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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Hellenistic Monarchies| ▸ |Pontic Kingdom||View Options:  |  |  |   

Pontic Kingdom

Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Lysimachos Type

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Mithradates VI Eupator "the Great"expanded his Pontic Kingdom through conquest, which inevitably brought him into conflict with Rome. Mithradates regarded himself as the champion of the Greeks against Rome, however, after three years of war, he was defeated by Pompey the Great. The design of this coin is taken from a coin of Lysimachos, bodyguard of Alexander the Great, and King of Thrace 323 - 281 B.C. The Lysimachos coin depicted Alexander the Great on the obverse. The features of the obverse portrait on this type are those of Mithradates VI.
SH12093. Gold stater, SNG Cop 1089 var. (monogram), Choice EF, weight 8.232 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, Byzantium (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 100 - 85 B.C; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great (with the features of Mithradates VI), wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena enthroned left, holding Nike and resting left arm on shield, transverse spear against her side, BY on throne, (AP monogram) over right arm, trident and two dolphins in exergue; fantastic style with superb portrait of Mithradates as Alexander the Great!; SOLD


Kingdom of Pontos, Mithradates VI Eupator, c. 120 - 63 B.C., In the Name and Types of Lysimachos of Thrace

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In the years following his death Alexander the Great came to be the subject of cult worship throughout the Mediterranean basin. His corpse was appropriated by Ptolemy I who transported it to Egypt, initially interring it at Memphis, then to a mausoleum and center of worship in Alexandria. It survived until the 4th century A.D. when Theodosius banned paganism, only to disappear without trace.
SH88032. Gold stater, Callata˙ p. 140, pl. XXXVII (D4/R2); SNG Cop 1089; AMNG I 260; HGC 3.2 1824, VF, well centered and struck on a compact flan, die wear, some bumps and marks, weight 8.277 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Kallatis mint, First Mithradatic War, c. 88 - 86 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great right wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse Athena seated left, Victory crowning name with wreath held in Athena's extended right hand, resting left elbow on round shield leaning on back of seat, HP monogram inner left, KAΛ below seat, trident in exergue ornamented with two small dolphins, ΛYΣIMAXOY downward on left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right; SOLD


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Lysimachos Type

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Mithradates VI Eupator "the Great"expanded his Pontic Kingdom through conquest, which inevitably brought him into conflict with Rome. Mithradates regarded himself as the champion of the Greeks against Rome, however, after three years of war, he was defeated by Pompey the Great. The design of this coin is taken from a coin of Lysimachos, bodyguard of Alexander the Great, and King of Thrace 323 - 281 B.C. The Lysimachos coin depicted Alexander the Great on the obverse. The features of the obverse portrait on this type are those of Mithradates VI.
SH88831. Gold stater, Callata˙ p. 140, pl. XXXVII (D3/R1); AMNG I 263; HGC 3.2 1824; SNG Cop 1089 var. (control), VF, struck with worn dies, weight 8.206 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, Kallatis mint, First Mithradatic War, c. 88 - 86 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great right wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse Athena seated left, Victory crowning name with wreath held in Athena's extended right hand, resting left elbow on round shield leaning on back of seat, A∆ monogram (control) inner left, KAΛ below seat, trident in exergue ornamented with two small dolphins, ΛYΣIMAXOY downward on left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right; Kirk Davis, catalog 70, lot 11; SOLD


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Lysimachos Type

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Mithradates VI Eupator "the Great" expanded his Pontic Kingdom through conquest, which inevitably brought him into conflict with Rome. He regarded himself as the champion of the Greeks against Rome, however, after three years of war, he was defeated by Pompey the Great. The design of this coin is taken from a coin of Lysimachos, bodyguard of Alexander the Great, and King of Thrace, 323 - 281 B.C. The Lysimachos coin depicted Alexander the Great on the obverse. The features of the portrait on this type are those of Mithradates VI.
SH85133. Gold stater, De Callata˙ p. 141 (D1/R1), SNG Cop 1090 (Thrace), VF, die wear, weight 8.395 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Moesia Inferior, Tomis (Constanta, Romania) mint, First Mithradatic War, 88 - 86 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great (with the features of Mithradates VI), wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena enthroned left, wearing crested helmet, Nike in right hand, resting left arm on round shield behind, monogram and V above knee, TO on throne, trident in exergue; ex CNG e-auction 92 (23 Jun 2004), lot 27; SOLD


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Mithradates VI Megas (the Great) was king of Pontus in northern Anatolia from about 119 to 63 B.C. He was of both Greek and Persian origin, claiming descent from both Alexander the Great and King Darius I of Persia. Mithradates is remembered as one of Rome's most formidable and successful enemies, who engaged three of the most prominent generals of the late Roman Republic in the so-called Mithridatic Wars: Sulla, Lucullus, and Pompey the Great. On this coin, minted in the name of Alexander but with his own portrait replacing that of Herakles (Alexander), Mithradates VI presents himself as Alexander's successor, the "defender" of Greece, and the "great liberator" of the Greek world. His propaganda translated the Romans into "barbarians," as the Persian Empire was during Alexander's campaign. How many Greeks genuinely bought into this claim will never be known but it served its purpose. At least partially because of it, Mithradates VI was able to fight the First War with Rome on Greek soil, and maintain the allegiance of Greece. His campaign for Greek allegiance was aided in no small part by his enemy Sulla, who allowed his troops to sack Delphi and plunder many of the city's most famous treasures to help finance his military expenses. Mithridates likely issued this type during the second Mithridatic War to pay Scythian and Thracian mercenaries. After Mithradates VI was at last defeated by Pompey and in danger of capture by Rome, he attempted suicide. The poison failed because he had taken daily doses to build immunity. He then made his bodyguard and friend, Bituitus, kill him with a sword.

SH74513. Silver tetradrachm, CCCHBulg I p. 83, 24 (same dies), Price 1192, SNG Cop 725, SNG Oxford 2681, Müller Alexander -, VF, excellent portrait, dark toning, porous areas, marks, edge bump, weight 14.463 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 0o, Odessos (Varna, Bulgaria) mint, Second Mithradatic War, 83 - 81 B.C.; obverse Mithradates VI bust right as Herakles in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on backless throne, eagle in right, long scepter in left hand, ΛAK left, O∆H in exergue; SOLD


Amisos, Pontos, 85 - 65 B.C.

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Amisos, the mythical home of the Amazons, was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire until it was captured by the Seljuks in 1200, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
SH73961. Bronze AE 21, SNG Cop 165; SNGvA 66; SNG BM 1218; SNG Stancomb 704; Rec Gen p. 56, 38; HGC 7 244; Laffaille -, VF, green patina, earthen encrustations, weight 7.574 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, Mithridatic War issue, 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse head of Amazon right, wearing wolf scalp headdress; reverse Nike walking right, extending wreath in right hand, palm frond over shoulder in left, AMI−ΣOY horizontal divided across field; scarce; SOLD


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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The portrait on the obverse bears an unmistakable likeness to Mithridates VI and is similar to his portraits on tetradrachms minted in Pontus. Mithridates likely issued this type during the second Mithridatic War to pay Scythian and Thracian mercenaries.
SH24750. Silver tetradrachm, Price 1191 (same dies), Choice gVF, weight 15.978 g, maximum diameter 29.4 mm, die axis 0o, Odessos (Varna, Bulgaria) mint, Second Mithradatic War, 83 - 81 B.C.; obverse Mithradates VI bust right as Herakles in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on backless throne, eagle in right, long scepter in left hand, ΛA left, O∆E exergue; SOLD


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

Click for a larger photo
Mithradates VI Megas (the Great) was king of Pontus in northern Anatolia from about 119 to 63 B.C. He was of both Greek and Persian origin, claiming descent from both Alexander the Great and King Darius I of Persia. Mithradates is remembered as one of Rome's most formidable and successful enemies, who engaged three of the most prominent generals of the late Roman Republic in the so-called Mithridatic Wars: Sulla, Lucullus, and Pompey the Great. On this coin, minted in the name of Alexander but with his own portrait replacing that of Herakles (Alexander), Mithradates VI presents himself as Alexander's successor, the "defender" of Greece, and the "great liberator" of the Greek world. His propaganda translated the Romans into "barbarians," as the Persian Empire was during Alexander's campaign. How many Greeks genuinely bought into this claim will never be known but it served its purpose. At least partially because of it, Mithradates VI was able to fight the First War with Rome on Greek soil, and maintain the allegiance of Greece. His campaign for Greek allegiance was aided in no small part by his enemy Sulla, who allowed his troops to sack Delphi and plunder many of the city's most famous treasures to help finance his military expenses. Mithridates likely issued this type during the second Mithridatic War to pay Scythian and Thracian mercenaries. After Mithradates VI was at last defeated by Pompey and in danger of capture by Rome, he attempted suicide. The poison failed because he had taken daily doses to build immunity. He then made his bodyguard and friend, Bituitus, kill him by the sword.
SH54915. Silver tetradrachm, Price 1191; Prokopov CCCHBulg p. 83, 24 (same obverse die), gVF, weight 15.739 g, maximum diameter 30.0 mm, die axis 0o, Odessos (Varna, Bulgaria) mint, Second Mithradatic War, 83 - 81 B.C.; obverse Mithradates VI bust right as Herakles in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on backless throne, eagle in right, long scepter in left hand, ΛA left, O∆H in exergue; SOLD


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

Click for a larger photo
Mithradates VI Megas (the Great) was king of Pontus in northern Anatolia from about 119 to 63 B.C. He was of both Greek and Persian origin, claiming descent from both Alexander the Great and King Darius I of Persia. Mithradates is remembered as one of Rome's most formidable and successful enemies, who engaged three of the most prominent generals of the late Roman Republic in the so-called Mithridatic Wars: Sulla, Lucullus, and Pompey the Great. On this coin, minted in the name of Alexander but with his own portrait replacing that of Herakles (Alexander), Mithradates VI presents himself as Alexander's successor, the "defender" of Greece, and the "great liberator" of the Greek world. His propaganda translated the Romans into "barbarians," as the Persian Empire was during Alexander's campaign. How many Greeks genuinely bought into this claim will never be known but it served its purpose. At least partially because of it, Mithradates VI was able to fight the First War with Rome on Greek soil, and maintain the allegiance of Greece. His campaign for Greek allegiance was aided in no small part by his enemy Sulla, who allowed his troops to sack Delphi and plunder many of the city's most famous treasures to help finance his military expenses. Mithridates likely issued this type during the second Mithridatic War to pay Scythian and Thracian mercenaries. After Mithradates VI was at last defeated by Pompey and in danger of capture by Rome, he attempted suicide. The poison failed because he had taken daily doses to build immunity. He then made his bodyguard and friend, Bituitus, kill him by the sword.
SH64011. Silver tetradrachm, Price 1193, VF, toned, weight 15.780 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 0o, Odessos (Varna, Bulgaria) mint, Second Mithradatic War, 83 - 81 B.C.; obverse Mithradates VI bust right as Herakles in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on backless throne, eagle in right, long scepter in left hand, ΛAKΩ left, O∆H in exergue; SOLD


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

Click for a larger photo
Mithradates VI Megas (the Great) was king of Pontus in northern Anatolia from about 119 to 63 B.C. He was of both Greek and Persian origin, claiming descent from both Alexander the Great and King Darius I of Persia. Mithradates is remembered as one of Rome's most formidable and successful enemies, who engaged three of the most prominent generals of the late Roman Republic in the so-called Mithridatic Wars: Sulla, Lucullus, and Pompey the Great. On this coin, minted in the name of Alexander but with his own portrait replacing that of Herakles (Alexander), Mithradates VI presents himself as Alexander's successor, the "defender" of Greece, and the "great liberator" of the Greek world. His propaganda translated the Romans into "barbarians," as the Persian Empire was during Alexander's campaign. How many Greeks genuinely bought into this claim will never be known but it served its purpose. At least partially because of it, Mithradates VI was able to fight the First War with Rome on Greek soil, and maintain the allegiance of Greece. His campaign for Greek allegiance was aided in no small part by his enemy Sulla, who allowed his troops to sack Delphi and plunder many of the city's most famous treasures to help finance his military expenses. Mithridates likely issued this type during the second Mithridatic War to pay Scythian and Thracian mercenaries. After Mithradates VI was at last defeated by Pompey and in danger of capture by Rome, he attempted suicide. The poison failed because he had taken daily doses to build immunity. He then made his bodyguard and friend, Bituitus, kill him by the sword.
SH21578. Silver tetradrachm, Price 1193, VF+, weight 16.162 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 0o, Odessos (Varna, Bulgaria) mint, Second Mithradatic War, 83 - 81 B.C.; obverse Mithradates VI bust right as Herakles in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on backless throne, eagle in right, long scepter in left hand, ΛAKΩ left, O∆H in exergue; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

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Catalog current as of Thursday, August 22, 2019.
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Pontic Kingdom