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BRITAIN - COINS THAT FEATURE BRITANNIA


CHARLES_II_AR_Farthing_Pattern_1676.JPG

This album contains coins depicting Britannia ranging from the time of the Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius, through her re-appearance on British currency in the reign of Charles II up until her final fleeting appearance on the currency of Britain at the beginning of the 21st Century.

83 files, last one added on Oct 03, 2018

BRITAIN - HAMMERED COINS


Edward_IV_AR_Groat_London.JPG

This small gallery contains various coins of monarchs who ruled in Britain and currently ranges from the period of Henry II up to the time of the Commonwealth following the death of Charles I.

43 files, last one added on Feb 05, 2020

GREEK - ALEXANDER THE GREAT


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This small gallery contains various issues of Alexander the Great.

6 files, last one added on Oct 21, 2017

ROMAN - COMMEMORATIVE AND HISTORICAL TYPES


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This album contains a range of coins including those which commemorate specific historical events as well as City Commemorative and Divus/Diva types.

97 files, last one added on Jan 16, 2020

ROMAN PROVINCIAL - ALEXANDRIA TETRADRACHMS


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This album contains Greek Imperial (Roman Provincial) coins struck at Alexandria, Egypt from the time of Nero until the issues ceased in the time of Diocletian.

19 files, last one added on Jan 02, 2019

ROMAN - IMPERIAL TO CARINUS


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This gallery contains a selection of imperial coins up to the reign of Carinus.

25 files, last one added on Feb 01, 2019

ROMAN - PROBUS


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This album contains a selection of coins from the reign of Probus. Many thanks to Martin Griffiths (maridvnvm) for his help with the attributions.

20 files, last one added on Oct 03, 2018

ROMAN - THE TETRARCHY


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This gallery contains coins issued by those who ruled during the period of the Tetrarchy initiated by Diocletian.

20 files, last one added on Jun 21, 2018

ROMAN - CONSTANTINE & LICINIUS


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This gallery contains a variety of coins issued from the accession of Diocletian up to the reign of Constantine I.

36 files, last one added on Sep 02, 2018

ROMAN - FAMILY OF CONSTANTINE


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Coins struck during the reigns of the family of Constantine up to the reign of Julian II.

26 files, last one added on Dec 29, 2019

ROMAN - JOVIAN TO MARCIAN


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This gallery consists mostly of late 4th to early 5th century coins.

48 files, last one added on Jan 08, 2020

BRITAIN - 18th & 19th CENTURY TOKENS


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18th century tokens first appeared in 1787 and were struck in large numbers over the next ten years. They began as payment for workers in the manufacturing and mining industries of the early Industrial Revolution but proved so popular that pieces for general circulation were soon issued.
At the beginning of the 19th century official coins were again in short supply and by 1811, penny, halfpenny and farthing tokens were once more being manufactured. These tokens became extremely popular and were accepted locally as a regular medium of exchange until they were all banned following the great re-coinage of 1816.

56 files, last one added on Feb 07, 2019

FRENCH JETONS


Louis_XIV_AE_(Brass)_Jeton.jpg

Historically, a jeton was at first just a counter, then a sort of small medal and finally more like a token.
During the Middle Ages, jetons were only used as counters for calculations on a lined board similar to an abacus. After the Renaissance, especially under Louis XIV, they were issued as small medals depicting the great events of the king's reign. They were very popular during the17th and 18th centuries and became collector's items in France and the Netherlands, the first catalogues date from the beginning of the 17th century. Collectors were especially interested in them as a source and illustration of history, which was sometimes called building up an "histoire metallique," a history in metal.
This gallery primarily contains jetons issued during the reign of Louis XIV.

9 files, last one added on Jul 25, 2018

FORVM - Linked Items


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Nothing to see here.

51 files, last one added on Feb 06, 2020

14 albums on 1 page(s)

Last additions - *Alex's Gallery
Northumbria_802.JPG
5 views*AlexFeb 06, 2020
810_-_841_EANRED_AE_Styca.JPG
810 - 841, EANRED, Anglo-Saxon king of Northumbria, AE Styca, Struck at York, England10 viewsObverse: + EANRED REX around small cross pattée. Cross pattée in legend.
Reverse: + FORDRED around small cross patoncé. Cross pattée in legend. Moneyer: Fordred.
Grey patina with slight silver sheen
Diameter: 12mm | Weight: 0.9gms | Die Axis: 12
SPINK: 862

Eanred's reign saw the first appearance of the styca, a new style of small coin which replaced the earlier sceat. The first stycas were of low silver content but later coins became effectively brass. Produced in York, large numbers have survived and several moneyers are named on the surviving coins, suggesting that they were minted in significant quantities. Higham estimates that hundreds of thousands of stycas were in circulation. The distribution of the coin finds suggests that their principal use was in external trade and that, apart from being used for the payment of taxes, coins were likely little used by the great majority of Northumbrians in their daily lives.

Eanred was king of Northumbria in the early ninth century.but very little is known for certain about him. Roger of Wendover, a 13th century English chronicler, states that Eanred reigned from 810 until 840, but the twelfth-century History of the Church of Durham records a reign of 33 years. Given the turbulence of Northumbrian history in this period, a reign of this length suggests a figure of some significance. Eanred was the son of King Eardwulf, who was deposed by an otherwise unknown Ælfwald in 806. According to the History of the Church of Durham, Ælfwald ruled for two years before Eanred succeeded. However Frankish sources claim that, after being expelled from England, Eardwulf was received by Charlemagne and then the pope, and that their envoys escorted him back to Northumbria and secured his restoration to power. The precise nature of the succession of Eanred is therefore unclear but all the sources agree that Eanred was eventually succeeded by his son, Æthelred.

The Kingdom of Northumbria was a medieval Anglian kingdom in what is now Northern England and South-east Scotland. The name derives from the Old English Norþan-hymbre meaning "the people or province north of the Humber", Northumbria started to consolidate into one kingdom in the early seventh century when the two earlier territories of Deira and Bernicia united. At its height, the kingdom extended from the Humber Estuary in the south to the Firth of Forth (now in Scotland) in the north.
Northumbria ceased to be an independent kingdom in the mid-tenth century.
1 comments*AlexFeb 05, 2020
841_-849_AETHELRED_II_AE_Styca.JPG
841 – 849, ÆTHELRED II, Anglo-Saxon king of Northumbria, AE Styca, Struck 841 – 844 at York, England11 viewsObverse: + EDILRED REX around large Greek cross, small Greek cross in legend.
Reverse: + EANRED around small Greek cross. Small Greek cross in legend. Moneyer: Eanred.
Issue: First Reign, Phase II, Group Cii
Diameter: 13mm | Weight: 0.9gms | Die Axis: 6
SPINK: 865 | Pirie: 1374 (same dies)

The new styca coinage, small brass coins containing very little silver and much zinc, introduced in Eanred's reign, continued in Æthelred's. Large numbers of Æthelred's styca coins have been found, they too were minted in York by a number of different moneyers.

Æthelred II was king of Northumbria in the middle of the ninth century, but, as with his father, his dates are uncertain. Relatively little is known of Æthelred's reign from the surviving documentary record. He appears to have been expelled in favour of Rædwulf, whose reign is confirmed by the evidence of coinage. However, Rædwulf was killed that same year fighting against the Vikings and Æthelred was restored to power. Æthelred was assassinated a few years later, but no further details are known of his murder. Æthelred II was succeeded by Osberht.
N. J. Higham, reader of history at Manchester University and author of several books on the Anglo-Saxons dates Æthelred II's reign as from 840 until his death in 848, with an interruption in 844 when Rædwulf briefly usurped the throne. Barbara Yorke, Emeritus professor of Medieval history at the University of Winchester agrees, but dates his death slightly later to 848 or 849.

The Kingdom of Northumbria was a medieval Anglian kingdom in what is now Northern England and South-east Scotland. The name derives from the Old English Norþan-hymbre meaning "the people or province north of the Humber", Northumbria started to consolidate into one kingdom in the early seventh century when the two earlier territories of Deira and Bernicia united. At its height, the kingdom extended from the Humber Estuary in the south to the Firth of Forth (now in Scotland) in the north.
Northumbria ceased to be an independent kingdom in the mid-tenth century.
1 comments*AlexFeb 05, 2020
David_II_Groat.JPG
1329 – 1371, David II, AR Groat struck 1367 - 1371 at Edinburgh, Scotland12 viewsObverse: + DAVID DEI GRA REX SCOTORVM. Crowned bust of David II facing left, sceptre topped with a lis and with a star at its base before, within double tressure of six arches broken at the king's neck, small trefoils in spandrels, surrounded by beaded inner circle. Mintmark, cross pattée in legend and two small crosses in spaces between words. The whole within beaded outer circle.
Reverse: + DnS PTECTOR MS ┼ LIBATOR MS (God is my protector and redeemer) / VILLA EDINBURGh. Long cross pattée dividing two concentric legends separated by two beaded circles into quarters, pierced mullet in each quarter of inner circle. Mintmark, cross pattée in outer legend. The whole within beaded outer circle.
Diameter: 28mm | Weight: 3.55gms | Die Axis: 6 | Class D, third (light) coinage
SPINK: 5125

David Bruce, Robert the Bruce's only surviving son, was King of Scotland for nearly 42 years, from 1329 until his death in 1371. David was born in 1324 when Bruce was aged 50 and at the age of four he was married to Joan, the seven year old sister of Edward III of England at a time when Robert the Bruce was trying to forge better relations with England. However David was only five years old when, in 1329, his father died, he was crowned as King David II at Scone on 24 November 1331, holding a small sceptre that had been specially made for him.
Edward Balliol, son of John Balliol, supported by a number of nobles who had been disinherited by Robert the Bruce, soon started a rebellion. In August 1332 at the Battle of Dupplin Moor, near Perth, Balliol defeated David's Regent, the Earl of Mar, and in September Balliol was crowned at Scone. He was soon deposed by the supporters of David II but, in 1333, after the Scottish army led by Archibald, Lord of Douglas, attacked Balliol and lost at the Battle of Halidon Hill, Balliol was restored to power. But this Scottish game of thrones continued for several more years, Balliol was deposed again in 1334 only to be restored in 1335. The young King David was driven into exile in France, but returned from there in 1341, and finally deposed Edward Balliol for the last time.
In 1346, responding to an appeal for help from France, David II invaded England. But, at the Battle of Neville's Cross, he was captured and remained a prisoner at the English court until 1357 when he was returned to Scotland on the promise of payment of a large ransom.
David II ruled with authority and trade increased during his rule. He continued to pursue the goal of a final peace with England and, at the time of his death, the Scottish monarchy was stronger, and the kingdom and the royal finances more prosperous than might have seemed possible.
David II died unexpectedly, in Edinburgh Castle, on 22 February 1371. He was buried in Holyrood Abbey. David II left no children and he was succeeded by his nephew, Robert II, the son of David's half-sister, Marjorie Bruce.
1 comments*AlexJan 26, 2020
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3 views*AlexJan 26, 2020
1180-1189_Henry_II_Penny_Short-cross.JPG
1154 - 1189, HENRY II, AR Short-cross Penny, Struck 1180 - 1189 at Winchester, England10 viewsObverse: HENRICVS • REX around central circle enclosing a crowned, draped and bearded facing bust of Henry II holding a sceptre tipped with a cross pommee in his right hand.
Reverse: + GOCELM • ON • WIN. Voided short cross dividing legend into quarters, crosslets in each quarter of inner circle. Cross pattée in legend. Moneyer: Gocelm, which is a name of Germanic Frankish origin.
Issue type Class 1b
Diameter: 19mm | Weight: 1.3gms | Die Axis: 6
SPINK: 1344

For the first few years of Henry II's reign the coins of King Stephen continued to be produced, but in 1158, in order to restore public confidence in the currency, a new 'cross and crosslet' or 'Tealby' coinage was introduced in England. While this coinage was acceptable in terms of weight and silver quality, it is notorious for its ugly appearance, bad craftsmanship and careless execution. The 'Tealby' issue continued until 1180 when the short-cross penny, a new style coin of much better workmanship, was introduced.

On the night of 14th/15th July 1180 the Winchester mint burnt down, and the fire spread to ‘the greater and better part’ of the city. The production of the new Short Cross coinage had just started earlier in 1180, and Winchester evidently only had one centralized mint building from the beginning of the new coinage. At the time of the fire the mint appears to have had four moneyers (Clement, Gocelm, Henri, and Rodbert), and Short Cross Class Ia2 was in production. After the fire some of the mint’s obverse dies of Classes Ia1 and Ia2 were used at the Wilton mint, apparently as an emergency measure. The coinage of the moneyer Henri ends abruptly at this time and he seems to have been replaced by Adam, whose known issues start in Class Ia2, and at Wilton in Class 1a2 it looks like Osbert replaced Iohan. Osbert continued to issue coins in Winchester after the fire, but he seems to have been regarded as a Wilton moneyer allowed to use the facilities of the Winchester mint. The Winchester coinage of Osbert and three other moneyers (Clement, Reinier, and Rodbert) whose issues end in Class Ib1 was probably restricted to the recoinage of 1180 to 1182. After that only two moneyers remained striking Class Ib2 at Winchester (Adam and Gocelm), and from 1183 to 1184 these moneyers were responsible for a rent of 2 marks each per annum for the use of the mint building.
1 comments*AlexJan 19, 2020
URBS_ROMA_Rome_RFQ.JPG
Struck A.D.330 - 331 under Constantine I. AE3 "URBS ROMA" COMMEMORATIVE ISSUE of Rome2 viewsObverse: VRBS ROMA. Helmeted and plumed bust of Roma facing left, two dots on helmet.
Reverse: No legend. She-wolf standing facing left, suckling Romulus and Remus; flower symbol on wolf's shoulder; above, two stars; in exergue, RFQ.
RIC VII : 338 (var)
SCARCE
1 comments*AlexJan 16, 2020
URBS_ROMA_Siscia.JPG
Struck A.D.334 - 335 under Constantine I. AE3 "URBS ROMA" COMMEMORATIVE ISSUE of Siscia0 viewsObverse: VRBS ROMA. Helmeted and plumed bust of Roma facing left, two dots on helmet.
Reverse: No legend. She-wolf standing facing left, suckling Romulus and Remus; above, two stars; in exergue, •ΓSIS•.
RIC VII : 240
*AlexJan 11, 2020
URBS_ROMA_SMANTHETA.JPG
Struck A.D.335 - 337 under Constantine I. AE3 "URBS ROMA" COMMEMORATIVE ISSUE of Antioch1 viewsObverse: VRBS ROMA. Helmeted and plumed bust of Roma facing left.
Reverse: No legend. She-wolf, flower symbol on shoulder, standing facing left, suckling Romulus and Remus; above, two stars; in exergue, SMANΘ.
Diameter: 16mm | Weight: 1.98gms
RIC VII : 113
*AlexJan 11, 2020
URBSROMA_SMALB.JPG
Struck A.D.337 - 340 under Constantine II, Constantius II and Constans. AE3 "URBS ROMA" COMMEMORATIVE ISSUE of Alexandria1 viewsObverse: VRBS ROMA. Helmeted and plumed bust of Roma facing left.
Reverse: No legend. She-wolf, two dots above it's head, standing facing left, suckling Romulus and Remus; above, S - R either side of two stars; in exergue, SMALB.
Diameter: 15.7mm | Weight: 1.88gms
RIC VIII : 8
*AlexJan 11, 2020
URBS_ROMA__Arelate_CONSA.JPG
Struck A.D.331 under Constantine I. AE3 "URBS ROMA" COMMEMORATIVE ISSUE of Arelate3 viewsObverse: VRBS ROMA. Helmeted and plumed bust of Roma facing left.
Reverse: No legend. She-wolf standing facing left, suckling Romulus and Remus; above, two stars, crescent between them; in exergue, SCONST.
RIC VII : 356
EXTREMELY RARE
*AlexJan 09, 2020
URBS_ROMA_Cyzicus_SMKDelta.JPG
Struck A.D.331 under Constantine I. AE3 "URBS ROMA" COMMEMORATIVE ISSUE of Cyzicus2 viewsObverse: VRBS ROMA. Helmeted and plumed bust of Roma facing left.
Reverse: No legend. She-wolf standing facing left, unclear symbol on shoulder, suckling Romulus and Remus; above, two stars; in exergue, SMKΔ.
RIC VII : 91
VERY RARE
*AlexJan 09, 2020

Random files - *Alex's Gallery
Loius_14_Copper_Jeton.JPG
Struck c.1650, Louis XIV (1643 – 1715), AE (Copper) Jeton6 viewsObverse: LVD•XIIII•D•G•FR•ET•NAV•REX. Laureate and draped youthful bust of Louis XIV facing right.
Reverse: IVSTIS•SPES•PACIS•IN ARMIS. Pax, helmeted, seated on a pile of arms, holding an olive branch in her outstretched right hand and a narrow cornucopia in her left.

Struck at unverified mint, probably Monnaie de Louvre, Paris, France
Die engraver: Jean Varin
Dimensions: 27.94mm | Weight: 6.8gms | Die Axis: 12
Ref. Feuardent: 12482 var.

Jean Varin (6 February 1604 Liège – 26 August 1672 Paris) was a French sculptor and engraver who made important innovations in the process of minting coins. He moved to Paris in 1625 or 1626 where, after demonstrating his talent as an engraver, he obtained the support of Cardinal Richelieu and in 1629 he was assigned as a “Conducteur de la Monnaie du Moulin”. In 1647 he was appointed head of the French mint, and became “engraver of the king's seal” and a member of the Academy of painting and sculpture. Varin brought back the use of the screw press in the mint, initially using it to produce a gold coin, the Louis d'or, which featured his youthful portrait of the King which is similar to that on this jeton.

This jeton, likely struck between 1650 and 1653, commemorates the signing of the Treaty of Münster between France and the Holy Roman Empire on 15 May 1648 which ended the Thirty Years War. France, to the detriment of the Holy Roman Empire, retained control of the bishoprics of Metz, Toul and Verdun near Lorraine as well as receiving the city of Pignerol near the Spanish Duchy of Milan and the cities of the Décapole in Alsace, excluding Strasbourg.
*Alex
DVPIO_ANT_TRDE.JPG
Struck A.D.249 - 251 by Trajan Decius. DIVUS ANTONINUS PIUS. Commemorative AR Antoninianus of Mediolanum. 10 viewsObverse: DIVO PIO. Radiate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO. Large altar.
Diameter: 23mm | Weight: 2.8gms | Die Axis: 11
RIC IV iii : 90
VERY RARE

This coin is one of a series of commemorative antoninianii of previous emperors believed to have been struck under Trajan Decius, although it has also been mooted that these coins may have been struck under Philip I in connection with the 1000th Anniversary of Rome. The other emperors commemorated in this series are Augustus, Vespasian, Titus, Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Marcus Aurelius, Commodus, Septimius Severus and Severus Alexander.

This particular coin was struck from a recently discovered die which has been registered on Joaquim Blay Detrell’s website. DIVI SERIES as die # AN61.
This coin is 90-175 and the obverse die is P069, documented for other coins which can be found in the database.
*Alex
Constans_Caes_Glor_Ex.JPG
Struck A.D.333 - 336. CONSTANS as Caesar. AE3 of Heraclea14 viewsObverse: CONSTANS IVN NOB C. Laureate and cuirassed bust of Constans facing right.
Reverse: GLORIA EXERCITVS. Two soldiers standing either side of two standards; in exergue, SMHB✱.
Weight: 2.7gms
RIC VII : 139
EXTREMELY RARE
1 comments*Alex