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Home > Catalog > |Roman Coins| > |The Twelve Caesars| > |Vespasian| > SH32529
Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.
Ephesus peaked during the 1st and 2nd century A.D. when it was second in importance and size only to Rome, with a population estimated at 400,000 to 500,000 in 100 A.D. The city was famous for the Temple of Artemis, the Library of Celsus, and its theater, seating 25,000 spectators. Ephesus also had several large bath complexes and one of the most advanced aqueduct systems in the ancient world. Water powered numerous mills, one of which has been identified as a sawmill for marble. The city and temple were destroyed by the Goths in 263 A.D., marking the decline of the city's splendor.
SH32529. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 1428; RPC II 830; RSC II 67; BMCRE II 453; BnF III 343; SRCV I 2269, VF, Ephesus mint, weight 3.110g, maximum diameter 17.0mm, die axis 180o, 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P, laureate head right; reverse CONCORDIA AVG (harmony of the Emperor), Concordia (or Ceres) seated left on high-backed throne, feet on footstool, two stalks of grain and a poppy in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, EPHE (PHE ligate) in exergue; excellent reverse in unusual style; scarce; SOLD











Catalog current as of Tuesday, October 22, 2019.
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