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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Under $50||View Options:  |  |  |   

Coins and Antiquities Under $50

Coins are listed from highest |price| to lowest. If you are a serious bargain hunter, click the last page first and move backwards to the first page.


Constantine Era Bronze Coin in Plastic Holder, 307 - 364 A.D.

|Under| |$50|, |Constantine| |Era| |Bronze| |Coin| |in| |Plastic| |Holder,| |307| |-| |364| |A.D.|, coin
The coin in the photo is randomly selected example, not the actual coin you will receive.
SL35619. Bronze coin, Constantine and his family, in plastic holder, Fine or better, no grades on holders, one coin; $2.90 SALE |PRICE| $2.61


Roman Republic, Lead Glandes Sling-Bullet, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Lead| |Glandes| |Sling| |Bullets|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Lead| |Glandes| |Sling-Bullet,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|,
According to the contemporary report of Vegatius, Republican slingers had an accurate range of up to six hundred feet. The best sling ammunition was cast from lead. For a given mass, lead, being very dense, offered the minimum size and therefore minimum air resistance. Also, lead sling-bullets were small and difficult to see in flight. In some cases, the lead would be cast in a simple open mold made by pushing a finger, thumb, or sharpened stick into sand and pouring molten metal into the hole. The flat top end was carved to a matching point after the lead cooled. More frequently, they were cast in two-part molds. Sling-bullets were made in a variety of shapes including an ellipsoidal form closely resembling an acorn; possibly the origin of the Latin word for lead sling-bullet: glandes plumbeae (literally leaden acorns) or simply glandes (meaning acorns, singular glans). The most common shape by far was biconical, resembling the shape of an almond or an American football. Why the almond shape was favored is unknown. Possibly there was some aerodynamic advantage, but it seems equally likely that there was a more prosaic reason, such as the shape being easy to extract from a mold, or that it will rest in a sling cradle with little danger of rolling out. Almond-shaped lead sling-bullets were typically about 35 millimeters (1.4 in) long and about 20 millimeters (0.8 in) wide. Sometimes symbols or writings were molded on the side. A thunderbolt, a snake, a scorpion, or others symbols indicating how it might strike without warning were popular. Writing might include the name of the military unit or commander, or was sometimes more imaginative, such as, "Take this," "Ouch," "Catch," or even "For Pompey's backside."
AW66458. Lead glandes sling-bullet; cf. Petrie XLIV 15-23; roughly biconical, without symbols or inscriptions, c. 40 - 90 grams, c. 3 - 5 cm long, one sling-bullet randomly selected from the same group as those in the photo, ONE BULLET, BARGAIN PRICED!; $20.00 SALE |PRICE| $18.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 152 - 145 B.C., Apameia Civic Coinage

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |I| |Balas,| |152| |-| |145| |B.C.,| |Apameia| |Civic| |Coinage|, AE 17
This rare civic coinage type, without the portrait of the Seleukid King, was only issued for one year, 150 - 149 B.C.

Apameia was on the right bank of the Orontes River, about 55 km (34 mi) to the northwest of Hama, Syria, overlooking the Ghab valley. Originally named Pharmake, it was fortified and enlarged by Seleucus I Nicator in 300 B.C., who renamed it after his Bactrian wife, Apama. The fortress was placed upon a hill; the windings of the Orontes, with the lake and marshes, gave it a peninsular form. Seleucus had his commissariat there with 500 elephants, 30,000 mares, and 300 stallions. The pretender, Diodotus Tryphon, made Apameia the basis of his operations. Located at a strategic crossroads for Eastern commerce, the city flourished to the extent that its population eventually numbered half a million. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis, boasted one of the largest theaters in the Roman world, and a monumental colonnade.
Great Colonnade at Apamea
GB59706. Bronze AE 17, BMC Galatia p. 233, 1, Lindgren-Kovacs 2029, Cohen DCA 134, VF, green patina with red earthen highlighting, obverse off center, scratches, edge crack, weight 4.278 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 0o, Syria, Apameia (Qalaat al-Madiq, Syria) mint, 150 - 149 B.C.; obverse turreted and veiled bust of Tyche right; reverse AΠAMEΩN, warrior advancing left, looking back right, extending right hand, spear and shield in left, ΓΞP (year 163 of Seleucid Era) left; rare; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Armenian Kingdom, Tigranes II the Great, 95 - 55 B.C.

|Armenian| |Kingdom|, |Armenian| |Kingdom,| |Tigranes| |II| |the| |Great,| |95| |-| |55| |B.C.|, four chalci
Tigranes was called "Tigranes the Great" by Plutarch. The "King of Kings" never appeared in public without having four kings attending him. At its height, Tigranes' empire extended from the Pontic Alps to Mesopotamia and from the Caspian to the Mediterranean. In 83 B.C., the Syrians offered him the crown and after conquering Phoenicia and Cilicia, he effectively ended the Seleucid Empire. His southern border reached as far as Akko-Ptolemais. The first Armenian ruler to issue coins, he adopted the Seleucid tradition and struck coins at Antioch and Damascus during his occupation of Syria from 83 to 69 B.C. In 66 B.C., Pompey advanced into Armenia with Tigranes' own son as an ally. Tigranes, now almost 75 years old, surrendered. Pompey treated him generously and returned part of his kingdom in return for 6,000 talents of silver. His unfaithful son was sent back to Rome as a prisoner. Tigranes continued to rule Armenia as an ally of Rome until his death in 55 B.C.
SH66375. Bronze four chalci, cf. Nercessian 84; Bedoukian CCA 119; BMC Seleucid p. 104, 12 (half chalkous); SNG Cop -, aF, weight 9.332 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus(?) mint, c. 83 - 69 B.C.; obverse head of Tigranes I right wearing five-pointed Armenian tiara, A behind; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ TIΓPANOY, Nike advancing left, wreath in extended right, left hand on hip, uncertain letters outer left; ex Gianni Aiello Collection; rare; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Mygissos, Caria, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

|Other| |Caria|, |Mygissos,| |Caria,| |c.| |350| |-| |300| |B.C.|, chalkous
Many Greek cities had names beginning MY, and this type has been attributed to many of them. Mygissos is most likely correct because nearby Nisyros issued coins with a very similar reverse with NI above the dolphin.
GB67788. Bronze chalkous, SNG MŁnchen 335 (MY...), SNG Cop 1022 (Myus), SNGvA 2114 (Myus), SNG TŁb 3115 (Myus), SNG Keckman 235 (Myndos?), SNG Kayhan 847 (Myndos), F, weight 1.655 g, maximum diameter 11.1 mm, die axis 0o, Mygissos mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Poseidon right; reverse dolphin right, MY above, trident right below; very rare; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Mesembria, Thrace, 300 - 250 B.C.

|Mesembria|, |Mesembria,| |Thrace,| |300| |-| |250| |B.C.|, AE 20
The wheel on the reverse is depicted with a degree of perspective, which is unusual on ancient coins.
GB68697. Bronze AE 20, SNG Stancomb 229, SNG Cop 658, SNG BM 276 var. (helmet left), VF, green patina, weight 4.348 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 90o, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, 300 - 250 B.C.; obverse Thracian helmet with cheek guard right; reverse wheel with hub, METAM/BPIANΩN (T = archaic Greek letter sampi = ΣΣ) above and below; ex Pecunem Gitbud & Naumann, auction 7, lot 49; rare; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Syracuse, Sicily, Agathokles, 317 - 289 B.C.

|Syracuse|, |Syracuse,| |Sicily,| |Agathokles,| |317| |-| |289| |B.C.|, trias
Although Agathocles was brutal in pursuit of power, afterward he was a mild and popular "tyrant." His grandest goal was to establish democracy as the dominant form of government for the world. He did not want his sons to succeed him as king and restored the Syracusan democracy on his death bed.
GB69177. Bronze trias, Calciati II p. 247, 118; SNG MŁnchen 1255 ff.; SNG ANS 752; SNG Cop 776; BMC Sicily p. 198, 414; SGCV I 1204; HGC 2 1509 (S), aVF, smoothing, weight 1.880 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 45o, Syracuse mint, c. 308 - 307 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena left, wearing ornamented Corinthian helmet; reverse ΣYPAK/OΣIΩN, thunderbolt; scarce; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

|Gordian| |III|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.|, sestertius
Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. Emperors frequently made vows to Jupiter for protection. The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored emperors and kings, those in positions of authority similar to his own.
RB76165. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 298a, Cohen V 111, Hunter III 134, SRCV III 8710, VF, nice green patina, excellent portrait, reverse double struck, flan cracks, incomplete cleaning, weight 20.980 g, maximum diameter 30.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 241 - 243 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse IOVI STATORI (to Jove who upholds), Jupiter standing facing, head right, naked, long scepter vertical in right hand, thunderbolt in left hand at side, S - C divided across field; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Berytus, Phoenicia

|Phoenicia|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Berytus,| |Phoenicia|, AE 26
The ceremonial founding of a new Roman colony included plowing a furrow, the pomerium, a sacred boundary, around the site of the new city.

Rouvier notes that this type is very often incorrectly attributed to earlier emperors as the legend is frequently missing and the portrait resembles those of Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nerva.
RP84807. Bronze AE 26, Sawaya cf. 540 (D98/-, unlisted reverse die); RPC Online III 3832 (23 spec.); BMC Phoenicia p. 64, 814; SNG Cop 95; Baramki AUB 52; Rouvier 520, F, tight flan, reverse slightly off center, weight 14.082 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 0o, Berytus (Beirut, Lebanon) mint, 98 - 102 A.D.; obverse IMP NER TRAIAN CAES - AVG GERM P P, laureate head right; reverse ēCOL / IVL - AVG - FEL - BERē (Colonia Julia Augusta Felix Berytus, FEL is upside down in exergue), veiled founder-priest plowing right with two oxen, plowing sacred pomerium around city; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Neopaphos, Cyprus, Cleopatra VII(?), c. 51 - 30 B.C.

|Cyprus|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Neopaphos,| |Cyprus,| |Cleopatra| |VII(?),| |c.| |51| |-| |30| |B.C.|, hemiobol
While not noted in Svoronos, this type is fairly common on Cyprus and many have been found in the excavations at Neopaphos. The lack of a central depression indicates they were struck after 96 B.C. Recent Cypriot numismatic publications date them to the time when Cleopatra VII of Egypt was the ruler of the island.
GP84819. Bronze hemiobol, Bank of Cyprus 69; Paphos II 469 ff.; Hosking 68; Cox Curium 128; Michaelidou 35; Svoronos -; Weiser -; SNG Cop -; RPC I -, VF, dark patina, irregular flan with edge split, light corrosion, weight 2.763 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 0o, Neopaphos mint, c. 51 - 30 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse statue of Zeus Salaminios standing left, stalks of grain in right hand, long scepter in left hand, star above; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00




  



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Catalog current as of Saturday, February 22, 2020.
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Under $50