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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Judean & Biblical Coins ▸ Biblical Coins ▸ In This Sign...View Options:  |  |  |   

In This Sign You Will Be The Victor

The Roman, Byzantine, crusader and other coins below carry the symbols of Christ. In 312 A.D., Constantine dreamed he saw a Chi Rho Christogram in the sky and heard the words IN HOC SIGNO ERIS, meaning "In this sign you will be the victor." He ordered the sign of Christ on his legions' standards and shields. He won a great victory and later became the first Christian Roman Emperor. Click here to read Christian Themes in Byzantine Coinage by Zach Margulies.


Byzantine Empire, Tiberius III Apsimar, Late 698 - Summer 705 A.D.

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All coins of Tiberius III are scarce or rare.

After the Arabs took Carthage, the disgruntled army declared Tiberius emperor. He mutilated Leontius (the previous emperor), cutting off his nose, just as Leontius had done to Justinian II. After Justinian II attacked and regained his throne, both Leontius and Tiberius were beheaded.
BZ82678. Bronze follis, Anastasi 341; DOC II-1 33; Wroth BMC 18; MIB 80; SBCV 1396, aVF, red and green patina, well centered on a ragged flan, weight 2.651 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, late 698 - summer 705 A.D.; obverse Tiberius III standing facing, wearing crown with pendilia, and long tunic, long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; reverse large M (40 nummi) between two crosses, Tiberius' monogram above, star below, SCL in exergue; rare; $300.00 (€255.00)
 


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class I, Nicephorus III, 7 January 1078 - 1 April 1081

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BZ86180. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, class I; SBCV 1889, gVF, excellent bust of Christ, weight 3.510 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 7 Jan 1078 - 1 Apr 1081; obverse Christ bust facing, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium, and colobium, raising right in benediction, gospels in left, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Iisoús Xristós - Jesus Christ) across field; reverse Latin cross with X at center, globule and two pellets at each extremity, floral ornaments in lower fields, crescents in upper fields; $215.00 (€182.75)
 


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A3, Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 11 November 1028 A.D.

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The obverse inscription Emmanuel is a Latinized Hebrew name meaning "God with us" (Matthew 1:23). It is the name of the child predicted in Isaiah 7:14: "Behold a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and his name shall be called Emmanuel."
BZ77225. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, class A3; SBCV 1818; Grierson-NumisWiki ornaments 32, aVF, nice patina, strike a weak and uneven, reverse a little off-center, weight 8.937 g, maximum diameter 30.1 mm, die axis 180o, provincial(?) mint, c. 1023 - 11 Nov 1028 A.D.; obverse + EMMANOVHΛ (Latinized Hebrew: Emmanuel - "God with us"), facing nimbate bust of Christ, pallium and colobium, Gospels in both hands, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Iisoús Xristós - Jesus Christ) across field; nimbus and Gospels ornamented with crosses; reverse + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Greek: Jesus Christ King of Kings), cross above and below inscription; $170.00 (€144.50)
 


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D., Issued by Vetranio

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In 312 A.D., Constantine dreamed he saw a Christogram in the sky and heard the words IN HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, meaning in Latin "In this sign, you will be the victor." He ordered the sign of Christ on his legions standards and shields. He won a great victory and later became the first Christian Roman Emperor.
RL90728. Billon maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 284 (S), LRBC II 1171, Voetter 48, SRCV V 18903, Cohen VII 3, gVF, oval flan, encrustation, flan split, weight 5.040 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, issued by Vetranio, 1 Mar - 25 Dec 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind, star in front; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Constantius standing half-left, in military dress, labarum (Chi-Rho standard) in each hand, A left, star above, •ΓSIS• in exergue; scarce; $160.00 (€136.00)
 


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class B, Romanus III or Michael IV, 12 November 1028 - 10 December 1041 A.D.

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The emperor's name and portrait are not part of the design on the Byzantine types referred to as anonymous folles. Instead of the earthly king, these coins depict Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
BZ86177. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, class B; SBCV 1823, gVF, well centered on a tight flan, overstruck, weight 9.586 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 12 Nov 1028 - 10 Dec 1041 A.D.; obverse + EMMANOVHΛ (Latinized Hebrew: Emmanuel - "God with us"), facing bust of Christ, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium, and colobium, holding gospels with both hands, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Iisoús Xristós - Jesus Christ) across field; reverse cross on three steps with pellet at each extremity, in fields IS - XS (Jesus Christ) / bAS-ILE / bAS-ILE (King of Kings); $125.00 (€106.25)
 


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A3, Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 11 November 1028 A.D.

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This type with the cross ornaments in the nimbus and on the Gospels is our favorite Anonymous Class A Follis variety. We find the crosses more interesting and appealing than the usual dots or shapes.
BZ77223. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, class A3; SBCV 1818; Grierson-NumisWiki ornaments 32, gF, nice dark blue-green patina, well centered, strike a little soft, small encrustations, weight 9.569 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 180o, provincial(?) mint, c. 1023 - 11 Nov 1028 A.D.; obverse + EMMANOVHΛ (Latinized Hebrew: Emmanuel - "God with us"), facing nimbate bust of Christ, pallium and colobium, Gospels in both hands, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Iisoús Xristós - Jesus Christ) across field; nimbus and Gospels ornamented with crosses; reverse + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Greek: Jesus Christ King of Kings), cross above and below inscription; $120.00 (€102.00)
 


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D., Issued by Vetranio

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In 312 A.D., Constantine dreamed he saw a Christogram in the sky and heard the words IN HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, meaning in Latin "In this sign, you will be the victor." He ordered the sign of Christ on his legions standards and shields. He won a great victory and later became the first Christian Roman Emperor.
RL85661. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 286 (S), LRBC II 1173, Voetter 51, SRCV V 18203, aEF, well centered, light encrustations, edge flaw, weight 5.475 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, issued by Vetranio, 1 Mar - 25 Dec 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind (appearing as H, as common in this period), star before; reverse HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, Constantius standing facing head left, holding labarum (Chi Rho Christogram standard) and spear, Victory right crowning him, A left (appearing as H), •ESIS• in exergue; scarce; $95.00 (€80.75)
 


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

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The Christogram (also called a Monogramma Christi or Chrismon) is a ligature of Chi (X) and Rho (P), the first two letters of Christ in Greek. It was among the earliest symbols of Christianity. The crucifix was rarely used in early Christian iconography, perhaps because most people then had personally witnessed its gruesome use for public execution.
RL73692. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Siscia 180, SRCV V 18021, LRBC I 788, Cohen VII -, gVF, nice green patina, earthen encrustation, weight 1.810 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 342 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTI-VS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVGG (victory of the two emperors), Victory walking left, looking right, holding wreath in each hand, Chi-Rho in right field, *ASIS* in exergue; rare type; $90.00 (€76.50)
 


Eudoxia, Augusta 9 January 400 - Early October 404 A.D., Wife of Arcadius

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Manus Dei, the hand of God, reaches down to crown the Empress Eudoxia.

The cross was rarely used in early Christian iconography, perhaps because it symbolized a purposely painful and gruesome method of public execution that most early Christians would have personally witnessed. In 315, Constantine abolished crucifixion as punishment in the Roman Empire. The Ichthys, or fish symbol, was used by early Christians. Constantine adopted the Chi-Rho Christ monogram (Christogram) as his banner (labarum). The use of a cross as the most prevalent symbol of Christianity probably gained momentum after Saint Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, traveled to the Holy Land, c. 326 - 328, and recovered the True Cross.
RL87997. Bronze centenionalis, RIC X Arcadius 84 (S), LRBC II 2926, DOCLR 294, SRCV V 20891, Choice VF, well centered, dark patina with red earthen highlighting, light scratches, weight 2.759 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Alexandria mint, 9 Jan 400 - 401 A.D.; obverse AEL EVDO-XIA AVG, pearl-diademed and draped bust right; reverse GLORIA ROMANORVM (glory of the Romans), Empress enthroned facing, hands folded over breast, crowned by the Hand of God, cross right, ALEA in exergue; ex Beast Coins; scarce; $90.00 (€76.50) ON RESERVE


Aelia Flaccilla, Augusta 19 January 379 - 386 A.D., Wife of Theodosius I

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Aelia Flaccilla died of natural causes early in 386. Her death is mentioned by (among others) Claudian, Zosimus, Philostorgius and Joannes Zonaras. According to the Chronicon Paschale, the palatium Flaccillianum of Constantinople was named in her honor. A statue of her was placed within the Byzantine Senate.
RL87999. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC IX Antioch 64 (R), LRBC II 2744, SRCV V 20628, Cohen VIII 5, Hunter V -, F, dark patina with highlighting red earthen deposits, well centered on a tight flan, small edge split, weight 0.816 g, maximum diameter 12.8 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 25 Aug 383 - 386 A.D.; obverse AEL FLACCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE (health of the Republic), Victory seated right, inscribing Christogram on shield set on cippus, ANE in exergue; ex Beast Coins; rare; $55.00 (€46.75)
 




  



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Catalog current as of Tuesday, December 18, 2018.
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In This Sign... Biblical Coins