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Titus RIC-233
∆ As, 11.89g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., with branch and cornucopiae
RIC 233 (R3). BMC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, December 2018. Ex Hirsch 317, 18 February 2016, lot 2027. Ex Hirsch 249, 6 February 2007, lot 1851.

The various stock Pax types struck for Titus are general carry-overs from Vespasian's reign and are normally seen on Titus' sestertii and asses. This as features a rare variant of the standing Pax type. She is seen here holding a cornucopiae instead of the much more common variant with caduceus. This reverse type with AVGVST instead of AVGVSTI is also extremely rare - only one specimen was known when the new RIC II.1 was published.

Fine style portrait and a pleasing coppery tone.
File information
Filename:T233.jpg
Album name:David Atherton / Imperial Coinage of Titus
File Size:74 KB
Date added:Jan 02, 2019
Dimensions:900 x 435 pixels
Displayed:69 times
URL:http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-152171
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FlaviusDomitianus  [Jan 02, 2019 at 10:03 AM]
Congrats on acquiring such a great rarity!
Jay GT4  [Jan 02, 2019 at 01:25 PM]
Amazing
quadrans  [Jan 02, 2019 at 06:20 PM]
Great piece .
curtislclay  [Jan 02, 2019 at 11:03 PM]
RIC 233 quotes your coin from the photofile of the Numismatic Institute in Vienna, unfortunately without reproducing the picture and without naming the location of the coin itself, presumably in an auction catalogue or a public or private collection. Maybe the Institute photo is of your actual specimen, published for example in an earlier G. Hirsch catalogue, or maybe it's from the same rev. and/or obv. die if it's a different specimen.