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Home > Member Collections > David Atherton

Vespasian Imperial Silver


V1424_R3.jpg

Titus Flavius Vespasianus - Augustus 69-79 AD

Imperial coins are arranged according to the new RIC II Part 1.

References cited:
RIC - The Roman Imperial Coinage II Part 1 - Carradice and Buttrey
BMC - Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum II - Mattingly
RSC - Roman Silver Coins II - Seaby
RPC - Roman Provincial Coinage II - Burnett, Amandry, Carradice

RIC frequency ratings -
R3 unique
R2 very few examples known
R rare
C common
C2 very common
C3 extremely common

160 files, last one added on Nov 02, 2017

Titus Imperial Silver


titus dolphin rev.JPG

Titus Flavius Vespasianus - Caesar 69-79 AD, Augustus 79-81 AD

Imperial coins are arranged according to the new RIC II Part 1.

References cited:
RIC - The Roman Imperial Coinage II Part 1 - Carradice and Buttrey
BMC - Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum II - Mattingly
RSC - Roman Silver Coins II - Seaby
RPC - Roman Provincial Coinage II - Burnett, Amandry, Carradice

RIC frequency ratings -
R3 unique
R2 very few examples known
R rare
C common
C2 very common
C3 extremely common

122 files, last one added on Oct 18, 2017

Domitian Imperial Silver


D183.jpg

Titus Flavius Domitianus - Caesar 69-81 AD, Augustus 81–96 AD

Imperial coins are arranged according to the new RIC II Part 1.

References cited:
RIC - The Roman Imperial Coinage II Part 1 - Carradice and Buttrey
BMC - Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum II - Mattingly
RSC - Roman Silver Coins II - Seaby
RPC - Roman Provincial Coinage II - Burnett, Amandry, Carradice

RIC frequency ratings -
R3 unique
R2 very few examples known
R rare
C common
C2 very common
C3 extremely common

Common Minerva Types:
M1 Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear
M2 Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear, on capital of rostral column, accompanied by owl
M3 Minerva standing, facing left, with thunderbolt and spear and shield behind her feet
M4 Minerva standing left with spear

188 files, last one added on Oct 10, 2017

Julia Titi Imperial Silver


T387a.jpg

Flavia Julia Titi - Augusta 80-91 AD

Imperial coins are arranged according to the new RIC II Part 1.

References cited:
RIC - The Roman Imperial Coinage II Part 1 - Carradice and Buttrey
BMC - Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum II - Mattingly
RSC - Roman Silver Coins II - Seaby
RPC - Roman Provincial Coinage II - Burnett, Amandry, Carradice

RIC frequency ratings -
R3 unique
R2 very few examples known
R rare
C common
C2 very common
C3 extremely common

3 files, last one added on Aug 24, 2017

Flavian Provincial Silver


RPC1944.jpg

Provincial coins of Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian 69-96 AD

Provincial coins are arranged according to RPC II

Reference cited: RPC - Roman Provincial Coinage II - Burnett, Amandry, Carradice

RPC frequency is determined by the number of specimens in the 'core collections'

Core collections:
Berlin, Staatliche Museen
Cambridge, Fitzwilliam Museum
Copenhagen, Nationalmuseet
Glasgow, Hunterian Museum
London, British Museum
Munich, Staatliche Münzsammlung
New York, American Numismatic Society
Oxford, Ashmolean Museum
Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France
Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum

59 files, last one added on Nov 16, 2017

 

5 albums on 1 page(s)

Last additions - David Atherton's Gallery
RPC1666.jpg
RPC-1666-Domitian27 viewsAR Didrachm, 6.38g
Rome mint (for Cappadocia), 93-94 AD
RPC 1666 (18 spec.).
Obv: AYT KAI ΔOMITIANOC CЄBACTOC ΓЄPM; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev : No legend; emperor in quadriga, r., holding laurel branch in r. hand, sceptre in l. hand
Ex Lanz, eBay, November 2017.

This is a fairly rare Cappadocian didrachm of Domitian struck late in the reign. The pronounced 'Roman' style and six o'clock die axis are clear evidence it was produced in Rome for circulation in the province. Remarkably, this reverse is the only instance of Domitian in a quadriga that was struck in silver for either the imperial or provincial issues. Naturally, one may ask for what reason is Domitian triumphing here? In May 92 Domitian left Rome for a military campaign along the Danube against the Sarmatians known as the Second Pannonian war. The conflict lasted eight months and Domitian was back in Rome by January 93. He was awarded only an ovation but not a full triumph, so it is unclear what triumph this reverse refers to.

Struck in fine late Domitianic style.
4 commentsDavid AthertonNov 16, 2017
RPC1503.jpg
RPC-1503-Domitian24 viewsAR Drachm, 3.22g
Rome mint (for Lycia), 95 AD
RPC 1503 (2 spec.).
Obv: AYT KAIC ΔOMITIANOC CЄBACTOC ΓЄPM; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: ЄTOYC IΔ YPATOY IZ; Two lyres with owl perched on top
Ex Lanz, eBay, October 2017.

A small issue of drachms were struck by Domitian for Lycia in 95. The style and six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the home mint. These drachms were produced alongside Domitian's Roman style cistophori from the same year. Both issues share the same Macedonian silver content of 80% fineness. The drachms weighed about one third of a cistophorus and likely were valued accordingly. It is not known if the two denominations circulated together or separately. Because of the drachms similar weight and appearance with contemporary denarii, they appear in denarius hoards all over the empire and seemed to have circulated with them. Interestingly, this drachm has the traditional Lycian lyres along with Athena's owl, perhaps an appropriate nod to Domitian's favourite deity.

Old cabinet toning and fine late style.
3 commentsDavid AthertonNov 14, 2017
V1425a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1425 var.44 viewsAR Denarius, 2.54g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD
RIC 1425 var. BMC - . RSC - . RPC - .
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. l., with wreath and palm; at lower l., BY
Ex Savoca Coins, eBay, October 2017.

An unpublished Victory adv. left for Vespasian's Ephesian Group 5 denarii. A unique specimen with Victory adv. right is cited in RIC II.1 (RIC 1425) for the group. A second Victory left specimen, a double die match with mine, has been noted in Doug Smith's collection. With the appearance of these two coins both Victory types can now be attested for Group 5. Tentatively the type will be considered a variant of RIC 1425 until it is officially assigned a place in the upcoming Addenda. It should be noted that COS III denarii are seen much more commonly with the EPHE mintmark where both Victory types are already attested. Generally speaking, denarii dated COS III with the BY mintmark are so rare that Mattingly in BMCRE II doubted many of the standard Ephesian types existed for the group. However, he did note a COS III Victory left with an unclear mintmark, citing Cohen 279 (BMC II p. 94, note).

Struck in fine Ephesian style.

4 commentsDavid AthertonNov 02, 2017
RPC1655_original.jpg
RPC-1655-Titus as Caesar32 viewsAR Drachm, 3.03g
Caesarea, Cappadocia mint, 73-74 AD
RPC 1655 (2 spec.).
Obv: AYTO KAI OYЄCΠACIANOC CEBACTOY YIOC; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: NIKH CЄBACTH; Nike advancing r., wreath in r. hand, palm in l. hand
Acquired from eBay, October 2017.

Caesarea in Cacppadocia struck a fairly large issue of silver coins in 76/77 AD. There are two distinct styles: 'Roman' (with a 6 o'clock die axis) struck at Rome for circulation in Cappadocia, and 'local' (with a 12 o'clock die axis) struck at Caesarea. Drachms with the Nike type were struck for Titus Caesar in both Roman and local style. This coin is most certainly a Cappadocian produced piece based on style and the 12 o'clock die axis. It is slightly scarcer than the corresponding Rome issue. With a fineness near 48%, this drachm was overvalued against the denarius by 67%, assuming the two denominations were of equal value.

Fine local style and nicely toned.
4 commentsDavid AthertonOct 27, 2017
T104a.jpg
Titus RIC-10442 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome Mint, 80 AD
RIC 104(R). BMC 40. RSC 306a.
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Captives, two, back to back, seated either side of trophy (man on l., woman on r.)
Ex Lanz, eBay, October 2017.

Rare variant of the two captives type with the male and female captives swapping places. The reverse commemorates an Agricolan British victory, perhaps the occasion when his legions reached the river Tay garnering Titus his 15th imperial acclamation. Some scholars in the past have attributed the reverse as a 'Judaea Capta' type, this is incorrect. The two captives echoes a Gallic victory type struck for Julius Caesar. The shields, like those on Caesar's denarii, are Celtic not Judaean in form. Additionally, H. Mattingly in BMCRE II correctly proposed the reverse alluded to a British victory.


Even though the coin is a bit worn it still has good eye appeal. Even wear and well centred.
2 commentsDavid AthertonOct 18, 2017
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Domitian RIC-81638 viewsAR Denarius, 2.73g
Rome mint, 95-96 AD
RIC 816 (R2). BMC 243. RSC 175.
Obv: DOMITIANVS AVG GERM; Head of Domitian, bare, bearded, r.
Rev: Temple, eight columns, seated figure in centre; IMP CAESAR on architrave
Ex Private Collection.

Domitian struck a rare undated issue of denarii depicting five different temples. Based on portrait style and the fact that Domitian's moneyers were experimenting with new reverse designs after 94, the issue has been dated to either 95 or 96. Four of the five temples have been identified - Serapis, Cybele, Minerva, and Capitoline Jupiter. The fifth type is an octastyle temple, as seen on the coin above, and its identification remains a mystery. Mattingly conjectured it could be the Temple of Divus Vespasian, P.V. Hill and D. Vagi thought it possibly the Temple of Jupiter Victor, R.H. Darwell-Smith speculated it is the Temple of Jupiter Custos, and M. Tameanko believed it to be the Temple of Divus Augustus. Tameanko makes the strongest case. Earlier renditions of the temple on the coinage under Caligula show it with a hexastyle facade. Domitian restored or rebuilt the temple after the fire of 80. His architect Rabirius may have completely overhauled the building in a more contemporary style producing an octastyle temple. Almost a hundred years later Antoninus Pius restored the temple again and struck a series of coins commemorating the event. His coins indeed depict an octastyle temple very much like the one seen on this denarius and may be proof that under Domitian the temple was rebuilt as an octastyle structure. However, until more evidence comes to light, the identification remains uncertain. Like Domitian's earlier Saecular Games series, the temple denarii were likely struck as a special issue, perhaps reflecting Domitian's new interest as builder. The remarkable bare headed portrait further enhances the issue as something special.

Needless to say it is a fantastically rare piece! Additionally, the eight column type may be the scarcest of the temple group, considering I have located only two other examples in trade over the last 15 years. The other two coins (OldRomanCoins 2002, HJB 145, lot 265) are obverse die matches with mine. Oddly, some specimens (BM 234 for example) lack IMP CAESAR on the architrave.

Worn, with some bumps and scrapes, but well-centred and in good style with plenty of eye appeal.
4 commentsDavid AthertonOct 10, 2017
D450sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-45043 viewsAR Denarius, 3.38g
Rome mint, 86 AD
RIC 450 (R2). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield (M1)
Acquired from Numismeo, September 2017.

In 86 Domitian was awarded imperial acclamations at an accelerated pace due to the Dacian War, which resulted in some fairly rare denarius issues. This coin is from the extremely rare fourth issue of 86, probably struck for just a few days or so until word of the next imperial acclamation reached the mint. The Minerva fighting (M1) and Minerva on rostral column (M2) are the only two denarius types known for the issue. The coins are so rare that Mattingly even doubted the issue's existence (BMCRE p. 320 note).

Struck in fine style on a large flan.
6 commentsDavid AthertonOct 04, 2017
V852.jpg
Vespasian RIC-852 (2)37 viewsAR Denarius, 3.25g
Rome mint, 76 AD
RIC 852 (C). BMC 184A. RSC 373.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS VII; Pax, bare to the waist, seated l., holding branch extended in r. hand, l. hand on lap
Ex eBay, September 2017.

Vespasian's seated Pax type is normally seen with a COS VI date, struck in conjunction with the opening of his Temple of Peace in 75 (probably Vespasian's most common denarius type). Here is a fairly rare COS VII seated Pax from 76. Owing to its rarity, the COS VII Pax could not have been struck for any length of time and likely dates to the first few weeks of 76 soon after Vespasian became COS VII on 1 January. Perhaps it was struck as a stop-gap until new reverse designs were produced and approved for the new year?

This coin is a considerable upgrade over the specimen I acquired in February 2017.
3 commentsDavid AthertonSep 26, 2017
D652a.jpg
Domitian RIC-65239 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Rome mint, 88-89 AD
RIC 652 (R2). BMC - . RSC - .
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XVI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
Acquired from NumisCorner, August 2017.

Domitian was acquiring imperial acclamations at a rapid pace in late 88 due to intense military activity in Germania and Dacia. The coins record the successive acclamations quite meticulously. Here is a very rare coin dated with his 16th imperial acclamation. Domitian was awarded his 17th imperial acclamation by 7 November, so this coin was struck at some point before then, perhaps for just a few days judging by the rarity of the title. We do not know what long lost victory the 16th salutation was awarded for, all that remains are the coins recording it. A reverse die match with the BM specimen, perhaps further evidence of its rarity.

Struck in good metal and nicely centred.
1 commentsDavid AthertonSep 21, 2017
V1396a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-139637 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome mint, 69-70 AD
RIC 1396 (R2). BMC 431. RSC 280b. RPC 806 (2 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory, advancing l., holding wreath in extended r. hand and palm curving up in l.
Acquired from Pars Coins, September 2017. Ex Hirsch 326, 16 February 2017, lot 1924. Ex Savoca Live Auction 9, 21 August, 2016, lot 532.

Ephesus struck a small issue of denarii for Vespasian between 69 and 74. The vast majority of these Ephesian denarii have a mintmark of one sort or another. Those without one are preciously rare.
The earliest and rarest are undated with no mint mark and were minted in late 69 or early 70. This unmarked type with Victory on the reverse has been a most elusive one to acquire! Very scarce in trade.

Struck in fine Ephesian style.
3 commentsDavid AthertonSep 19, 2017
D56best2.jpg
Domitian RIC 5645 viewsAR Denarius, 3.22g
Rome mint, 81 AD
RIC 56 (R2). BMC p. 299, ‡. RSC 560a.
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
Ex eBay, September 2017.

Here is a rare Domitian 'PONT' denarius with the legend variant of DOMITIANVS fully spelled out. Denarii with 'PONT' instead of PM in the obverse legend come very early in the reign. Historically, PONT did not stand for Pontifex Maximus under Augustus, but did so under Nero (PONT was used after Nero was already Pontifex Maximus, BMC 9). It is possible Domitian followed Nero's example and used PONT as an abbreviation for Pontifex Maximus. Conversely, it is also possible he followed in Augustus' footsteps and used the temporary title 'PONT' until the ceremony electing him to the position was completed. We simply do not know. The records of the Arval brothers do not show Domitian as Pontifex Maximus by 30 October, so presumably he acquired the title in either November or December. The office seems to have had no fixed date of appointment. Knowing how much of a stickler Domitian was to keeping to the proper forms, the mint likely waited until his election as Pontifex Maximus before the title was displayed on the coinage. Whether or not that title on the coinage after the election was abbreviated as 'PONT' for a brief time is a mystery.

Struck in fine early style with a well centred obverse.
6 commentsDavid AthertonSep 14, 2017
V794e_zpsyafi2d8j~original.jpg
Vespasian RIC-79440 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.36g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
RIC 794 (C). BMC - . RSC 614.
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
Acquired from Traianvs Coins, September 2017.

Vespasian's moneyer's struck a great issue of undated quinarii in 75, possibly in conjunction with the opening of his Temple of Peace. Two standard Victory types (seated and advancing) were employed along with various variant legend spellings and orientations. The variations are: obverse legend - VESPASIANVS or less commonly VESPASIAN; reverse legend - AVGVSTI or less commonly AVGVST. The reverse legend can also either be oriented from low r. or high l. This coin is considered one of the more 'common' variants with VESPASIANVS in the obverse legend and AVGVSTI in the reverse, oriented from low r. Even so, it is a very rare piece, as are all Flavian quinarii compared with the denarii.

Struck on a large flan and in good mid-period style with the small portrait head.
4 commentsDavid AthertonSep 12, 2017
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Domitian RIC-59769 viewsAR Denarius, 2.60g
Rome mint, 88 AD
RIC 597 (R2). BMC 133 var. RSC - (cf. 77a).
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
Acquired from Michael Trenerry, August 2017.

An extremely rare example of the Saecular Games herald denarius with portrait head left. Probably the fifth recorded specimen. Obverse die match with the RIC plate coin.

Somewhat worn, but nicely centred and in fine style.
6 commentsDavid AthertonSep 05, 2017
D599.jpg
Domitian RIC-59954 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.61g
Rome mint, 88 AD
RIC 599 (C2). BMC 134. RSC 78.
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; Herald adv. l., with wand and shield
Ex CNG E404, 23 August 2017, lot 504. Ex Helios 1, 17 April 2008, lot 248 (The Frank L. Kovacs Collection).

Unusually, this quinarius lacks the de rigueur Victory on the reverse, instead we have an interesting historical type of a Herald announcing Domitian's Ludi Saeculares. This was the only saeculum type struck on his quinarii. The games were held in 88 following the Augustan cycle. Presumably this piece was struck for commemorative purposes in conjunction with the games. RIC places the frequency rating for this type as 'very common' (C2), however, this seems a bit over generous. Perhaps a rating of 'common' (C) would be more appropriate. The upcoming RIC II.1 Addenda notes the frequency discrepancy, citing C. Clay's concern that only nineteen specimens are in King's survey of Roman quinarii.

A lovely piece with dark toning and fine style.
8 commentsDavid AthertonAug 29, 2017
T388aa.jpg
Julia Titi RIC T38841 viewsAR Denarius, 3.09g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
RIC T388 (C2). BMC T142. RSC 14.
Obv: IVLIA AVGVSTA TITI AVGVSTI F; Bust of Julia Titi, draped and diademed, r., hair in long plait
Rev: VENVS AVGVST; Venus stg. r., leaning on column, with helmet and spear
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, August 2017.

The most 'common' variant of Julia Titi's Venus denarii. However, I think RIC's frequency rating of 'C2' overstates the case. The same reverse type is also shared with Titus. Stylistic note - many of Julia's portraits have the facial features of either Titus or Domitian Caesar, this example is no exception.

Struck on a large flan in decent style.

8 commentsDavid AthertonAug 24, 2017
D688a.JPG
Domitian RIC-68833 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome mint, 89 AD
RIC 688 (C2). BMC 163. RSC 255.
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
Acquired from Numisbur (eBay), August 2017.

In 88 and 89, due to increased military campaigns in Germania and Dacia, imperial acclamations were being awarded to Domitian at a quick pace culminating in a double triumph the Senate voted Domitian over the chatti and Dacians at the end of 89. The rapid succession of titles was meticulously recorded on his denarii. This denarius dates between mid September and 31 December 89. Domitian's double triumph was held while this issue was struck.

Good style portrait typical of the period.
3 commentsDavid AthertonAug 16, 2017

Random files - David Atherton's Gallery
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Vespasian RIC 3992 viewsAR Denarius, 2.69g
Rome mint, 71 AD
RIC 39 (R). BMC 59A. RSC 564.
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: TRI POT II COS III P P; Mars adv. r., with spear and aquila
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, June 2012. Ex Maridvnvm Collection.

A very rare Vespasian denarius from 71 AD. The reverse features the familiar Mars walking right with spear and aquila, nothing new there...however, it's the shorter obverse legend used in early 71 and the (unique to this series) TRI POT II COS III P P reverse legend that makes this a rare denarius. Oddly enough, the only other denarius from the same series (Pax seated) was minted in copious amounts.

The coin itself has deep cabinet toning and good centering. Very nice in hand. Vespasian seems to be cracking a rare smile too.
7 commentsDavid Atherton
RPC2401sm.jpg
RPC-2401-Vespasian116 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 12.65g
Alexandria mint, 69 AD
RPC 2401 (25 spec.).
Obv: AYT TIT ΦΛAYI OYEΣΠAΣIAN KAIΣ ; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., date LA before neck
Rev: EIPHNH; Eirene standing, l., with corn-ears and caduceus
Acquired from Almanumis, August 2014.

The first coins struck for Vespasian anywhere in the empire are those dated "Year 1" (LA) from Alexandria Egypt. The two legions stationed there under the Prefect Tiberius Julius Alexander were the first to declare him emperor. According to Tacitus - "The first move to convey imperial status to Vespasian took place at Alexandria. This was due to the eagerness of Tiberius Alexander, who caused his legions to swear allegiance to the new emperor on 1 July" (Hist 2.79). The year 1 coins were struck between 1 July and 28 August. The obverse legend of these first coins lack the title Augustus (sebastos). However, those dated Year 2 (29 August 69 - 28 August 70) include the title, which is strong evidence that Vespasian did not immediately adopt it during the first two months of his reign. Vespasian did not arrive in Alexandria until December, so the Alexandrian die engravers probably had no idea of the new emperor's appearance. Understandably, these early portraits have more than a passing similarity to those of Vitellius. It is interesting to note this tetradrachm was struck nearly 6 months before the senate in Rome recognised Vespasian as emperor and the first imperial coins in his name were struck there.

This tetradrachm displays the unique "Alexandrian" style quite well - a large squarish head, crudely engraved, with a thick mop of hair. Despite its lack of artistry and clunkiness, I quite adore this charming style. A chunky coin in hand.
5 commentsDavid Atherton
D425.JPG
Domitian RIC-42596 viewsAR Denarius, 3.06g
Rome mint, 86 AD
RIC 425 (R). BMC 88. RSC 194.
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XI COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)

A rare denarius from the first issue of 86. It records Domitian's 11th imperial acclamation from the First Dacian War and can be somewhat closely dated between 1 January and the Spring (he received his 12th imperial acclamation between 17 March and 13 May).

The style is a continuation of that seen in the issues of 85 - very idealised with large, high quality portraits.
2 commentsDavid Atherton
T91.jpg
Titus RIC 9160 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.55g
Rome mint, 79-80 AD
RIC 91 (C). BMC 108. RSC 356.
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (clockwise, inwardly, from low l.); Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
Ex CNG E399, 14 June 2017, lot 486.

Titus struck a small undated issue of quinarii, most of which are fairly rare. This traditional Victory type is copied from quinarii minted by Vespasian.

Struck in a fine and neat style, typical of the mint during this period.
5 commentsDavid Atherton