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Segóbriga_Ampitheater.jpg
Spain, Segobriga - Ampitheater48 viewsSegobriga is a former Roman city near Saelices, in the province of Cuenca in Spain. It is possibly one of the most important archaeological sites of the Spanish Meseta. The name Segóbriga derives from two words: "Sego" meaning victory and "briga" meaning city fortress. The translation would be "City of the Victory" or "Victorious City." The site includes an amphitheatre, theater, the city walls and gates, two thermal buildings or Roman baths, and the Forum. There is also a necropolis, and the circus (Roman race track) is being excavated - its outline can be seen from the top of the hill.

The Amphitheater, 75m long and of an irregular elliptic shape, is the biggest monument of Segóbriga and had capacity for 5,500

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seg%C3%B3briga_Circo_04_JMM.jpg
Joe Sermarini
Segóbriga_Termas_JMM.jpg
Spain, Segobriga - Roman baths47 viewsSegóbriga is a former Roman city near Saelices, in the province of Cuenca in Spain. It is possibly one of the most important archaeological sites of the Spanish Meseta. The name Segóbriga derives from two words: "Sego" meaning victory and "briga" meaning city fortress. The translation would be "City of the Victory" or "Victorious City." The site includes an amphitheatre, theater, the city walls and gates, two thermal buildings or Roman baths, and the Forum. There is also a necropolis, and the circus (Roman race track) is being excavated - its outline can be seen from the top of the hill.

Roman Baths: The monumental baths were not only for hygienic reasons but also for social and business purposes.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seg%C3%B3briga_Termas_JMM.jpg
Joe Sermarini
Theater_Segobriga.jpg
Spain, Segobriga - Theater39 viewsSegóbriga is a former Roman city near Saelices, in the province of Cuenca in Spain. It is possibly one of the most important archaeological sites of the Spanish Meseta. The name Segóbriga derives from two words: "Sego" meaning victory and "briga" meaning city fortress. The translation would be "City of the Victory" or "Victorious City." The site includes an amphitheatre, theater, the city walls and gates, two thermal buildings or Roman baths, and the Forum. There is also a necropolis, and the circus (Roman race track) is being excavated - its outline can be seen from the top of the hill.

Construction of the theater began under the emperor Tiberius and was completed during the Flavian dynasty, circa AD 79. The orchestra had three tiers of seats for VIP's and is preserved together with seats for spectators divided into sections according to their social classes. The upper cavea was built on the city wall on a vault over a street

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Theater_Segobriga.jpg
Photographer: Art Davis
25 September 2011
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Joe Sermarini
Aqueduct_Segovia_s.png
Spain, Segovia - Aqueduct259 views2 commentsViriathus
IMG_5374_1_s.png
Spain, Talaiot de Torellonet Vell160 viewsPlace: Torellonet Vell, Menorca
Country: Spain

The talaiot is the most significant structure of the prehistorical culture of Minorca and Majorca. Its characteristics are very varied but always bears a similarity with a tower. Although some talaiots have been found with an interior room, generally, the area that is used more frequently would be at the top, which is now mostly in ruins.

Nonetheless, the large talaiot depicted in this photo, Torelló 1, still has a well preserved door-window open to the south. It seems that the construction had diverse buildings embedded around it.

Although the excavation of the superior camera gave Roman chandeliers and ceramics, the remains of a factory of brass foundry was found west of the talaiot (where several molds, a faulty axe and Talaiotic ceramic were located) which seem to date the construction of the monument before the beginning of the 1st millennium BC.

Viriathus
IMG_2296_1_s.png
Spain, Torralba d'en Salord135 viewsPlace: Torralba d'en Salord, Menorca
Country: Spain

Torralba d'en Salord is a prehistoric talaiotic settlement located on the island of Minorca between the towns of Mahon and Alayor. Chronologically, it lies between 1000 BC and the Roman conquest. Although it lasted until the Middle Ages.

The large T-shaped monument that is depicted in the photo is called a Taula, and it's probably a sanctuary. A U-shaped wall encloses the Taulas; these precincts are 3000 years old, but the age of its central monuments is unknown. This Taula measures 5 meters tall and it's the largest of its kind.
Viriathus
IMG_5111_1_s.png
Spain, Torre d'en Galmés, Menorca169 viewsPlace: Torre d'en Galmés, Menorca
Country: Spain

Torre d'en Galmés is situated on a small hill that dominates most of the southern part of the island Minorca. On clear days it is possible to see the mountains of neighbouring Majorca. In prehistoric times it would have been possible to observe a large numbers of talaiotic towns from this position which leads to think that Torre d'en Galmés exercised a position of authority.

The Cartailhac Circle, named in honour of the eminent French archaeologist Émile Cartailhac, author of "Primitive Monuments on the Balearic Islands (1892)", was inhabitated between 250-50 BC. Its external wall is made with flagstones placed vertically on a baseboard.
In the interior, we see the remains of a central patio, with numerous fallen architectural elements (mullions, lintels, pilasters...), and three rooms around it.
To each side of the entrance there is a small covered space, with the roof below the superior level of the stones of the external facade, which seems to indicate that, at least above these spaces, there was a floor.
Viriathus
IMG_5045_1_s.png
Spain, Torre d'en Galmés, Menorca - The Cartailhac Circle121 viewsPlace: Torre d'en Galmés, Menorca
Country: Spain

Torre d'en Galmés is situated on a small hill that dominates most of the southern part of the island Minorca. On clear days it is possible to see the mountains of neighbouring Majorca. In prehistoric times it would have been possible to observe a large numbers of talaiotic towns from this position which leads to think that Torre d'en Galmés exercised a position of authority.

The Cartailhac Circle, named in honour of the eminent French archaeologist Émile Cartailhac, author of "Primitive Monuments on the Balearic Islands (1892)", was inhabitated between 250-50 BC. Its external wall is made with flagstones placed vertically on a baseboard.

In the interior, we see the remains of a central patio, with numerous fallen architectural elements (mullions, lintels, pilasters...), and three rooms around it.

To each side of the entrance there is a small covered space, with the roof below the superior level of the stones of the external facade, which seems to indicate that, at least above these spaces, there was a floor.
Viriathus
Arwad.jpg
Syria, Arwad / Ruad (Arados, Phoenicia)22 viewsArwad, an island about 800 m long by 500 m wide, about 50 km north of Tripolis, was settled in the early 2nd millennium B.C. by the Phoenicians. Ancient Arados was an important trading city surrounded by a massive wall and an artificial harbor on the east side toward the mainland. Its powerful navy and ships are mentioned in the monuments of Egypt and Assyria. In the Bible, an "Arvad" is noted as the forefather of the "Arvadites," a Canaanite people. Arados ruled some neighboring cities on the mainland, such as Marat (present-day Amrit) and Sumur, the former nearly opposite the island and the latter some kilometers to the south and held hegemony over the northern Phoenician cities from the mouth of the Orontes to the northern limits of Lebanon, something like that of Sidon in the south. Under the Persians, Arwad was allowed to unite in a confederation with Sidon and Tyre, with a common council at Tripolis. When Alexander the Great invaded Syria in 332 B.C., Arados submitted without a struggle under her king Strato, who sent his navy to aid Alexander in the reduction of Tyre. The city received the favor of the Seleucid kings of Syria and enjoyed the right of asylum for political refugees. It is mentioned in a rescript from Rome about 138 B.C. in connection with other cities and rulers of the East, to show favor to the Jews. This was after Rome had begun to interfere in the affairs of Judea and Syria and indicates that Arwad was still of considerable importance at that time.

Photo by NASA.
Joe Sermarini
Theatre_at_Bostra.JPG
Syria, Bostra, Roman Theatre55 viewsOriginally a Nabataean city, in A.D.106 Bostra was conquered by the emperor Trajan who renamed it Nova Trajana Bostra and made it the capital of the Roman province of Arabia Petraea. Since it was at the juncture of several trade routes connecting Damascus to the Red Sea the city flourished and Bostra eventually achieved the title metropolis under the emperor Philip I, who was a native of the city.
Today Bostra is a major archaeological site and has been declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Its main feature is it's Roman theatre which is reputed to be the best preserved Roman theatre in the world.
*Alex
Apamea_ad_Orontes_2000.jpg
Syria, The Great Colonnade at Apamea117 viewsApamea, on the right bank of the Orontes River, was a treasure city and stud-depot of the Seleucid kings, and was the capital of Apamene. Its site is found about 55 km (34 mi) to the northwest of Hama, Syria, overlooking the Ghab valley.

Previously known as Pharmake, it was fortified and enlarged by Seleucus I Nicator in 300 B.C., who so named it after his Bactrian wife, Apama. The fortress was placed upon a hill; the windings of the Orontes, with the lake and marshes, gave it a peninsular form. Seleucus had his commissariat there, 500 elephants, with 30,000 mares, and 300 stallions. The pretender, Diodotus Tryphon, made Apamea the basis of his operations.

Josephus relates, that Pompey marching south from his winter quarters, probably at or near Antioch, razed the fortress of Apamea in 64 B.C. and the city was annexed to the Roman Republic. In the revolt of Syria under Q. Caecilius Bassus, it held out against Julius Caesar for three years till the arrival of Cassius, 46 B.C.
Located at a strategic crossroads for Eastern commerce, the city flourished to the extent that its population eventually numbered half a million. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. The city boasted one of the largest theaters in the Roman world, and a monumental colonnade.

On the outbreak of the Jewish War, the inhabitants of Apamea spared the Jews who lived in their midst, and would not suffer them to be murdered or led into captivity.
Destroyed by Chosroes I in the 6th century, it was partially rebuilt and known in Arabic as Famia, and destroyed by an earthquake in 1152. In the Crusades it was still a flourishing and important place and was occupied by Tancred.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apamea,_Syria

The ancient city has been damaged as a result of the ongoing civil war in Syria.
Joe Sermarini
Amrit.jpg
Syria, The Ma'abed - Temple at Marathos (Amrit)33 viewsOne of the most important excavations at Marathos (Amrit) was the Phoenician temple, commonly referred to the "ma'abed," dedicated to the god Melqart of Tyre and Eshmun. The colonnaded temple, excavated between 1955 and 1957, consists of a large court cut out of rock measuring 47 × 49 metres (154 × 161 ft) and over 3 metres (9.8 ft) deep, surrounded by a covered portico. In the center of the court a well-preserved cube-shaped cella stands. The open-air courtyard was filled with the waters of a local, traditionally sacred spring, a unique feature of this site. The temple—which was dated to the late 4th century BC, a period following the Persian expansion into Syria—shows major Achaemenid influence in its layout and decoration. According to Dutch archaeologist, Peter Akkermans, the temple is the "best-preserved monumental structure from the Phoenician homeland."

Source:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amrit#/media/File:Amrit01.jpg
Photo by Jerzy Strzelecki
Joe Sermarini
Jableh_2.jpg
Syria, The Roman theater of Gabalah (Jableh, Syria)105 viewsJableh (Arabic: جبلة‎ Ǧabla), also spelt Jebleh, Jabala, Jablah or Gabala, is a coastal city on the Mediterranean in Syria, 25 km north of Baniyas and 25 km south of Latakia, with c. 80,000 inhabitants (2008). In antiquity Jableh was an important Roman city, one of the main remains of this period is an amphitheater, capable of housing c. 7,000 spectators. Near the seashores even older remains were found dating to the Iron Age or Phoenician Era. Less than 1 kilometer of the city center lies the ancient site of Gibala, today known as Tell Tweini. This city was inhabited from the third millennium BCE until the Persian period. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JablehJoe Sermarini
23293292.jpg
Tunisia, Tunis (Carthage)347 viewsCarthage was completely destroyed 146 BC so all excavations are from roman times.1 commentsJohny SYSEL
23293607.jpg
Tunisia, Tunis (Carthage) - bath of Antoninus234 viewsJohny SYSEL
23293768.jpg
Tunisia, Tunis (Carthage) - bath of Antoninus222 viewsJohny SYSEL
Oinoanda.JPG
Turkey, İncealiler - Termessos ad Oenoanda75 viewsOenoanda in the upper valley of the Xanthus River, was a colony of Termessos Major, and was also called Termessos Minor. The ruins of the city lie west of the modern village İncealiler in the Fethiye district of Muğla Province, Turkey, which partly overlies the ancient site. An extensive inscription of Diogenes of Oenoanda has been identified from over 300 scattered fragments, apparently from the stoa, varying in size from a few letters to passages of several sentences covering more than one block. The inscription sets out Epicurus' teachings on physics, epistemology, and ethics. It was originally about 25,000 words long and filled 260 square meters of wall. The stoa was dismantled in the second half of the third century A.D. to make room for a defensive wall; previously the site had been undefended.

By Ansgar Bovet - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18861664
Joe Sermarini
childs_toy.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.35 viewsA Phrygian toy in the form of a griffin eating a fish. Made of wood and dating to the 8th cent. BC, it was recovered in a Tumulus at the site of Gordion.
Photograph by Will Hooton.
*Alex
Bust_attributed_to_Marcus_Aurelius_.jpg
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.31 viewsBust attributed to a somewhat ill looking Marcus Aurelius.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Bronze_tondo_of_Trajan_Decius_(2)_jpg_PNG.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.39 viewsA magnificent bronze tondo of Trajan Decius. It was really tricky to photograph, the light above acts as a backlight and picking up facial details with out flash (and with a museum guard behind you to make sure you don't). And the reflective panes of glass don't help either.
Nevertheless, a wonderful piece. I am sorry I could not do any better.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Bronze_tondo_of_Trajan_Decius_(1).jpg
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.33 viewsSide view of the magnificent bronze tondo of Trajan Decius.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
A_relief_of_Hittite_troops_and_palace_officals,_dating_to_the_second_half_of_the_8th_cent__BC_.jpg
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.30 viewsA relief of Hittite troops and palace officials, dating to the second half of the 8th cent. BC.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
PHRYGIAN_BOWL.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.29 viewsThe Phrygians seemed to have possessed advanced metal working skills as is testified to by this bronze phiale, found at the Great Tumulus at Gordion.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
PHRYGIAN_HELMET.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.28 viewsThis helmet is called the Phyrigian type, not because it is Phrygian in origin, but because of it's resemblance to the Phrygian cap. This helmet appeared in the classical section rather than the Phrygian one.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
livia.jpg
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.33 viewsBust attributed to Livia.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
King_Sulumeii_offering_a_libation_to_a_god__Basalt,_10th_-_9th_cent__BC.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.30 viewsKing Sulumeli offering a libation to a god. Basalt, 10th - 9th cent. BC.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Detail_of_a_mythical_man-lion__Basalt_relief_from_Carchemish__9th_cent__BC_jpg_PNG.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.34 viewsDetail of a mythical man-lion. Basalt relief from Carchemish, 9th cent. BC.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
VOTIVE_STELE.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.29 viewsA votive stele, 2nd-3rd cent. BC.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Column_of_Julian_in_Ankara.jpg
Turkey, Ankara, Column of Julian32 viewsThe Column of Julian in Ankara was erected in dedication to his visit sometime in 362 AD. It has a strange ribbed design. In fact it looks like a giant marble kebab to me.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Ankara__baths.jpg
Turkey, Ankara, Roman Baths29 viewsPhotograph by Will Hooton*Alex
Roman_Baths__Ankara.jpg
Turkey, Ankara, Roman Baths27 viewsPhotograph by Will Hooton*Alex
Temple.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, The Temple of the Divine Augustus and Rome33 viewsThe Temple of the Divine Augustus and Rome in the centre of Ankara, which now stands besides a mosque. I was unable to get any closer due this being Ramazan, the area was cordoned off in preparation for iftar.

Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Theatre,_Ankara_(1).jpg
Turkey, Ankara, Theatre (1)29 viewsNot to far from the Anatolian Museum in Ankara, a theatre is currently being excavated. It certainly looks promising, although excavation is expected to continue for a long while. To excavate something like this in the middle of a metropolitan city is quite extraordinary!
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Theatre_at_Ankara.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, Theatre (2)29 viewsAnother view of the Theatre.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Ankara__Tombstones.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, Tombstones.32 viewsSituated in the town's palestra, a short distance away from the Roman Baths, are a large selection of Roman tombstones some of which are very interesting.
Photographs by Will Hooton
*Alex
LimyraTheater.jpg
Turkey, Antalya Province, Limyra - Theater28 viewsLimyra was a small city in Lycia on the southern coast of Asia Minor, on the Limyrus River, about 5 1/2 KM from the mouth of that river. The ruins are about 5 km northeast of the town of Finike (ancient Phoenicus) in Antalya Province, Turkey. It was a prosperous city, and one of the oldest cities in Lycia. It had rich and abundant soil, and gradually became one of the finest trade settlements in Greece. Pericles adopted it as the capital of the Lycian League. The city came under control of the Persian Empire after it was conquered by Cyrus the Great. He later annexed Lydia and its territories after a decisive victory at the Battle of Thymbra and the Siege of Sardis, where he defeated armies twice as large as his. Cyrus then got his greatest general: Harpagus of Media to conquer the much smaller kingdoms in Anatolia, while he went to conquer the Neo-Babylonian Empire. Anatolia would become an important place for the Persian monarchs who succeeded Cyrus. The massive Royal road constructed by Darius went from the Persian capital of Persepolis, to the Anatolian city of Sardis. Limyra would stay under Persian control until it was conquered and sacked by Alexander the Great. It is mentioned by Strabo (XIV, 666), Ptolemy (V, 3, 6) and several Latin authors. Gaius Caesar, adopted son of Augustus, died there (Velleius Paterculus, II, 102). Ruins consist of a theater, tombs, sarcophagi, bas-reliefs, Greek and Lycian inscriptions etc. About 3 km east of the site is the Roman Bridge at Limyra, one of the oldest segmented arch bridges of the world.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:LimyraTheater1.jpg
Photo by Kpisimon, 8 May 1988
Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
Joe Sermarini
JULIA_SOAEMIAS.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.34 viewsStatue attributed to Julia Soaemias, mother of  Elagabalus.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Herakles.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.29 viewsStatue of Herakles.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Hadrian.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.34 viewsStatue of Hadrian in military dress.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
ATHENA.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.32 viewsStatue of Athena.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
artemis_perge.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.31 viewsStatue of Artemis, removed from Perge.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
TYCHE.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.29 viewsTyche
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
TRAJAN~0.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.29 viewsStatue of Trajan in military dress.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Private_Citizen.jpg
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.29 viewsStatue of a private citizen.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
POSSIBLY_FORTUNA.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.29 viewsStatue, probably of Fortuna.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Mercury.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.31 viewsStatue of Mercury.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
UNATTRIBUTED_EMPEROR.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.30 viewsUnattributed statue of an emperor.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
The_three_Graces.jpg
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.29 viewsThe Three Graces, removed from Perge.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Red_figure_pottery_(3).JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.29 viewsAn example of the wonderful collection of red figure pottery housed at the museum.
Photograph by Will Hooton.
*Alex
RED_FIGURE_POTTERY_(2).JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.31 viewsAn example of the wonderful collection of red figure pottery housed at the museum.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
RED_FIGURE_POTTERY_(1).JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.26 viewsAn example of the wonderful collection of red figure pottery housed at the museum.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Sarcophagus__Labours_of_Herakles_details.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.29 viewsDetails from a sarcophagus featuring the 10 labours of Hercules.
Photographs by Will Hooton
*Alex
Sarcophagus__Labours_of_Herakles_.jpg
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.30 viewsSarcophagus featuring the 10 labours of Hercules.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Heroic_Hadrian.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.33 viewsHeroic statue of Hadrian.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
H2.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.33 viewsHeroic statue of Hadrian.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
H1.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya. 29 viewsHeroic statue of Hadrian.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Sarapis1.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.34 viewsStatue of Serapis.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Tyche2.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya. 32 viewsTyche
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Athena2.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.33 viewsStatue of Athena.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Herakles2.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.29 viewsStatue of Herakles.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Hermes2.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.35 viewsStatue of a Hermes.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Hermes1.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.48 viewsStatue of a Hermes.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Tempio_di_Afrodite_e_tetrapylon.JPG
Turkey, Aphrodisias - Aphrodite's temple with tetrapylon201 viewsMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
Aspendos_1.JPG
Turkey, Aspendos - Theater's entrance188 viewsMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
Aspendos_theatre_seating.jpg
Turkey, Aspendos, Roman theatre, Seating325 viewsAspendos has a strong claim to possess the best-preserved Roman theatre in the world. It dates from the mid-second century, completed during the last years of the reign of Antoninus Pius, to a design by a local architect, Zenon. The cavea seats over 10,000; walking around the top level, you can still find the original post holes for the masts fixing the velarium. 1 commentsAbu Galyon
Aspendos_theatre_stage_building.jpg
Turkey, Aspendos, Roman theatre, Stage building219 viewsThe scaenae frons is similarly largely undamaged. The stage building had secondary use, first as a caravanserai and later as a residence for the Seljuk governor of the city! Abu Galyon
s_Arch.jpg
Turkey, Attalia (Antalya) - Hadrian's gate256 viewsA stylish triple-arched gateway erected in 130 CE to mark the emperor Hadrian’s visit to the city. It’s still used as one of the principal entrances to the historic Kaleiçi quarter of today’s Antalya. And it’s a very visible reminder of how much lower the street level was in Roman times. At the base of the central arch there are quite deep grooves formed by the passage of carts: hence the glass-bottomed footbridge, designed to save the modern pedestrian from a twisted ankle. Abu Galyon
Çatalhöyük.jpg
Turkey, Çatalhöyük265 viewsÇatalhöyük (SE of Konya in Anatolia) is an outstanding Neolithic site. Excavation is ongoing, with the delicate mud brick architecture preserved under two large domes. There are no streets in Çatalhöyük; the buildings all abut one another and were accessed (using ladders) from the roof. The people of Çatalhöyük, it seems, had discovered how to construct houses, but hadn’t yet worked out the technology of doors and windows. 1 commentsAbu Galyon
UzuncaburcZeus.jpg
Turkey, Cilicia, Olba, Temple of Zeus229 viewsPhoto by Klaus-Peter Simon 1995. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olba_(ancient_city)Joe Sermarini
Tel_at_Colossae.JPG
Turkey, Colossae136 viewsAnother Anatolian tel awaiting excavation (or perhaps looters if the archaeologists delay too long): this is the site of ancient Colossae in the Lycus valley. Modern Christian pilgrims touring the ‘Seven Churches of Asia’ visit nearby Laodicea but generally ignore this place, which is slightly odd because Saint Paul did address one of his letters to the congregation resident here. Of course, there’s little to see apart from the usual surface scatter of shards. Abu Galyon
Turkey_ancient_tombs.jpg
Turkey, Dalyan - The rock tombs of Kaunos54 viewsOutside the official Kaunos archeological site, near Dalyan, Turkey there are six rock tombs on the Dalyan river (4th – 2nd century BC). The façades of the rock tombs resemble the fronts of Hellenistic temples with two Ionian pillars, a triangular pediment, an architrave with toothed friezes, and acroterions shaped like palm leaves.1 commentsJoe Sermarini
Eflatun_pinar.jpg
Turkey, Eflatun pinar185 viewsThe name means ‘lilac spring’. If you are travelling between Konya (Iconium) and Yalvaç (Pisidian Antioch) it’s only a short detour to visit this delightfully secluded site near Lake Beyşehir. The stones are the remains of a small Hittite temple or sanctuary, dating from perhaps the 14th or 13th century BCE. Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Elaioussa Sebaste, Islands off Cilicia, Theater67 viewsElaiussa, meaning olive, was founded in the 2nd century B.C. on a tiny island attached to the the southern coast of Anatolia (in modern-day Turkey) by a narrow isthmus in Mediterranean Sea. During the reign of Augustus, the Cappadocian king Archelaus founded a new city on the isthmus. Archelaus called it Sebaste, which is the Greek equivalent word of the Latin "Augusta." The city entered a golden age when Vespasian purged Cilicia of pirates in 74 A.D. Towards the end of the 3rd century A.D. however its importance began to wane, due in large part to incursions by the Sassanian King Shapur I in 260 and later by the Isaurians. When its neighbor Corycus began to flourish in the 6th century A.D., Elaiussa Sebaste slowly disappeared from history.

The theater, dating to the 2nd century A.D., is small with only 23 rows of seats, whose steps and decorations unfortunately succumbed to centuries of plunder. Next to the theater is the agora, built in all great probability during the imperial period. At the entrance of the agora, which is surrounded by a semi-destroyed defense wall once rose two monumental fountains in the shape of lions. Inside the agora stands a large church, its floor is covered by sand to protect the mosaic pavement. Elaiussa's only temple stands outside the city on a hill overlooking the sea; only two of the Corinthian columns of this temple, which had 12 on the long and 6 on the short side originally, are standing today. A large bath complex among the lemon groves between the temple and the agora was built with a Roman technique little used in Anatolia. The necropolis is the richest and most impressive of cities of ancient Cilicia. The "Avenue of Graves," located on a hill to the north of the city, preserves close to a hundred graves of various shapes and sizes scattered among the lemon trees. The ancient aqueducts that carried water to the ruins from the Lamos ("Lemon") river also adorn the city’s two entrances. The aqueduct to the west of the city in particular is in relatively good condition. Centuries ago the aqueduct actually ran all the way to Corycus.
Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Ephesus - Library of Celsus217 viewsThis building had two-storied façade but was three-storied.
built ca. CE 125 by Gaius Julius Aquila
once held nearly 12,000 scrolls
Johny SYSEL
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Turkey, Ephesus - Central Square463 viewsPart of the central square of the terrace houses in Ephesus.memphius
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Turkey, Ephesus - Central square of Terrace Houses559 viewsPart of the central square of the terrace houses in Ephesus.1 commentsmemphius
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Turkey, Ephesus - Curetes Street1262 viewsLooking down Curetes Street named after the priests who presided over the sacred fire of Hestia. The street is paved with marble slabs with sidewalks covered in mosaics.
3 commentsmemphius
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Turkey, Ephesus - Domitian's temple173 viewsMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
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Turkey, Ephesus - Gate of Augustus236 viewsgate to agoraJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Ephesus - Library284 viewsEaster 20071 commentsPotator II
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Turkey, Ephesus - Library of Celsus197 viewsJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Ephesus - Library of Celsus223 viewsJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Ephesus - Public Toilets682 viewsMinus the slaves to warm the seats in winter and the live entertainment1 commentsmemphius
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Turkey, Ephesus - Relief inside temple of Hadrian602 views1 commentsmemphius
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Turkey, Ephesus - Sculptured Drum of Column from Ephesus1074 views
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Turkey, Ephesus - street connecting upper and lower town231 viewsJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Ephesus - street in upper town224 viewsJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Ephesus - street leading from harbour to agora175 viewsJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Ephesus - street leading to harbour207 viewsIn ancient times Ephesus had harbour but alluviums of local river moved coast 5,6 km further.Johny SYSEL
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Turkey, Ephesus - temple of Artemis - 1 of the 7 wonders of ancien world382 viewsWe can only dream up what it was once.2 commentsJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Ephesus - temple of Hadrian951 viewsA magnificent relief of Medusa filling the interior arch of the temple of Hadrian. Other reliefs of Amazons and the Olympian gods grace the interior.memphius
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Turkey, Ephesus - temple of Hadrian218 viewsJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Ephesus - Temple of Hadrian - Easter 2007185 viewsPotator II
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Turkey, Ephesus - Terrace House525 viewsLocated in the ongoing excavation of the upper-class terrace houses. Lovely floor mosaicmemphius
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Turkey, Ephesus - Theater500 viewsOne of the largest in the ancient world. The apostle Paul spoke here before getting booted out for causing riots.1 commentsmemphius
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Turkey, Ephesus - theatre193 viewsJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Ephesus - theatre228 views44000 spectators - maybe the largest ancient theatreJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Ephesus - theatre183 viewsJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Ephesus - Wall fresco438 viewsLocated in the ongoing excavation of the upper-class terrace houses. Note the opening in the wall for circulation. The entire complex must have appeared like a luxury hotel with a central arbitorium.memphius
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Turkey, Ephesus, Library of Celsus1379 viewsOne of the true glories of Ephesus is the reconstructed facade of the Library of Celsus. Dedicated in 120 A.D to the former governor of Asia Gaius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus, the library contained up to 12,000 scrolls. It was burned when the Goths sacked the city in 260 A. D. The edifice to the right is the Gate of Hadrian which connected the library to the public agora or marketplace.1 commentsmemphius
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Turkey, Erythrai amphitheatre122 viewsErythrai amphitheatre ruins in Turkey, 2009.Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Hadrian's Gate in Antalya125 viewsHadrian's Gate in Antalya
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antalya
Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
Ingo Mehling - 17 May 2012
Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Hierapolis - Easter 2007161 viewsPotator II
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Turkey, Hierapolis - main street173 viewsHierapolis was used as spa since Hellenistic times.Johny SYSEL
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Turkey, Hierapolis - main street178 viewsHierapolis was used as spa since Hellenistic times.Johny SYSEL
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Turkey, Hierapolis - necropolis175 viewsJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Hierapolis - necropolis172 viewsJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Hierapolis - necropolis184 viewsJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Hierapolis - roman bath157 views(northern bath)Johny SYSEL
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Turkey, Hierapolis - theatre179 viewsJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Hierapolis - theatre177 viewsJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Hierapolis of Phrygia - Theater159 viewsMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
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Turkey, Ilium - Troy (Turkey) - Odeon140 viewsMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
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Turkey, Istanbul (Constantinople)177 viewsHagia Sophia (translated holy wisdom).Erected in the 6th Century (the third church at this place) during the reign of Iustinianus I. It was the main church of the byzantine empire. After the conquering of Constantinople by the osmanic turks in 1453 it became a mosque and then since 1935 a museum.Franz-Josef M
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Turkey, Istanbul (Constantinople) - Halikarnassos mausoleum lion179 viewsThis is a lion from the Mausoleum of Halikarnassos (now Bodrum Turkey), one of the seven world wonders. Now in the archaeological museum of Istanbul. Behind the lion is a picture of the reconstruction of the building.The building is now nearly completely destroyed.Franz-Josef M
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Turkey, Istanbul (Constantinople) - Obelisk Thutmosis Hippodrom178 viewsEgypt obelisk (from Thutmosis III temple of Karnak 1471 before christ). now on the Hippodrom place (where in ancient times was a horse race-track) in Instanbul, erected under the reign of Theodosius in the year 390 after christ.Franz-Josef M
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Turkey, Istanbul (Constantinople) - Yerebatan Saray Cistern190 viewsThe cistern was build in the year 542 under the reign of Justinian. It is positioned near the Hagia Sophia museum. The Gorgo (a female monster with serpents instead of hairs- one view can kill) head belongs to an old unknown monument and was used here in this cistern a second time as a base of a column. The cistern consists of 336 columns. But only 2 gorgo heads can be seen in the cistern. Franz-Josef M
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Turkey, Istanbul (Constantinople) - Yerebatan Saray Cistern167 viewsA mysterious place under modern Istanbul. The technical data: the cistern is 138 m long and 65 m wide, the capacity is 21 million US gallons of water or 80.000 cubic meters, 336 marble columns. Franz-Josef M
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Turkey, Istanbul (Constantinople) - Yerebatan Saray Cistern173 viewsThe second Gorgo of the Cistern. I saw a third Gorgo in the Archaeological Museum of Istanbul. The original temple, from where the Gorgos were removed is still unknown. Franz-Josef M
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Turkey, Istanbul (Constantinople) The Land Wall138 viewsThe Land Wall of Theodosius stretches for 6.5 km from the Golden Horn to the Sea of Marmara. The first phase (a single wall with towers) was complete by 413; after a major earthquake in 447 the Wall was rebuilt and strengthened (a second outer screen and a moat were added), just in time to discourage Attila the Hun from attacking the city. The fortifications included 96 guard towers, each 18-20 m in height and spaced roughly 55 m apart. The Land Wall remained a formidable defensive barrier until the advent of artillery in the 15th century. Even in ruins, and with vegetables growing in the moat, it's still an impressive sight today. Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Istanbul - Alexander III in Lion Skin Head Dress - a frontal view - from the Alexander Sarcophagus in the Istanbul Museum353 viewsWe are accustomed to seeing the lion skin head dress in profile on coinage. Rarely are we afforded a more frontal view. I took this photo of Alexander the Great portrayed on the Alexander Sarcophagus in the Istanbul Museum. The head dress in nicely portrayed in three dimensions 2 commentsLloyd T
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Turkey, Istanbul - Medusa's marble head150 viewsIn the Underground Cistern, was taken from Tarsus in ancient times.
May 2011
FlaviusDomitianus
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Turkey, Istanbul - the Column of Marcian36 viewsThe column of emperor Marcian, Fatih, Istanbul, Turkey.

The Column of Marcian was dedicated to Marcian, built by the praefectus urbi Tatianus, sometime between 450 and 452. It still stands in modern Istanbul, though the statue of Marcian which originally topped it has been lost. Marcian also had a statue in the Forum of Arcadius, which contained the statues of several of Arcadius' successors.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:20111224_Flavius_Marcianus_Augustus_Column_Fatih_Istanbul_Turkey.jpg
Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Istanbul - Underground Cistern121 viewsMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
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Turkey, Istanbul, Boukoleon Palace46 views9-6-2015
This section was built in the reign of Emperor Theophilus (829-42 AD).
The brick walls would have been clad in Marble.
The three doorways led to a balcony.
The Sea reached up to the walls in those days.
After being ransacked by the "4th Crusade" in 1204 AD, it remained abandoned, even after Michael VIII retook the city in 1261 AD.
The Ottomans never took this section over.
In 1873 AD it was partially destroyed to make way for the railway line that began at Sirkeci Station.
Masis
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Turkey, Istanbul, Column of Constantine50 views9-6-2015
Known locally as "Çemberlitaş" which translates as "hooped Stone" due to the Iron hoops added in 1779 AD after an earthquake and fire. The base was also reinforced at this date.
The column was inaugurated in 330 AD and originally had three more sections with a large Capital upon which was a gilded statue of Constantine in the guise of his favourite deity, Sol.
At the base of the column was said to have been a sanctuary with ancient relics stored.
A hurricane blew down the statue, Capital and upper three sections of column in 1106 AD.
In the reign of Manuel I (1143-1180 AD) a new Capital was installed with a dedicatory inscription around it which translates as "Faithful Manuel invigorated this holy work of art, which has been damaged by time."
A Cross was also placed on top of this, removed after the Ottoman conquest in 1453 AD. Bronze Wreaths are said to have covered the joints of the column, where the stone ones are today, said to have been looted by the Franks in 1204 AD.
Masis
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Turkey, Istanbul, Hagia Sophia , picture from 2nd Floor51 views1 commentsSimon
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Turkey, Istanbul, Hagia Sophia at Night37 viewsSimon
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Turkey, Istanbul, Maiden's Tower49 views2-6-2015
The first recorded structure on this islet dates from 1110 AD when Emperor Alexius had a tower constructed on it.
This tower was linked to another tower on the European side (the Mangana district) by an iron chain.
This tower was connected to the nearby Asian coast by a causeway upon which was built a wall.

A number of additions and uses have happened to the tower since then, the last of which were steel supports after the devastating earthquake of 17 August 1999.
Masis
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Turkey, Istanbul, Monastery of the Mother of God at the Spring51 views7-6-2015
The full name of this ancient complex is "Monastery of the Mother of God at the Spring" but it is often known as "Zoödochos Pege" (Life-giving spring).
The Turkish name of it and the area is "Balıklı" which translates as "place where there are fishes" due to the presence of fish in this spring.
The era of the first Church complex around this spring is given either from the time of Emperor Leo I (457-74 AD) or Justinian I (527-65 AD).
Earthquakes and enemy invasions saw numerous rebuilding of this complex through the centuries.
The last was after the Pogroms of the 1950's.
Masis
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Turkey, Istanbul, Mosaic Museum53 views9-6-2015
The south-western section of the Great Palace (dated to the reign of Emperor Justinian, 527-65 AD) was excavated in the years 1935-38 and 1951-54 by the University of St. Andrews.
This section comprised a Peristyle courtyard, decorated in Mosaics.
The Austrian Academy of Sciences undertook preservation work on the Mosaics in the years 1983-97.
In the photo above, you can also see the pipes inside the walls that would have water and heating.
Masis
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Turkey, Istanbul, Mosaic Museum50 viewsOutside the Museum is an array of columns, capitals, entablature and even marble Lions.Masis
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Turkey, Istanbul, Princes Islands, Proti53 views10-6-2015
The Monastery of the Transfiguration, on the island of Kınalıada (Proti).
A place of exile and burial of many members of the Byzantine aristocracy, including Emperors.
The earliest of which is said to have been Leo V (813-20 AD) but the most famous was Romanus IV (1068-71 AD).
Note the Corinthian capital in the foreground.
Like many ethnic Greek Church complexes in Turkey, this is often closed.
Masis
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Turkey, Istanbul, Rumeli Hisari128 viewsRumeli Hisari means ‘Rumelian Castle’: Rumelia (derived from ‘Rome’) being the Turkish word for the Balkan lands which once belonged to the Roman (Byzantine) Empire. The Rumeli Hisari was constructed in 1452 a few miles north of Constantinople on the European side of the Bosphorus by order of Sultan Mehmet II. Impressively, the whole fortress was built in less than four months. The Rumeli Hisari sits opposite an older, smaller Ottoman fort on the Asian side, the Anadolu Hisari (Anatolian Castle). Together the two forts effectively controlled traffic through the Bosphorus, cutting Constantinople off from the Black Sea and ensuring that an Ottoman army operating on the European side could be supplied from the granaries of central Anatolia. The building of Rumeli Hisari was preparation for the investment and conquest of Constantinople, which took place the following year.

The Rumeli Hisari/Anadolu Hisari forts are built at the point where the Bosphorus is most constricted (about 700m across). This is the same narrows where the Persian King Darius I over 2500 years ago built a ‘bridge of boats’ to transport his army across to attack Thrace (see Herodotus, Histories 4.87f). And these days a modern suspension bridge links Asia to Europe at the same spot, but sadly it rather spoils the view.
Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Kaunos - the Theatre118 viewsA nicely proportioned theatre of the Greek type, with 34 rows of seats (18 below the diazoma and 16 above). The two arched entrances are original. Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Kaunos: The Baetyl Sanctuary132 viewsThe flat terrace above the agora and harbour of Kaunos has a long history of sacred use. In late antiquity a three-nave Christian church was constructed here. Before that (from the first century BCE) the site was a temple and temenos dedicated to Zeus Soteros. Earlier still (perhaps fifth century BCE) is this unusual round structure, built at an angle to the axis of the later temple.

When first uncovered, the structure’s purpose seemed mysterious. But the mystery was partially solved when archaeologists sank a trench underneath the central flat circular slab and found a large, roughly conical baetyl, 3.5m in height resting on bedrock about 6.5m below the present surface. This sacred stone, associated with the eponymous founder of the city, appears as a design on several of the city’s coins.

Note that the inner ring wall is plastered on its interior surface, suggesting that quantities of water (or other liquids) were involved in whatever rituals were conducted here.
Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Kizilcakuyu (Euromus, Caria) The Temple of Zeus Lepsinos100 viewsThe Temple of Zeus Lepsinos at Euromus was built on the site of an earlier Carian temple in the 2nd century AD during the reign of the emperor Hadrian.1 commentsJoe Sermarini
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Turkey, Kursunlutepe - ancient Skepsis, Troas 70 viewsView of the village of Kurşuntepe from the highest point of the site of ancient Skepsis.

Skepsis or Scepsis, an ancient settlement in the Troad, is today the village of Kursunlutepe, near the town of Bayramic in Turkey. The famous library of Aristotle was kept at Skepsis before being moved to Pergamum and then Alexandria. It was also home to Metrodorus of Scepsis and Demetrius of Scepsis. Several times in its history, the citizens of Skepsis were forced to move elsewhere. In 306 B.C., Antigonus evacuated Skepsis and other cities in the area and forced the residents to move to Alexandria Troas. Tradition holds that Saint Cornelius the Centurion, the first Gentile convert to Christianity, became the first bishop of Skepsis in the early days of Christianity.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skepsis
Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Lystra133 viewsLystra has never been excavated, so the mound you’re looking at is a typical Middle Eastern ‘tel’. However, an inscription was found here (now displayed in the Konya Archaeological Museum) which makes the site identification secure. Lystra has significant New Testament links: Barnabas and Paul while visiting Lystra were mistaken for gods [Acts 14:6ff] and Paul’s companion Timothy was born here [Acts 16:1]. Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Miletos205 viewsEaster 20071 commentsPotator II
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Turkey, Miletos - Theater140 viewsEaster 2007Potator II
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Turkey, Misis, Roman bridge over the Pyramus38 viewsRoman bridge in Misis-Mopsuestia over the Pyramus. Constantius II built this magnificent bridge over the Pyramus (Malalas, Chronographia, XIII; P.G., XCVII, 488) afterwards it was restored by Justinian (Procopius, De Edificiis, V. 5) and it has been restored again recently. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mopsuestia Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Mount Argaeus - Cappadocia117 viewsMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
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Turkey, near Denizli, Laodicea on the Lycus22 viewsLaodicea on the Lycus was an ancient city built on the river Lycus (Curuksu), in Lydia, later the Roman Province of Phrygia Pacatiana. It contained one of the Seven churches of Asia mentioned in the Book of Revelation. It is now near the modern city of Denizli. In 2013 the archaeological site was identified as a of World Heritage Site. The existing remains attest to its former greatness. Its many buildings include a stadium, baths, temples, a gymnasium, theaters, and a bouleuterion (Senate House). On the eastern side, the line of the ancient wall may be distinctly traced, with the remains of the Ephesus gate; there are streets traversing the town, flanked by colonnades and numerous pedestals. North of the town, towards the Lycus, are many sarcophagi, with their covers lying near them, partly embedded in the ground, and all having been long since rifled.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Laodicea_(2).JPG

Photo by Rjdeadly, 16 May 2012
Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Nymphaeum of Perge238 viewsThe monumental fountain or nymphaeum of Perga consists of a wide pool, and behind it a two-storeyed richly worked facade. From its inscription, it is apparent that the structure was dedicated to Artemis Pergaia, Septimius Severus, his wife Julia Domna, and their sons. An inscription belonging to the facade, various facade fragments, and marble statues of Septimius Severus and his wife, all found in excavations of the nymphaeum, are now in the Antalya Museum.1 commentsJoe Sermarini
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Turkey, Perga - Agora194 viewsPerge’s principal market square is a substantial space (sides approximately 75m) dating mostly from the 2nd century CE and colonnaded on all four sides. At its centre is a small circular temple (just over 13m diameter) of uncertain dedication: presumably either Hermes or (perhaps more likely) Tyche. Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Perga - Agora (Shop Sign)205 viewsHidden away in one corner of the agora is this rather delightful trading sign. The meat hook and knife presumably indicate that this location was a butcher’s shop. Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Perga - Agora and Macellum149 viewsMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
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Turkey, Perga - Collonaded Street147 viewsPart of the wide (20m) colonnaded boulevard which runs almost the whole length of the lower city (over 500m), testimony to Perge’s importance as a commercial centre. In antiquity both sides of the street would have been lined with fancy shops, and the ‘shopping experience’ was enhanced by an ornamental water canal running down the middle of the road, fed from the nymphaeum which you can see at the far end. Beyond the nymphaeum is the path leading up to the city’s acropolis. Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Perga - Nimpheum125 viewsMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
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Turkey, Perga - Roman Baths154 viewsThe hot room (caldarium); some traces of the original marble flooring are visible at the far end. Underneath, a well-preserved hypocaust of slightly unusual design, based on pilae tiles formed into arches rather than the more common upright stacks. Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Pergamum - Acropolis145 viewsMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
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Turkey, Pergamum - Asclepion129 viewsMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
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Turkey, Pergamum - Theatre146 viewsThe Hellenistic theatre at Pergamum is extraordinary. It’s built into a steep hill-side, in close proximity to the city’s famous altar of Zeus, as well as to temples dedicated to Athena and Dionysus. But the constraints of the chosen site meant that the theatre could not take the ‘normal’ Greek shape (rather more than a semi-circle). Instead, to fit in the required number of seats, the cavea was extended vertically: there are 78 rows. The result is vertiginous. Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Perge city overview114 viewsRoman rule of Perge began in 188 BC, and most of the surviving ruins today date from this period. After the collapse of the Roman Empire, Perge remained inhabited until Seljuk times, before being gradually abandoned.

Source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Perge_city_overview.jpg
Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Priene, The Temple of Athena at Priene93 viewsThe Temple of Athena at Priene was started by Mausolus but completed by Alexander the Great, who hired the great Greek architect Pytheos to complete the design and construction. It is the largest temple in Priene. Pytheos situated the temple so that it had (and still has) a beautiful view over the valley and river below Alexander the Great invested heavily into rebuilding all of the Greek cities of the Ionic league following the defeat of the Persians. This classic Greek temple was done in the Ionic style and had no frieze around the top. Instead, a dentil design sat above the columns and architrave. The statue of Athena that was originally inside the temple was based on the famous statue by Phidias in the Parthenon of Athens.Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Ruins of the main street in Perga, capital of Pamphylia, Asia Minor.151 viewshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pamphylia. 23 February 2006. Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Sanliurfa Province, Urfa - Roman Columns of Edessa18 viewsThe heritage of Roman Edessa survives today in these columns at the site of Urfa Castle, dominating the skyline of the modern city of Urfa.

Photo by Bernard Gagnon, 24 May 2014.
Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Side - Temple of Athena245 viewsSide’s temple of Athena, together with an adjacent temple dedicated to Apollo and a later Byzantine basilica, occupy a spectacular site on the edge of the city’s ancient harbour. This is wonderful, picture-postcard stuff! Unfortunately, the rest of Side is a dump: a ghastly collection of bars and discos, cheap eateries, souvenir shops and garish hotels, whatever charm it once had totally destroyed by modern mass tourism. The most disappointing ancient town I’ve ever visited. 1 commentsAbu Galyon
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Turkey, Side, Pamphylia Temple of Apollo 42 viewsThe ruins of the Temple of Apollo at Side, Antalya, Turkey.

The great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. The well-preserved city walls provide an entrance to the site through the Hellenistic main gate (Megale Pyle) of the ancient city, although this gate from the 2nd century BC is badly damaged. Next comes the colonnaded street, whose marble columns are no longer extant; all that remains are a few broken stubs near the old Roman baths. The street leads to the public bath, restored as a museum displaying statues and sarcophagi from the Roman period. Next is the square agora with the remains of the round Tyche and Fortuna temple (2nd century BC), peripteral with twelve columns, in the middle. In later times it was used as a trading center where pirates sold slaves. The remains of the theater, which was used for gladiator fights and later as a church, and the monumental gate date back to the 2nd century. The early Roman Temple of Dionysus is near the theater. The fountain gracing the entrance is restored. At the left side are the remains of a Byzantine Basilica. A public bath has also been restored. The remaining ruins of Side include three temples, an aqueduct, and a nymphaeum.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sunrise_apollo_side.jpg
Photo by Saffron Blaze, via http://www.mackenzie.co
Date: 21 October 2011
Authorization: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en
Joe Sermarini
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Turkey, Side, Pamphylia Temple of Tyche on the commercial agora24 viewsThere are two agoras: a commercial one and one, called "State agora." On the commercial one there is a round temple, well-restored, that was dedicated to Tyche. The agora is over 8000 square meters, surrounded by columns, with shops, exedras and latrines and washing places. On it inconceivable numbers of slaves must have been traded, for during part of its history Side was a major center for pirates who stationed their fleet here. In the center stood a temple for the protective goddess of the city, Tyche. The present construction dates from the 2nd century A.D., it was in use in Byzantine times.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Side_Tyche_temple_on_agora_6140.jpg

Author, Date: Dosserman, 20 February 2015

Joe Sermarini
Side_Commercial_agora_panorama_2.jpg
Turkey, Side, Pamphylia The Commercial Agora31 viewsTurkey, Side, Pamphylia the Commercial Agora

The great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. The well-preserved city walls provide an entrance to the site through the Hellenistic main gate (Megale Pyle) of the ancient city, although this gate from the 2nd century BC is badly damaged. Next comes the colonnaded street, whose marble columns are no longer extant; all that remains are a few broken stubs near the old Roman baths. The street leads to the public bath, restored as a museum displaying statues and sarcophagi from the Roman period. Next is the square agora with the remains of the round Tyche and Fortuna temple (2nd century BC), peripteral with twelve columns, in the middle. In later times it was used as a trading center where pirates sold slaves. The remains of the theater, which was used for gladiator fights and later as a church, and the monumental gate date back to the 2nd century. The early Roman Temple of Dionysus is near the theater. The fountain gracing the entrance is restored. At the left side are the remains of a Byzantine Basilica. A public bath has also been restored. The remaining ruins of Side include three temples, an aqueduct, and a nymphaeum.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Side_Commercial_agora_panorama_2.jpg
Author, Date: Dosserman, 20 February 2015
Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Joe Sermarini
Side_Theatre.jpg
Turkey, Side, Pamphylia Theater 2nd Century AD18 viewsThe great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. They cover a large promontory which a wall and a moat separate from the mainland. There are colossal ruins of a theater complex, the largest in Pamphylia, built in the 2nd century A.D. Following design it relies on arches to support the sheer verticals. The Roman style was adopted because Side lacked a convenient hillside that could be hollowed out in the usual Greek fashion more typical of Asia Minor. In Greek fashion, the seating (for 15,000–20,000 people) curves 210° vice the usual 180° for a Roman theater. The stage building was ornately adorned but the decorations and the theater are damaged, in part due to a strong earthquake. The theater was converted into an open-air sanctuary with two chapels during the 5th or 6th century (Byzantine times).

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Side_Theatre_4192.jpg

Author, Date: Dosseman, 21 March 2011

Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Joe Sermarini
Side_TH_au.JPG
Turkey, Side, Pamphylia Theater 2nd Century AD Exterior23 viewsTurkey, Side, Pamphylia theater 2nd century AD, exterior. The great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. They cover a large promontory which a wall and a moat separate from the mainland. There are colossal ruins of a theater complex, the largest in Pamphylia, built in the 2nd century A.D. Following design it relies on arches to support the sheer verticals. The Roman style was adopted because Side lacked a convenient hillside that could be hollowed out in the usual Greek fashion more typical of Asia Minor. In Greek fashion, the seating (for 15,000–20,000 people) curves 210° vice the usual 180° for a Roman theater. The stage building was ornately adorned but the decorations and the theater are damaged, in part due to a strong earthquake. The theater was converted into an open-air sanctuary with two chapels during the 5th or 6th century (Byzantine times).

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Side_TH_au.JPG

Author, Date: Dosseman, 21 March 2011

Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Joe Sermarini
Side_Theatre_panorama.jpg
Turkey, Side, Pamphylia Theater 2nd Century AD panorama22 viewsTurkey, Side, Pamphylia, theater 2nd century AD, panorama

The great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. They cover a large promontory which a wall and a moat separate from the mainland. There are colossal ruins of a theater complex, the largest in Pamphylia, built in the 2nd century A.D. Following design it relies on arches to support the sheer verticals. The Roman style was adopted because Side lacked a convenient hillside that could be hollowed out in the usual Greek fashion more typical of Asia Minor. In Greek fashion, the seating (for 15,000–20,000 people) curves 210° vice the usual 180° for a Roman theater. The stage building was ornately adorned but the decorations and the theater are damaged, in part due to a strong earthquake. The theater was converted into an open-air sanctuary with two chapels during the 5th or 6th century (Byzantine times).

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Side_Theatre_panorama.jpg

Author, Date: Dosseman, 21 March 2011

Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Joe Sermarini
Termessos_-_Theatre.jpg
Turkey, Termessos - Theatre180 viewsThough Termessos is fairly close to a major tourist resort (Antalya) it’s not over-visited, perhaps because it’s a fairly steep uphill climb to reach the principal monuments from the nearest point where you can park. But the effort is worth it: the setting (inside Güllük Daği National Park) is spectacular and the ruins at this unrestored site are as romantic a pile of tumble-down stones as anyone could wish for. Abu Galyon
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Turkey, Yakapinar (Mopsos) - Mosaics depicting Noah's Ark in the Misis Mosaic Museum124 viewsMosaics depicting Noah's Ark from ancient Mopsos in the Misis Mosaic Museum.1 commentsJoe Sermarini
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Yap Island, Micronesia360 viewsA 400-year old flagged stone trail on Yap Island, leads down to village and into a "stone money" bank. There are several similar stone money banks on the island. Way back when, the Yapese voyaged 700 miles across the sea in out-rigger canoes to the island of Palau, where they mined and wrought these stones.Mayadigger
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Yap Island, Micronesia, Stone money372 viewsMayadigger
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Yap Island, Micronesia, Stone money393 viewsThis larger example is known as "O'Keefe" money and is not as valuable as the earlier stone moneyMayadigger
   
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