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The Emperors and Such


Civil_Wars_BonusEvent.jpg

130 files, last one added on Aug 19, 2019

Antiquities


Scarab.jpg

7 files, last one added on Dec 12, 2016

The Republic


Vesp_Countermark.jpg

7 files, last one added on Sep 19, 2018

Judean / Samarian / Philistian


PhilistiaOverstruck.jpg

26 files, last one added on Nov 05, 2016

Greek


ShekelDeltaBl.jpg

28 files, last one added on May 21, 2019

Roman Provincial


VespCyprus.jpg

16 files, last one added on Sep 19, 2018

Persian Empire


SiglosHelmetI~0.jpg

13 files, last one added on Aug 08, 2019

Reference Coins and Updated Photographs


1181837-2.jpg

7 files, last one added on Sep 24, 2018

8 albums on 1 page(s)

Last additions - Nemonater's Gallery
Civil_Wars_BonusEvent.jpg
Roman Civil Wars, Revolt of Galba, Governor of Spain5 viewsSilver denarius, Tarraco(?) mint, Apr - Jun 68 A.D.
O: BON EVENT, young female head (Bonus Eventus) right, fillet around forehead.
R: ROM RENASC, Roma standing right in military garb, Victory on globe in right hand, eagle-tipped scepter over left shoulder in left, implying the restoration of the Republic.
- RIC I 9 (R4), RSC II 396, BMCRE I 9, SRCV I 2072.

Galba lived in Tarraco for eight years. This coin was issued by Galba as governor of Spain in revolt against Nero. The obverse is copied from Republican denarii struck in 62 B.C. by the moneyer L. Scribonius Libo.
2 commentsNemonaterAug 19, 2019
SiglosHelmetI~0.jpg
Siglos Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II Engraved Reverse Die36 views
Persian Empire, Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II. Ca. 420-375 B.C. AR siglos (15 mm, 5.67 g).
O: Persian king or hero in kneeling/running stance right, holding dagger and bow; bankers marks.
R: Helmet facing within reverse incuse punch.
- Carradice plate XIII, 34; BMC Arabia p. 165, 124, pl. XXVI, 21.
3 commentsNemonaterAug 08, 2019
VespShieldWreath1393.jpg
Vespasian / Shield Within Wreath RIC 139339 viewsVespasian; 69-79 AD, Ephesus, c. 69-70 AD, Denarius, 2.80g.
O: IMP CAES - VESPAS AVG Head laureate r.; on neck rectangular countermark IMP VES with IMP and VE ligate (Howgego-839).
R: AVG on round shield within oak wreath; rectangular countermark IMP VES with IMP and VE ligate.

Extremely rare, apparently the second recorded specimen, the first having appeared in Schenk-Behrens 76, 26 Nov. 1998, lot 186, as reported but not illustrated by RIC-1393.

The attribution of this reverse type to Ephesus, suggested by the use on later marked coins of that mint of a simplified version of the same type, AVG within oak wreath but without the shield, is confirmed by the countermark of Vespasian on this specimen, since the few Flavian denarii known to have been marked with that countermark are all coins of the Ephesus mint.
5 commentsNemonaterJul 07, 2019
ShekelDeltaBl.jpg
Shekel Tyre Civic Year 4 (123/2 BC)74 viewsPHOENICIA. Tyre. AR shekel (29mm, 14.07 gm, 12h). Dated Civic Year 4 (123/2 BC).
O: Laureate head of Melqart right
R: TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (Tyre the Holy and Inviolable), Eagle standing left on prow, palm frond over wing; to left, LΔ (date) above club, M and Phoenician bet between legs.
- DCA Tyre 9. DCA 921. ex ClassicalCoins.Com 2005
5 commentsNemonaterMay 21, 2019
Ptolemy_30mms.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter Tetradrachm as Satrap32 viewsPtolemy I Soter. Silver Tetradrachm (15.65 g, 30mm), as Satrap, 323-305 BC. Alexandria, in the name of Alexander III
O: Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant's skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY in left field, Athena Alkidemos advancing right, wielding javelin and holding forth shield;in right field, monogram, Corinthian helmet above and eagle standing right on thunderbolt.
Overstruck, traces of undertype visible.

The earlier 17g tetradrachms were withdrawn from circulation in 306/305 BC and reissued after weight adjustment. They were trimmed to remove 1.5g of silver, heated and restruck. This must have been faster than melting them down into bullion and restriking. Some issues show clear evidence of the edges being trimmed, although many, such as this one, do not.

Ptolemy was feeling the financial burden of repelling Antigonus’ invasion and supporting Rhodes through a thirteen-month siege. The government needed extra currency and Egypt produced little or no silver. The recall of the heavy issues meant 8 tetradrachms were restruck into 9 “Crisis Issues” but with no change in the appearance of the dies.
4 commentsNemonaterApr 12, 2019
PtolemyI26mms.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter Tetradrachm as Satrap27 viewsPtolemy I Soter. Silver Tetradrachm (15.68 g, 26mm), as Satrap, 323-305 BC. Alexandria, in the name of Alexander III. Overstruck on earlier Alexander tetradrachm, 306-305 BC.
O: Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant's skin headdress, aegis around neck with tiny Δ in scales.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY in left field, Athena Alkidemos advancing right, wielding javelin and holding forth shield;in right field, monogram, Corinthian helmet right above ΔI and eagle standing right on thunderbolt.
Overstruck, undertype beading visible on obverse just above elephant's ear; on the reverse, portrait of Alexander above eagles head into Athena's shield.

The earlier 17g tetradrachms were withdrawn from circulation in 306/305 BC and reissued after weight adjustment. They were trimmed to remove 1.5g of silver, heated and restruck. This must have been faster than melting them down into bullion and restriking. Some of these issues, such as this one, show the clear evidence of the edges being trimmed, although many do not.

Ptolemy was feeling the financial burden of repelling Antigonus’ invasion and supporting Rhodes through a thirteen-month siege. The government needed extra currency and Egypt produced little or no silver. The recall of the heavy issues meant 8 tetradrachms were restruck into 9 “Crisis Issues” but with no change in the appearance of the dies.
3 commentsNemonaterApr 12, 2019
SiglosLion.jpg
Siglos Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II Engraved Reverse Die71 viewsPersian Empire, Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II. Ca. 420-375 B.C. AR siglos (14 mm, 5.57 g).
O: Persian king or hero in kneeling/running stance right, holding dagger and bow; roaring lion left countermark.
R: Incuse punch; stylized facing lion in reverse punch.
3 commentsNemonaterFeb 08, 2019
SiglosSlug.jpg
Siglos Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II Engraved Reverse Die65 viewsPersian Empire, Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II. Ca. 420-375 B.C. AR siglos (14 mm, 5.57 g).
O: Persian king or hero in kneeling/running stance right, holding dagger and bow; bankers marks.
R: Incuse punch; roaring lion left.
- Carradice IV B, pl. XIII, 35.
2 commentsNemonaterFeb 08, 2019
Alexander.jpg
Alexander III Tetradrachm Price 299969 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’, 336-323 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 25 mm, 17.13 g, 12 h), Tarsos, struck under Balakros or Menes, circa 333-327.
O: Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and eagle standing right with closed wings in his right.
- Price 2999. A rare early and unusual issue from Tarsos, "Officina B", bearing no symbol.

By comparing these early Tarsos tetradrachms to the staters of Mazaios (Pictured below) it is easy to see the identical forms of the throne, scepter, footstool and other details. The drapery is rendered in a similar manner, the Aramaic inscription of the one and the Greek inscription of the other share the same curve following the dotted border. This evidence indicates the two series of coins were the common product of a single mint.

2 commentsNemonaterJan 21, 2019
AlexanderA.jpg
Alexander III Tetradrachm Price 299357 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’, 336-323 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 25 mm, 17.25 g, 4 h), Tarsos, struck under Balakros or Menes, circa 333-327.
O:Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and eagle standing right with closed wings in his right; below throne, A.
- Price 2993.
1 commentsNemonaterJan 21, 2019
AlexanderB.jpg
Alexander III Price 300045 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’, 336-323 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 25 mm, 17.16 g, 3 h), Tarsos, struck under Balakros or Menes, circa 333-327.
O: Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and eagle standing right with closed wings in his right; below throne, B.
- Price 3000.
2 commentsNemonaterJan 21, 2019
VespasianTDHorseRIC5.jpg
Vespasian / Titus and Domitian on Horseback58 viewsVespasian AR Denarius, Rome Mint, 69-70 AD
O: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
R: TITVS ET DOMITIAN CAES PRIN IV; Titus and Domitian riding r., hands outstretched
- RIC 5 (R). BMC p. 7, RSC 539.

One of the rarest of the dynastic types.
5 commentsNemonaterOct 23, 2018
TitusRIC1.jpg
Titus / Bearded Captive82 viewsTitus AR Denarius. Rome mint, AD 79. 3.1g, 18mm.
O: IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right
R: TR POT VIII COS VII, bearded captive, wearing trousers and cape, kneeling right at base of trophy.
- RIC 1; RSC 334a; BMCRE 1.

Only two specimens in the Reka Devnia Hoard, not in the Paris collection or Cohen. An attractively toned issue dated to the first week of Titus' reign, between Vespasian's death on 23 June 79 AD and the beginning of Titus' ninth tribunician year on 1 July. The reverse type was carried on from Titus' last issue as Caesar, see http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-89575
5 commentsNemonaterOct 16, 2018
MaxTRPIIII.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax / P M TR P IIII40 viewsMaximinus I. AD 235-238. AR Denarius 2.55 g. Rome mint, 6th officina. 6th emission, December AD 237-April AD 238.
O: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
R: P M TR P IIII COS P P Maximinus standing left, raising hand and holding spear; two signa flanking.
- RIC IV 6; BMCRE 219; RSC 70.

Maximinus took his fourth tribunitian on December 10, 237. Although assassinated in April of the following year, he lost control of the Rome mint that January. This rare last issue of his reign was struck between December 237 and January 238.
2 commentsNemonaterOct 11, 2018
Crisis_and_Decline_Comp.jpg
The Year of the Six Emperors (And a Caesar) 48 viewsIn order from top left to right: Maximinus Thrax, murdered; Maximus Caesar, murdered; Gordian I suicide; Gordian II killed in battle; Pupienus, murdered; Balbinus, murdered; Gordian III, probably murdered but possibly died in battle. 4 commentsNemonaterOct 11, 2018
1181837-2.jpg
Titus / Quadriga Aureus19 viewsNOT MINE!!
Perhaps one day?
1 commentsNemonaterSep 24, 2018

Random files - Nemonater's Gallery
Titus_PontifMaxim.jpg
Titus / Pontif Maxim Mule91 viewsTitus. As Caesar, AD 69-79. AR Denarius, Rome mint. Struck under Vespasian, AD 73.
O: Laureate head right; T CAES IMP VESP CENS
R: Vespasian seated right on curule chair, feet on footstool, holding scepter and olive branch.
- RIC II 554 (R) (Vespasian); BMC 113; RSC 158. Struck from the same obverse die as the aureus illustrated for Calicó 746.

An interesting mule. When this coin was struck, Titus was only Pontifex not Pontifex Maximus. The same reverse type was also struck for Titus with his correct titles, PONTIF TRI POT.
The reverse type clearly copies the PONTIF MAXIM Livia seated type of Tiberius. Vespasian may have copied this and other earlier aureus and denarius reverse types as restorations, since he was melting down and recoining the originals to take advantage of Nero's debasement of 64 AD. According to CClay, "Use of the SAME dies for both aurei and denarii was the rule up until Titus and continued in some issues until about Hadrian. Thereafter the style and size of the two denominations diverged, though gold and silver QUINARII often continued to be struck from the same dies."
5 commentsNemonater
VespasianTDHorseRIC5.jpg
Vespasian / Titus and Domitian on Horseback58 viewsVespasian AR Denarius, Rome Mint, 69-70 AD
O: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
R: TITVS ET DOMITIAN CAES PRIN IV; Titus and Domitian riding r., hands outstretched
- RIC 5 (R). BMC p. 7, RSC 539.

One of the rarest of the dynastic types.
5 commentsNemonater
JCElephantII.jpg
Julius Caesar Elephant Denarius55 viewsJulius Caesar. 49-48 BC. AR Denarius. Military mint traveling with Caesar.
O: Elephant right, trampling on serpent
R: Emblems of the pontificate - Simpulum, sprinkler, axe and priest's hat.
- Crawford 443/1; Sear (History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators) 9; Sydenham 1006; BMCRR (Gaul) 27; Cohen/RSC 49; Babelon (Voconia) 1; Sear (Roman Coins & Their Values I) 1399. Ex HJBerk 90th Buy or Bid Sale, 4/17/96, Lot 232, listed as Mint state.

Julius Caesar and his armies assembled on the banks of the Rubicon River on 10 January 49 BC, ready to invade Italy. Since large quantities of denarii were necessary to pay Caesar's military expenses, the mint traveled with them. This issue was ordered, not by a moneyer, as was usual, but by Julius Caesar himself. In all likelihood, this type was used by Caesar's military forces at least until the decisive battle of Pharsalus.

"It is the inscription CAESAR in the exergue that has led to the modern identification of the elephant as Caesar. But the exergue is the traditional place for the moneyer’s name and Caesar is separated from the field by the ground line. When Hirtius minted, he put his own name there. Presumably the Caesarian message remained the same with or without CAESAR inscribed on the coin. So whatever that message was, it had to be using symbols easily recognized by the people he was speaking to.

The main problem with a Good over Evil interpretation is that the snake was not a symbol of evil in the pagan Roman mind. As for the elephant, the most frequent use of the elephant on coinage had been by the Metelli. Of all the families of Rome they had done more to connect their name with the elephant image than any other family line. And Metellus Scipio himself even used the elephant again (without snake, of course) after Caesar minted his coin.

As others have pointed out, the other side of the coin with the implements of the pontifex maximus makes an unmistakable reference to Caesar with or without the name Caesar. But that also got me to thinking. Why did he want to advertise that position? Simply put, the main concern of the Roman state religion was the Salus of the state, hence it was Caesar’s chief concern as Pontifex Maximus. If the Metellan elephant was trampling on the Salus of the state, it was his duty as Pontifex Maximus to protect and restore Salus." - mharlan, http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=88757.0
2 commentsNemonater
PtolemyI26mms.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter Tetradrachm as Satrap27 viewsPtolemy I Soter. Silver Tetradrachm (15.68 g, 26mm), as Satrap, 323-305 BC. Alexandria, in the name of Alexander III. Overstruck on earlier Alexander tetradrachm, 306-305 BC.
O: Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant's skin headdress, aegis around neck with tiny Δ in scales.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY in left field, Athena Alkidemos advancing right, wielding javelin and holding forth shield;in right field, monogram, Corinthian helmet right above ΔI and eagle standing right on thunderbolt.
Overstruck, undertype beading visible on obverse just above elephant's ear; on the reverse, portrait of Alexander above eagles head into Athena's shield.

The earlier 17g tetradrachms were withdrawn from circulation in 306/305 BC and reissued after weight adjustment. They were trimmed to remove 1.5g of silver, heated and restruck. This must have been faster than melting them down into bullion and restriking. Some of these issues, such as this one, show the clear evidence of the edges being trimmed, although many do not.

Ptolemy was feeling the financial burden of repelling Antigonus’ invasion and supporting Rhodes through a thirteen-month siege. The government needed extra currency and Egypt produced little or no silver. The recall of the heavy issues meant 8 tetradrachms were restruck into 9 “Crisis Issues” but with no change in the appearance of the dies.
3 commentsNemonater