Classical Numismatics Discussion Members' Gallery
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register.

Members' Gallery Home | Member Collections | Last Added | Last Comments | Most Viewed | Top Rated | My Favorities | Search Galleries
Home > Members' Coin Collection Galleries > Nemonater > Greek

TITLE  +   - 
FILE NAME  +   - 
DATE  +   - 
POSITION  +   - 
AlexIIIObol.jpg
Alexander III AR Hemiobol26 viewsKingdom of Macedon, Alexander III 'the Great' AR Hemiobol. Uncertain Eastern mint, circa 325-300 BC. 0.56g, 9mm
O: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
R: Bow, quiver and club; monogram in field.
- Cf. Price 4013-4014.
Nemonater
AlexanderB.jpg
Alexander III Price 300055 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’, 336-323 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 25 mm, 17.16 g, 3 h), Tarsos, struck under Balakros or Menes, circa 333-327.
O: Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and eagle standing right with closed wings in his right; below throne, B.
- Price 3000.
2 commentsNemonater
AlexanderA.jpg
Alexander III Tetradrachm Price 299366 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’, 336-323 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 25 mm, 17.25 g, 4 h), Tarsos, struck under Balakros or Menes, circa 333-327.
O:Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and eagle standing right with closed wings in his right; below throne, A.
- Price 2993.
1 commentsNemonater
Alexander.jpg
Alexander III Tetradrachm Price 299980 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’, 336-323 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 25 mm, 17.13 g, 12 h), Tarsos, struck under Balakros or Menes, circa 333-327.
O: Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and eagle standing right with closed wings in his right.
- Price 2999. A rare early and unusual issue from Tarsos, "Officina B", bearing no symbol.

By comparing these early Tarsos tetradrachms to the staters of Mazaios (Pictured below) it is easy to see the identical forms of the throne, scepter, footstool and other details. The drapery is rendered in a similar manner, the Aramaic inscription of the one and the Greek inscription of the other share the same curve following the dotted border. This evidence indicates the two series of coins were the common product of a single mint.

2 commentsNemonater
AlexanderSardesDrachm.jpg
Alexander III ‘the Great’93 viewsAlexander III ‘the Great’ AR Drachm (18mm 4.24g) Sardes mint. Lifetime issue, circa 334/25-323 BC.
O: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin R: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; torch in left field, monogram below throne. Price 2567.
1 commentsNemonater
AthensOwl.jpg
Athens, Greece, Pi-Style III Tetradrachm, 353 - c. 340 B.C67 viewsSilver tetradrachm, 17.1g, Athens mint, oval flan, typical of the type.
O: Head of Athena right with eye seen in true profile, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and pi-style floral scroll, pellet in ear.
R: Owl standing right, head facing, to right AΘE in large lettering, to left olive sprig and crescent, pellet over eyes.
- Kroll Pi-Style p. 244, fig. 8; Flament p. 126, 3; SNG Cop 63; SNG Munchen 96; SNG Delepierre 1479; Svoronos Athens pl. 20: 2

Unlike the customary flans of 5th and earlier 4th century Athenian tetradrachms that have solid, rounded edges from having been cast in a mold, these were struck on thick planchets made of flattened, folded-over, older tetradrachms. The flattened coins were not just folded in two but were folded over a second time to produce a planchet of three or four layers

There are three distinct features of this type of Athens Owl coinage. 1st, they have flans that are commonly misshapen. A number of them are so distorted that numismatists and collectors in Greece have long referred to them as “logs” (koutsoura); these are the tetradrachms in the form of long, stretched ovals with one or two nearly straight sides. 2nd, since the flans, of whatever shape, were ordinarily too small for the full relief designs of the dies, relatively few pi-style coins were minted with their entire obverse and/or reverse type showing. 3rd, just as the diameters and surface areas of the pi flans are generally smaller than those of Athenian tetradrachms of the 5th century and of the first half of the 4th century, they tend also to be exceptionally thick.

The name Pi-style refers to the floral helmet ornament on the obverse which resembles the Greek letter pi (P) bisected by a long central tendril.
5 commentsNemonater
AthensOwlI.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena and Owl44 viewsAttica, Athens, 449-413 BC, silver tetradrachm, 21 mm, 16.88 g.
O: Head of Athena to right, the eye seen in facing, archaic style, banker's mark on cheek.
R: Owl standing to right, head facing; to right A-theta-E; to left, olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square, two test cuts and crescent banker's mark in field.

This was the first true "silver dollar" of the ancient world, the coins manufactured in Athens circulated wherever the Greeks travelled. Furthermore, similar coins were struck at a number of Eastern mints, and this may be one of them.

Dark toning with beautiful dark blue highlights.
Nemonater
LooseChange.jpg
Change From Under The Cushions72 views2 commentsNemonater
UncertainHemiobol.jpg
Cilicia, Uncertain Hemiobol28 viewsCilicia, uncertain mint. AR Hemiobol 4th C. BC. 0.31g, 7mm.
O: Female figure seated r. on the ground playing with astragali.
R: Archer kneeling r., drawing bow, Amphora to right.
- Troxell-Kagan, pg. 277, 6; Klein 641.
Nemonater
HalfShekelSpink.jpg
Half Shekel Tyre Uncertain Date48 viewsPHOENICIA, Tyre. 126/5 BC-AD 65/6. AR Half Shekel. Uncertain date.
O:Laureate bust of Melkart right
R: Eagle standing left on prow, with palm frond over shoulder; to left, illegible date above club; crude monograms to right, [Phoenician letter] between legs.

The Isfiya hoard uncovered in 1955 consisted of more than 4,000 shekels and half shekels. The coins had a full range of dates through the 50s AD (about the Tyre year 170s). About 15 percent of the coins had crude and unreadable dates. Since the hoard had almost no coins in the 20s to 30s AD (mid Tyre year 140s through the 150s), the finders made a conjecture that that's where these unreadable coins fall. All these coins with unreadable dates had a KP monogram. Mine lacks readable monograms so I cannot be sure about its period of striking. However, this coin is consistent with the coins in this group.
1 commentsNemonater
halfshekelI.jpg
Half Shekel, Tyre LA (Year 1)140 views6.43 g Tyre Mint 126/125 BCE

O: Head of Herakles (Melqart)
R: Eagle standing left; ΤΥΡΟΥ ΙΕΡΑΣ ΚΑΙ ΑΣΥΛΟΥ "Of Tyre the Holy and City of Refuge." around; Date LA to left; Monogram FP to right.

BMC Phoenicia page 250 #213 lists one Year 1 half shekel with M monogram. DCA lists this date as R3, the highest rarity rating.
Unique with with FP monogram. Glossy, dark chocolate find patina.

Shekels and Half Shekels of Tyre began being issued as autonomous silver coins in 126/125 BCE after gaining freedom from Seleucid domination that year. Although similar in style to the Seleucid coinage, the most obvious change was the King's bust being replaced with the city's chief god Melqart.

They have become highly desired due to their being the money of choice for payments to the Jerusalem Temple. The half shekel was the required yearly tribute to the temple for every Jewish male over the age of 20.

Ed Cohen notes in Dated Coins of Antiquity, that the minting of Tyre shekels or, more specifically, half shekels, ended at the onset of the Jewish Revolt in 65/66 and the minting of the Jewish Revolt shekels then begins. This, along with other compelling evidence, has led many, including me, to believe the later "KP" shekels were struck south of Tyre.
4 commentsNemonater
AthensCountermarkTet.jpg
Heavily Countermarked Classical (Old-Style), c. 454 - 404 B.C. Athens Owl Tetradrachm75 views3 commentsNemonater
Tort_Stater.jpg
Islands off Attica, Aegina Transitional Issue Land Tortoise 46 viewsIslands off Attica, Aegina. Circa 456/45-431 BC. AR Stater 12.40g, 22mm
O: Land tortoise, head in profile, with segmented shell
R: Large square incuse with heavy skew pattern.

- Meadows, Aegina, Group IIIb; Milbank pl. II, 13; HGC 6, 437 var. (head not in profile); SNG Copenhagen 517 var. (same); Dewing 1683 var. (same); Gillet 948 var. (same); Jameson 1200 var. (same); Pozzi 1635 var. (same).

Struck on a broad flan. Very rare with head in profile.

The head of the land tortoise on this massive coinage is typically engraved shown from above, with the tortoise looking forward. Very rarely are they encountered with the head shown in profile. The profile head was canonical on the earlier, sea turtle coinage, thus the land tortoise coins of this variety may represent a short transitional issue at the beginning of this period.
5 commentsNemonater
TriteLion.jpg
Kingdom of Lydia Alyattes II EL Trite80 viewsKingdom of Lydia. Alyattes II EL Trite. 610-560 BC. Sardes mint, 4.67g, 13mm.
O: Confronted lion’s heads (only the right is visible); walwet (partially off flan) between.
R: Double incuse square punch. Weidauer 93.

The Kingdom of Lydia under the Mermnad dynasty may well have been the originator of coinage in the Mediterranean world. It possessed rich deposits of electrum, an alloy of gold and silver, which was the only metal used for coin production in its earliest stages. While most of these coins are anepigraphic, a small number of types bear either the the inscription walwet or kukalim in Lydian, the former thought to be the name of the Mermnad king known from Greek sources as Alyattes.

On trites such as this coin, the oversized die features two confronted lion's heads, with the inscription between them, although only the right or left lion is ever fully visible. It would seem the dies were initially produced for the striking of staters, although none survive.
Nemonater
LysimachusTet.jpg
Lysimachus AR tetradrachm37 viewsTHRACIAN KINGDOM. Lysimachus (305-281 BC) struck 287/6-281/0. AR tetradrachm (30mm, 17.17 gm, 11h). Thrace, Lysimachia.
O: Diademed head of deified Alexander III right, with horn of Ammon
R: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑXΟ[Υ]; (King Lysimachus), Athena seated left, Nike in right hand crowning name, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; YE monogram in exergue.

- From the Medicus Collection, Ex CGB.fr MONNAIES 9 lot 33, MONNAIES 19 lot 44 2004, MONNAIES 34 lot 102 2008, Ex Gorny and Mosch, Auction 42 (10 October 1988) lot 138. Formerly known as NGC Choice XF 5/5 - 4/5, Fine Style. - Müller 41?, Gülnar II 2696? (A. Davesne & G. Le Rider. Le trésor de Meydancikkale. 2 Vols. Paris. 1989.) Possibly unique with this monogram.

Missing the final upsilon of the name of Lysimachus, how could such a talented engraver make this mistake?
4 commentsNemonater
FirstMerisTet.jpg
Macedon under Roman Rule. First Meris AR Tetradrachm.50 viewsMacedon under Roman Rule. First Meris AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, 158-146 BC.
O: Diademed and draped bust of Artemis right, bow and quiver at shoulder; all within tondo of Macedonian shield
R: ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝΩΝ ΠΡΩΤΗΣ, horizontal club, monograms above and below; all within oak wreath tied at left; thunderbolt in outer left field.
2 commentsNemonater
PhilipAplustre_Tet_b.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom. Philip II, Amphipolis mint54 viewsMacedonian Kingdom. Philip II, 359-336 BC. Silver Tetradrachm, Amphipolis mint. Early posthumous issue, struck under Kassander.
O: Zeus right wearing laurel wreath with berries.
R: Φ I Λ I Π - Π OY (Of Philip) Naked youth on horse prancing right holding long palm branch and reins; aplustre below; Γ under foreleg. Rider pl. 46, 18; SNG ANS 740. Light golden toning.

Plutarch (Alex., 3)
"To Philip, however, who had just taken Potidaea, there came three messages at the same time:
the first that Parmenio had conquered the Illyrians in a great battle, the second that his race-horse had won a victory at the Olympic games, while a third announced the birth of Alexander. These things delighted him, of course, and the seers raised his spirits still higher by declaring that the son whose birth coincided with three victories would be always victorious."

Plutarch (Alex., 4.10)
"...and (Philip) took care to have the victories of his chariots at Olympia engraved upon his coins..."

The reverse-types of Philip’s coins are nearly all agonistic, and refer either to the games celebrated by him at Dium in
honour of the Olympian Zeus (Müller, Mon. d'Alex., pp. II and 344), or, preferably, to the great Olympian games where his
chariots were victorious. We have, indeed, the direct assertion of Plutarch (Alex., c. 4) in favour of the latter
hypothesis, τας εν ‘Ολυμπια νικας των αρματων εγχαραττων τοις νομισμασιν. Philip was also successful at Olympia with the
race-horse (ιππω κελητι νενικηκέναι; Plut., Alex., 3), a victory of which he perpetuated the memory on his tetradrachms. The horseman
with kausia and chlamys is less certainly agonistic, and may (perhaps with a play upon his name) represent the king
himself as a typical Macedonian ιππευς.
Philip’s coins were struck at many mints in various parts of his empire. For the various mint-marks which they bear see
Müller’s Num. d'Alex. le Grand, the local attributions in which are, however, to be accepted with great caution. They
continued to circulate in Europe long after his death, and the Gauls, when they invaded and pillaged Greece, took vast
numbers of them back into their own land, where they long continued to serve as models for the native currency of Gaul and
Britain. (Historia Numorum, Barclay V. Head, 1887)

It is clear that, trying hard to show off, to pass and ultimately to impose his Greek character, Philip was especially
interested in the aesthetic aspect of his coins and also in the propaganda and psychological effects they would have
on the rest of the Greek world, and especially on "those sarcastic, democratic Athenians" and on "the more barbarian" people than himself...

Demosthenes (19, 308)
"And as for Philip,—why, good Heavens, he was a Greek of the Greeks, the finest orator and the most thorough—going
friend of Athens you could find in the whole world. And yet there were some queer, ill-conditioned fellows in Athens who
did not blush to abuse him, and even to call him a barbarian! "
4 commentsNemonater
PhilipII.jpg
Philip II Tetradrachm Lifetime Issue27 viewsPhilip II Tetradrachm Lifetime Issue Amphipolis Mint, 355-349/8.
O: Laureate head of Zeus to right.
R: ΦΙΛΙΠ ΠΟΥ Philip II, wearing kausia and chlamys and raising his right hand in salute, riding to left; horizontal club below belly.
- Le Rider 96-108

The reverse is a representation of the King’s arrival on his accession to the throne, dressed in traditional Macedonian garb.
2 commentsNemonater
ShekelStar.jpg
Phoenicia, Tyre Shekel with Star Countermark71 viewsPHOENICIA, Tyre. 126/5 BC-AD 65/6. AR Shekel (13.10 g, 12h). Irregular issue Dated CY 92 (35/4 BC). Laureate bust of Melkart right / Eagle standing left on prow, with palm frond over shoulder; to left, ЧB (date) above club; monogram to right, beth between legs. Extremely rare with star countermark. (7 or 8 known to exist? Unique with this date.)

An irregular issue, possibly illegal. The parallel with the countermarked coins of the procurators is interesting: Only varieties or defectuous coins are countermarked (spelling error, retrograde letter, upside-down wreath, hole...), not the regular coins.
Nemonater
PtolemyI26mms.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter Tetradrachm as Satrap42 viewsPtolemy I Soter. Silver Tetradrachm (15.68 g, 26mm), as Satrap, 323-305 BC. Alexandria, in the name of Alexander III. Overstruck on earlier Alexander tetradrachm, 306-305 BC.
O: Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant's skin headdress, aegis around neck with tiny Δ in scales.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY in left field, Athena Alkidemos advancing right, wielding javelin and holding forth shield;in right field, monogram, Corinthian helmet right above ΔI and eagle standing right on thunderbolt.
Overstruck, undertype beading visible on obverse just above elephant's ear; on the reverse, portrait of Alexander above eagles head into Athena's shield.

The earlier 17g tetradrachms were withdrawn from circulation in 306/305 BC and reissued after weight adjustment. They were trimmed to remove 1.5g of silver, heated and restruck. This must have been faster than melting them down into bullion and restriking. Some of these issues, such as this one, show the clear evidence of the edges being trimmed, although many do not.

Ptolemy was feeling the financial burden of repelling Antigonus’ invasion and supporting Rhodes through a thirteen-month siege. The government needed extra currency and Egypt produced little or no silver. The recall of the heavy issues meant 8 tetradrachms were restruck into 9 “Crisis Issues” but with no change in the appearance of the dies.
3 commentsNemonater
Ptolemy_30mms.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter Tetradrachm as Satrap55 viewsPtolemy I Soter. Silver Tetradrachm (15.65 g, 30mm), as Satrap, 323-305 BC. Alexandria, in the name of Alexander III
O: Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant's skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY in left field, Athena Alkidemos advancing right, wielding javelin and holding forth shield;in right field, monogram, Corinthian helmet above and eagle standing right on thunderbolt.
Overstruck, traces of undertype visible.

The earlier 17g tetradrachms were withdrawn from circulation in 306/305 BC and reissued after weight adjustment. They were trimmed to remove 1.5g of silver, heated and restruck. This must have been faster than melting them down into bullion and restriking. Some issues show clear evidence of the edges being trimmed, although many, such as this one, do not.

Ptolemy was feeling the financial burden of repelling Antigonus’ invasion and supporting Rhodes through a thirteen-month siege. The government needed extra currency and Egypt produced little or no silver. The recall of the heavy issues meant 8 tetradrachms were restruck into 9 “Crisis Issues” but with no change in the appearance of the dies.
4 commentsNemonater
Seleukos_I_Nikator.jpg
Seleukos I Nikator156 viewsSeleukos I Nikator, 312 - 281 B.C. AR Unit 17mm, 3.3 g. Babylon I mint. Struck circa 311-300 BC O: Head of Herakles wearing lion skin R: Club and quiver-over-bow; monogram to left, Lambda to right.
SC 84; Price 3705; A. Spaer, “A New Type of Alexander the Great?” INJ 5 (1981), 1; HGC 9, 70 (R3). Only two others published, each from a different set of dies and different monogram on the reverse.

Seleukos was Satrap in Babylon from 321/20-316 BC and then fled to Egypt under threat from Antigonos. He returned to Babylonia in April 311 and it is from this date in the Macedonian year 312/11 that the Seleukid era is dated i.e. Seleucid Year 1 = 312/11 BC being the year he ousted Peithon from Babylonia. Peithon had been appointed Satrap of Babylonia by Antigonos after the flight of Seleukos.

Previous authors have noted the denomination of this rare issue as 1/5th tetradrachm or 1/5th stater, based on the Macedonian standard used from Archelaos through Philip II. However, the weights of the three published pieces, 3.3 g, 3.19 g and 2.79 g, do not comport well with this idea. The fact that this type is only known in the far eastern mint of Babylon also makes such a weight standard doubtful. Unfortunately, the weights of these three pieces also do not comport well with the local Babylonian standard. Until more pieces come to light, their exact standard and denomination remains unknown.
6 commentsNemonater
SelElephant.jpg
Seleukos I Nikator / Quadriga of Elephants18 viewsSeleukos I Nikator. 312-281 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 17.13 g, 4h). Seleukeia on the Tigris II mint. Struck circa 296/5-281 BC.
O: Laureate head of Zeus right
R: BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King) left, Athena, brandishing spear and shield, in quadriga of elephants right; anchor above,ΣEΛEYKOY (Seleukos), two monograms in exergue.
- SC 130.20c corr. (monogram); ESM – (but obv. die A42); HGC 9, 18a; NFA XXII, lot 339 (same dies); CNG 96 lot 530 (Same Dies).

For this variety, 130.20c, SC cites NFA XXII, lot 339, but the monogram is not clear in the photograph. The present coin, from the same dies as the NFA piece, clearly shows that the diagonal line in the lower left of the monogram is not present.

Seleucus I was the founder of the Seleucid dynasty. His kingdom at its highest point extended from Thrace and Asia Minor in the West to Bactria in the East and from the Black Sea in the north to the borders of Egypt in the South. Out of all of the Successors of Alexander the Great, he was the one who came closest to restoring the entirety of the Macedonian Empire. Although Seleucus had been appointed satrap of Babylonia by an assembly of Alexander’s former generals in 321 BC, Antigonos, who was made strategos of Asia at the same time sought to remove the satraps that he could not control and thereby become the new master of Alexander’s Empire. Realizing the danger, Seleucus escaped from Babylon to the Egyptian court of Ptolemy. With Ptolemy’s assistance, Seleucus was able to return to Babylon and reclaim his satrapy in 312 BC. In 306/5 he embarked upon an eastern campaign to gain control of the Upper Satrapies.

This series of tetradrachms served as a reminder of the 500 war elephants Seleukos received in settlement with Chandragupta in the Peace of 303. The treaty is celebrated on the reverse which depicts a militant Athena being pulled by four elephants equipped with horned headdresses.

Elephants were the equivalent to the tank of the ancient Greek world. The elephants of Chandragupta had a pivotal role to play in Seleucus’ reign. Thanks to their timely arrival at the Battle of Ipsos (301 BC), it was possible for Seleucus and his allies to defeat and kill Antigonos, thereby ending an ever-present threat to his security. With Antigonos gone, Seleucus could safely rule his eastern kingdom. In 281 BC Philetairos and other cities and rulers of western Asia Minor invited Seleucus to march west and destroy his sometime ally, Lysimachos, who had made himself very unpopular in the region. Seleucus acquiesced to this request, defeating and killing Lysimacus at the Battle of Korupedion. This victory gained for Seleucus all of Lysimacus’ former territory in Asia Minor and Thrace, but he was not able to savour this triumph for long. Later in the year, as he marched through Thrace, Seleucus was murdered by a refugee from the Ptolemaic court.
1 commentsNemonater
SelTrophy.jpg
Seleukos I Nikator Trophy Tetradrachm 36 viewsSELEUKID KINGS of SYRIA. Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 26mm, 17.02 g 8), Susa, c. 304-298/7.
O: Bust of Alexander the Great and/or Seleukos as Dionysos to right, wearing helmet covered with a panther skin and adorned with a bull’s horn and ear, and with a panther skin tied around his shoulders.
R: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ Nike walking to right, placing wreath on trophy of arms to right; to left and right of Nike, monogram.

- CSE 1023. ESM 426. Kraay/Hirmer 740. SC 173.4., Ex New York Sale XXVIII, 5 January 2012, 1033, and from an English collection.

The portrait on the obverse has been identified as Dionysos, Alexander, or Seleukos. The arguments for each identification have merit, and indeed they are probably all correct; the image is an assimilation of all three into a singular portrait, as Iossif argues. The portrait relates to Seleukos' eastern victory and ties his mythology to that of both Dionysos (the panther being the animal companion of the god Dionysos), the first conqueror of India, and Alexander, the second conqueror of India.

In contrast, the reverse relates to the western victories of Seleukos. Here, Nike, the goddess of victory, places a wreath on a “trophy of arms”. An ancient “trophy” was a wooden post set up on a battlefield, decorated with the armor and weapons of a defeated enemy. This trophy is built from Macedonian arms, as evidenced by the Vergina Sun (or Argead Star) emblazoned on the shield. This star is ubiquitous in Greek and Macedonian art from ancient times down to our day. A beautiful example is found on a larnax in the tomb of Philip II of Macedonia, the father of Alexander the Great. This clearly identifies the vanquished enemy as the Antigonid army that fell at Ipsos in 301 BCE.

Thus, this issue celebrates the totality of Seleukos' victories in the east and west, solidifying his new empire, and also further establishes his dynastic heritage by tying his exploits to that of the great conqueror, Alexander, in an effort to legitimize Seleukos' right to rule over these vast lands.
3 commentsNemonater
ShekelDeltaBl.jpg
Shekel Tyre Civic Year 4 (123/2 BC)100 viewsPHOENICIA. Tyre. AR shekel (29mm, 14.07 gm, 12h). Dated Civic Year 4 (123/2 BC).
O: Laureate head of Melqart right
R: TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (Tyre the Holy and Inviolable), Eagle standing left on prow, palm frond over wing; to left, LΔ (date) above club, M and Phoenician bet between legs.
- DCA Tyre 9. DCA 921. ex ClassicalCoins.Com 2005
5 commentsNemonater
Shekel_33_34~0.jpg
Shekel Tyre CY 159, 33-34CE127 viewsShekel Tyre CY 159, 33-34CE
PHOENICIA, Tyre. 126/5 BC-AD 65/6. AR Shekel (14.29 g g, 12h). Dated CY 159 (AD 33/4).
O: Bust of Melkart right, wearing laurel wreath.
R: Eagle standing left on prow, palm frond over right wing; to left, PNΘ (date) above club; to right, KP above monogram; Phoenician letter between legs; TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY around.
- Rouvier 2107 var. (monogram); RPC 4663; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC 204 var. (monogram & letter between legs); HGC 10, 357; DCA 920.

Perhaps the most desirable date in the 191 year series due to 33 C.E. being the most widely accepted year for Jesus execution.

Tacitus, a Roman historian who lived during the latter part of the first century C.E., wrote: “Christus [Latin for “Christ”], from whom the name [Christian] had its origin, suffered the extreme penalty during the reign of Tiberius at the hands of one of our procurators, Pontius Pilatus.”—The Complete Works of Tacitus (New York, 1942), “The Annals,” Book 15, par. 44.
2 commentsNemonater
ShekelTyreCY166.jpg
Shekel Tyre CY 166 (40/41)53 viewsPHOENICIA, Tyre. 126/5 BC-AD 65/6. AR Shekel. 14.45g Dated CY ΡΞς (40/41 CE).
O: Laureate bust of Melkart right
R: Eagle standing left on prow; palm frond behind; to left, ΡΞς (Year 166; 40/41CE) above club; monogram KP to right, Phoenician Aleph between legs.
- DCA II 615 plate coin.

Extremely rare date, only three known to exist, unique with Aleph. RPC1s.4669A listed a shekel for year 166, ΡΞς. It gave neither identification of its monogram, letter beneath the eagle, nor its weight.
Nemonater
ShekelTyreYear20.jpg
Shekel Tyre CY 20 (107/106 BC)94 viewsPHOENICIA, Tyre. 126/5 BC-AD 65/6. AR Shekel Dated CY 20 (107/6 BC).
O: Bust of Melkart right, wearing laurel wreath, lion skin around neck
R: Eagle standing left on prow; palm frond in background; to left, LK (date) above club; monogram to right, Phoenician Bet between legs; TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY around.
- Rouvier 1997 var. (letter between legs); HGC 10, 357; DCA 919; BMC 91–2.
1 commentsNemonater
ShekelTyr.jpg
Shekel Tyre CY 24 (103/102 BC)44 viewsPHOENICIA, Tyre. 126/5 BC-AD 65/6. AR Shekel Dated CY 24 (103/2 BC).
O: Bust of Melkart right, wearing laurel wreath, lion skin around neck
R: Eagle standing left on prow; palm frond in background; to left, ΔK (date) above club; monogram to right, Phoenician Bet between legs; TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY around.
1 commentsNemonater
ShekelTyreCY30.jpg
Shekel Tyre CY 30 (97/96)51 viewsPHOENICIA, Tyre. 126/5 BC-AD 65/6. AR Shekel. Dated CY 30 (97/6 BC).
O: Laureate bust of Melkart right
R: Eagle standing left on prow; palm frond behind; to left, LΛ (date) above club; monogram to right, Phoenician aleph between legs.
- DCA-Tyre 74; Rouvier 2013; BMC 116-7; DCA 919; HGC 10, 357.
Nemonater
ShekelTyreYear128.jpg
Shekel Tyre Year 128 (2/3 CE)34 viewsPHOENICIA, Tyre. 126/5 BC-AD 65/6. AR Shekel. Dated CY 128 (2/3 CE).
O: Laureate bust of Melkart right, wearing lion’s skin around his neck
R: Eagle standing left on prow; palm frond behind; to left, PKH (date) above club; Z to right, Phoenician aleph between legs.
- DCA Sup. No. 307, RPC I Suppl. 4650b. Cf. BMC Phoenicia 233.
Nemonater
ShekelTyreYear142.jpg
Shekel Tyre Year 142 (16/17 CE)44 viewsPHOENICIA, Tyre. 126/5 BC-AD 65/6. AR Shekel. Dated CY 142 (16/17 CE).
O: Laureate bust of Melkart right
R: Eagle standing left on prow, palm frond over right wing; to left, PMB (date) above club; to right, KP above monogram; Phoenician B between legs.
- Rouvier -; BMC -; RPC I Suppl. 4688A.
1 commentsNemonater
ShekelTyreCY178.jpg
Shekel Tyre Year 178 (52/53 CE)59 viewsPHOENICIA, Tyre. 126/5 BC-AD 65/6. AR Shekel. Dated CY POH (52/53 CE).
O: Laureate bust of Melkart right
R: Eagle standing left on prow; palm frond behind; to left, POH (date) above club; monogram KP to right, Phoenician Bet between legs.
- DCA Sup. No. 430 (This coin)
Nemonater
Shekel76_75.jpg
Shekel, PHOENICIA, Tyre.77 viewsPHOENICIA, Tyre. 126/5 BC-AD 65/6. AR Shekel (27mm, 13.82 g). Dated CY 51 (76/75 BC). The letter A may have been engraved over another letter.
O: Laureate bust of Melkart right R: Eagle standing left on prow; palm frond over right wing; to left, AN (the date on this coin is very likely re-engraved) above club; D to right; b between legs. - No. 129 in Cohen's 2014 Supplement.
Nemonater
Virtual_Tray_of_Philip_II,_Alexander_III_and_the_Diadochi.jpg
Virtual Tray of Philip II, Alexander III and the Diadochi57 viewsPhilip II, Alexander III, Ptolemy, Seleucus, Lysimachus and Kassander.5 commentsNemonater
 
35 files on 1 page(s)