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   View Categories Home > Catalog > |Greek Coins| > |Geographic - All Periods| > |Greece| > |Illyria| > RP13275
Dyrrhachion, Illyria, Greece, Roman Protectorate, 229 - 30 B.C.
|Illyria|, |Dyrrhachion,| |Illyria,| |Greece,| |Roman| |Protectorate,| |229| |-| |30| |B.C.|, Durrės, one of the oldest cities in Albania, was founded as Epidamnos in 627 B.C. by Greek colonists from Corinth and Corcyra, modern-day Corfu. Located around a natural rocky harbor surrounded by inland swamps and high cliffs on the seaward side, the city was difficult to attack from land or sea. After the decisive defeat of the Illyrians to Rome in 229 B.C., the new Roman rulers renamed the city Dyrrachium because Epidamnos is similar to the Latin word damnum, meaning "loss" or "harm." Dyrrhachion is Greek for "bad spine" or "difficult ridge," probably referring to the imposing cliffs near the city. Dyrrachium prospered under Roman rule and was developed as a naval and military base. Pompey made a stand there in 48 B.C. before fleeing south to Greece. Augustus made the city a colony for veterans of his legions following the Battle of Actium, proclaiming it a civitas libera (free town).
RP13275. Silver drachm, Ceka 318; BMC Thessaly, p 68, 41; SNG Cop 476 var., F, Dyrrhachium (Durrės, Albania) mint, weight 2.758g, maximum diameter 17.3mm, die axis 225o, 229 - 30 B.C.; obverse MENIΣKOΣ, cow right, head turned back toward suckling calf left, rudder in exergue; reverse ∆YP - AP-XIΠ−ΠOY, double stellate pattern within double linear square with sides curved inward; SOLD











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