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Coins and Antiquities Under $50

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Coin Hoards From Roman Britain Volume XI

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The eleventh volume, is dedicated to finds of Roman hoards from the early imperial period (with terminal dates up to AD 235) discovered between 1997 and 2001. The highlight of the volume is the Shapwick Villa (Somerset) hoard of over 9,000 denarii, the largest hoard of its kind from Britain to be fully published. It is complemented by an important essay on hoards of the Severan period from Britain by Richard Abdy and Roger Bland.
BK10551. Coin Hoards From Roman Britain Volume XI edited by Richard Abdy, Ian Leins, and Jonathan Williams, Royal Numismatic Society Special Publication No. 36, 2002, 223 pages, 10 plates, new, shelf-worn; $35.00 SALE PRICE $31.50


Roman Republic, Lead Glandes Sling-Bullet, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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According to the contemporary report of Vegatius, Republican slingers had an accurate range of up to six hundred feet. The best sling ammunition was cast from lead. For a given mass, lead, being very dense, offered the minimum size and therefore minimum air resistance. Also, lead sling-bullets were small and difficult to see in flight. In some cases, the lead would be cast in a simple open mold made by pushing a finger, thumb, or sharpened stick into sand and pouring molten metal into the hole. The flat top end could later be carved to a matching shape. More frequently, they were cast in two-part molds. Sling-bullets were made in a variety of shapes including an ellipsoidal form closely resembling an acorn; possibly the origin of the Latin word for lead sling-bullet: glandes plumbeae (literally leaden acorns) or simply glandes (meaning acorns, singular glans). The most common shape by far was biconical, resembling the shape of an almond or an American football. Why the almond shape was favored is unknown. Possibly there was some aerodynamic advantage, but it seems equally likely that there was a more prosaic reason, such as the shape being easy to extract from a mold, or that it will rest in a sling cradle with little danger of rolling out. Almond-shaped lead sling-bullets were typically about 35 millimeters (1.4 in) long and about 20 millimeters (0.8 in) wide. Sometimes symbols or writings were molded on the side. A thunderbolt, a snake, a scorpion, or others symbols indicating how it might strike without warning were popular. Writing might include the name of the military unit or commander, or was sometimes more imaginative, such as, "Take this," "Ouch," "Catch," or even "For Pompey's backside."
AW66458. Lead glandes sling-bullet; cf. Petrie XLIV 15-23; roughly biconical, c. 40 - 90 grams, c. 3 - 5 cm long, one sling-bullet randomly selected from the same group as those in the photo, ONE BULLET, BARGAIN PRICED!; $24.00 SALE PRICE $21.60


Ptolemaic Kyrenaica, Ptolemy III Euergetes - Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon), 246 - 116 B.C.

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Alexander the Great received tribute from the cities of Kyrenaica after he took Egypt. Kyrenaica was annexed by Ptolemy I Soter. It briefly gained independence under Magas of Cyrene, stepson of Ptolemy I, but was reabsorbed into the Ptolemaic empire after his death. It was separated from the main kingdom by Ptolemy VIII and given to his son Ptolemy Apion, who, dying without heirs in 96 B.C., bequeathed it to the Roman Republic.
GP65950. Bronze AE 12, Svoronos 874 (Ptolemy II, 1 specimen), cf. SNG Cop 445 (Ptolemy III), Weiser 105 (Ptolemy V), Noeske 130 (Ptolemy III), SNG Milan 484 (uncertain date), VF, weight 0.881 g, maximum diameter 12.0 mm, die axis 0o, Kyrene mint, 246 - 116 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis; reverse head of Libya right, wearing tainia, cornucopia below chin; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


Danubian Celts, Serdi Region, Moesia, 168 - 31 B.C.

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Celtic imitative of a rare Macedonian issue struck under Philip V or Perseus, 187 - 168 B.C. The choice was appropriate for the Serdi Celts as the river Strymon runs through the Serdi region.
CE46721. Bronze AE 18, Malloy Danubian Celts type H5G; imitative of a Macedonian Kingdom (Philip V or Perseus) type, 187 - 168 B.C., SNG Cop 1299, F, blue-green patina, brassy high points, overstruck(?), weight 3.373 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, obverse reed-wreathed head of the river god Strymon right; reverse trident head, bar across near base of prongs, no inscription or symbols; scarce; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Thracians, Odrysian Kingdom, Early 5th - Middle 4th Century B.C.

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A Gorgoneion was a horror-creating apotropaic Gorgon head pendant. The name derives from the Greek word gorgs, which means "dreadful." The Gorgons were three sisters who had hair of living, venomous snakes, and a horrifying face that turned those who saw it to stone. Stheno and Euryale were immortal, but their sister Medusa was not, and was slain by Perseus. Zeus, Athena, Hellenistic kings and Roman emperors wore Gorgoneion for protection. Images of the Gorgons were also put upon objects and buildings for protection. A Gorgon image is at the center of the pediment of the temple at Corfu, the oldest stone pediment in Greece from about 600 B.C.
GA47658. Silver hemidrachm, Topalov Thrace p. 230, 55, aF, crude, worn dies, weight 2.761 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, Thracian, Greek city or tribal mint, early 5th - middle 4th century B.C.; obverse facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion); reverse incuse square containing angles in each corner forming a cruciform pattern, with pellet in center; ex Alex G. Malloy; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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Ticinum was a municipality and an important military site (a castrum) under the Roman Empire. In 476, Odoacer defeated Flavius Orestes at Ticinum after a long siege. To punish the city for helping his rival, Odoacer destroyed it completely. After the Lombard's conquest, Pavia became the capital of their kingdom, 568 - 774.
RB49562. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V-2 546, aEF, full centering on a large flan, near full silvering, small closed flan crack, weight 4.261 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, obverse IMP C PROBVS P F AVG, radiate bust left in consular robe, eagle-tipped scepter in right; reverse PAX AVG (the peace of the Emperor), Pax standing left, olive branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand,EXXI in exergue; rare; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon), Second Reign, 145 - 116 B.C.

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Of all the Ptolemies, only Ptolemy VIII had a Year 41.
SH50529. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1632, SNG Cop 663, Weiser -, Noeske -, BMC Ptolemies -, VF, weight 8.539 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 0o, Paphos mint, 130 - 129 B.C.; obverse diademed bust of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left, head left, wings closed, LMA (year 41) over lotus before; very rare; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Kyrene, Ptolemaic Kingdom, 221 - 140 B.C.

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The date of this type is uncertain and varies greatly in the references. We believe it was most likely struck during the reign of Ptolemy V Epiphanes, c. 204 - 180 B.C.
GP57271. Bronze hemiobol, Svoronos 867 (271 - 246 B.C.), Noeske 235, Weiser 104 (204 B.C.), SNG Cop 445, SNG Milan 471 (221 - 96 B.C), Hosking 67, BMC Cyrenaica p. 85, 62, VF, weight 3.031 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 0o, Kyrene mint, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOY, draped bust of Libya right, cornucopia below chin; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 280, Julius Saturninus, the governor of Syria, was made emperor by his troops. Probus besiege him at Apamea, where he was captured and executed. Proculus started a rebellion at Lugdunum (Lyon, France) and he proclaimed himself emperor. Before the end of the year, Probus suppressed the revolt and Proculus was executed.
RA68440. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V-2 715; Alfldi Siscia V, pl. XXIII, Type 42, N 114, Choice EF, sharp, full silvering and centering, better than photo, weight 3.805 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 280 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS P AVG, radiate bust left in consular robe, eagle-tipped scepter in right; reverse PAX AVGVSTI (to the peace of the emperor), Pax standing left, holding olive branch in right and transverse scepter in left hand, P right, XXI in exergue; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Byzantine Empire, Heraclius & Heraclius Constantine, 23 January 613 - 11 January 641 A.D.

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Heraclius offered peace to Khusro, presumably in 624, threatening otherwise to invade Persia, but Khusro rejected the offer. Heraclius marched into Persia with an army of probably less than 25,000 men, willingly abandoning any attempt to secure his rear or maintain lines of communication. Heraclius fought brilliantly and bravely repeatedly defeated the Persian forces. When the war ended in 628, Khusro had been murdered by his own men, the Byzantines regained all their lost territories, their captured soldiers, a war indemnity, and most importantly for them, the True Cross and other relics that were lost in Jerusalem in 614.
BZ64050. Bronze decanummium, Anastasi 62; DOC II part 1, 257; Wroth BMC 410; SBCV 886; Hahn MIB 241, VF, pit (flan defect?) on reverse, weight 5.067 g, maximum diameter 10.0 mm, die axis 180o, Sicily, Catania mint, 625 - 626 A.D.; obverse facing busts of Heraclius on left, bearded, and Heraclius Constantine on right, beardless; both crowned, draped and cuirassed; cross between their heads; reverse large I (10 nummi), ANNO right, X/ς (year 16) right, CAT in exergue; scarce; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00




  



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Under $50