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Home > Theme Galleries > Roman Mint Style Examples

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Four_Cons_Ob.JPG
Antioch mint Portrait Style508 viewsFour coins from Anitoch mint. Typical 'hook-nosed' portraits.Kevin_S
AvsR.jpg
Antioch vs. Rome1016 viewsOne way to distinguish Gordian's Antioch products from Rome is by letter shape, in particular, the letter M; on Antioch coins it is formed with a V in the middle thus IVI, whereas the Rome M is two lambdas thus Λ Λ. Joe Sermarini
gothicus~0.JPG
Claudius Gothicus AE Antoninianus, Rome mint150 viewsOBV: IMP CLAUDIUS AVG; Radiate head right
REV: SECURIT AVG; Securitas looking left, leaning on a column with legs crossed, baton in hand/ XI in field
Not listed in RIC , found in hoards (eg Cunettio 2228) and listed in Wildwinds as RIC V -I 101 Rome var.

The products of the Rome mint at this time have nearly vertical letter shapes eg 'M' is IIII, 'V' is almost II and 'A' appears like I-I or H
daverino
moneta_575.jpg
Claudius Gothicus Antoninianus: Rome or Antioch? 112 viewsCurtis Clay posted on the discussion board: A. Markl, Mints and Issues of Claudius Gothicus (in German), Num. Zeitschrift 16, 1884, notes that Antioch and Rome share the same officina marks and some of the same rev. types, but the marked coins are easily separated, since Antioch always has obv. leg. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG and officina letter IN EXERGUE, whereas Rome-mint coins with letters in exergue only began in Issue 3 with shortened obv. leg. IMP CLAVDIVS AVG.

Moreover Rome and only Rome usually writes IIIIIP for IMP in obv. leg. (your coin has more IVI for the M, which Markl says also occurs at Antioch).

Finally Antioch coins "are usually on nicely rounded flans and are struck in better billon than the antoniniani of other mints, and are also found more often with an intact silver coating."

Markl, a retired army officer, was a specialist collector of Claudius and the first man to clearly distinguish the different mints of the antoniniani and to put the production of each mint in approximate chronological order.
Joe Sermarini
Constantine I a.jpg
Constantine- Mint of Rome style!919 viewsVery stern face, and distinctive nose are a dead give-away for Rome issues of Constantine and Licinius. The impressive cuirass is also quite common, while the drapery from Rome has a distinctive "flourish" to it. Very large bust...

From the Collection of Evan Rankin (Wolfgang336)
2 commentswolfgang336
constantius~0.jpg
Constantius Gallus-Maiorina679 viewsThis is one of my coins that was mint in Sirmium. Coins mint in Sirmium are sharp, perfectly round, usually with great patina.Marcus Aurelius
elagabal_88_2.jpg
Elagabal mint of Rome606 viewsElagabal AD 218-222
Denar RIC 88; C.61; BMC 212; rev. INVICTVS SACEDOS AVG

The star in the left field, a symbol of the sun-god, stands for the mint of Rome (Curtis Clay)
1 commentsJochen
forvpltft.jpg
FEL TEMP REPARATIO from the Forvm Catalog256 viewsRow 1 Fallen Horseman

Constantius II-Aquileia
Constantius II-Constantinople
Constantius II-Heraclea

Row 2Fallen Horseman

Constantius II-Arles
Constantius II-Thessalonica
Julian II-Sirmium
Julian II-Siscia
Constantius Gallus-Constantinople

Row 3 Barbarian Hut

Constans-Aquileia
Constans-Alexandria
Constantius II-Cyzicus

Row 4 Galley

Constantius II-Thessalonica
Constans-Siscia

Row 5 Galley

Constantius II-Thessalonica
Constantius II-Siscia
Constans-Siscia
Constans-Thessalonica

Row 6 Phoenix

Constantius II-Siscia
Constans-Siscia
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
06249q00.jpg
Laodicea ad Mar, loop up from drapery on Julia Domna denarii804 viewsLaodicea ad Mare is today Latakia, Syria. It was a Phonecian town, refounded by Seleucus I Nicator 301-281 B.C. and renamed after his mother, Laodicea. Coins of Julia Domna from the Laodicea mint can be identified by the loop coming up from her drapery at the neck.5 comments
ANT 5 copy~0.jpg
Licinius II, Ae 3 Issues struck in Antioch347 viewsThe portraits of Licinius II struck in Antioch are quite unusual and never to be confused with any other mint. Note the sharp nose and somewhat pinched features.Mayadigger
ANT 3 copy~0.jpg
Licinius II, Ae 3 Issues struck in Antioch305 viewsThe portraits of Licinius II struck in Antioch are quite unusual and never to be confused with any other mint. Note the sharp nose and somewhat pinched features.1 commentsMayadigger
ANT 1 copy~0.jpg
Licinius II, Ae 3 Issues struck in Antioch432 viewsThe portraits of Licinius II struck in Antioch are quite unusual and never to be confused with any other mint. Note the sharp nose and somewhat pinched features.3 commentsMayadigger
Four_Cons_Rx.JPG
LRBC Antioch Issues290 viewsThe celators in Antioch had a unique and easily recognized portrait style; ie. hooked noses. On the other hand, each mint office had a different style for the same 'GLORIA EXERCITVS' Rev.Kevin_S
AD244_philip_antoninianus_spes_east_obv_14_rev_09.JPG
Philip I - Unknown Eastern Mint - SPES FELICITATIS ORBIS91 viewsRoman Empire
Emperor Philip I (244 - 249 AD)
Silver Antoninianus ( double denarius )
Struck at Unknown Eastern Mint - 244 AD.

obv: IMP C M IVL PHILIPPVS P F AVG PM - Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right. Seen from behind.
rev: SPES FELICITATIS ORBIS - (translation: 'Hope for a Happy World') - Spes (Hope) advancing left, holding flower in one hand and lifting skirt with the other.

weight: 5.0 Grams
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The extra obverse titles give away the fact that this was struck at the Unknown Eastern Mint, another obverse type has the 'PM', at the end of the obv titles on this example, underneath the bust of the Emperor on the Obverse.
One of three known reverse types struck at this Unknown Mint of the East of the Emperor Philip I. The other two are the ' PAX FUNDATA CUM PERSIS' - and 'VIRTUS EXERCITUS' reverses.
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Now, I know some other people on here have some other, and much nicer examples from this mint, and I would encourage them to post them in this 'Roman Mint Styles' Gallery.
Some people classify these coins as being from Antioch, here is an interesting link on that subject:
http://marchal.thibaut.free.fr/e_classification.htm
rexesq
AD244_philip_antoninianus_virtus_00.jpg
Philip I - Unknown Eastern Mint - Virtus Exercitus105 viewsUnknown Eastern Mint. Philip I - AR Antoninianus. 3.3 grams, flan crack.

obv: IMP C M IVL PHILIPPVS P F AVG PM - radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right. Seen from behind.
rev: VIRTVS EXERCITVS - Virtus standing right, holding spear & resting hand on shield.
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The extra obverse titles give away the fact that this was struck at the Unknown Eastern Mint, another obverse type has the 'PM' underneath the bust of the Emperor on the Obverse.
One of three known reverse types struck at this Unknown Mint of the East of the Emperor Philip I. The other two are the ' PAX FUNDATA CUM PERSIS' - and 'SPES FELICITATIS ORBIS'
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Now, I know some other people on here have some other, and much nicer examples from this mint, and I would encourage them to post them in this 'Roman Mint Styles' Gallery.
Some people classify these coins as being from Antioch, here is an interesting link:
http://marchal.thibaut.free.fr/e_classification.htm
rexesq
index_php.jpeg
Probus Stlyes Montage258 viewsmaridvnvm posted this on the discussion board July 17, 2006:

One of my specialist areas is Probus and I thought I would share a little montage that I have put together. We must remember that stylistic changes occur within a mint over the time of a single emperor as well as between mints and it is often necessary to become as familiar as we can with these style differences to be able to determine the correct mint placement for some coins.

Here are some Bust Type Cs (Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right (seen from the rear)) for arrange of mints under Probus including some examples from different periods of output from these mints where I have examples to show. I hope it is evident that there are marked differences to be seen between the mints but also within a single mint just for this short period of production. I have taken a random sample of coins and there are different styles notable between dies from the same period but they are all generally evident that they come from a particular mint at a particular period.

The output of Antioch and Tripolis are notably more crude and eccentric than the output of the other mints,

Similar stylistic differences can be seen for the other

Regards,
Martin
2 commentsJoe Sermarini
Probus CLEMENTIA TEMP RIC 928~0.jpg
Tripolis mint Probus CLEMENTIA TEMP RIC 928869 viewsAnt. IMP C MAVR PROBVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R, seen from the back. CLEMENTIA TEMP, Probus receiving globe from Jupiter. Crescent in field, KA in exe. Tripolis, RIC 928, Common.

A good example of the Tripolis style for this emperor; it's quite distinctive, and quite naturalistic by comparison with other mints.
2 commentsRobert_Brenchley
URBS_ROMA_SMK_(Cyzicus).JPG
URBS ROMA. Mint: Cyzicus26 viewsStruck A.D.331 under Constantine I.
Obverse: VRBS ROMA. Helmeted and plumed bust of Roma facing left.
Reverse: No legend. She-wolf standing facing left, suckling Romulus and Remus; above, two stars; in exergue, SMKΔ.
RIC VII : 91
VERY RARE
*Alex
URBS_ROMA_SMTS_(Thessalonika).JPG
URBS ROMA. Mint: Thessalonika29 viewsStruck A.D.330 - 333 under Constantine I.
Obverse: VRBS ROMA. Helmeted and plumed bust of Roma facing left.
Reverse: No legend. She-wolf standing facing left, suckling Romulus and Remus; above, two stars; in exergue, SMTSA.
RIC VII : 187.
*Alex
URBS_ROMA_TRS_(Treveri).JPG
URBS ROMA. Mint: Treveri31 viewsStruck A.D.332 - 333 under Constantine I.
Obverse: VRBS ROMA. Helmeted and plumed bust of Roma facing left.
Reverse: No legend. She-wolf, crescent symbol on shoulder, standing facing left, suckling Romulus and Remus; above, two stars; in exergue, TRS.
RIC VII : 542

This coin is from the Grassmoor Hoard, Nottinghamshire, England.
*Alex
RIC_V356_RIC_1553.jpg
Vespasian RIC 356 and RIC 1553106 viewsAR denarius
Rome mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 356 (C3), BMC 64, RSC 45
And
Antioch mint, 72-73 AD
RIC 1553 (R3), BMC - , RSC - , RPC -

The first denarius is the common Rome mint example of the priestly implements type. The second coin is the same type struck at Antioch. Notice how the Antioch specimen has the trademark crude lettering style of that mint. Also, the second coin's portrait is reminiscent of contemporary tetradrachms struck in the 'Antioch' style.
3 commentsDavid Atherton
     
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