FORVM's Classical Numismatics Gallery
For Classical Numismatics Discussion Board Members

   


Home > Member Collections > Steve E > Misc. Ancient coins

TITLE  +   - 
FILE NAME  +   - 
DATE  +   - 
POSITION  +   - 
siglos_dagger_pan.jpg
Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Darius II - Artaxerxes II, c. 420 - 375 B.C.58 viewsSilver siglos, (Carradice Type IV (middle) B; plate XIII, 35); weight 5.5g, max. diameter 14.14 mm, Sardeis mint, c. 420 - 350 B.C.; obverse kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, dagger in right, bow in left, bearded, crowned, waist indicated; reverse oblong incuse punch; lion head left within incuse, crescent moon banker's mark.
3 commentsSteve E
siglos_obv_rev.jpg
Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Xerxes I - Darius II, 485 - 420 B.C.62 viewsSilver siglos, Carradice Type IIIb (early), plate XII, 16 ff.(online source); SGCV II 4682; (Carradice NC 1998 pl. 7, 168; Carradice Price p. 67 and pl. 17, 1 ff.), banker's marks on Obv., Rev, & edge; weight 5.54 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, Obv. Kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, spear in right, quiver on right shoulder, bow in left, bearded, crowned (off flan); Rev. irregular oblong punch; Light toning in low areas, a few light scratches.

Background Info:
The later kings of Persia, successors of Darius I, continued in the tradition established by that monarch, issuing gold darics and silver sigloi for circulation in western Anatolia. The Lydian capitol of Sardeis, the center of Persian power in the area, was undoubtedly the principal mint, though other cities may have assisted in the production of this enormous coinage. The kneeling archer, with oblong punch on rev., remained the sole type for this Persian imperial coinage down to Alexander's conquest in 330 B.C. Sear GCV II p.426

Many silgoi bear small countermarks, possibly the signets of money changers. A large number of emblems have been recorded. Sear GCV II p.427

2 commentsSteve E
     
2 files on 1 page(s)