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PET080_Jerash_Plaza.JPG
Jordan, Jerash - Oval Plaza172 viewsJerash is ancient Gerasa in Jordan, one of the Decapolis cities. The superb Oval Plaza stands at one end of the Cardo.Abu Galyon
PET090_Jerash_Nymphaeum.jpg
Jordan, Jerash - Nymphaeum160 viewsGerasa’s Nymphaeum is quite well preserved and must have been spectacular in its prime. Originally there would have been a half-dome covering the top and each niche would have contained a statue. Note the holes in the lower level niches: the sculptures here would have also served as decorative water conduits to fill the basin underneath. Abu Galyon
PET095_Jerash_Temple.jpg
Jordan, Jerash - Temple of Artemis206 viewsArtemis was the patron goddess of Gerasa, and the temple dedicated to her was one of the city’s grandest monuments. It was reached by ascending an imposing processional Sacred Way, starting from the Cardo. The temple was built during the mid 2nd-century CE and worship continued there until suppressed by Theodosius around 391. Afterwards, in Byzantine times, part of the Sacred Way was converted into a church (the ‘Propylaeum Church’) and the temple courtyard was used as a pottery workshop, while the naos itself was left to crumble quietly away. Abu Galyon
PET105_Khasneh.JPG
Jordan, Petra - Khasneh169 viewsOK, it’s the photograph every visitor to Petra takes: the first sight of the Kasneh framed by the dark canyon of the Siq. But the view is breathtaking, so who can resist? Abu Galyon
PET125_Reality_-_Ed_Deir.JPG
Jordan, Petra - Ed Deir162 viewsThis is Ed Deir, one of the 'high places' of Petra. There's a rock cut path, you have to climb about 800 steps above Cardo level to get there, but worth it. Early Western visitors called it 'the Monastery', which perhaps it was during Byzantine times, originally though, a Nabataean temple (not a tomb).Abu Galyon
PET140_Silk_Tomb.JPG
Jordan, Petra - Silk Tomb158 viewsThe 'Silk Tomb' is hard to photograph and is best visited near sunrise or sunset. Depending on the time of day (i.e. on the angle at which the sunlight strikes the rock) the colours either look vibrant and alive or flat and dull.Abu Galyon
PET170_Qasr_al-Bint.jpg
Jordan, Petra - Qasr al-Bint137 viewsIt’s known locally by the name of Qasr al-Bint al-Faroun, ‘the Palace of Pharaoh’s Daughter’, but it’s really a Nabataean temple, probably originally dedicated to Dushrat. The Qasr al-Bint is one of the best preserved free-standing buildings in Petra and stands in a sacred precinct at the far end of the city’s Cardo. In front of the temple steps is a substantial open-air altar platform. The area still further in the foreground of the picture is now used as a Bedouin taxi rank, where the tired tourist who no longer wishes to walk can hire a camel or donkey for the trip back to the start of the Siq. Abu Galyon
PET225_Little_Petra.JPG
Jordan, Petra - 'Little Petra'170 viewsThis is Al-Barid (often called 'Little Petra') which is about 5 km distant from the central parts of Petra which attract all the tourists. By contrast, Little Petra is not often visited, but it's very atmospheric (with its own mini-Siq!) and an excursion here can also take in the nearby and fascinating Neolithic site of Beidha.Abu Galyon
Petra1.jpg
Jordan, Petra - The Treasury780 viewsI visited the ancient city of Petra in 1999, it is located in Jordan.
The Nabateers "build" this city in the dessert, all the temples and houses are carved in the soft rock.
When you have passed the Siq, the first temple you see is the Al-Khazneh Farun, or The Treasury.
3 commentspax
Petra2.jpg
Jordan, Petra - The Treasury 2407 viewsAl-Khazneh Farun - The Faro treasure
This was build in 84-85 b.c., by king Aretas IV.
pax
Petra3.jpg
Jordan, Petra - Theater448 viewsA vieuw on some graves and on the left side a theater.pax
Petra4.jpg
Jordan, Petra - Theater 2435 viewsThe remains, the side were the artists stood.
The theater was build in 100 a.c., and expanded in 106 when the Romans came.
pax
Petra5.jpg
Jordan, Petra - Gate of Temenos455 viewsPetra, Gate of Temenospax
Petra7.jpg
Jordan, Petra - The collonaded street470 viewsThis is the centre of the lower city and divides it in north and south.
This is the road that leads to the Semenos gate (at our back)
You can also see the following tombs (from left to right)
Corinthian tomb, Silk tomb and the Urn tomb.
pax
Petra8.jpg
Jordan, Petra - Theater 3497 viewspax
PHRYGIAN_BOWL.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.30 viewsThe Phrygians seemed to have possessed advanced metal working skills as is testified to by this bronze phiale, found at the Great Tumulus at Gordion.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
PHRYGIAN_HELMET.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.29 viewsThis helmet is called the Phyrigian type, not because it is Phrygian in origin, but because of it's resemblance to the Phrygian cap. This helmet appeared in the classical section rather than the Phrygian one.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
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Turkey, Istanbul (Constantinople) - Obelisk Thutmosis Hippodrom179 viewsEgypt obelisk (from Thutmosis III temple of Karnak 1471 before christ). now on the Hippodrom place (where in ancient times was a horse race-track) in Instanbul, erected under the reign of Theodosius in the year 390 after christ.Franz-Josef M
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Turkey, Istanbul (Constantinople)178 viewsHagia Sophia (translated holy wisdom).Erected in the 6th Century (the third church at this place) during the reign of Iustinianus I. It was the main church of the byzantine empire. After the conquering of Constantinople by the osmanic turks in 1453 it became a mosque and then since 1935 a museum.Franz-Josef M
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Turkey, Istanbul (Constantinople) - Yerebatan Saray Cistern191 viewsThe cistern was build in the year 542 under the reign of Justinian. It is positioned near the Hagia Sophia museum. The Gorgo (a female monster with serpents instead of hairs- one view can kill) head belongs to an old unknown monument and was used here in this cistern a second time as a base of a column. The cistern consists of 336 columns. But only 2 gorgo heads can be seen in the cistern. Franz-Josef M
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Turkey, Istanbul (Constantinople) - Yerebatan Saray Cistern174 viewsThe second Gorgo of the Cistern. I saw a third Gorgo in the Archaeological Museum of Istanbul. The original temple, from where the Gorgos were removed is still unknown. Franz-Josef M
PICT2412mod.jpg
Turkey, Istanbul (Constantinople) - Yerebatan Saray Cistern168 viewsA mysterious place under modern Istanbul. The technical data: the cistern is 138 m long and 65 m wide, the capacity is 21 million US gallons of water or 80.000 cubic meters, 336 marble columns. Franz-Josef M
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Italy, Pompeii - residential street295 viewsOne of the numerous residential streets in Pompeii. July 20081 commentsMark Zema
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Italy, Pompeii - bakery250 viewsHere's a bakery, complete with oven. When this was unearthed, there were several loaves of bread inside, intact, but a little overdone ;-) July 2008Mark Zema
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Italy, Pompeii - villa 237 viewsThis is one of the more fashionable villas in town. Note the private garden area to the rear. The small pool in the foreground was for catching rainwater falling through a specially made hole in the roof. July 2008Mark Zema
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Italy, Pompeii - victims of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 AD.376 viewsOne of the unfortunate victims of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 AD.1 commentsMark Zema
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Italy, Pompeii - bath257 viewsInside the public bathhouse. Much like the "Occulus" in the Pantheon, the window to the upper left is the only light source in the room.Mark Zema
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Italy, Pompeii - modest villa354 viewsInside one of the more modest villas in Pompeii, although you'd never know it by the still-beautiful murals on the walls and the fountain there to the right.1 commentsMark Zema
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Italy, Pompeii - street209 viewsAnother great shot of another street in Pompeii. The stepping stones in the foreground can be found all around the city. As I'm sure you know, water ran constantly through the streets, and pedestrians used these stepping stones to keep their feet dry.Mark Zema
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Bulgaria, Anchialos (Pomorie) Thracian Tomb307 viewsPomorie's ancient Thracian tombJoe Sermarini
POSSIBLY_FORTUNA.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.30 viewsStatue, probably of Fortuna.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Private_Citizen.jpg
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.30 viewsStatue of a private citizen.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Profile_of_the_Charioteer_of_Delphi.jpg
Greece, Delphi - Profile of the Charioteer of Delphi320 viewsDating from the early fifth century BC, this is one of the most hauntingly beautiful works of art. It still speaks after 2,500 years.2 commentsLloyd T
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Turkey, Ephesus - Public Toilets683 viewsMinus the slaves to warm the seats in winter and the live entertainment1 commentsmemphius
Qumran_Cave_4.JPG
Israel, Qumran - Cave 4183 viewsCave 4 was the nearest cave containing documents to the site at Qumran - it’s only about 500 metres away. Most visitors to Qumran take a picture like this one. But mostly they don’t realise that the highly visible cave entrance in their picture is modern, knocked into the side by looters. The ancient entrance to Cave 4 is on the top and well-hidden. Which is perhaps why Cave 4 was found by the local Bedouin, not by Western archaeologists, and why it wasn’t discovered until 1952, over five years after the original manuscript finds of 1946/7. Abu Galyon
Qumran_Cistern_(or_Mikveh)_with_earthquake_faultA.jpg
Israel, Qumran - Miqvah155 viewsThis is L48-49, a water storage feature. The low, plastered partitions on the steps make it likely that this was a miqvah (a ritual bath), rather than a cistern. The damage on the left side of the steps dates from the earthquake of 31 BCE. Abu Galyon
Qumran_RefectoryA.JPG
Israel, Qumran - Refectory158 viewsThe ‘Refectory’ (L77) is the largest room at Qumran. A smaller connecting space (L86) nearby contained a huge cache of pottery plates, bowls, and cups. Hence, de Vaux argued that L77 was probably the community’s communal dining room. Abu Galyon
Qumran_ScriptoriumA.JPG
Israel, Qumran - Scriptorium145 viewsL30. From the fill of this room (which came from a collapsed upper level) de Vaux recovered two inkwells and the remains of what appeared to be a long, narrow plastered table (about 480 cm x 40 cm). Another inkwell was found in an adjacent locus. He conjectured that L30 could have been the community’s ‘scriptorium’, a room for copying manuscripts. Abu Galyon
Qumran_TowerA.JPG
Israel, Qumran - Tower190 viewsThe remains of the tower at Qumran. The tower is set in the middle of the north side and has a natural function as an observation or guard tower: north looks towards Jericho, and that would be the natural direction from which travellers would approach the settlement. There is no access to the tower at ground level; instead people would have entered higher up, after climbing a flight of stone steps fixed to the south-side exterior wall. Abu Galyon
RED_FIGURE_POTTERY_(1).JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.27 viewsAn example of the wonderful collection of red figure pottery housed at the museum.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
RED_FIGURE_POTTERY_(2).JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.32 viewsAn example of the wonderful collection of red figure pottery housed at the museum.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Red_figure_pottery_(3).JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.30 viewsAn example of the wonderful collection of red figure pottery housed at the museum.
Photograph by Will Hooton.
*Alex
resizeJeru.jpg
Israel, Jerusalem Sep 201681 viewsSimon
resizejeru2.jpg
Israel, Jerusalem Sep 201676 viewsEast JerusalemSimon
rm003.jpg
Italy, Rome, Forum167 viewsruins of The Forum - Temple of Saturn being excavated 1999

We were unable to get close, I think this pic was taken from the sidewalk by hte main road that ran by.
randy h2
rm004.jpg
Italy, Rome, Forum184 views1999

I think this is ( or near) The Forum - Temple of Saturn
randy h2
rm005.jpg
Italy, Rome, Coliseum150 viewsColiseum 1999randy h2
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Italy, Venice - Bridge of Sighs154 viewsBridge of Sighs 1999randy h2
rm007.jpg
Italy, Venice - Grand Canal and St. Marks158 viewsVeiw from the ferry 1999randy h2
Roda_Nilometer.jpg
Egypt, Cairo - Nilometer302 viewsThis octagonal pillar is the only surviving Nilometer in Cairo, tucked away in a kiosk on the island of Roda, in the middle of the Nile. When in use, the height of water in the pit measured the annual flooding of the river. In an ideal year the water would rise to the 16th of the marked divisions (each one cubit, approximately 52cm) decorating the column.

The Nilometer is an attribute of the titular river god, Nilus (equivalent to the Egyptian deity, Hapy), and often features on coin reverses depicting Nilus.

The surrounding structure is itself of architectural significance and dates to 861 CE. Which means those pointed arches set into the walls predate the European Gothic style by around 250 years – they could be the earliest pointed arches anywhere in the world.
1 commentsAbu Galyon
RomaForoRomanoColonnaFoca2.JPG
Italy, Rome, The Column of Focas277 viewsThe Column of Phocas at Rome was erected before the Rostra and dedicated to the Emperor on 1 August 608. It was the last addition made to the Forum Romanum. The Corinthian column has a height of 13.6 m (44 ft). Both the column and the marble socle were recycled from earlier use. It still stands in its original location. An English translation of the inscription follows: To the best, most clement and pious ruler, our lord Phocas the perpetual emperor, crowned by God, the forever august triumphator, did Smaragdus, former praepositus sacri palatii and patricius and Exarch of Italy, devoted to His Clemency for the innumerable benefactions of His Piousness and for the peace acquired for Italy and its freedom preserved, this statue of His Majesty, blinking from the splendor of gold here on this tallest column for his eternal glory erect and dedicate, on the first day of the month of August, in the eleventh indiction in the fifth year after the consulate of His Piousness. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Column_of_Phocas. Image released to public domain.Joe Sermarini
RomaForoRomanoTempioAntoninoFaustina.JPG
Italy, Rome, Temple of Antoninus and Faustina, with the church of San Lorenzo in Miranda, view from Palatine Hill, May 2005.64 viewsTemple of Antoninus and Faustina, with the church of San Lorenzo in Miranda, view from Palatine Hill, May 2005. The Temple of Antoninus and Faustina is an ancient Roman temple in Rome, adapted as a Roman Catholic church, Chiesa di San Lorenzo in Miranda. It is in the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra, opposite the Regia. The temple was begun by Antoninus Pius in 141 and was initially dedicated to his deceased and deified wife, Faustina the Elder. When Antoninus Pius was deified after his death in 161 AD, the temple was re-dedicated jointly to Antoninus and Faustina at the instigation of his successor, Marcus Aurelius. The ten monolithic Corinthian columns of its pronaos are 17 metres high. The rich bas-reliefs of the frieze under the cornice, of garlanded griffons and candelabri, were often copied from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_of_Antoninus_and_Faustina Photograph released to the public domain.
1 commentsJoe Sermarini
Roman-Bridge1.jpg
France, Sommiéres - Roman Bridge543 views17 arch bridge built on orders of Tiberius to cross the river Vidourle and enable to connect Nemausis ( Nîmes ) with Tolosa ( Toulouse ).Bohemond
Roman-Bridge2.jpg
France, Sommiéres - Roman bridge641 views17 arch bridge built on orders of Tiberius to cross the river Vidourle and enable to connect Nemausis ( Nîmes ) with Tolosa ( Toulouse ).Bohemond
Roman_Amphitheatre_Paris.jpg
France, Paris, Arena of Lutetia70 viewsThe Roman Arena that was discovered by Théodore Vaquer during the building of Rue Monge, in the 5th arrondissement, between 1860–1869. It was first built in the 1st century AD. Victor Hugo created a preservation committee called "la Société des Amis des Arènes" to preserve it. However in the photo, taken by me in May 2014, can be seen the line of apartments on Rue Monge that cover the remaining third of the Arena.Masis
Roman_Baths_c1900.jpg
England, Roman Baths, Bath (2)148 viewsThis is a Photochrome print of the Roman Baths, Bath, England taken sometime between 1895 and 1905.
It shows the new Victorian embellishments added to the Baths since their discovery in the 1880's and which, for the most part, are the works that visitors to the site see today.
The familiar green hue of the pool seen by modern visitors is caused by algae, resulting from the water's exposure to the open air. In Roman times the pool was roofed over and its waters, while perhaps not crystal clear, would almost certainly not have been green.

Photochrome prints are coloured images produced from black-and-white photographic negatives via the direct photographic transfer of a negative onto lithographic printing plates.
*Alex
Roman_Baths__Ankara.jpg
Turkey, Ankara, Roman Baths28 viewsPhotograph by Will Hooton*Alex
roman_Brno.jpg
Czech Republic, Morava region - Brno - V-shaped ditch of Roman temporary camp69 viewsV-shaped ditch of Roman temporary camp in Brno watching ford crosing on Svratka River in area of Marcoman tribe for while sometimes from 172 - 180 AD in time of Marcus Aurelius' Marcomannic Wars.
Dec 2017 excavated
1 commentsBohemian
Roman_era_residential_area_-_Delos.jpg
Greece, Delos - Maritime Quarter Streetscape249 viewsLloyd T
Roman_era_wall_-_Delos.jpg
Greece, Delos - Wall in the Maritime Quarter297 viewsRemnant plasterwork and painting illustrates how the coarse stone walls were finished in the residential area that is the Maritime Quarter.1 commentsLloyd T
Roman_seige_encampment.jpg
Israel, Masada - Remains of a Roman Seige Encampment202 viewsLloyd
ROMAN_SEIGE_RAMP_MASADA.jpg
Israel, Masada - Looking Down the Roman Seige Ramp146 viewsIndustrious bunch those Romans!Lloyd
Rumeli_Hisari.jpg
Turkey, Istanbul, Rumeli Hisari129 viewsRumeli Hisari means ‘Rumelian Castle’: Rumelia (derived from ‘Rome’) being the Turkish word for the Balkan lands which once belonged to the Roman (Byzantine) Empire. The Rumeli Hisari was constructed in 1452 a few miles north of Constantinople on the European side of the Bosphorus by order of Sultan Mehmet II. Impressively, the whole fortress was built in less than four months. The Rumeli Hisari sits opposite an older, smaller Ottoman fort on the Asian side, the Anadolu Hisari (Anatolian Castle). Together the two forts effectively controlled traffic through the Bosphorus, cutting Constantinople off from the Black Sea and ensuring that an Ottoman army operating on the European side could be supplied from the granaries of central Anatolia. The building of Rumeli Hisari was preparation for the investment and conquest of Constantinople, which took place the following year.

The Rumeli Hisari/Anadolu Hisari forts are built at the point where the Bosphorus is most constricted (about 700m across). This is the same narrows where the Persian King Darius I over 2500 years ago built a ‘bridge of boats’ to transport his army across to attack Thrace (see Herodotus, Histories 4.87f). And these days a modern suspension bridge links Asia to Europe at the same spot, but sadly it rather spoils the view.
Abu Galyon
Ruta 2~0.jpg
New World, Maya331 viewsMayadigger
Sabratha_-_Frons.JPG
Lybia, Sabratha - Scaenae Frons231 viewsThe scaenae frons of the theatre of Sabratha, modern Libya. The sea is visible behind, through the central gate. Note the great reliefs under the stage itself. Syltorian
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Lybia, Sabratha - Theatre181 viewsThe theatre of the ancient city of Sabratha (Libya), built during the reign of the Severans, reconstructed by Mussolini. Syltorian
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Lybia, Sabratha - Detail of Scaenae Frons144 viewsA relief in one of the niches of the theatre frontSyltorian
Salona_-_baths.jpg
Croatia, Salona (Solin) - Baths173 viewsSalona (Solin), Croatia - Baths. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solin,_CroatiaJoe Sermarini
Santuario_emiciclo_colonne_4.JPG
Italy, Palestrina, Ruins of the Sanctuary of Fortuna Primigenia146 viewshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PalestrinaJoe Sermarini
Sarapis1.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.35 viewsStatue of Serapis.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Sarcophagus__Labours_of_Herakles_.jpg
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.31 viewsSarcophagus featuring the 10 labours of Hercules.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Sarcophagus__Labours_of_Herakles_details.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.30 viewsDetails from a sarcophagus featuring the 10 labours of Hercules.
Photographs by Will Hooton
*Alex
Scepsis_2009.jpg
Turkey, Kursunlutepe - ancient Skepsis, Troas 71 viewsView of the village of Kurşuntepe from the highest point of the site of ancient Skepsis.

Skepsis or Scepsis, an ancient settlement in the Troad, is today the village of Kursunlutepe, near the town of Bayramic in Turkey. The famous library of Aristotle was kept at Skepsis before being moved to Pergamum and then Alexandria. It was also home to Metrodorus of Scepsis and Demetrius of Scepsis. Several times in its history, the citizens of Skepsis were forced to move elsewhere. In 306 B.C., Antigonus evacuated Skepsis and other cities in the area and forced the residents to move to Alexandria Troas. Tradition holds that Saint Cornelius the Centurion, the first Gentile convert to Christianity, became the first bishop of Skepsis in the early days of Christianity.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skepsis
Joe Sermarini
Sculptured Drum of Column from Ephesus.jpg
Turkey, Ephesus - Sculptured Drum of Column from Ephesus1077 views
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Israel, Scythopolis ampitheatre145 viewsA picture of the ampitheatre in Scythopolis, taken from the top of the even more ancient Beit She'an mound. Running in the foreground is the cardo. This was taken in June 2012 during a two week trip my wife and I took to Israel and Jordan.cmcdon0923
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Spain, Segobriga - Ampitheater49 viewsSegobriga is a former Roman city near Saelices, in the province of Cuenca in Spain. It is possibly one of the most important archaeological sites of the Spanish Meseta. The name Segóbriga derives from two words: "Sego" meaning victory and "briga" meaning city fortress. The translation would be "City of the Victory" or "Victorious City." The site includes an amphitheatre, theater, the city walls and gates, two thermal buildings or Roman baths, and the Forum. There is also a necropolis, and the circus (Roman race track) is being excavated - its outline can be seen from the top of the hill.

The Amphitheater, 75m long and of an irregular elliptic shape, is the biggest monument of Segóbriga and had capacity for 5,500

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seg%C3%B3briga_Circo_04_JMM.jpg
Joe Sermarini
Segóbriga_Termas_JMM.jpg
Spain, Segobriga - Roman baths48 viewsSegóbriga is a former Roman city near Saelices, in the province of Cuenca in Spain. It is possibly one of the most important archaeological sites of the Spanish Meseta. The name Segóbriga derives from two words: "Sego" meaning victory and "briga" meaning city fortress. The translation would be "City of the Victory" or "Victorious City." The site includes an amphitheatre, theater, the city walls and gates, two thermal buildings or Roman baths, and the Forum. There is also a necropolis, and the circus (Roman race track) is being excavated - its outline can be seen from the top of the hill.

Roman Baths: The monumental baths were not only for hygienic reasons but also for social and business purposes.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seg%C3%B3briga_Termas_JMM.jpg
Joe Sermarini
SepphorisMosaic.JPG
Israel, Sepphoris - 'Mona Lisa' Mosaic213 viewsPart of a Roman mosaic, usually dated to the early 3rd-century CE, from the dining room floor of a mansion in the upper town at Sepphoris. When it was first excavated, the Israeli press named it 'the Mona Lisa of the Galilee'. Over-hype, maybe, but it is certainly attractive.Abu Galyon
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Spain, Santiponce, Italica.41 viewsDetail of the floor of the house of Planetarium. May, 2002.jmuona
Severus_ Arch.jpg
Italy, Rome, Arch of Septimus Severus503 viewsPosted by Strength And Honour.
Photo taken by my friend Hebe.
Strength And Honour
Side_-_Temple_of_Athena.jpg
Turkey, Side - Temple of Athena246 viewsSide’s temple of Athena, together with an adjacent temple dedicated to Apollo and a later Byzantine basilica, occupy a spectacular site on the edge of the city’s ancient harbour. This is wonderful, picture-postcard stuff! Unfortunately, the rest of Side is a dump: a ghastly collection of bars and discos, cheap eateries, souvenir shops and garish hotels, whatever charm it once had totally destroyed by modern mass tourism. The most disappointing ancient town I’ve ever visited. 1 commentsAbu Galyon
Side_Commercial_agora_panorama_2.jpg
Turkey, Side, Pamphylia The Commercial Agora33 viewsTurkey, Side, Pamphylia the Commercial Agora

The great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. The well-preserved city walls provide an entrance to the site through the Hellenistic main gate (Megale Pyle) of the ancient city, although this gate from the 2nd century BC is badly damaged. Next comes the colonnaded street, whose marble columns are no longer extant; all that remains are a few broken stubs near the old Roman baths. The street leads to the public bath, restored as a museum displaying statues and sarcophagi from the Roman period. Next is the square agora with the remains of the round Tyche and Fortuna temple (2nd century BC), peripteral with twelve columns, in the middle. In later times it was used as a trading center where pirates sold slaves. The remains of the theater, which was used for gladiator fights and later as a church, and the monumental gate date back to the 2nd century. The early Roman Temple of Dionysus is near the theater. The fountain gracing the entrance is restored. At the left side are the remains of a Byzantine Basilica. A public bath has also been restored. The remaining ruins of Side include three temples, an aqueduct, and a nymphaeum.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Side_Commercial_agora_panorama_2.jpg
Author, Date: Dosserman, 20 February 2015
Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Joe Sermarini
Side_Theatre.jpg
Turkey, Side, Pamphylia Theater 2nd Century AD20 viewsThe great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. They cover a large promontory which a wall and a moat separate from the mainland. There are colossal ruins of a theater complex, the largest in Pamphylia, built in the 2nd century A.D. Following design it relies on arches to support the sheer verticals. The Roman style was adopted because Side lacked a convenient hillside that could be hollowed out in the usual Greek fashion more typical of Asia Minor. In Greek fashion, the seating (for 15,000–20,000 people) curves 210° vice the usual 180° for a Roman theater. The stage building was ornately adorned but the decorations and the theater are damaged, in part due to a strong earthquake. The theater was converted into an open-air sanctuary with two chapels during the 5th or 6th century (Byzantine times).

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Side_Theatre_4192.jpg

Author, Date: Dosseman, 21 March 2011

Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Joe Sermarini
Side_Theatre_panorama.jpg
Turkey, Side, Pamphylia Theater 2nd Century AD panorama24 viewsTurkey, Side, Pamphylia, theater 2nd century AD, panorama

The great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. They cover a large promontory which a wall and a moat separate from the mainland. There are colossal ruins of a theater complex, the largest in Pamphylia, built in the 2nd century A.D. Following design it relies on arches to support the sheer verticals. The Roman style was adopted because Side lacked a convenient hillside that could be hollowed out in the usual Greek fashion more typical of Asia Minor. In Greek fashion, the seating (for 15,000–20,000 people) curves 210° vice the usual 180° for a Roman theater. The stage building was ornately adorned but the decorations and the theater are damaged, in part due to a strong earthquake. The theater was converted into an open-air sanctuary with two chapels during the 5th or 6th century (Byzantine times).

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Side_Theatre_panorama.jpg

Author, Date: Dosseman, 21 March 2011

Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Joe Sermarini
Side_TH_au.JPG
Turkey, Side, Pamphylia Theater 2nd Century AD Exterior24 viewsTurkey, Side, Pamphylia theater 2nd century AD, exterior. The great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. They cover a large promontory which a wall and a moat separate from the mainland. There are colossal ruins of a theater complex, the largest in Pamphylia, built in the 2nd century A.D. Following design it relies on arches to support the sheer verticals. The Roman style was adopted because Side lacked a convenient hillside that could be hollowed out in the usual Greek fashion more typical of Asia Minor. In Greek fashion, the seating (for 15,000–20,000 people) curves 210° vice the usual 180° for a Roman theater. The stage building was ornately adorned but the decorations and the theater are damaged, in part due to a strong earthquake. The theater was converted into an open-air sanctuary with two chapels during the 5th or 6th century (Byzantine times).

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Side_TH_au.JPG

Author, Date: Dosseman, 21 March 2011

Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Joe Sermarini
Side_Tyche_temple_on_agora.jpg
Turkey, Side, Pamphylia Temple of Tyche on the commercial agora26 viewsThere are two agoras: a commercial one and one, called "State agora." On the commercial one there is a round temple, well-restored, that was dedicated to Tyche. The agora is over 8000 square meters, surrounded by columns, with shops, exedras and latrines and washing places. On it inconceivable numbers of slaves must have been traded, for during part of its history Side was a major center for pirates who stationed their fleet here. In the center stood a temple for the protective goddess of the city, Tyche. The present construction dates from the 2nd century A.D., it was in use in Byzantine times.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Side_Tyche_temple_on_agora_6140.jpg

Author, Date: Dosserman, 20 February 2015

Joe Sermarini
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Greece, Athens - Acropolis, Parthenon, Slab of the North Parthenon Frieze663 views
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Croatia, Ruins of the amphitheater of Solin175 viewsRuins of the amphitheater of Salona, Dalmatia (Solin, Croatia). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solin,_CroatiaJoe Sermarini
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Greece, Cape Sounion - The Temple of Poseidon302 viewsAccording to legend, Cape Sounion is the spot where Aegeus, king of Athens, leapt to his death off the cliff, thus giving his name to the Aegean Sea.1 commentsLloyd T
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Greece, Temple of Poseidon at Sounion67 viewscmcdon0923
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Greece, The acropolis at Sounion and the Temple of Poseidon, from across the harbor.70 viewsTaken September 29, 2016cmcdon0923
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Israel, Caesarea Maritima - the less desirable view south from Herod's Palace227 viewsDog's in the palace pool and now this. How the mighty have fallen!Lloyd
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Greece, Olympia - In the Stadium at Olympia186 viewsThe winner of the 2006 Ride on Mower final crosses the line in the stadium.Lloyd T
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Spain, Santiponce, Italica.35 viewsCopies of statues found at the site have been placed around the ruins. May, 2002.jmuona
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Spain, Santiponce, Italica.32 viewsThe copy of the statue of Venus is placed close to the entrance. The original, now in the Archelogical Museum in Sevilla, was found in Italica.jmuona
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Italy, Monza, Serpero Museum, Duomo di Monza.46 viewsIvory diptych of Stilicho, Roman General (magister militum), Patrician and Consul of the Western Roman Empire. The diptych depicts Stilicho, on the right and, on the left, his wife Serena standing with his son, Eucherius.

The Duomo di Monza is the main religious building of Monza. Although known in English as Monza Cathedral, the building is not in fact a cathedral, as Monza is part of the Diocese of Milan. The church is also known as the Basilica of San Giovanni Battista from its dedication to John the Baptist. In the right transept is the entrance to the Serpero Museum which houses the treasury.
*Alex
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Italy, Ostia - Street545 viewsIt is like stepping back in time....
Posted by Strength And Honour.
Photo taken by my friend Hebe.
1 commentsStrength And Honour
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Italy, Cosenza, Sibari (Thurium), Street204 viewsLucania, Thourioi.
Today Sibari (Cosenza), Italy
Taras
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France, St Romain-en-Gal - public toilet200 viewspublic toiletvacationchick
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Turkey, Side, Pamphylia Temple of Apollo 44 viewsThe ruins of the Temple of Apollo at Side, Antalya, Turkey.

The great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. The well-preserved city walls provide an entrance to the site through the Hellenistic main gate (Megale Pyle) of the ancient city, although this gate from the 2nd century BC is badly damaged. Next comes the colonnaded street, whose marble columns are no longer extant; all that remains are a few broken stubs near the old Roman baths. The street leads to the public bath, restored as a museum displaying statues and sarcophagi from the Roman period. Next is the square agora with the remains of the round Tyche and Fortuna temple (2nd century BC), peripteral with twelve columns, in the middle. In later times it was used as a trading center where pirates sold slaves. The remains of the theater, which was used for gladiator fights and later as a church, and the monumental gate date back to the 2nd century. The early Roman Temple of Dionysus is near the theater. The fountain gracing the entrance is restored. At the left side are the remains of a Byzantine Basilica. A public bath has also been restored. The remaining ruins of Side include three temples, an aqueduct, and a nymphaeum.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sunrise_apollo_side.jpg
Photo by Saffron Blaze, via http://www.mackenzie.co
Date: 21 October 2011
Authorization: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en
Joe Sermarini
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Italy, Sybaris, Planning assumptions of Sybaris (Lucania)181 viewsPlanning assumptions of Sybaris by Archaeological Museum of Sibaritide (Sibari, Cs, Italy)Taras
Sybaris_port_facilities.jpg
Italy, Port facilities of Sybaris131 viewsExcavated remains of the port facilities of Sybaris. These are located on the Casa Bianca site in the easternmost section of the Sybaris archaeological park. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sybaris_port_facilities.jpgJoe Sermarini
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Turkey, Attalia (Antalya) - Hadrian's gate257 viewsA stylish triple-arched gateway erected in 130 CE to mark the emperor Hadrian’s visit to the city. It’s still used as one of the principal entrances to the historic Kaleiçi quarter of today’s Antalya. And it’s a very visible reminder of how much lower the street level was in Roman times. At the base of the central arch there are quite deep grooves formed by the passage of carts: hence the glass-bottomed footbridge, designed to save the modern pedestrian from a twisted ankle. Abu Galyon
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Greece, Athens - The Gate of Schliemann's House - Athens237 viewsNot exactly an ancient site but as the home of the Greek Numismatic Museum it houses one of the great collections of ancient coins .... a must see on any visit to Athens.

This is photo is of one of the wrought iron gates of Schliemann’s Athenian mansion constructed in 1878/9. The swastika motif derives from his Trojan excavations and borders a design of winged sphinxes and acanthus leaves capped by an owl with spread wings.
Lloyd T
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Israel, Caesarea Maritima - Herod's Villa324 viewsAnother of Herod the Great's many residences.
This one is by the seaside.
Abu Galyon
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Jordan, Petra - Roman Soldier's Tomb184 viewsIt's popularly called the "Roman Soldier's Tomb" because the central headless figure on the facade is clearly wearing a cuirass. The trouble is that the tomb can't really be dated later than the early years of Rabbel II, i.e. at least 30 years before the Roman annexation in 106 CE. That makes a Roman officer's burial highly questionable. The interior layout is elaborate - a tomb intended for someone of quite high status.Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Hierapolis of Phrygia - Theater160 viewsMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
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Turkey, Colossae137 viewsAnother Anatolian tel awaiting excavation (or perhaps looters if the archaeologists delay too long): this is the site of ancient Colossae in the Lycus valley. Modern Christian pilgrims touring the ‘Seven Churches of Asia’ visit nearby Laodicea but generally ignore this place, which is slightly odd because Saint Paul did address one of his letters to the congregation resident here. Of course, there’s little to see apart from the usual surface scatter of shards. Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Ephesus - Central square of Terrace Houses560 viewsPart of the central square of the terrace houses in Ephesus.1 commentsmemphius
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Turkey, Aphrodisias - Aphrodite's temple with tetrapylon202 viewsMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
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Turkey, Ephesus - Domitian's temple174 viewsMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
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Turkey, Ankara, The Temple of the Divine Augustus and Rome34 viewsThe Temple of the Divine Augustus and Rome in the centre of Ankara, which now stands besides a mosque. I was unable to get any closer due this being Ramazan, the area was cordoned off in preparation for iftar.

Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Priene, The Temple of Athena at Priene94 viewsThe Temple of Athena at Priene was started by Mausolus but completed by Alexander the Great, who hired the great Greek architect Pytheos to complete the design and construction. It is the largest temple in Priene. Pytheos situated the temple so that it had (and still has) a beautiful view over the valley and river below Alexander the Great invested heavily into rebuilding all of the Greek cities of the Ionic league following the defeat of the Persians. This classic Greek temple was done in the Ionic style and had no frieze around the top. Instead, a dentil design sat above the columns and architrave. The statue of Athena that was originally inside the temple was based on the famous statue by Phidias in the Parthenon of Athens.Joe Sermarini
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Greece, Olympia - Temple of Hera199 viewsLloyd T
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Greece, Athens - The Temple of Olympian Zeus 212 viewsLloyd T
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Italy, Rome, Temple of Vesta in the Forum Romanum.73 viewsTemple of Vesta in the Forum Romanum in Rome. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_of_Vesta. All temples to Vesta were round, and had entrances facing east to symbolize connection between Vesta’s fire and the sun as sources of life. The Temple of Vesta represents the site of ancient cult activity as far back as 7th century BCE. Numa Pompilius is believed to have built this temple along with the original Regia and House of the Vestal Virgins in its original form. Around the Temple stood The Sacred Grove, in which also there was a graveyard for the priests and virgins. It was one of the earliest structures located in the Roman Forum although its present reincarnation is the result of subsequent rebuilding. Instead of a cult statue in the cella there was a hearth which held the sacred flame. The temple was the storehouse for the legal wills and documents of Roman Senators and cult objects such as the Palladium. The Palladium was a statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) believed to have been brought by Aeneas from Troy; the statue was felt to be one of the Pignora Imperii, or pledges of imperium, of Ancient Rome. According to Dionysius of Halicarnassus, the Romans believed that the Sacred fire of Vesta was closely tied to the fortunes of the city and viewed its extinction as a portent of disaster. The sacred flame was put out in 394 by Theodosius I after he won the Battle of the Frigidus, defeating Eugenius and Arbogast. The Temple of Vesta remained reasonably intact until the Renaissance. However, in 1549 the building was completely demolished and its marble reused in churches and papal palaces. The section standing today was reconstructed in the 1930s during the dictatorship of Benito Mussolini.

By Wknight94, 26 April 2008. Source:
Joe Sermarini
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Greece, Olympia - Temple of Zeus fallen columns208 viewsLloyd T
Termessos_-_Theatre.jpg
Turkey, Termessos - Theatre181 viewsThough Termessos is fairly close to a major tourist resort (Antalya) it’s not over-visited, perhaps because it’s a fairly steep uphill climb to reach the principal monuments from the nearest point where you can park. But the effort is worth it: the setting (inside Güllük Daği National Park) is spectacular and the ruins at this unrestored site are as romantic a pile of tumble-down stones as anyone could wish for. Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Ephesus - Central Square464 viewsPart of the central square of the terrace houses in Ephesus.memphius
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Turkey, Ephesus - Terrace House526 viewsLocated in the ongoing excavation of the upper-class terrace houses. Lovely floor mosaicmemphius
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Greece, Athens - Acropolis, The Erectheum846 views
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Turkey, Elaioussa Sebaste, Islands off Cilicia, Theater68 viewsElaiussa, meaning olive, was founded in the 2nd century B.C. on a tiny island attached to the the southern coast of Anatolia (in modern-day Turkey) by a narrow isthmus in Mediterranean Sea. During the reign of Augustus, the Cappadocian king Archelaus founded a new city on the isthmus. Archelaus called it Sebaste, which is the Greek equivalent word of the Latin "Augusta." The city entered a golden age when Vespasian purged Cilicia of pirates in 74 A.D. Towards the end of the 3rd century A.D. however its importance began to wane, due in large part to incursions by the Sassanian King Shapur I in 260 and later by the Isaurians. When its neighbor Corycus began to flourish in the 6th century A.D., Elaiussa Sebaste slowly disappeared from history.

The theater, dating to the 2nd century A.D., is small with only 23 rows of seats, whose steps and decorations unfortunately succumbed to centuries of plunder. Next to the theater is the agora, built in all great probability during the imperial period. At the entrance of the agora, which is surrounded by a semi-destroyed defense wall once rose two monumental fountains in the shape of lions. Inside the agora stands a large church, its floor is covered by sand to protect the mosaic pavement. Elaiussa's only temple stands outside the city on a hill overlooking the sea; only two of the Corinthian columns of this temple, which had 12 on the long and 6 on the short side originally, are standing today. A large bath complex among the lemon groves between the temple and the agora was built with a Roman technique little used in Anatolia. The necropolis is the richest and most impressive of cities of ancient Cilicia. The "Avenue of Graves," located on a hill to the north of the city, preserves close to a hundred graves of various shapes and sizes scattered among the lemon trees. The ancient aqueducts that carried water to the ruins from the Lamos ("Lemon") river also adorn the city’s two entrances. The aqueduct to the west of the city in particular is in relatively good condition. Centuries ago the aqueduct actually ran all the way to Corycus.
Joe Sermarini
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Spain, Segobriga - Theater40 viewsSegóbriga is a former Roman city near Saelices, in the province of Cuenca in Spain. It is possibly one of the most important archaeological sites of the Spanish Meseta. The name Segóbriga derives from two words: "Sego" meaning victory and "briga" meaning city fortress. The translation would be "City of the Victory" or "Victorious City." The site includes an amphitheatre, theater, the city walls and gates, two thermal buildings or Roman baths, and the Forum. There is also a necropolis, and the circus (Roman race track) is being excavated - its outline can be seen from the top of the hill.

Construction of the theater began under the emperor Tiberius and was completed during the Flavian dynasty, circa AD 79. The orchestra had three tiers of seats for VIP's and is preserved together with seats for spectators divided into sections according to their social classes. The upper cavea was built on the city wall on a vault over a street

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Theater_Segobriga.jpg
Photographer: Art Davis
25 September 2011
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Ankara, Theatre (1)30 viewsNot to far from the Anatolian Museum in Ankara, a theatre is currently being excavated. It certainly looks promising, although excavation is expected to continue for a long while. To excavate something like this in the middle of a metropolitan city is quite extraordinary!
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
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Greece, Delos - the ancient theatre219 viewsLloyd T
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Turkey, Ankara, Theatre (2)30 viewsAnother view of the Theatre.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
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Syria, Bostra, Roman Theatre56 viewsOriginally a Nabataean city, in A.D.106 Bostra was conquered by the emperor Trajan who renamed it Nova Trajana Bostra and made it the capital of the Roman province of Arabia Petraea. Since it was at the juncture of several trade routes connecting Damascus to the Red Sea the city flourished and Bostra eventually achieved the title metropolis under the emperor Philip I, who was a native of the city.
Today Bostra is a major archaeological site and has been declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Its main feature is it's Roman theatre which is reputed to be the best preserved Roman theatre in the world.
*Alex
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Libya, The theatre of the Roman city of Sabratha172 viewsPhoto made by the author (duimdog) of the theatre of the Roman city of Sabratha in Libya. For more images of Sabratha See also my Sabratha photoset on Flickr.Source: http://flickr.com/photos/duimdog/127614169/in/set-72057594105577693/

This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.
Joe Sermarini
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France, Paris, Roman Baths60 viewsThe Roman Baths of Cluny, Paris. Dated to the 3rd century AD, thought to have been paid for by the guild of "Lutetian Boatmen". The complex is now incorporated into the National Museum of the Middle Ages. Photo taken by me in May 2014.Masis
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Greece, Athens, The Acropolis from the Pnyx.209 viewsThe Pnyx, the home of democracy is the sloping area in the foreground, while the Acropolis dominates the background. Here assembled the Athenian citizen body to hear the great Athenian masters of rhetoric and to cast their votes on the most momentous decisions in the history of ancient Athens. The speaker's platform cut from the rear bedrock face of the Pnyx is to be seen in the centre right. As seen here the remains of the Pynx date from its third and final phase of development in the mid-fourth century BC when it was greatly expanded to accommodate the growing citizen body.Lloyd
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Greece, Delos - detail of the ancient pathway to Mt Kinthos291 viewsLloyd T
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Israel, The Herodium146 viewsThe Herodium, 12 km south of Jerusalem, the site of one of Herod's residences and the location of his tomb. The buildings mid-slope to the left of centre are the site of the excavation of Herod's tomb.Lloyd
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Greece, Mycenae - The Lion Gate365 viewsI waited a long time for this shot, the nanosecond when any one of the thousands of visitors swarming over the site wasn't visible in the frame. Sometimes you get lucky!2 commentsLloyd T
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Greece, Amphipolis: The Lion of Amphipolis181 viewsThe first pieces of this rather grand monument were discovered near the banks of the River Strymon in 1912 by Greek soldiers during the Second Balkan War. Further finds were made in 1916 and in 1930-32 during the creation of Lake Kerkini. The Lion was restored (and partly reconstructed) in 1937.

The sculpted Lion itself is 5.3m tall, on its base it stands over 8m high. It is plausibly dated to the late 4th century BCE. Recent work on the Kasta Tomb, which is about 4km distant, has revealed further fragments also apparently belonging to the Lion and it may be the case that the Lion originally surmounted that tomb and was only later moved to its present location.

Nobody knows what or who the monument commemorates; perhaps ongoing work on the Kasta Tomb will illuminate matters. A quite similar, somewhat smaller, statue, the “The Lion of Chaeronea”, honours the Sacred Band of Thebes, which was wiped out at the battle of Chaeronea in 338 BCE. But while several ancient sources (including Pausanias and Strabo) mention the Chaeronea lion and the circumstances of its construction, there is no ancient record of the Amphipolis lion.
1 commentsAbu Galyon
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Greece, Athens, The Approach to the Pynx from the Agora246 viewsThe home of democracy, the Pnyx was rebuilt and expanded in the 3rd quarter of the 4th century B.C., probably around 345-335 B.C. A massive, curved, retaining wall was built, as seen in this image. The steps of the old walkway from the Agora are visible and overbuilt by the retaining wall. Great Athenians such as Themistocles, Pericles and Socrates would have walked this path and steps in the heady days of the zenith Athenian democracy. 1 commentsLloyd
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Germany, Berlin, The propylon of the Sanctuary of Athena Nikephoros from the Pergamon Acropolis, Pergamon Museum Berlin123 viewsThe monumental gateway, which stood at the northeast corner of the sanctuary, was built by Eumenes II in the early 2nd century BC. The two-storey building, had a porch of four Doric columns (tetrastyle) on the ground floor, above which was a dedicatory inscription by Eumenes to Athena Nikephoros. The upper storey was a balcony with four Ionic columns and fronted by a military frieze depicting armour and weapons. The Sanctuary of Athena Nikephoros, on the southwest corner of the walled citadel on the Acropolis, was one of Pergamon's oldest religious centres, used for the worship of Athena and Nike. The cult of Athena at Pergamon had associations with the city's mythical founder Telephos, the son of Herakles and Auge, who was a priestess of Athena. The Attalid rulers of Pergamon claimed to be descendants of Telephos, and thus of Herakles and Auge.Joe Sermarini
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Greece, Delphi - The Stadium at Delphi227 viewsLooking from the marker at the farthest end from the starting line.Lloyd T
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Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.30 viewsThe Three Graces, removed from Perge.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
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Italy, Thurium, Planning assumptions of Thurium (Lucania)254 viewsPlanning assumptions of Thurium, by Archaeological Museum of Sibaritide (Sibari, Cs, Italy).1 commentsTaras
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New World, Maya, Tikal, Guatemala482 viewsMayadigger - Tikal was the home to 45,000 + citizens from 200-800 AD. This truly maginificent site is located deep in the Peten rainforest. The pyramid seen here is approx. 140 feet tall, whose temple is topped with a "cox-comb" roof decoration. In the right foreground is seen the Great Plaza with a number of stone stelae commemorating the city's kings. In the right background is the acropolis, where the elites not only lived, but were also buried with great pomp.
Mayadigger
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Mali, West Africa, Timbukto1886 viewsYes it does exist! although it has lost a lot from its glory days in the 14th and 16th centuries, still a fascinating place to visit. Meaning well of the woman named 'Bouctou'. In its day 25,000 students are reputed to have studied there at any one time. Some of the manuscripts can still be viewed; on such varied subjects at medicine, astronomy and arithmetic; sadly they are not well preserved.4 commentsBolayi
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Italy, Rome, Trajan's Markets 2405 viewsPosted by Strength And Honour.
Photo taken by my friend Hebe.
Strength And Honour
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Italy, Rome, Trajan's Markets 3493 viewsPosted by Strength And Honour.
Photo taken by my friend Hebe.
Strength And Honour
trajan market.jpg
Italy, Rome, Trajan's Markets 1492 viewsThe first mall in history.
Posted by Strength And Honour.
Photo taken by my friend Hebe.
Strength And Honour
Trajan.jpg
Italy, Rome, Trajan's Markets 4527 viewsThe modern bronze statue of Trajan, which stands near this emperor's Forum.
Posted by Strength And Honour.
Photo taken by my friend Hebe.
Strength And Honour
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Italy, Rome, Trajan's Column633 views
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Spain, Santiponce, Italica.44 viewsBust of Trajanus, copy at the ticket booth in Italica, original in Archelogical Museum, Sevilla.
Trajanus was born in this city. May, 2002.
jmuona
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Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.30 viewsStatue of Trajan in military dress.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
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Israel, Jericho - Herod's Palace181 viewsThe ruins at Tulul Abu el-Alaiq, site of Herod the Great’s winter retreat on the outskirts of Jericho. Jericho is over 300m below sea level and hence pleasantly warm in winter, even when it's freezing in Jerusalem. Around 35 BCE, Aristobulus, the last Hasmonaean high-priest and Herod’s brother-in-law, was murdered here on Herod’s orders, drowned in a fish pond. The palace and grounds extended across the Wadi Qilt (the seasonal river-bed in the foreground of the picture), which was spanned by a bridge. Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Dalyan - The rock tombs of Kaunos56 viewsOutside the official Kaunos archeological site, near Dalyan, Turkey there are six rock tombs on the Dalyan river (4th – 2nd century BC). The façades of the rock tombs resemble the fronts of Hellenistic temples with two Ionian pillars, a triangular pediment, an architrave with toothed friezes, and acroterions shaped like palm leaves.1 commentsJoe Sermarini
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Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.30 viewsTyche
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
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Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya. 33 viewsTyche
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.31 viewsUnattributed statue of an emperor.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
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Turkey, Sanliurfa Province, Urfa - Roman Columns of Edessa20 viewsThe heritage of Roman Edessa survives today in these columns at the site of Urfa Castle, dominating the skyline of the modern city of Urfa.

Photo by Bernard Gagnon, 24 May 2014.
Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Cilicia, Olba, Temple of Zeus230 viewsPhoto by Klaus-Peter Simon 1995. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olba_(ancient_city)Joe Sermarini
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Italy, Sicily, Agrigento, Valley of the Temples117 viewsThe Valle dei Templi (English: Valley of the Temples, Sicilian: Vaddi di li Tempri) is an archaeological site in Agrigento (ancient Greek Akragas), Sicily, southern Italy. It is one of the most outstanding examples of Greater Greece art and architecture, and is one of the main attractions of Sicily as well as a national monument of Italy. The area was included in the UNESCO Heritage Site list in 1997. Much of the excavation and restoration of the temples was due to the efforts of archaeologist Domenico Antonio Lo Faso Pietrasanta (1783–1863), who was the Duke of Serradifalco from 1809 through 1812.

The term "valley" is a misnomer, the site being located on a ridge outside the town of Agrigento.
Joe Sermarini
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Spain, Santiponce, Italica.33 viewsPartially opened site. May, 2002.jmuona
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Spain, Santiponce, Italica.35 viewsMay, 2002. Large areas were still unstudied at the time.jmuona
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Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.30 viewsA votive stele, 2nd-3rd cent. BC.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
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Spain, Santiponce, Italica.65 viewsFragments of old painted wall. very little is left of this type of structures.
The largest floor mosaics are in the Archelogical Museum in Sevilla but many fine ones were at the orginal site in May, 2002.
jmuona
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Turkey, Ephesus - Wall fresco439 viewsLocated in the ongoing excavation of the upper-class terrace houses. Note the opening in the wall for circulation. The entire complex must have appeared like a luxury hotel with a central arbitorium.memphius
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Afghanistan, Balkh2617 viewsThe walls of Balkh, Afganistan1 commentsJoe Sermarini
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Bulgaria, Varna - Odessos, Thrace Roman Baths314 viewsOdessus, Thrace, first included into the Roman Praefectura orae maritimae and then in 15 CE annexed to the province of Moesia (later Moesia Inferior), covered 47 hectares in present-day central Varna and had prominent public baths, Thermae, erected in the late 2nd century AD, now the largest Roman remains in Bulgaria (the building was 100 m (328.08 ft) wide, 70 m (229.66 ft) long, and 25 m (82.02 ft) high) and fourth-largest known Roman baths in Europe. Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Ephesus - Curetes Street1264 viewsLooking down Curetes Street named after the priests who presided over the sacred fire of Hestia. The street is paved with marble slabs with sidewalks covered in mosaics.
3 commentsmemphius
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Greece, Delos - household well238 viewsWater supply was a problem on the dry island of Delos. The solution was found in a mix of cisterns and wells. Cisterns retained the water from the sparse winter rains, while small wells are to be found frequently in residences as illustrated by this example.Lloyd T
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Croatia, Split - Diocletian's palace - peristyle - sphinx400 viewsDiocletian's palace is historical centre of Split - Croatia.Johny SYSEL
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Croatia, Split - Diocletian's palace362 viewsDiocletian's palace is historical centre of Split - Croatia.1 commentsJohny SYSEL
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Croatia, Split - Diocletian's palace - Cathedral of St. Domnius (St. Duje)324 viewsCathedral of St. Duje is build over Diocletian's mausoleum.Johny SYSEL
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Croatia, Split - Diocletian's palace - peristyle357 viewspart of cathedrale of St. Duje in the left upper cornerJohny SYSEL
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Croatia, Split - Diocletian's palace - silver gate434 viewseast gate leading to the centre of Split.Johny SYSEL
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New World, Maya, Xpuhil, Campeche, Mexico436 viewsLocated about thirty miles south of Chicanna, the ancient Maya city named Xpuhil, pronounced "SH-PUH-HEEL" found themselves between the hammer of wanning Tikal to the South and the anvil of the rising Chichen Itza to the North. Without the resources of Tikal, but trying to emmulate that great city's pyramids/temples, poor Xpuhil could only manage a sorry and rather pathetic attempt of Tikal's grand structures. Seen here, we see that their Temple structure tries to copy those seen at Tikal...rather sad, isn't it...?Mayadigger
 
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