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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Greek Imperial| ▸ |Thrace||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Provincial Coins from Thrace

Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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In 279 B.C., Ptolemy Keraunos, the son of Ptolemy I, was captured and killed by Galatian Celts who overran Thrace and established a Celtic kingdom at Tylis. Mesembria, Odessos, Kallatis, and Istros, later followed by Cabyle, Dionysopolis and Tomis began striking gold and silver coins in the name of Alexander the Great along with autonomous civic bronze coinage. Much of the silver and gold coinage was likely needed to pay tribute to the new Celtic rulers of the hinterland until the destruction of the Kingdom of Tylis, c. 218 B.C.
SH32292. Gold stater, Price 898 var. (monogram; cf. Price 927 tetradrachm), EF, high relief, bold, mint luster and a rare variety, small scratch on reverse, weight 8.443 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, c. 250 - 225 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse Nike standing half left, wreath in extended right, stylus in left, KAΛ monogram to left, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; SOLD


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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Lysimachus, one of Alexander the Great's personal bodyguards, was appointed strategos (general) in Thrace and the Chersonesos after Alexander's death. He became one of the diadochi (successors of Alexander) who were initially generals and governors, but who continuously allied and warred with each other and eventually divided the empire. In 309, he founded his capital Lysimachia in a commanding situation on the neck connecting the Chersonesos with the mainland. In 306, he followed the example of Antigonus in taking the title of king, ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. In 281, he was killed in battle against Seleucus, another successor of Alexander.
SH09059. Gold stater, Thompson 164, EF, weight 8.50 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesus mint, posthumous, 305 - 297 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great right wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena seated left, resting elbow on shield and holding Victory, bee and E-Φ in left field; struck with beautiful dies, mint luster!; SOLD


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Philippopolis, Thrace

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Nomos described this coin as, "An extraordinary piece, especially with remains of its original silver plating. Some marks from cleaning, otherwise, about extremely fine."
SH85458. Bronze medallion, okatassarion or quinarius; SNG Cop 784; Varbanov III 1721 (R8); Mionnet I, p. 419, 358 (R6); Mouchmov 5428 (all same dies), aEF, cleaning marks, areas of light corrosion, weight 38.718 g, maximum diameter 40.8 mm, die axis 15o, Philippopolis mint, 218 - 222 A.D.; obverse AYT K M AYPΛ ANTΩNEINOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed three-quarter length bust of Elagabalus left; reverse MHTPOΠOΛEΩC ΦIΛIΠΠOΠOΛEΩC NEΩ KOPOY, youthful Herakles standing left, nude but for lion's skin draped around his left forearm, resting his right hand on the handle of a club set on the ground and holding an apple in his left hand; big 40.8mm bronze!, ex Nomos AG, auction 10 (18 May 2015), lot 115 (realized approximately $4686 including buyers fee); extremely rare; SOLD


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Judea Capta

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SH58765. Orichalcum semis, RIC II 504, Hendin 1598, Cohen I 112, BMCRE II 259 (notes mint uncertain), BnF III 275 (Rome), RPC II -, gF, weight 4.116 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain eastern (Thracian?) mint, 80 - 81 A.D.; obverse IMP T CAESAR DIVI VESPAS F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IVD - CAP / S - C across fields, palm tree, flanked by a mourning Jewess captive seated left to the left, helmet and yoke to the right; ex Ancient Imports (Marc Breitsprecher); rare; SOLD


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Odessos, Moesia Inferior

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As first noticed by von Sallet in the Berlin Catalogue, the obverse die of this coin was also used to strike medallions for Marcianopolis and Tomis (see AMNG Marcianopolis 1098 note).
SH85459. Bronze medallion, hexassarion; Varbanov 4434 (R8, same dies), AMNG I/II 2315 (4 specimens), EF, nice dark green patina, well centered on a broad flan, marks and scratches, weight 25.655 g, maximum diameter 36.8 mm, die axis 180o, Odessos (Varna, Bulgaria) mint, 29 Jul 238 - 25 Feb 244 A.D.; obverse AVT K M ANT ΓOP∆-IANOC AVΓ, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust left, almost half-length, seen from front, raising right hand in greeting, globe in left hand; reverse O∆HC-C-EITON, On the left, Hygeia standing right, holding phiale in her left hand from which she feeds snake held in her right; to right, Asklepios standing left, holding serpent-entwined staff in his right hand; ex Stack's NYINC auction (9 Jan 2015), lot 261; ex Heritage Long Beach Signature Sale (25 Sep 2013), lot 23297; ex Heritage-Gemini VIII (14 Apr 2011), lot 406; SOLD


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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Thompson notes that Pyrrhus held Pella until 286 B.C. It was one of the last, if not the last, mint opened by Lysimachos. Twenty-six obverse dies are known for the tetradrachms.
GS56901. Silver tetradrachm, Thompson 252, Müller 473, Choice VF, weight 17.246 g, maximum diameter 29.8 mm, die axis 315o, Pella mint, 286 - 281 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great right, wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena seated left on prow, Nike crowning name in extended right hand, resting left arm on shield behind, transverse spear against right side, monogram under arm, K under throne; ex Stack's, Bowers and Ponterio NYINC Auction 2012, lot 200; SOLD


Celts, Boii in Bohemia, Devil, Mid 1st Century B.C.

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The Boii first appear in history in connection with the Gallic invasion of north Italy, 390 B.C., when they made the Etruscan city of Felsina their new capital, Bononia (Bologna). They were defeated by Rome at the Battle of Mutina in 193 and their territory became part of the Roman province of Cisalpine Gaul. According to Strabo, writing two centuries after the events, rather than being destroyed by the Romans like their Celtic neighbors, "the Boii were merely driven out of the regions they occupied; and after migrating to the regions round about the Ister, lived with the Taurisci, and carried on war against the Daci until they perished, tribe and all - and thus they left their country, which was a part of Illyria, to their neighbors as a pasture-ground for sheep." The new Boian capital was a fortified town on the site of modern Bratislava, Slovakia, which is where minted their silver coins. Around 60 B.C., a group of Boians joined the Helvetians' ill-fated attempt to conquer land in western Gaul and were defeated by Julius Caesar, along with their allies, in the battle of Bibracte. Caesar settled the remnants of that group in Gorgobina, from where they sent two thousand to Vercingetorix's aid at the battle of Alesia six years later. The eastern Boians on the Danube were incorporated into the Roman Empire in 8 A.D. Devil is presumably the name of a king.
SH56021. Silver tetradrachm, Lanz 76, Paulsen 782 ff., Forrer Keltische pl. XXXVIII, 550, De la Tour 10163, Allen-Nash -, F, weight 16.322 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 45o, Slovakia, Bratislava mint, obverse beardless male head right with short; reverse bear(?) walking right on ground line, DEVIL in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Perinthus, Thrace

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In 46 A.D., after the death of the Thracian king Rhoemetalces III and after an unsuccessful anti-Roman revolt, the Thracian Kingdom was annexed by Claudius as the Roman province of Thracia. Perinthus was made the capital of Roman Thracia. All the Latin coins of Perinthus are rare. BMC does not list Perinthus mint, but identifies this type as "barbarous." RIC notes the existence of Balkan sestertii, dupondii, and asses but does not catalog them.
SH30710. Copper as, RPC I Supp. S-1760a, VF/F, fantastic portrait, weight 11.846 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 45o, Heraclea Perinthos (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, obverse NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG, laureate head right; reverse Neptune standing half left, dolphin in right, long vertical trident in left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; very rare; SOLD


Kingdom of Bosporus, Eupator, 154 - 170 A.D.

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SH17753. Electrum stater, MacDonald Bosporus 474/3; BMC Pontus p. 65, 8 (Lucius Verus), Choice gVF, weight 7.740 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, Pantikapaion (Kerch, Crimea) mint, 67/8 A.D; obverse BACILEΩC EVΠATOPOC, diademed bust of Eupator right; reverse laureate head of Marcus Aurelius right; star before, ∆ZY below; a few light scrapes; SOLD


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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Lysimachus, one of Alexander the Great's personal bodyguards, was appointed strategos (general) in Thrace and the Chersonesos after Alexander's death. He became one of the diadochi (successors of Alexander) who were initially generals and governors, but who continuously allied and warred with each other and eventually divided the empire. In 309, he founded his capital Lysimachia in a commanding situation on the neck connecting the Chersonesos with the mainland. In 306, he followed the example of Antigonus in taking the title of king, ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. In 281, he was killed in battle against Seleucus, another successor of Alexander.
SH58576. Silver tetradrachm, Thompson 163, Müller -, VF, weight 16.631 g, maximum diameter 30.6 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, c. 297 - 281 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena enthroned left, holding Nike crowning name with wreath in right hand, resting left arm on shield at side, transverse spear behind, wreath outer left, Σ exergue; ex ACCG Benefit Auction, Aug 2008, lot 21; ex Freeman and Sear; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Corpus Nummorum Thracorum - http://www.corpus-nummorum.eu/
Imhoof-Blumer, F. ed. Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands. (Berlin, 1898 - 1913).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Mionnet, T. Description de Médailles antiques grecques et romaines. (Paris, 1806-1837).
Mouchmov, N. Antichnitie Moneti na Balkanskitiia Poluostrov i Monetite Tsare. (1912).
Poole, R. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
Roman Provincial Coinage Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Austria, Klagenfurt, Landesmuseum für Kärnten, Sammlung Dreer, Part 3: Thracien-Macedonien-Päonien. (Klagenfurt, 1990).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 2: Taurische Chersones-Korkyra. (Berlin, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain VII, Manchester University Museum. (London, 1986).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IX, British Museum, Part 1: The Black Sea. (London, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XI, The William Stancomb Collection of Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Oxford, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, United States, The Collection of the ANS, Part 7: Macedonia 1 (Cities, Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Paeonian kings). (New York, 1997).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume II: Thrace (from Abdera to Pautalia). (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume III: Thrace (from Perinthus to Trajanopolis), Chersonesos Thraciae, Insula Thraciae, Macedonia. (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2007).

Catalog current as of Monday, October 14, 2019.
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Roman Thrace