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AntonyOctaviaTetra.jpg
Antony & Octavia tetradrachm114 viewsM ANTONIVS IMP COS DESIG ITER ET TERT
Conjoined heads of Antony and Octavia right, Antony wearing an ivy wreath

VIR RPC
Dionysus standing left, holding cantharus and thyrsus on cista mystica flanked by two interlaced snakes

Ephesus, summer-autumn 39 BC

11.22g

Imperators 263, RPC 2202, Babelon Antonia 61, Syndenham 1198, BMCRR east 135

Punch mark on the obverse protrudes onto the reverse

Ex-Numisantique

This series of Cistophori from Asia commemorates the marriage of Antony and Octavia and celebrate's Antony's divine status in the east as the "New Dionysus" which was bestowed on him when he arrived in Ephesus in 41 BC. Antony's titulature of "Imperator and Consul designate for the second and third times" fixes the period of issue to the latter part of 39 BC after the Pact of Misenum in July and before Antony's second Imperatorial acclamation in the winter of 39-38BC
7 commentsJay GT4
ANTKAI.jpg
Antony and Octavian 295 viewsAntony and Octavian

Α Γ Ω N Ο Θ Ε Σ Ι Α
Bust of Agonotheseia right

ANT KAI within wreath

Æ 22 mm.
11.07g
RPC I, 1552. SNG ANS 819. SNG Copenhagen 375. BMC 64.

Ex-Aegean

Refers to the establishment of Games to commemorate Antony & Octavian's victory over Cassius & Brutus at Philipi in 42 B.C. The cheif organizers of these games were known as Agonothetes; Agonotheseia, who appears on the obverse, was the personification of the Games.

Rare, historical
1 commentsJay GT4
antonyfouree.jpg
Antony fouree71 viewsbare head of Antony right

Plowman with yoke of two oxen to left

2.30g

Reverse may be immitating the denarius of C. Marius C.f. Capito. 81 BC

Ex-Sosius
3 commentsJay GT4
Antonyquinarius.jpg
Antony quinarius84 viewsIII VIR R P C
Diademed and veiled head of Concordia right

M ANTON C CAESAR
Two hands clasped round caduceus

Mint moving with Octavian in Gaul
39 BC

1.57g

Crawford 529/4b. Sydenham 1195. Sear, Imperators 304

From a very old collection
Museum number 175 on obverse.
Could use some more cleaning but I don't want to loose the number.
2 commentsJay GT4
Antony_gallery.jpg
Antony Virtual tray305 viewsMy Antony coins at a glance.
Clickable for larger size photo
Individual coins in the Antony section of my gallery
2 commentsJay GT4
Caesar_Lf.jpg
Caesar: Grandfather of Mark Antony 131 viewsCAESAR
Head of young Mars left wearing a crested helmet

Rev.
L IVLI L F
Venus Genetrix in Biga left drawn by two cupids, before them a lyre

Rome 103 BC

Sear 198

ex-Harlan J. Berk

Lucius Julius Caesar was Mark Antony's grandfather and Gaius Julius Caesar's cousin. He was moneyer in 103 BC and tried in vain to obtain the quaestorship. However he was praetor in 94 and then became the proconsul of Macedonia. Finally he gained the Consulship in 90 BC the same year his younger brother Gaius was aedile.

In 90 BC Lucius Julius Caesar as consul defeated the Samnites and proposed the Lex Julia which offered citizenship to all communities in Italy that were not in revolt. In the following year 89, the Lex Plautia Papiria extended citizenship to those who gave up the fight by a certain date. Lucius Julius Caesar was now made censor along with Publius Licinius Crassus (father of the triumvir). But it was a time of unrest.

In 87 Marius returned to Rome with Cinna and captured the city. Lucius and Gaius were killed during the fighting and according to Livy their heads were exposed on the speakers platform.
1 commentsTitus Pullo
Fulvia2.jpg
Fulvia69 viewsBust of Fulvia (as Nike) right

Athena standing left, holding shield and spear; ΦOYΛOYIANON in right field, ZMEPTOPIΓOΣ ΦIΛΩNIΔOΥ in two lines in left field.

Phrygia 41, 40 BC

6.69g

Rare

Ex-Savoca

RPC 3139; SNG München –; BMC 21


Fulvia married Mark Antony in 44 BC, and became an outspoken defender of his interests in Rome while he campaigned in the East. The city name of Eumenea in Phrygia was changed to Fulvia on the occasion of Mark Antony's journey to the east in 41 BC. Fulvia was to die at Sicyon the next year, hence this was a short-lived coinage. Sometime afterward these coins struck at "Fulviana" had their ethnic scratched off, and two countermarks were applied: one may be resolved as Eumeneia; the other as Philonidos, (although Zmertorix himself has been suggested). These countermarks suggest that, rather than melting down the coinage of Fulvia and striking new coins, a more expeditious solution was required to keep needed currency in circulation. This coin was not countermarked
5 commentsJay GT4
Fulvia.jpg
Fulvia Second wife of Mark Antony197 viewsBust of Fulvia as Victory right

Lion right between A and XL (year 40) LVGV in ex DVNI above

Lugdunum, autumn 43 BC

1.37g

Sear 1518
RSC 4

Antony's name is not mentioned on the coin but the date-numeral A XL (year 40) refers to his age at the time of the issue. A similar type was struck the following year which includes Antony's name and titles and recods his age as 41.

Silver Quinarius fouree 1.36gm
ex CNG 9/98 #1358


LOST
Titus Pullo
AntonyFulvia.jpg
Fulvia Second wife of Mark Antony 109 viewsBust of Fulvia as Victory right

Lion right between A and XL (year 40) LVGV in ex DVNI above

Lugdunum, autumn 43 BC

1.74g

Sear 1518
RSC 4

Antony's name is not mentioned on the coin but the date-numeral A XL (year 40) refers to his age at the time of the issue. A similar type was struck the following year which includes Antony's name and titles and recods his age as 41.

Ex-Lucernae
1 commentsJay GT4
FulviaAnton.jpg
Fulvia Second wife of Mark Antony81 viewsIII VIR R P C
Winged head of fulvia as the goddess Victory right

ANTONI IMP
Lion walking right with Date A XLI (year 41)

Lugdunum
42 BC
1.46g

Rare

Sear 1519

On this quinarius Antony's name is mentioned with A XLI (year 41) and refers to his age at the time of the issue. A similar type was struck the previous year which doesn't include Antony's name or titles yet records his age as 40.
3 commentsJay GT4
JubaCleo.jpg
Juba II & Cleopatra Selene daughter of Antony62 viewsJuba II of Mauretania and Cleopatra Selene

REX IVBA REGIS IVBA E F R A VI
Head of Juba II left.

BACIΛICCA KΛE - OΠATPA
Cleopatra Selene left

dated year 6 = 20-19 BC.

3.12g

Rare

Ex-D. Loates Fine Arts; Ex-William McDonald Collection; Ex-Geoffrey Bell 2012 Fall Auction lot 273

SNG Cop. 546 ; Mazard 357 ; Sear 6000 ; Müller III, 108, 87

Wildwinds example


Juba II was the only son and heir of his father King Juba I. King Juba I was the King of Numidia and ally to Pompey the Great. He fought against Julius Caesar at the battle of Thapsus and lost commiting suicide soon after. His son Juba II was taken away to Rome to be paraded in Caesar's Triumph's. He was then raised in Caesar's houshold and educated in both Latin and Greek excelling in his studies. He was praised as one of Rome's most educated citizens and at age 20 even published a work entitled Roman Archaeology. He became life long friends with Julius Caesar's heir Octavian. He accompanied Octavian on several campaigns during the turbulent times after Caesar's death even fighting at the battle of Actium against his future wifes parents...Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia between 29 BC-27 BC and Numidia become one of the most loyal client kings that served Rome. Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II (Daughter of Antony and Cleopatra) giving her a large dowry and appointing her queen. She also had been paraded in a Triumph in Rome after the battle of Actium. It was probably due to his services with Augustus in a campaign in Spain that led Augustus to make him King of Mauretania.

Cleopatra is said to have exerted considerable influence on Juba II's policies. Juba II encouraged and supported the performing arts, research of the sciences and research of natural history. Juba II also supported Mauretanian trade. Mauretania traded all over the Mediterranean and exported fish grapes, pearls, figs, grain, wooden furniture and purple dye harvested from certain shellfish, which was used in the manufacture of purple stripes for senatorial robes. Juba II sent a contingent to Iles Purpuraires to re-establish the ancient Phoenician dye manufacturing process.

Cleopatra Selene seems to have inherited the same qualities of both Antony and Cleopatra VII. She was strong willed and maintained her Egyptian/Greek heritage. She seems intent on continuing the Ptolomaic line of strong women rulers using the same titles as her mother. She died sometime before Juba II. The Greek Historian Plutarch describes Juba II as 'one of the most gifted rulers of his time'. Between 2 BC-2, he travelled with Gaius Caesar as a member of his advisory staff to the troubled Eastern Mediterranean. In 21, Juba II made his son Ptolemy co-ruler. Juba II died in 23 AD. He had two children by Cleopatra Selene, Ptolomy of Mauretania (1 BC- 40 AD) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born in 5 AD). He was burried in the Mausolium he constructed for himself and his wife which is still visible today. A partial inscription attributed to her reads:

The moon herself grew dark, rising at sunset,
Covering her suffering in the night,
Because she saw her beautiful namesake, Selene,
Breathless, descending to Hades,
With her she had had the beauty of her light in common,
And mingled her own darkness with her death
Jay GT4
Juba_II.jpg
Juba II and Cleopatra Selene216 viewsREX IVBA
Diademed head right

BACIΛICCA KΛEOΠATPA
Star and crescent.

Caesarea; 25 B.C.-23 A.D
17 mm, 2.62 gm

MAA 85; SNG Copenhagen 590; Mazard 300.
VF, toned
Scarce

Ex-ANE

Juba II was the only son and heir of his father King Juba I. King Juba I was the King of Numidia and ally to Pompey the Great. He fought against Julius Caesar at the battle of Thapsus and lost commiting suicide soon after. His son Juba II was taken away to Rome to be paraded in Caesar's Triumph's. He was then raised in Caesar's houshold and educated in both Latin and Greek excelling in his studies. He was praised as one of Rome's most educated citizens and at age 20 even published a work entitled Roman Archaeology. He became life long friends with Julius Caesar's heir Octavian. He accompanied Octavian on several campaigns during the turbulent times after Caesar's death even fighting at the battle of Actium against his future wifes parents...Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia between 29 BC-27 BC and Numidia become one of the most loyal client kings that served Rome. Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II (daughter of Antony and Cleopatra) giving her a large dowry and appointing her queen. She also had been paraded in a Triumph in Rome after the battle of Actium. It was probably due to his services with Augustus in a campaign in Spain that led Augustus to make him King of Mauretania.

Cleopatra is said to have exerted considerable influence on Juba II's policies. Juba II encouraged and supported the performing arts, research of the sciences and research of natural history. Juba II also supported Mauretanian trade. Mauretania traded all over the Mediterranean and exported fish grapes, pearls, figs, grain, wooden furniture and purple dye harvested from certain shellfish, which was used in the manufacture of purple stripes for senatorial robes. Juba II sent a contingent to Iles Purpuraires to re-establish the ancient Phoenician dye manufacturing process.

Cleopatra Selene seems to have inherited the same qualities of both Antony and Cleopatra VII. She was strong willed and maintained her Egyptian/Greek heritage. She seems intent on continuing the Ptolomaic line of strong women rulers using the same titles as her mother. She died sometime before Juba II. The Greek Historian Plutarch describes Juba II as 'one of the most gifted rulers of his time'. Between 2 BC-2, he travelled with Gaius Caesar as a member of his advisory staff to the troubled Eastern Mediterranean. In 21, Juba II made his son Ptolemy co-ruler. Juba II died in 23 AD. He had two children by Cleopatra Selene, Ptolomy of Mauretania (1 BC- 40 AD) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born in 5 AD). He was burried in the Mausolium he constructed for himself and his wife which is still visible today.
6 commentsJay GT4
Jubaselene.jpg
Juba II and Cleopatra Selene84 viewsJuba II of Mauretania and Cleopatra Selene

REX IVBA REGIS IVBA E F R A VI
Head of Juba II left.

BACIΛICCA KΛE - OΠATPA
Cleopatra Selene left

dated year 6 = 20-19 BC.

3.12g

Rare

Ex-William McDonald Collection

SNG Cop. 546 ; Mazard 357 ; Sear 6000 ; Müller III, 108, 87

Wildwinds example


Juba II was the only son and heir of his father King Juba I. King Juba I was the King of Numidia and ally to Pompey the Great. He fought against Julius Caesar at the battle of Thapsus and lost commiting suicide soon after. His son Juba II was taken away to Rome to be paraded in Caesar's Triumph's. He was then raised in Caesar's houshold and educated in both Latin and Greek excelling in his studies. He was praised as one of Rome's most educated citizens and at age 20 even published a work entitled Roman Archaeology. He became life long friends with Julius Caesar's heir Octavian. He accompanied Octavian on several campaigns during the turbulent times after Caesar's death even fighting at the battle of Actium against his future wifes parents...Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia between 29 BC-27 BC and Numidia become one of the most loyal client kings that served Rome. Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II (Daughter of Antony and Cleopatra) giving her a large dowry and appointing her queen. She also had been paraded in a Triumph in Rome after the battle of Actium. It was probably due to his services with Augustus in a campaign in Spain that led Augustus to make him King of Mauretania.

Cleopatra is said to have exerted considerable influence on Juba II's policies. Juba II encouraged and supported the performing arts, research of the sciences and research of natural history. Juba II also supported Mauretanian trade. Mauretania traded all over the Mediterranean and exported fish grapes, pearls, figs, grain, wooden furniture and purple dye harvested from certain shellfish, which was used in the manufacture of purple stripes for senatorial robes. Juba II sent a contingent to Iles Purpuraires to re-establish the ancient Phoenician dye manufacturing process.

Cleopatra Selene seems to have inherited the same qualities of both Antony and Cleopatra VII. She was strong willed and maintained her Egyptian/Greek heritage. She seems intent on continuing the Ptolomaic line of strong women rulers using the same titles as her mother. She died sometime before Juba II. The Greek Historian Plutarch describes Juba II as 'one of the most gifted rulers of his time'. Between 2 BC-2, he travelled with Gaius Caesar as a member of his advisory staff to the troubled Eastern Mediterranean. In 21, Juba II made his son Ptolemy co-ruler. Juba II died in 23 AD. He had two children by Cleopatra Selene, Ptolomy of Mauretania (1 BC- 40 AD) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born in 5 AD). He was burried in the Mausolium he constructed for himself and his wife which is still visible today. A partial inscription attributed to her reads:

The moon herself grew dark, rising at sunset,
Covering her suffering in the night,
Because she saw her beautiful namesake, Selene,
Breathless, descending to Hades,
With her she had had the beauty of her light in common,
And mingled her own darkness with her death.
2 commentsJay GT4
AntonySpeculator.jpg
LEGIO COHORTIS SPECULATORVM96 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
Galley right mast with banners at prow
Rev.
CHORTIS SPECVLATORVM
Three standards each decorated with two wreaths and model of prow

Patrae mint 32-31BC

SEAR 1484

ex-Arcade coins

Apparantly this was a mounted cohort of scouts or were placed on an elevated part of Mark Antony's ships. This is in harmony with the Numiswiki entry:

"Speculator, derived from specula, a prospect that is to say a view from the summit of a place, whence anything may be seen advantageously at a distance. - Thus a cohort of this description (Speculatorum Cohors) was established by M. Anthony, that they, from an elevated part of his ships, might explore and act as sentries or watchmen. There were other acceptations of the word, such as spies and even executioners."
2 commentsJay GT4
AntonyOctavian.jpg
Marcus Antonius and Octavian Denarius211 viewsM ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P (MP and AV in monogram)
Bare hd of Mark Antony right

Rev
CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C
Bare head of Octavian right

Ephesus spring/summer 41 BC

3.54g

Sear 1504

This series of coins commemorates the establishment of the second Triumvirate of November 43 B.C. between Antony, Octavian and Lepidus. Both sides bear the inscription "III VIR R P C", meaning "One of Three Men for the Regulation of the Republic. Within a few years Antony would depart Italy for the Eastern provinces.

The moneyer for this coin is M. Barbatius Pollio who was also a Questor in 41 BC. Barbatius bears the title of "Quaestor pro praetore" abbreviated to QP a distinction shared by his colleague L. Gelllius.

From the Enrico collection
6 commentsJay GT4
Lucius_Antony.jpg
Marcus Antonius AR Cistophorus88 viewsBowcase flanked by two serpents, heads confronted, monogram above, serpent twined around thyrsus to right, Q to left.

Cista mystica with serpent, all within ivy wreath

Pergamum
Ca. 133-56 BC.

BMC Ionia 176 (under M. Antonius M.f.)

12.34 g

These "anonymous" issues were struck in Pergamum by Roman Quaestors between ca. 100-56 BC. They are called anonymous because the monograms are not easily identifiable. This issue is commonly attributed to be either Mark Antony or his brother Lucius Antony who both served as Quaestors in the east. However it is more likely that the Quaestor was in fact Marcus Antonius the orator who was Marcus and Lucius Grandfather. He served as Consul in 99 BC and as a Quaestor in Asia in 113/112 BC
1 commentsJay GT4
Antony_Sol.jpg
Mark Antony225 viewsM ANTONI IMP
Bare head of Marcus Antonius right, bearded

III VIR R P C
Distyle temple containing facing bust of Sol on disk

Epirus? Autumn of 42 BC

3.44g

Sear 1467
Scarce
Ex-Incitatus

David Sear in "The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators" says:

The reappearance of IMP in Antony's titulature suggests that this issue is subsequent to the second battle of Philippi (23 October), though as the Triumvir is still bearded it must have been struck quite soon after the deaths of Brutus and Cassius before orders had been given for the modification of the portrait. With Caesar's murder now avenged both Antony and Octavian could shave the beards which they had worn as a sign of mourning."
11 commentsJay GT4
AntonyCaesarportrait.jpg
Mark Antony & Julius Caesar portrait denarius202 viewsM ANTON IMP R P C
Bare head of Mark Antony right, bearded, lituus behind

CAESAR DIC
Wreathed head of Caesar right, capis behind

Gaul, November 43 BC

Imperators 123, Crawford 488/2, Sydenham 1166, Cohen 3, BMCRR Gaul 55, 57

3.05g

Rare!

Ex-Alberta coins

From Sears Imperator's:

"This issue would appear to be a revival of the type struck by Antony in the spring during the war around Mutina. After his Gallic adventures Antony, accompanied by his ally Lepidus, was now back in Cisalpine Gaul to meet with his former opponent Octavian. The conference between the three men at Bononia in early November, set the seal on the formation of the Second Triumvirate, an event commemorated by this issue. It clearly belongs to the period immediately following the agreement at Bononia as the form of the triumviral titulature (R P C) had not yet been expanded to the normal III VIR R P C. A distinctive feature of this coinage is the portrait of Antony which has a strangely elongated form, giving it something of the appearance of a caricature. Presumably, Antony's retinue at this time lacked the services of a die-engraver competent in the art of portraiture."
4 commentsJay GT4
AntonyLepidus.jpg
Mark Antony & Lepidus Quinarius132 viewsM ANT IMP
lituus, jug and raven

Victory standing right, crowning trophy with a wreath

Military mint with Antony and Lepidus in Transalpine Gaul
43 BC

AR quinarius
1.82g, 17 mm

Syd 1160, Cr 489/4

Rare!

Ex-Roma Numismatics

This quinarius provides clear evidence of the superiority enjoyed by Antony in his "partnership" with Lepidus. The previous issue named Lepidus who was the Governor of Narbonensis. On this issue he is completely ignored and his name is dropped from the reverse.
4 commentsJay GT4
Antony_Octavia.jpg
Mark Antony & Octavia150 viewsSilver Cistophorus

M ANTONIVS IMP COS DESIG ITER ET TERT
Head of Antony right, wreathed with ivy, lituus below, all within ivy wreath

III VIR R P C
Draped bust of Octavia right above cista mystica flanked by two snakes

Ephesus, summer-autumn 39 BC
10.42g

Sear 1512, RPC 2201

Ex-Incitatus

This issue commemorates the marriage between Antony and Octavia and also celebrates Antony as "the new Dionysus". The honor was bestowed on Antony in 41 BC when he arrived in Ephesus. Antony is named as Imperator and Consul designate for the second and third time. This fixes the date towards the end of 39 BC. after the pact of Misenum in July. At that time the consular designations were agreed upon for the next eight years. However it must also be dated before the winter of 39-38 BC when Antony was acclaimed as Imperator for the second time.

Octavia is not specifically mentioned by name, but certainly there can be no doubt it is her image found on the reverse given the time this coin was minted.
5 commentsJay GT4
Antony_Thessalonica.jpg
Mark Antony AE 27 mm 77 views Mark Antony

ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ ΕΛΕΥΘΕPΙΑΣ
Draped bust of Eleutheria right

M ANT AYT Γ KAI AYT
Nike advancing left, holding wreath and palm

MACEDON, Thessalonica
Circa 37 BC.

Weight: 18.8 gm
Diameter: 27 mm

Very Scarce!

RPC 1551; SNG Copenhagen 374,
1 commentsJay GT4
ANTVARVS.jpg
Mark Antony denarius100 viewsBare head of a bearded Mark Antony right

C VIBVS VARVS
Fortuna standing left holding Victory and cornucopiae

Rome 42 BC

3.25g

Rough but much better in hand!

Sear 1466, RRC 494/32

ex-Londinium

Fortuna holding Victory shows the confidence the Triumvirs had in defeating the Ruplicans, namely Brutus and Cassius. Varus also struck this type for Octavian. It is interesting to note that on the evidence of stylistic similarity it is possible that the die-engraver responsible for the triumviral portraits was later transferred from the Capitoline mint to Antony's military mint outside the city.

The fact that Antony is again shown bearded is in reference to his mourning for Caesar's death. Only after Caesar was avenged would Antony be shown as a typical clean shaven Roman.
4 commentsJay GT4
Antony_Fleet_galley.jpg
Mark Antony Fleet coinage156 viewsMarcus Antonius Fleet coinage (Light Series)

M ANT IMP TERT COS DESIG ITER ET TERT III VIR RPC
Conjoined heads of Marcus Antonius and Octavia right

M OPPIVS CAPITO PRO PR PRAEF CLASS FC
Galley under sail right

Tarentum (?) summer 37 BC
4.13g

Sear 1497, RPC 1470, CRI 296,

Very rare in any condition

Cleaned by Kevin at NRC.

The legendary Fleet coinage of Antony belongs to two series, heavy and light. The "light series" is thought to have been minted at a later date, possibly just after Antony returned from his conference with Octavian in 37 BC. The meeting saw the Pact of Tarentum. Part of that agreement saw Antony loan 120 ships to Octavian along with his Admirals Altratinus and Capito.

A fine insight into Antony's administrative abilities can be seen by his fleet coinage that came in sestertius, dupondius and as denominations. Of note is that Antony's "Fleet Coinage" shows the appearance of the first sestertius in bronze rather than silver. When Octavian (Augustus) reformed the coinage 20 years later he maintained the exact same denominations; sestertius, dupondius and as. After Actium Octavian also kept many if not all of the client Kings in their positions and territories. A strong case for Antony's capabilities as an administrator.

M. Oppius Capito occupied an important position in Antony's inner circle although little is known of him. Capito's coins are more abundant than those of his colleagues and only Capito's coins include the title "Praefectus classis" (Prefect of the fleet). Most of his coins are found in Greece and were probably minted in Piraeus, the harbor complex of Athens. Athens at this time was the home of Antony and Octavia so it is likely that Capito's mint would be located here.

Sold to Calgary Coin Jan 2016
4 commentsJay GT4
ANTLEGII~0.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG II55 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
Galley right, mast with banners at prow

LEG II
legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

3.14g

Great "bankers" mark on reverse, a very nice "C"


Origianlly founded by Pompey the Great in 84 BC. Legio II was given the title of "Augusta" in about 25 BC by Augustus. The II Augusta legion took part in Germanicus' campaigns in Germany and was commanded by Germanicus' friend Publius Vitellius who held the rank of legate. Publius Vitellius later prosecuted Piso for the murder of Germanicus.
Jay GT4
ANTLEGII.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG II68 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG II
legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

3.17g

Perfect tiny hole for suspension with great dark toning


Origianlly founded by Pompey the Great in 84 BC. Legio II was given the title of "Augusta" in about 25 BC by Augustus. The II Augusta legion took part in Germanicus' campaigns in Germany and was commanded by Germanicus' friend Publius Vitellius who held the rank of legate. Publius Vitellius later prosecuted Piso for the murder of Germanicus.

Ex-ECIN, Ex-Littleton Coin Company
Jay GT4
LEGIO_III.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG III 109 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C

galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG III
legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

Legio III Gallica was levied by Julius Caesar around 49 BC, for his civil war against the conservative republicans led by Pompey.

The legion took part in all Julius Caesar's campaigns against his enemies, including the battles of Pharsalus and Munda. Following Caesar's death, III Gallica was integrated in the army of Mark Antony for his campaigns against the Parthians. They were included in the army levied by Fulvia and Lucius Antonius (Antony's wife and brother) to oppose Octavian, but ended by surrendering in Perugia, in the winter of 41 BC. After the battle of Actium and Antony's suicide, the III Gallica was sent again to the East, where they garrisoned the province of Syria.

III Gallica was used in Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo's campaign against the Parthians over the control of Armenia (63). Corbulo's successes triggered emperor Nero's paranoia of persecution and eventually the general was forced to commit suicide. After this, III Gallica is transferred to Moesia province, in the Danube border.
Titus Pullo
LEGIIII~0.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG IIII177 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG IIII
legionary eagle between two standards

3.04g

Patrae mint 32-31BC

Sear Imperator's 353; Crawford 544/16; Cohen 29

Ex-Calgary Coin

VERY RARE

This type with LEG IIII rather than LEG IV is quite rare. No examples were found in the Delos Hoard of 1905. Missing from RBW collection.
Only 3 examples ever offered by CNG.
1 commentsJay GT4
ANTLEGIV.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG IV71 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley right, mast with banners at prow

LEG IV
Legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31BC

3.34g

ex-Arcade coin

The coin that started it. This was my first Mark Antony coin!

In its first years, the whereabouts of IV Scythica are uncertain, although it is probable that it took part in Antony's campaign against the Parthians. The name suggests that it fought against the Scythians. After the battle of Actium and Antony's suicide, Octavian transferred IV Scythica to the Danube province of Moesia. The legion is reported to have taken part in civilian tasks, such as the building and keeping of roads. In his youth, future emperor Vespasian served in this legion.
2 commentsJay GT4
LEG_VIII.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG VIII83 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG VIII
legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

3.63g

This legion is not LEG VIII Augusta which was disbanded by Caesar and re-enlisted by Octavian.

Ex-Forum
5 commentsJay GT4
LEGVIIII.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary denarius LEG VIIII120 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C

galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG VIIII
legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

3.3g

Sear Imperator's 360; Crawford 544/22; Cohen 36

Scarcer archaic LEG VIIII rather then IX

The Ninth was raised before Caesar arrived in Gaul in 58 BC. and had seen constant action since then. In 49 BC the Ninth Legion was waiting in Northern Italy while Caesar was fighting in Spain. Resting idle caused the legion to mutiny, complaining that they had not received their promised rewards. Upon Caesar's arrival he arrested the ringleaders and executed a good number of them restoring order.

In 48 BC the legion was moved across into Greece and given to the Command of Antony at the seige of Dyrrachium. During the Pompeian break outs 3 Cohorts of the Ninth managed to hold a fort for an entire day, in the process almost every man was wounded.

The Ninth was so depleted that at the battle of Pharsalus they were merged with the 8th Legion and stationed on the far left wing under the command of Antony.

2 commentsJay GT4
ANTVESPcounter.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary denarius LEG X IMPVESP138 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
Galley r. mast with banners at prow
IMPVESP counter mark above galley

LEG X?
Legionary eagle between two standards IMPVESP countermark


Patrae mint 32-31BC

3.01g

Ex-Incitatus

Obverse countermarked IMPVESP during Vespasian's reign showing this denarius was in circulation for well over 100 years! In hand I can make out X for the legion number but can't be sure if any other numerals appear after it. This countermark appears mostly on late Republican and Imperatorial denarii, although denarii of Augustus and denarii of the Flavians struck at Ephesus are also recorded. The MP VES countermarks circulated specifically within the province of Asia Minor. Martini noted that the output of silver coinage in relation to the civic bronze for this region was much smaller during the Julio-Claudian period. This suggests the denarii were countermarked to validate locally circulating silver coinage at an acceptable weight while the regional mints opened by Vespasian were gearing up production, a theory which the countermarking of cistophori with the contemporary MP VES AVG countermarks seems to support. The similarly countermarked Flavian denarii struck at Ephesus can be accounted for then as examples accidentally countermarked by unobservant mint workers during the transition.



LEG X (later called Gemina) was levied in 59 BC or earlier by Julius Caesar. It was the first legion levied by him personally and was raised in Spain. It played a major role in the Gallic war featuring prominently in Caesar's "Gallic Wars." Legio X was his most trusted and loyal Legion. In 45 BC the Legion was disbanded and given land grants in Southern Gaul.

During the civil war that followed Caesar's assassination, Legio X was reconstituted by Lepidus in the winter of 44/43 BC making use of many retired legionaries who re-enlisted. It was eventually turned over to Antony and fought for him until the final Battle of Philippi. The veterans obtained lands near Cremona, and an inscription reports that the name of the legion at the time was Veneria, "devoted to Venus." This alluded to Julius Caesar's claimed descent from Venus.

The newly levied Tenth was then taken by Antony to Armenia for his Parthian campaign. During Antony's civil war, the legion fought for him until his defeat at the Battle of Actium, after which the legion changed sides and moved into Octavian's army. They were then taken to Egypt to finish off Antony and Cleopatra. Octavian never fully trusted the 10th Legion as it had been fiercely loyal to both Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. After Antony's death Octavian left the legion in the East in Syria. In 29 BC the legion was due to be discharged. When the legionaries pressed for their release and land grants Octavian was slow in complying. Suetonius says that the entire legion rioted and Octavian dishonorably discharged the entire legion.

Octavian now recruited new legionaries to fill the 10th Legion in its traditional recruiting grounds of Spain. Some of the senior Centurions may have re-enlisted for a third term to serve with the 10th. These men would have been in their late 40's or early 50's. The new legionaries marched over land to Syria to take up their posting. The new 10th Legion's home base was on the Euphrates to keep an eye on the Parthians.

The next discharge date would be 14-13 BC. This time the 10th Legion was settled in Beirut and the city was given Colony status. Ten years later the 10th Legion under Publius Quintilius Varus was marched down to Jerusalem to garrison the city after Herod the Great died. The 10th Legion would remain in Jerusalem until 6 AD.
5 commentsJay GT4
LegXIIANT.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XII ANTIQVAE115 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
Galley right mast with banners at prow

LEG XII ANTIQVAE
Legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31 BC
3.57g

SEAR 1480

Ex-Londinium Coins

This was Caesar's 12th legion, raised in 58 BC for the campaign against the Helvetii. It served throughout the wars in Gaul (58 to 49), Italy (49), and at Pharsalus (48). It was disbanded 46-45 BC and the colonists were settled at Parma. The legion was reformed in 44-43 BC most likely by Lepidus. The legion was then passed to Antony in 41-31 BC and was present at Actium. It appears on Antony's coinage as LEG XII ANTIQVAE. Colonists were settled at Patrai, Greece alongside men of Legio X Equestris, perhaps by Antony, more likely by Octavian soon after Actium.

The legion's whereabouts during most of Augustus' reign is unclear. The 12th was very possibly the unnamed third legion (with III Cyrenaica and XXII Deiotariana) stationed in Egypt. That unnamed legion disappears from Egypt at just about the same time that Legio XII Fulminata is first found in Syria. By early in the reign of Tiberius, the 12th legion was based at Raphanae.
4 commentsJay GT4
AntonyLEGXIII.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XIII93 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

Rev LEG XIII legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

New Photo

Legio XIII was levied by Julius Caesar in 57 BC, before marching against the Belgae, in one of his early interventions in intra-Gallic conflicts.

During the Gallic wars (58-51 BC), Legio XIII was present at the Battle against the Nervians, the siege of Gergovia, and while not specifically mentioned in the sources, it is not unreasonable to assume that Legio XIII was also present for the Battle of Alesia.

Forced to choose either the end of his political career, or civil war, Caesar brought Legio XIII across the Rubicon river and into Italy. The legion remained faithful to Caesar during the resulting civil war between Caesar and the conservative Optimates faction of the senate, whose legions were commanded by Pompey. Legio XIII was active throughout the entire war, fighting at Dyrrhachium (48 BC) and Pharsalus (48 BC). After the decisive victory over Pompey at Pharsalus, the legion was to be disbanded, and the legionaries "pensioned off" with the traditional land grants; however, the legion was recalled for the Battle of Thapsus (46 BC) and the final Battle of Munda (45 BC). After Munda, Caesar disbanded the legion, retired his veterans, and gave them farmlands in Italy.

Reconstituted by Octavian in 41 BC.
Its standard was the lion.
Jay GT4
ANT_CLASSICAE.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XVII CLASSICAE155 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
Galley right mast with banners at prow

LEG XVII CLASSICAE
Legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31 BC

2.99g

Crawford 544/10, Sydenham 1238, BMCRR 223, RSC I 50

Very scarce

Not the greatest coin but one that was missing from my collection. The ending of "CLASSICAE" is clearly seen on the reverse.

LEG XVII CLASSICAE was raised by Antony and was later disbanded or lost it's identity after the battle of Actium, being incorporated into Octavian's legions. The cognomen "Classica" seems to relate to special naval duties assigned to this regiment by Antony.
1 commentsJay GT4
ANT_LYBICAE.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XVIII LYBICAE89 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

Rev LEG XVIII LYBICAE
legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

Sear 1482

One of the scarcer named legions levied by Mark Antony. The legion was disbanded after Actium.
1 commentsJay GT4
ANT_PRET.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary PRAETORIARVM140 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

CHORTIVM PRAETORIARVM
Legionary Eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31BC

3.08g
Imperators 385, Sydenham 1213, BMCRR East 184, Cohen 7

Ex-Incitatus

Scarce/rare

An important and historical coin!

The Praetorian cohorts had their origins in the small escorts which accompanied the generals on campaign. The name derives from the commander's tent (praetorium), a name which was later applied to the commandant's house in a permanent fort. At the time of Actium Antony probably had at least four praetorian cohorts. In the years following Actium Augustus established a permanent body of nine praetorian cohorts, three in Rome, the remainder dispersed among neighboring towns. They were regarded as elite troops and this was reflected in their living conditions and pay (more than three times the rate for legionaries). The praetorian prefects, first appointed by Augustus in 2 BC were to exercise enormous political power in Rome in the centuries to follow.

4 commentsJay GT4
ANTVerus.jpg
Mark Antony restitution issue by Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus144 viewsANTONIVS AVGVR III VIR R P C
Galley moving left over waves

ANTONINVS ET VERVS AVG REST
Legionary eagle between two standards LEG VI across lower field

Rome 168-9 AD

3.17g

Sear 5236; RIC 443; RSC Mark Antony 83

Ex-ANE

Sear:
The reasons for this remarkable restoration remain obscure. Mattingly suggests that Legio VI Ferrata, which had fought for Antony at Philippi in 42 BC, may have played a leading role in the Parthian War of AD 164, the exceptional commemoration of this achievement on the coinage being prompted both by the legion's long and distinguished history and the similarity of the names "Antonius" and "Antoninus". The 200th Anniversary of the battle of Actium perhaps provides a more obvious reason for the issue.

Curtis Clay:
The reason for the restoration is not in doubt in my opinion, having been discerned by Mommsen in 1859.

Because of their lower silver content, Antony's legionary denarii were excluded from Trajan's recoinage of 107, and therefore Trajan did not restore this type.
But by the reign of Marcus and Verus, the silver content of the current denarius had fallen to the point that it had now become profitable to recoin Antony's denarii. Marcus and Verus did so, and therefore restored the coin too, picking at random one of the commoner legions for their restoration, since it was quite unnecessary to restore coins for several different legions, or for all of them!

The Reka Devnia hoard, ending essentially in c. 241 AD, still contained 9 original legionary denarii of Antony, plus 20 restorations by Marcus and Verus!
3 commentsJay GT4
Scarpus~0.jpg
Mark Antony Scarpus denarius101 viewsM ANTO COS III IMP III
Head of Jupiter Ammon right

ANTONIO AVG SCARPVS IMP
Victory walking right holding wreath and palm

Cyrene summer of 31 BC
2.86g
Sear 1486

In the will of Caesar, Scarpus received one eighth of certain legacies after the legacies given to Octavian. He along with his cousins from the will became heirs to his great uncle.

Scarpus became an ally to Mark Antony and commanded for him against the war on Marcus Brutus and Cassius Longinus. In the years leading up to Actium 31 BC, Antony appointed Scarpus to the military command of Cyrenaica. Scarpus had with him four legions to command. During his time in Cyrenaica Scarpus had control of the currency mint in Cyrene, as he became a moneyer. Scarpus had issued various coins bearing Antony’s name and Scarpus’ name was inscripted as an issuer of these coins.

After Antony & Cleopatra were defeated by Octavian at Actium, Scarpus withdrew his support from Antony and gave his support (including his legions) to Octavian. Antony after the defeat sailed back to North Africa and sent messengers to Scarpus for help.
Scarpus refused to see Antony’s messengers and put them to death. He gave his legions to Gaius Cornelius Gallus, Octavian’s lieutenant to command.

Augustus then appointed his cousin as Governor of Cyrenaica. Scarpus as he did for Antony, became a moneyer and issued various coins bearing Augustus’ name. On these coins, Scarpus had his name inscripted as an issuer of the coins.
2 commentsJay GT4
AntonySolAVG.jpg
Mark Antony Sol denarius98 viewsM ANTONIVS M F M N AVGVR IMP TERT around (MP and RT ligatured)
Mark Antony, veiled and wearing the priestly robes of an Augur, standing right, holding lituus in right hand.

III VIR R P C COS DESIG ITER ET TERT
Radiate head of Sol right

Athens
Summer 38 BC

3.92g
Crawford 533/2, Sear Imperators 267

Ex-ANE, Ex-Seaby with original ticket

New Photo

Antony's third Imperatorial acclimation resulted from Ventidius' victory at Gindarus. Antony's depiction in priestly robes of an augur emphasizes the importance which he placed on the possession of this religious office. The word AVGVR features prominently on most of Antony's remaining coinage right down to Actium. No doubt this was to stress his adherence to Republican traditions. Sol is symbolic of the East and shows Antony's personal concern for eastern affairs after the distraction caused by his extended stay in Italy starting in the second half of 40 BC and running almost the whole of the following year
6 commentsJay GT4
Antony_fouree.jpg
Mark Antony unofficial fouree305 viewsANT IMP III VIR R P C
Bare head of Mark Antony right, lituus behind

CN DOMIT AHENOBARBVS IMP
Prow of galley right star above

Corcyra? Summer 40BC
2.08g

Sear 1472

Ex-ANE

Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus was a republican admiral who accompanied Brutus to Macedonia after Caesar's assassination. He was given command of the fleet in the Adriatic. After Cassius and Brutus were defeated at Philippi, Ahenobarbus turned to piracy and was in command of up to 2 legions and 70 ships. He was reconciled to Antony's side by Asinius Pollio and after the Pact of Brundisium he was given back his civic rights and was appointed Governor of Bithynia. He remained loyal to Antony almost to the end but deserted him just prior to Actium, dying shortly after of illness.
1 commentsJay GT4
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