anonymous compiler of the Epitome de caesaribus. The truth of
the claims, of course, is impossible to confirm, and there is a healthy dose of skepticism among modern scholars.
Whatever personal or sexual affection Caligula may have felt toward his sisters, this coinage is purely political and
dynastic in flavour. His sisters are each named and are shown in the guise of personifications: the eldest, Agrippina Junior,
as Securitas, the middle-sister, Drusilla, as Concordia, and the youngest, Julia Livilla, as Fortuna.
This remarkable type was produced on two occasions, his initial coinage of 37-38, and again in 39-40. The example
offered here belongs to the first coinage, which was issued when all three of the imperial women were alive. Drusilla,
Caligula’s favourite sister (and the one with whom he is said to have had an enduring incestuous relationship), died
tragically on June 10, 38, nearly three months after the last coins of the initial issue were struck.
By the time the last issue was produced (beginning March 18, 39), Drusilla had been accorded the status of a goddess,
providing the curious circumstance of a goddess being portrayed in the guise of a personification. Life in the palace
worsened after Drusilla’s death and Caligula’s affection for his remaining two sisters declined.
The circumstances reported by the ancient sources are nothing short of bizarre: Drusilla had been married to Marcus
Aemilius Lepidus, who had also been Caligula’s lover. At least after Drusilla died, Lepidus extended his sexual liaisons to
include Agrippina and Julia Livilla, his former sisters-in-law. By late in 39 this web of relationships seems to have evolved
into a failed plot by Lepidus against Caligula, who executed Lepidus and sent his two sisters into exile out of their
suspected complicity.
All of this palace intrigue occurred in the midst of the second issue of ‘three sisters’ sestertii, the production of which
Caligula probably halted immediately since of the three sisters shown, one was dead and two were in exile for having
plotted against his life.

Per RIC-Rare
3 commentsGary W206/12/19 at 23:38Jay GT4: Great acquisition
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-UY8Ftdm9LPrma-Divi_Vesp_Titus~0.jpg
Titus (Augustus) Coin: Brass Sestertius35 viewsDIVVS AVGVSTVS VESP - Radiate Vespasian seated left holding branch and scepter.
IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII Around large S C - Legend surrounding large S C
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (80 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 24.10g / 35mm / 12h
Rarity: Rare
References:
RIC II 145
Sear 2573
Cohen 207
Provenances:
Father Wilbur B. Dexter Collection
CNG
Acquisition/Sale: fvrivs.rvfvs eBay CNG Electronic/137 #216 $0.00 11/18
Notes: Jan 5, 19 - The Gary R. Wilson Collection

Per RIC-Rare
2 commentsGary W206/12/19 at 23:37Jay GT4: That's a great piece. Congrats
IMG_5149.jpg
Philip IV VIII Maravedis No Visible 1659-165228 views1 commentsRandygeki(h2)06/12/19 at 21:23Mat: Nice early modern bronze
IMG_5147.jpg
10 Constantius II37 viewsConstantius II. AE2. Lyons. DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl-diademe, draped, cuirassed bust right, A behind head / FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, soldier standing left, one knee drawn up, about to spear fallen horseman wearing a Phrygian helmet and is sitting on ground, arms raised. A in left field. Mintmark SLG

RIC Lyons 100
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)06/12/19 at 21:23Mat: Nice, love the horsemans hat
RIC_515_Titus.jpg
RIC 0515 Titus86 viewsObv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, Laureate head of Titus, right
Rev : CA-PIT (across field) RESTIT (in exergue), Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minerva
AR/Cistophorus (26.81 mm 10.174 g 6h) Struck in Rome for circulation in Asia Minor 80-81 A.D.
RIC 515 (R), RSC-BMCRE-BNF unlisted, RPC II 860
Numismatik Naumann Auction 78 Lot 735
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus06/12/19 at 02:06Jay GT4: Oh baby! That's a great coin. Congrats
211-208_BC,_Rep_,_AR-Sest,_Anonymus,_Helm__head_of_Rome_r__SII_behind,_Dioscouri_r_,_below_ROMA,_Crawford-42-7,_Syd-142,_Rome,_Q-001,_8h,_10,5-11,5mm,_0,97g-s.jpg
211-208 B.C., Anonymus AR-Sestertius, Crawford 042/7, Rome, Dioscuri galloping right, #184 views211-208 B.C., Anonymus AR-Sestertius, Crawford 042/7, Rome, Dioscuri galloping right, #1
avers: Helmeted head of Roma right, behind SII, border of dots.
reverse: Dioscuri galloping right, in exergue in linear frame ROMA, line border.
exergue: -/-//ROMA, diameter: 10,5-11,5mm, weight: 0,97g, axis: 8h,
mint: Rome, date: 211-208 B.C.,
ref: Crawford-042/7, Sydenham-142, BMCRR Rome 13, Sear 46, Anonymous,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans06/12/19 at 01:10PMah: The high relief on the obv is particularly nice.
Nerva_Sesterz.jpg
Nerva Sestertius65 viewsObv. IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS II DESIGN III P P, laureate head right.
Rev. CONCORDIA EXERCITVVM S C, clasped hands in front of legionary standard.
Mint: Rome, 96-98 AD.

33.5mm 26.40g

RIC 70

Ex CNG, Electronic Auction 156, 2007, Lot 173.
Ex CNG, Mail Bid Sale 67, 22.09.2004, Lot 1402.
EX Tony Hardy Collection
Ex Mazzini Collection

This sestertius shows the clasped hands of unity holding a legionary aquila set on a prow, the latter symbolizing the imperial navy.
3 commentskc06/11/19 at 21:55paul1888: A very nice coin!
Nerva_Sesterz.jpg
Nerva Sestertius65 viewsObv. IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS II DESIGN III P P, laureate head right.
Rev. CONCORDIA EXERCITVVM S C, clasped hands in front of legionary standard.
Mint: Rome, 96-98 AD.

33.5mm 26.40g

RIC 70

Ex CNG, Electronic Auction 156, 2007, Lot 173.
Ex CNG, Mail Bid Sale 67, 22.09.2004, Lot 1402.
EX Tony Hardy Collection
Ex Mazzini Collection

This sestertius shows the clasped hands of unity holding a legionary aquila set on a prow, the latter symbolizing the imperial navy.
3 commentskc06/11/19 at 21:51curtislclay: A nice coin, quite rare with date DESIGN III! The ...
Titus_ric_89.jpg
Titus Ar Denarius25 viewsTitus (79-81). AR Denarius, 79-80.
2.93 g 19.00mm
Obv: Head right, laureate. IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM
Rev: Bonus Eventus standing left, holding patera, corn-ears and poppy; BONVS EVENTVS AVGVSTI
RIC (2nd ed.) 89. AR.
Toned. About VF.
Atrtemide Aste E-Live auction 8 Lot 268
1 commentsorfew06/11/19 at 18:24Mat: Love the look of it
sev11.jpg
Severus II (305 - 307 A.D.)59 viewsÆ Follis
O:SEVERVS NOB C, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
R:  GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae; altar left, star right: PLC in exergue.
Lugdunum (Lyon) mint
8.83g
39mm
Seltz Hoard 9; RIC VI Lyons 193 var (star type)

Ex CNG Electric Auction, Lot 372, 1/10/2008

Ex. Gordon S. Parry Collection

Published on Wildwinds
4 commentsMat06/11/19 at 05:13Randygeki(h2): Cool addition Mat
75FA6AD6-1BFA-4304-A0A2-754ECC025DE3.jpeg
THESSALIAN LEAGUE AR Drachm. VF+. Apollo - Athena Itonia.29 viewsObverse: Laureate head of Apollo to right; to left, monogram of ΛΕΥ.
Reverse: ΘΕΣΣΑ / ΛΩΝ. Athena Itonia striding right, hurling spear with her right hand and extending shield in her left; in field to left and right, Α-Ν.

Very nice thessalian drachm, in VF+ condition.

BMC 41, SNG Munich 212. Thessalian mint, Second half 2nd century BC. 4,1 g - 19 mm
2 commentsMark R106/10/19 at 20:34Tracy Aiello: Very nice.
211-208_BC,_Rep_,_AR-Sest,_Anonymus,_Helm__head_of_Rome_r__SII_behind,_Dioscouri_r_,_below_ROMA,_Crawford-42-7,_Syd-142,_Rome,_Q-001,_8h,_10,5-11,5mm,_0,97g-s.jpg
211-208 B.C., Anonymus AR-Sestertius, Crawford 042/7, Rome, Dioscuri galloping right, #184 views211-208 B.C., Anonymus AR-Sestertius, Crawford 042/7, Rome, Dioscuri galloping right, #1
avers: Helmeted head of Roma right, behind SII, border of dots.
reverse: Dioscuri galloping right, in exergue in linear frame ROMA, line border.
exergue: -/-//ROMA, diameter: 10,5-11,5mm, weight: 0,97g, axis: 8h,
mint: Rome, date: 211-208 B.C.,
ref: Crawford-042/7, Sydenham-142, BMCRR Rome 13, Sear 46, Anonymous,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans06/10/19 at 20:30Tracy Aiello: Very nice. I really like the obverse portrait.
AADIb_small.png
Antigonos I Monophthalmos, AR Drachm28 viewsAntigonos I Monophthalmos, 306–301 BC.

Abydos Mint, c. 310-301 BC

17mm., 4.12g.

Head of Alexander III assimilated to Herakles right, wearing lionskin, knotted at base of neck

AΛEΞANΔΡOY, Zeus seated left, nude to waist, holding eagle in out-stretched hand, and sceptre, MY monogram in left field, ivy leaf beneath chair.

References: Price 1527

AADI
1 commentsRL06/10/19 at 18:22quadrans: Nice one
BCC_MA39_Enameled_Plate_Fibula.jpg
BCC MA3922 viewsEnameled Plate Fibula
Caesarea Maritima
Roman 2nd - 3rd Century CE
Rectangular bronze plate fibula
with two sections of brick-red
enamel separated by waviform
partition.  Rounded triangular
end pieces topped by circular
design with incised concentric
circles.  The missing pin was
articulated with a dual plaque
hinge and iron axis-pin.  
A hooked pin-catch extends
perpendicular from the foot,
parallel to the length of the fibula.
Length: 3.8 x 1.3cm. Weight:3.20gm.
Surface find, 1970
(click for larger pic)
1 commentsv-drome06/10/19 at 18:21quadrans: Nice piece..
vespasian_ric_362.jpg
Vespasian AR Denarius37 viewsVespasian 72-73
AR Denarius
3,24 g.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG PM COS IIII; Head laureate right
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victoria stg r ; crowning standard and holding palm.
RIC 362 Cohen 618
Ex-Paul Schürer (1890-1976);
Ex-Fritz Reusing (1874-1956)
Purchased from Manfred Olding Munzenhandlung June 4, 2019
2 commentsorfew06/10/19 at 18:20quadrans: Nice one
FR018_fac.jpg
Freiburg im Breisgau, 1300, AR Brakteat, Raven, Cross23 viewsFreiburg im Breisgau
AR Brakteat
AD ca. 1300
Obv.: ​Head of raven/eagle left, cross to the left
Rev.: -
AR, 0.41g, 16mm
Ref.: Freiburger Münzen und Medaillen No. 2; Slg. Ulmer 1472; Wielandt 46
1 commentsshanxi06/10/19 at 18:20quadrans: Interesting piece..
FR019fac.jpg
Freiburg im Breisgau, 1425, AR Brakteat, Raven, Coat of arms 22 viewsFreiburg im Breisgau
AR Brakteat
AD ca. 1425
Obv.: ​Coat of arms with head of raven within ring
Rev.: -
AR, 0.41g, 18mm
Ref.: Berstett 127, Becker p.17/5; Freiburger Münzen und Medaillen No. 11; 25. Jahre Freiburger Münzsammelverein Abb.19
1 commentsshanxi06/10/19 at 18:20quadrans: Nice piece..
sev11.jpg
Severus II (305 - 307 A.D.)59 viewsÆ Follis
O:SEVERVS NOB C, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
R:  GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae; altar left, star right: PLC in exergue.
Lugdunum (Lyon) mint
8.83g
39mm
Seltz Hoard 9; RIC VI Lyons 193 var (star type)

Ex CNG Electric Auction, Lot 372, 1/10/2008

Ex. Gordon S. Parry Collection

Published on Wildwinds
4 commentsMat06/10/19 at 18:13quadrans: Great piece ...
RPC_II_1942_Vespasianus.jpg
RPC II 1942 Vespasianus50 viewsObv: AYTOKPAT KAIΣA OYEΣΠAΣIANOY, Laureate head of Vespasian, left
Rev: T ΦΛAYI OYEΣΠ KAIΣ ETOYΣ NEOY IEPOY, Laureate head of Titus, right; in left field, star; in right field B
AR/Tetradrachm (24.01 mm 14.13 g 12 h - Struck in Antiochia ad Orontem (Syria, Seleucis and Pieria) 69-70 A.D.
RPC II 1942 - Prieur 108A (this coin)
From the Michel Prieur Collection
5 commentsFlaviusDomitianus06/10/19 at 16:46Jay GT4: Nice one!
228-1-Blk.jpg
C. VALERIUS FLACCUS XVI - Denarius, RRC 228/125 viewsDenomination: Denarius
Era: c. 140 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma R; Behind, XVI downward. Border of dots


Reverse: Victory in biga r., Holding reins in l. hand and whip in r. hand; above FLAC; below monogram of C. VAL.C.F. Line border

Mint: Rome
Weight: 4.03 gm.
Reference: RRC 128/1
Provenance: Aureo & Calico Alba Longa sale, November 7, 2018, Lot 710; Ex. NFA XXVII, Dec 4-5, 1991, Lot 343.

Sear plate coin for this type in Roman Coins and their Values. This issue is one of the five issues listed in RRC with the mark of value XVI instead of X, signaling the re-tariffing of the denarius. Beautiful toning, well centered and Superb EF.
3 commentsSteve B506/10/19 at 09:17carthago: NFA XXVII was Roberto Russo’s collection. Great c...
sev11.jpg
Severus II (305 - 307 A.D.)59 viewsÆ Follis
O:SEVERVS NOB C, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
R:  GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae; altar left, star right: PLC in exergue.
Lugdunum (Lyon) mint
8.83g
39mm
Seltz Hoard 9; RIC VI Lyons 193 var (star type)

Ex CNG Electric Auction, Lot 372, 1/10/2008

Ex. Gordon S. Parry Collection

Published on Wildwinds
4 commentsMat06/10/19 at 08:15okidoki: very nice Mat
Lucania_Metapontion_SNG-ANS467ff.jpg
Lucania, Metapontion.22 viewsLucania, Metapontion. 330-290 BC. AR Nomos (7.89 gm). Head of Demeter r., with long heair, wearing wreath of grain, earrings and necklace, ΔΑΙ under chin. / Ear of grain, leaf to r. w/ plow above, META to l. MAX to r. gVF. CNG 45 #49. SNG ANS 467ff; SNG Cop 1227; HN Italy 1581; Johnson Class 1. 62 (same dies "unusual reverse signature"); SNG GB I Newnham Davis 22, III Lockett 425, VI Fitzwilliam 187, VII Manchester 210-211.1 commentsChristian T06/09/19 at 22:32Jay GT4: You've added some great southern Italian coins...
Vlasto_320-1.jpg
CALABRIA, Taras, c. 415-400 BC. AR Nomos (Contemporary Imitation)26 views20mm, 5.35g, 9h
Nude youth on horseback right, placing wreath on the horse's head; caduceus before.
TARAS, Taras astride dolphin right, left hand extended, right hand at side.
Vlasto 320-1
VF – silver deeply black plated, with green spots where the copper core give up.
In consideration of the artistic quality of the dies, observe in detail the horse head on the obverse.
1 commentsLeo06/09/19 at 22:31Jay GT4: Interesting coin
vespasian_ric_362.jpg
Vespasian AR Denarius37 viewsVespasian 72-73
AR Denarius
3,24 g.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG PM COS IIII; Head laureate right
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victoria stg r ; crowning standard and holding palm.
RIC 362 Cohen 618
Ex-Paul Schürer (1890-1976);
Ex-Fritz Reusing (1874-1956)
Purchased from Manfred Olding Munzenhandlung June 4, 2019
2 commentsorfew06/09/19 at 22:30Jay GT4: Great coin and provenance
Vespasian_RIC_937.jpg
Vespasian AR Denarius21 viewsVespasian 77-78
AR Denarius
3,19 g.
Obv: Laureate head r; IMP CAESAR VESPASIANUS AVG
Rev: Mars standing l with spear and trophy; COS - VIII
RIC 937 Cohen 125
Ex-Paul Schürer (1890-1976);
Ex-Fritz Reusing (1874-1956)
Purchased from Manfred Olding Munzenhandlung June 4, 2019
1 commentsorfew06/09/19 at 22:30Jay GT4: Sweet
Lucania_Thourioi_SNG-Cop1463.jpg
Lucania, Thourioi.22 viewsLucania, Thourioi. 350-281 BC. AR Stater (7.79 gm). Head of Athena, r., wearing Attic helmet decorated with Scylla brandishing stone. / Bull butting r., Nike above, Σ-Ι-M below. ex: ΦΟΥΡΙΩΝ (remnant). EF. Ponterio 145 #118. SNG Cop 1463; HN Italy 1845; HGC 1 1262; Santangelo Coll. (MN Napoli) 4943; SNG ANS -; BMC1 296, 96.1 commentsChristian T06/09/19 at 19:35Mark R1: Lovely coin.
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PERGAMON (Mysia) AE18. EF-/EF. Athena Nikoforos - Trophy of arms.22 viewsObverse: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Reverse: AΘHNAΣ NIKHΦOΡOΥ. Trophy of arms.

Excellent exemplar of pergamente bronze, in EF-/EF condition (very few circullated), conserving full details in both sides, very bold reliefs checkable at photo and precious green patina.

SNG Cop 396. Pergamon mint, 2nd Century b.C. 6,9 g - 18 mm
1 commentsMark R106/09/19 at 17:54Christian T: Incredible state of preservation, especially for a...
002_Augustus_(63_B_C_-14_A_D_),_RIC_I_480,_Pergamum,_AR-Cistophoric-Tetradrachm,_IMP_CAE_SAR,_AVGVSTVS,_RSC_16,_27-26_BC,_Q-001,_1h,_26,2-27,2mm,_11,52g,-s.jpg
002 Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 480, Pergamum, AR-Cistophoric-Tetradrachm, AVGVSTVS, Capricorn right, laurel wreath around, #180 views002 Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 480, Pergamum, AR-Cistophoric-Tetradrachm, AVGVSTVS, Capricorn right, laurel wreath around, #1
avers: IMP•CAE SAR, Bare head of Augustus right.
reverse: AVGVSTVS, Capricorn right with head left, holding cornucopiae, laurel wreath around.
exergue: -/-//AVGVSTVS, diameter: 26,2-27,2mm, weight: 11,52g, axes: 12h,
mint: Pergamum, date: 27-26 B.C.,
ref: RIC I 480, RSC 16, BMCRE 696, RPC I 2211,
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans06/09/19 at 13:22Steve P: Sweet capricorn, my coin-friend (congrats)
002_Augustus_(63_B_C_-14_A_D_),_RIC_I_480,_Pergamum,_AR-Cistophoric-Tetradrachm,_IMP_CAE_SAR,_AVGVSTVS,_RSC_16,_27-26_BC,_Q-001,_1h,_26,2-27,2mm,_11,52g,-s.jpg
002 Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 480, Pergamum, AR-Cistophoric-Tetradrachm, AVGVSTVS, Capricorn right, laurel wreath around, #180 views002 Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 480, Pergamum, AR-Cistophoric-Tetradrachm, AVGVSTVS, Capricorn right, laurel wreath around, #1
avers: IMP•CAE SAR, Bare head of Augustus right.
reverse: AVGVSTVS, Capricorn right with head left, holding cornucopiae, laurel wreath around.
exergue: -/-//AVGVSTVS, diameter: 26,2-27,2mm, weight: 11,52g, axes: 12h,
mint: Pergamum, date: 27-26 B.C.,
ref: RIC I 480, RSC 16, BMCRE 696, RPC I 2211,
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans06/09/19 at 10:07*Alex: Very nice! I like these cistophoric tetradrachms, ...
002_Augustus_(63_B_C_-14_A_D_),_RIC_I_480,_Pergamum,_AR-Cistophoric-Tetradrachm,_IMP_CAE_SAR,_AVGVSTVS,_RSC_16,_27-26_BC,_Q-001,_1h,_26,2-27,2mm,_11,52g,-s.jpg
002 Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 480, Pergamum, AR-Cistophoric-Tetradrachm, AVGVSTVS, Capricorn right, laurel wreath around, #180 views002 Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 480, Pergamum, AR-Cistophoric-Tetradrachm, AVGVSTVS, Capricorn right, laurel wreath around, #1
avers: IMP•CAE SAR, Bare head of Augustus right.
reverse: AVGVSTVS, Capricorn right with head left, holding cornucopiae, laurel wreath around.
exergue: -/-//AVGVSTVS, diameter: 26,2-27,2mm, weight: 11,52g, axes: 12h,
mint: Pergamum, date: 27-26 B.C.,
ref: RIC I 480, RSC 16, BMCRE 696, RPC I 2211,
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans06/09/19 at 08:33shanxi: very nice
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PERGAMON (Mysia) AE16. EF. Athena - Heads of Bull. Circa 310-282 BC.22 viewsObverse: Helmeted and laureate head of Athena left.
Reverse: ΠEΡΓA. Confronted heads of bulls; ivy leaf above.

EF condition, conserving full details in both sides, very bold reliefs and a nice green patina totally natural.

SNG BN 1577-85 var. Pergamon (Mysia), Circa 310-282 BC. 4,0 g - 16 mm
1 commentsMark R106/09/19 at 08:33shanxi: nice
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ISTROS AR Drachm. EF-/EF. Eagle over Dolphin.28 viewsObverse: Facing male heads, the left inverted
Reverse: IΣTPIH. Sea-eagle left, grasping dolphin with talons.

in EF-/EF condition, conserving full details in both sides, very bold reliefs and high quality silver.

SNG BM Black Sea 237. Istros (Thrace) mint, 400-350 BC. 5,0 g - 17,5 mm
3 commentsMark R106/09/19 at 03:18Jay GT4: Sweet!
RIC_143_Vespasianus.jpg
RIC 0143 Vespasianus90 viewsObv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III, laureate head right
Rev: CAES AVG F DES IMP AVG F COS DES IT / S C (in field), Titus standing right with spear and parazonium, confronting Domitian standing left with spear
AE/Sestertius (34.44 mm 25,40 gr 6h) Struck in Rome 71 AD (2nd issue)
RIC 143 R, BMCRE 528, BNF 473
Purchased on eBay in 2004
5 commentsFlaviusDomitianus