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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Budget & Wholesale ▸ Under $50View Options:  |  |  |     

Coins and Antiquities Under $50

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Roman Republic, Lead Glandes Sling-Bullet, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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According to the contemporary report of Vegatius, Republican slingers had an accurate range of up to six hundred feet. The best sling ammunition was cast from lead. For a given mass, lead, being very dense, offered the minimum size and therefore minimum air resistance. Also, lead sling-bullets were small and difficult to see in flight. In some cases, the lead would be cast in a simple open mold made by pushing a finger, thumb, or sharpened stick into sand and pouring molten metal into the hole. The flat top end could later be carved to a matching shape. More frequently, they were cast in two-part molds. Sling-bullets were made in a variety of shapes including an ellipsoidal form closely resembling an acorn; possibly the origin of the Latin word for lead sling-bullet: glandes plumbeae (literally leaden acorns) or simply glandes (meaning acorns, singular glans). The most common shape by far was biconical, resembling the shape of an almond or an American football. Why the almond shape was favored is unknown. Possibly there was some aerodynamic advantage, but it seems equally likely that there was a more prosaic reason, such as the shape being easy to extract from a mold, or that it will rest in a sling cradle with little danger of rolling out. Almond-shaped lead sling-bullets were typically about 35 millimeters (1.4 in) long and about 20 millimeters (0.8 in) wide. Sometimes symbols or writings were molded on the side. A thunderbolt, a snake, a scorpion, or others symbols indicating how it might strike without warning were popular. Writing might include the name of the military unit or commander, or was sometimes more imaginative, such as, "Take this," "Ouch," "Catch," or even "For Pompey's backside."
AW66458. Lead glandes sling-bullet; cf. Petrie XLIV 15-23; roughly biconical, without symbols or inscriptions, c. 40 - 90 grams, c. 3 - 5 cm long, one sling-bullet randomly selected from the same group as those in the photo, ONE BULLET, BARGAIN PRICED!; $24.00 (20.40)


Phoenician (Palistinian Workshop), 4 Stamped Glass Votive Fragments, 1st Century B.C. - 1st Century A.D.

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From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years.

These votive pieces were made to be ritually broken before offering in the altar of the god or distribution in fields for fertility or under building foundations for good fortune. They are almost always found broken.
AA32416. 4 glass votive stamped fragements, partial images of male god; $45.00 (38.25)


Danubian Celts, Serdi Region, Moesia, 168 - 31 B.C.

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Celtic imitative of a rare Macedonian issue struck under Philip V or Perseus, 187 - 168 B.C. The choice was appropriate for the Serdi Celts as the river Strymon runs through the Serdi region.
CE46721. Bronze AE 18, Malloy Danubian Celts type H5G; imitative of a Macedonian Kingdom (Philip V or Perseus) type, 187 - 168 B.C., SNG Cop 1299, F, blue-green patina, brassy high points, overstruck(?), weight 3.373 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, obverse reed-wreathed head of the river god Strymon right; reverse trident head, bar across near base of prongs, no inscription or symbols; scarce; $45.00 (38.25)


Thracians, Odrysian Kingdom, Early 5th - Middle 4th Century B.C.

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A Gorgoneion was a horror-creating apotropaic Gorgon head pendant. The name derives from the Greek word gorgs, which means "dreadful." The Gorgons were three sisters who had hair of living, venomous snakes, and a horrifying face that turned those who saw it to stone. Stheno and Euryale were immortal, but their sister Medusa was not, and was slain by Perseus. Zeus, Athena, Hellenistic kings and Roman emperors wore Gorgoneion for protection. Images of the Gorgons were also put upon objects and buildings for protection. A Gorgon image is at the center of the pediment of the temple at Corfu, the oldest stone pediment in Greece from about 600 B.C.
GA47658. Silver hemidrachm, Topalov Thrace p. 230, 55, aF, crude, worn dies, weight 2.761 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, Thracian, Greek city or tribal mint, early 5th - middle 4th century B.C.; obverse facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion); reverse incuse square containing angles in each corner forming a cruciform pattern, with pellet in center; ex Alex G. Malloy; $45.00 (38.25)


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

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In 291, Diocletian signed peace treaties with the kingdoms of Aksum and Nubia.
RA51543. Billon antoninianus, Bastien pl. XXIII, 323a (same obverse die, 39 spec.); RIC V-2 28; Cohen VI 153; Hunter IV 33 var. (bust), VF, weight 2.785 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 290 - 291 A.D.; obverse IMP DIOCLETIANVS AVG, radiate and mantled bust left, holding eagle-tipped scepter; reverse IOVI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, victory in right, leaning on long scepter in left hand, eagle at feet left, A in exergue; ex Harlan J. Berk; $45.00 (38.25) ON RESERVE


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

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After Apollo insulted him, Eros (cupid) shot Apollo with an arrow that caused him to fall in hopeless love with Daphne, a mortal woman. Eros shot Daphne with an arrow which made her incapable of loving Apollo. Nevertheless Apollo pursued her, and out of desperation Daphne escaped by having herself turned into a laurel. Ever after, winners of the games to honor Apollo wore wreaths of laurel in honor of Apollo's Daphne.
RB55439. Bronze sestertius, RIC IV SA694, BMCRE VI SA190, Cohen IV 62, SRCV II 8232, aVF, weight 20.624 g, maximum diameter 31.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 224 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right; reverse VENERI FELICI, Venus standing facing, head right, long scepter vertical in right hand, cupid seated facing her in her left hand, cupid is naked, winged and extends his hands toward her, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $45.00 (38.25)


Tarsos, Cilicia, c. 380 - 360 B.C.

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In historical times, Tarsos was first ruled by the Hittites, followed by Assyria, and then the Persian Empire. Tarsus, as the principal town of Cilicia, was the seat of a Persian satrapy from 400 B.C. onward. Indeed, Xenophon records that in 401 B.C., when Cyrus the Younger marched against Babylon, the city was governed by King Syennesis in the name of the Persian monarch. Alexander the Great passed through with his armies in 333 B.C. and nearly met his death here after a bath in the Cydnus. By this time Tarsus was already largely influenced by Greek language and culture, and as part of the Seleucid Empire it became more and more Hellenized. Strabo praises the cultural level of Tarsus in this period with its philosophers, poets and linguists. The schools of Tarsus rivaled those of Athens and Alexandria.
GS58069. Silver obol, SNG BnF 310 - 311, SNG Levante 217 - 218, F, weight 0.458 g, maximum diameter 10.0 mm, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, obverse uncertain female head facing slightly left; reverse bust of Aphrodite right, wearing tainia; $45.00 (38.25)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Kyrenaica, Ptolemy IX Soter II (Lathyros), 116 - 110 B.C.

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After Ptolemy VIII died in 116 B.C., Cleopatra III ruled with her mother Cleopatra II and son Ptolemy IX. In 110 B.C., she replaced Ptolemy IX as co-regent with her second son Ptolemy X. Ptolemy IX regained the throne in 109 but was again replaced in 107 B.C. In 101 B.C., Ptolemy X had his mother Cleopatra III murdered and then ruled alone or with his niece and wife, Berenice III.
GP59568. Bronze hemiobol, Svoronos 1718; Buttrey Cyrene 361 ff., SNG Cop 678; Weiser 169 (Alexandria); BMC Ptolemies p. 107, 42 ff.; SNG Milan 527 (Cyprus); Noeske -, VF, weight 4.057 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Kyrene (near Shahhat, Libya) mint, 116 - 110 B.C.; obverse horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, filleted double cornucopia with two stars above, Σ − Ω / Θ − E in field; $45.00 (38.25)


Kingdom of Persis, Second Unknown King, 1st Century A.D.

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Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS63290. Silver diobol, BMC Arabia p. 227, 11; cf. Tyler-Smith, type 2, 220 -221 (obol); Alram IP 622 (obol); Sunrise 650 (obol), VF, obverse rough, tight flan, weight 1.018 g, maximum diameter 12.4 mm, die axis 45o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, End of 1st Century A.D.; obverse bearded, draped bust left, wearing turreted crown and diadem, bushy hair; reverse diadem, formally presented with two ties laid across center; $45.00 (38.25)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

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The reverse may commemorate Gallienus' victory over the Alemanni at Milan in 259 A.D.
RA64633. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 872d, RIC V-1 J18 (Lugdunum), RSC IV 308 (Lugdunum), SRCV III 10225, VF, weight 3.239 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 258 - 259 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GERMANICVS MAX V, two captives seated back-to-back flanking the foot of a trophy of captured arms, their arms tied behind their backs; scarce; $45.00 (38.25)




    



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Under $50