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The Emperors and Such


Civil_Wars_BonusEvent.jpg

130 files, last one added on Aug 19, 2019

Antiquities


Scarab.jpg

7 files, last one added on Dec 12, 2016

The Republic


Vesp_Countermark.jpg

7 files, last one added on Sep 19, 2018

Judean / Samarian / Philistian


PhilistiaOverstruck.jpg

26 files, last one added on Nov 05, 2016

Greek


PhilipII.jpg

30 files, last one added on Oct 15, 2019

Roman Provincial


VespCyprus.jpg

16 files, last one added on Sep 19, 2018

Persian Empire


SiglosHelmetI~0.jpg

13 files, last one added on Aug 08, 2019

Reference Coins and Updated Photographs


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7 files, last one added on Sep 24, 2018

8 albums on 1 page(s)

Last additions - Nemonater's Gallery
PhilipII.jpg
Philip II Tetradrachm Lifetime Issue8 viewsPhilip II Tetradrachm Lifetime Issue Amphipolis Mint, 355-349/8.
O: Laureate head of Zeus to right.
R: ΦΙΛΙΠ ΠΟΥ Philip II, wearing kausia and chlamys and raising his right hand in salute, riding to left; horizontal club below belly.
- Le Rider 96-108

The reverse is a representation of the King’s arrival on his accession to the throne, dressed in traditional Macedonian garb.
1 commentsNemonaterOct 15, 2019
PhilipAplustre_Tet_b.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom. Philip II, Amphipolis mint31 viewsMacedonian Kingdom. Philip II, 359-336 BC. Silver Tetradrachm, Amphipolis mint. Early posthumous issue, struck under Kassander.
O: Zeus right wearing laurel wreath with berries.
R: Φ I Λ I Π - Π OY (Of Philip) Naked youth on horse prancing right holding long palm branch and reins; aplustre below; Γ under foreleg. Rider pl. 46, 18; SNG ANS 740. Light golden toning.

Plutarch (Alex., 3)
"To Philip, however, who had just taken Potidaea, there came three messages at the same time:
the first that Parmenio had conquered the Illyrians in a great battle, the second that his race-horse had won a victory at the Olympic games, while a third announced the birth of Alexander. These things delighted him, of course, and the seers raised his spirits still higher by declaring that the son whose birth coincided with three victories would be always victorious."

Plutarch (Alex., 4.10)
"...and (Philip) took care to have the victories of his chariots at Olympia engraved upon his coins..."

The reverse-types of Philip’s coins are nearly all agonistic, and refer either to the games celebrated by him at Dium in
honour of the Olympian Zeus (Müller, Mon. d'Alex., pp. II and 344), or, preferably, to the great Olympian games where his
chariots were victorious. We have, indeed, the direct assertion of Plutarch (Alex., c. 4) in favour of the latter
hypothesis, τας εν ‘Ολυμπια νικας των αρματων εγχαραττων τοις νομισμασιν. Philip was also successful at Olympia with the
race-horse (ιππω κελητι νενικηκέναι; Plut., Alex., 3), a victory of which he perpetuated the memory on his tetradrachms. The horseman
with kausia and chlamys is less certainly agonistic, and may (perhaps with a play upon his name) represent the king
himself as a typical Macedonian ιππευς.
Philip’s coins were struck at many mints in various parts of his empire. For the various mint-marks which they bear see
Müller’s Num. d'Alex. le Grand, the local attributions in which are, however, to be accepted with great caution. They
continued to circulate in Europe long after his death, and the Gauls, when they invaded and pillaged Greece, took vast
numbers of them back into their own land, where they long continued to serve as models for the native currency of Gaul and
Britain. (Historia Numorum, Barclay V. Head, 1887)

It is clear that, trying hard to show off, to pass and ultimately to impose his Greek character, Philip was especially
interested in the aesthetic aspect of his coins and also in the propaganda and psychological effects they would have
on the rest of the Greek world, and especially on "those sarcastic, democratic Athenians" and on "the more barbarian" people than himself...

Demosthenes (19, 308)
"And as for Philip,—why, good Heavens, he was a Greek of the Greeks, the finest orator and the most thorough—going
friend of Athens you could find in the whole world. And yet there were some queer, ill-conditioned fellows in Athens who
did not blush to abuse him, and even to call him a barbarian! "
4 commentsNemonaterOct 09, 2019
Civil_Wars_BonusEvent.jpg
Roman Civil Wars, Revolt of Galba, Governor of Spain19 viewsSilver denarius, Tarraco(?) mint, Apr - Jun 68 A.D.
O: BON EVENT, young female head (Bonus Eventus) right, fillet around forehead.
R: ROM RENASC, Roma standing right in military garb, Victory on globe in right hand, eagle-tipped scepter over left shoulder in left, implying the restoration of the Republic.
- RIC I 9 (R4), RSC II 396, BMCRE I 9, SRCV I 2072.

Galba lived in Tarraco for eight years. This coin was issued by Galba as governor of Spain in revolt against Nero. The obverse is copied from Republican denarii struck in 62 B.C. by the moneyer L. Scribonius Libo.
2 commentsNemonaterAug 19, 2019
SiglosHelmetI~0.jpg
Siglos Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II Engraved Reverse Die60 views
Persian Empire, Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II. Ca. 420-375 B.C. AR siglos (15 mm, 5.67 g).
O: Persian king or hero in kneeling/running stance right, holding dagger and bow; bankers marks.
R: Helmet facing within reverse incuse punch.
- Carradice plate XIII, 34; BMC Arabia p. 165, 124, pl. XXVI, 21.
3 commentsNemonaterAug 08, 2019
VespShieldWreath1393.jpg
Vespasian / Shield Within Wreath RIC 139352 viewsVespasian; 69-79 AD, Ephesus, c. 69-70 AD, Denarius, 2.80g.
O: IMP CAES - VESPAS AVG Head laureate r.; on neck rectangular countermark IMP VES with IMP and VE ligate (Howgego-839).
R: AVG on round shield within oak wreath; rectangular countermark IMP VES with IMP and VE ligate.

Extremely rare, apparently the second recorded specimen, the first having appeared in Schenk-Behrens 76, 26 Nov. 1998, lot 186, as reported but not illustrated by RIC-1393. I believe this is the only example of a Vespasian denarius mistakenly countermarked not just once, but twice!

The attribution of this reverse type to Ephesus, suggested by the use on later marked coins of that mint of a simplified version of the same type, AVG within oak wreath but without the shield, is confirmed by the countermark of Vespasian on this specimen, since the few Flavian denarii known to have been marked with that countermark are all coins of the Ephesus mint.
5 commentsNemonaterJul 07, 2019
ShekelDeltaBl.jpg
Shekel Tyre Civic Year 4 (123/2 BC)90 viewsPHOENICIA. Tyre. AR shekel (29mm, 14.07 gm, 12h). Dated Civic Year 4 (123/2 BC).
O: Laureate head of Melqart right
R: TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (Tyre the Holy and Inviolable), Eagle standing left on prow, palm frond over wing; to left, LΔ (date) above club, M and Phoenician bet between legs.
- DCA Tyre 9. DCA 921. ex ClassicalCoins.Com 2005
5 commentsNemonaterMay 21, 2019
Ptolemy_30mms.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter Tetradrachm as Satrap47 viewsPtolemy I Soter. Silver Tetradrachm (15.65 g, 30mm), as Satrap, 323-305 BC. Alexandria, in the name of Alexander III
O: Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant's skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY in left field, Athena Alkidemos advancing right, wielding javelin and holding forth shield;in right field, monogram, Corinthian helmet above and eagle standing right on thunderbolt.
Overstruck, traces of undertype visible.

The earlier 17g tetradrachms were withdrawn from circulation in 306/305 BC and reissued after weight adjustment. They were trimmed to remove 1.5g of silver, heated and restruck. This must have been faster than melting them down into bullion and restriking. Some issues show clear evidence of the edges being trimmed, although many, such as this one, do not.

Ptolemy was feeling the financial burden of repelling Antigonus’ invasion and supporting Rhodes through a thirteen-month siege. The government needed extra currency and Egypt produced little or no silver. The recall of the heavy issues meant 8 tetradrachms were restruck into 9 “Crisis Issues” but with no change in the appearance of the dies.
4 commentsNemonaterApr 12, 2019
PtolemyI26mms.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter Tetradrachm as Satrap35 viewsPtolemy I Soter. Silver Tetradrachm (15.68 g, 26mm), as Satrap, 323-305 BC. Alexandria, in the name of Alexander III. Overstruck on earlier Alexander tetradrachm, 306-305 BC.
O: Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant's skin headdress, aegis around neck with tiny Δ in scales.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY in left field, Athena Alkidemos advancing right, wielding javelin and holding forth shield;in right field, monogram, Corinthian helmet right above ΔI and eagle standing right on thunderbolt.
Overstruck, undertype beading visible on obverse just above elephant's ear; on the reverse, portrait of Alexander above eagles head into Athena's shield.

The earlier 17g tetradrachms were withdrawn from circulation in 306/305 BC and reissued after weight adjustment. They were trimmed to remove 1.5g of silver, heated and restruck. This must have been faster than melting them down into bullion and restriking. Some of these issues, such as this one, show the clear evidence of the edges being trimmed, although many do not.

Ptolemy was feeling the financial burden of repelling Antigonus’ invasion and supporting Rhodes through a thirteen-month siege. The government needed extra currency and Egypt produced little or no silver. The recall of the heavy issues meant 8 tetradrachms were restruck into 9 “Crisis Issues” but with no change in the appearance of the dies.
3 commentsNemonaterApr 12, 2019
SiglosLion.jpg
Siglos Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II Engraved Reverse Die79 viewsPersian Empire, Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II. Ca. 420-375 B.C. AR siglos (14 mm, 5.57 g).
O: Persian king or hero in kneeling/running stance right, holding dagger and bow; roaring lion left countermark.
R: Incuse punch; stylized facing lion in reverse punch.
3 commentsNemonaterFeb 08, 2019
SiglosSlug.jpg
Siglos Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II Engraved Reverse Die71 viewsPersian Empire, Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II. Ca. 420-375 B.C. AR siglos (14 mm, 5.57 g).
O: Persian king or hero in kneeling/running stance right, holding dagger and bow; bankers marks.
R: Incuse punch; roaring lion left.
- Carradice IV B, pl. XIII, 35.
2 commentsNemonaterFeb 08, 2019
Alexander.jpg
Alexander III Tetradrachm Price 299976 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’, 336-323 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 25 mm, 17.13 g, 12 h), Tarsos, struck under Balakros or Menes, circa 333-327.
O: Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and eagle standing right with closed wings in his right.
- Price 2999. A rare early and unusual issue from Tarsos, "Officina B", bearing no symbol.

By comparing these early Tarsos tetradrachms to the staters of Mazaios (Pictured below) it is easy to see the identical forms of the throne, scepter, footstool and other details. The drapery is rendered in a similar manner, the Aramaic inscription of the one and the Greek inscription of the other share the same curve following the dotted border. This evidence indicates the two series of coins were the common product of a single mint.

2 commentsNemonaterJan 21, 2019
AlexanderA.jpg
Alexander III Tetradrachm Price 299364 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’, 336-323 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 25 mm, 17.25 g, 4 h), Tarsos, struck under Balakros or Menes, circa 333-327.
O:Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and eagle standing right with closed wings in his right; below throne, A.
- Price 2993.
1 commentsNemonaterJan 21, 2019
AlexanderB.jpg
Alexander III Price 300053 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’, 336-323 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 25 mm, 17.16 g, 3 h), Tarsos, struck under Balakros or Menes, circa 333-327.
O: Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and eagle standing right with closed wings in his right; below throne, B.
- Price 3000.
2 commentsNemonaterJan 21, 2019
VespasianTDHorseRIC5.jpg
Vespasian / Titus and Domitian on Horseback67 viewsVespasian AR Denarius, Rome Mint, 69-70 AD
O: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
R: TITVS ET DOMITIAN CAES PRIN IV; Titus and Domitian riding r., hands outstretched
- RIC 5 (R). BMC p. 7, RSC 539.

One of the rarest of the dynastic types.
5 commentsNemonaterOct 23, 2018
TitusRIC1.jpg
Titus / Bearded Captive90 viewsTitus AR Denarius. Rome mint, AD 79. 3.1g, 18mm.
O: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right
R: TR POT VIII COS VII, bearded captive, wearing trousers and cape, kneeling right at base of trophy.
- RIC 1; RSC 334a; BMCRE 1.

Only two specimens in the Reka Devnia Hoard, not in the Paris collection or Cohen. An attractively toned issue dated to the first week of Titus' reign, between Vespasian's death on 23 June 79 AD and the beginning of Titus' ninth tribunician year on 1 July. The reverse type was carried on from Titus' last issue as Caesar, see http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-89575
5 commentsNemonaterOct 16, 2018
MaxTRPIIII.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax / P M TR P IIII48 viewsMaximinus I. AD 235-238. AR Denarius 2.55 g. Rome mint, 6th officina. 6th emission, December AD 237-April AD 238.
O: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
R: P M TR P IIII COS P P Maximinus standing left, raising hand and holding spear; two signa flanking.
- RIC IV 6; BMCRE 219; RSC 70.

Maximinus took his fourth tribunitian on December 10, 237. Although assassinated in April of the following year, he lost control of the Rome mint that January. This rare last issue of his reign was struck between December 237 and January 238.
2 commentsNemonaterOct 11, 2018

Random files - Nemonater's Gallery
SullaTorquatusI.jpg
L. Manlius Torquatus and L. Cornelius Sulla52 viewsL. Manlius Torquatus and L. Cornelius Sulla (82 BC). AR denarius 3.99 g. Military military mint with Sulla.
O: Helmeted bust of Roma right, with peaked visor, cruciform earring and necklace, hair in three locks; L MANLI before; PRO•Q behind
R: Sulla, togate, driving triumphal quadriga right, holding branch and reins; above, Victory flying left crowning Sulla with laurel wreath; L•SVLLA•IM in exergue. - Crawford 367/5. Sydenham 757. Manlia 4.
Fine style, light golden toning.

As consul for the year 88 BC, Sulla was awarded the coveted assignment of suppressing the revolt of Mithradates VI of Pontus, but political maneuvers resulted in this assignment being transferred to Marius. In response, Sulla turned his army on Rome, captured it, and reclaimed his command against Mithradates. His prosecution of the first Mithradatic War was successful, but he spared the Pontic king for personal gain. In 83 BC, Sulla returned to Italy as an outlaw, but he was able to win the support of many of the leading Romans. Within a year, he fought his way to Rome, where he was elected dictator. It was during this campaign to Rome that this denarius was struck. The obverse type represents Sulla's claim to be acting in Rome's best interest. The reverse shows Sulla enjoying the highest honor to which a Roman could aspire: the celebration of a triumph at Rome.

We learn from Plutarch that L. Manlius Torquatus was one of Sulla’s generals. This type was struck during Sulla’s political campaign to be elected dictator, following his return to Rome after his victory against Mithridates. Prior to the Mithridatic Wars, L. Manlius Torquatus had been Sulla’s quaestor - a post he had resigned to assume his military role; hence on this issue he is proquaestor.
1 commentsNemonater
BarbPrutahWeb.jpg
Jewish War Year 2 irregular bronze prutah38 viewsJewish War, 66-70 AD, irregular bronze prutah, 16.1 mm, 2.92 gm. Dated "year 2", struck 67/68 AD.
O: Amphora crude style and legend.
R: Vine leaf on tendril, crude style and legend.
Unique obverse die, Hendin-1360b, MCP 048 with R67

A scarcer irregular issue bronze coins of the Jewish War. Some believe that these were struck at a second mint, moving with the army. Recent data suggests that these were made at secondary quasi-official mints and accepted in circulation as regular coins.

"The most amazing thing is the high number of irregular dies (56 obverse & 74 reverse dies!) vs. the extreme rarity of irregular dies for the prutah of the 3rd year. Something important happened in the production of these prutot between the 2nd and the 3rd years of the revolt. Has an illegal workshop been closed after year 2? Or was there apprentice engravers employed at the regular mint on year 2 who were no longer employed on year 3?" - JPFontanille
Nemonater
MysiaPergSenateRoma.jpg
Mysia, Pergamum. Pseudo-autonomous issue. Defaced.28 viewsMYSIA, Pergamum. Pseudo-autonomous issue. Circa AD 40-60. Æ 20mm, 3.4g
O: Turreted and draped bust of Roma right; ΘЄAN PΩMHN. / Draped bust of Senate right; ΘЄΩΝ ϹVNKΛHTON
- RPC I 2374; SNG France 1964-71.
Nemonater
year_4web.jpg
Jewish War, 66-70 AD, bronze 1/8 shekel 83 viewsBronze eighth denomination, 19 mm, 5.08 g, 69 - 70 A.D.
O: "To the redemption of Zion" in Hebrew, Omer cup with a pearled rim;
R: "Year four" in Hebrew, Lulav (myrtle, palm and willow branches tied together) flanked by an etrog (citron - small lemon like fruit) on both sides - Hendin 1369

During the fourth year of the Jewish War, the Romans had besieged the Jews in Jerusalem. There was a shortage of materials, and so, for the first time fractions of the shekel were minted in bronze. These are among the earliest examples of "siege money." Intended to pass as the equivalent in silver, they would have been redeemed for their face value at the end of a successful rebellion.

These siege pieces recall a time of despair and desperation in Jerusalem. Surrounded by Roman Legions under General Titus, intense starvation ravaged the city. Inhabitants were reduced to eating pieces of leather, belts and shoes. Josephus says that mothers even roasted and ate their own children. Simply having the appearance of good health implied a person was hiding food and would be reason enough to be murdered.
3 commentsNemonater