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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Hellenistic Monarchies ▸ Pergamene KingdomView Options:  |  |  | 

Pergamene Kingdom

Philetaerus, an officer under Lysimachus, deserted in 282 B.C., taking control of Pergamon and a large treasury deposited there. At first nominally a Seleukid suzerainty, Pergamon grew into a strong, prosperous and independent kingdom. Loyal allies of Rome in the Macedonian Wars and against the Seleucids, they were rewarded with all the former Seleucid domains in Asia Minor. When Attalus III died without an heir in 133 B.C., to prevent a civil war, he bequeathed the kingdom to the Roman Republic.

Attalid Dynasty of Pergamon
Philetaerus (282 - 263 BC)
Eumenes I (263 - 241 BC)
Attalus I Soter (241 - 197 BC)
Eumenes II (197 - 159 BC)
Attalus II Philadelphus (160 - 138 BC)
Attalus III (138 - 133 BC)
Eumenes III Aristonicus (pretender, 133 - 129 BC)


Pergamene Kingdom, Attalos I Soter 241 - 197 B.C., In the Name of Philetairos

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Attalus, a capable general, champion of the Greeks, and loyal ally of Rome, made Pergamon a powerful kingdom. He earned the name "Soter" (savior) by defeating the Galatians, who had plundered and exacted tribute for more than a generation. In the Macedonian Wars he allied with Rome against Philip V of Macedon.
SH70868. Silver tetradrachm, Westermark Group VIB; SNG BnF BnF 1626; BMC Mysia p. 117, 45; McClean 7685, VF/F, excellent portrait, uneven toning, weight 16.753 g, maximum diameter 30.5 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, 235 - 210 B.C.; obverse Philetairos (founder of the Attalid dynasty) diademed head right; reverse Athena enthroned left, crowning dynastic name ΦIΛETAIPOY to left, holding spear and resting left arm on shield, XAP monogram inner left, bow on right; very rare with this monogram; $430.00 (€382.70)
 


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 2nd Century B.C.

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Pergamon, Mysia was located to the northwest of the modern city of Bergama, Turkey, 16 miles (26 km) from the Aegean Sea on a promontory on the north side of the Caicus (Bakircay) River. It was the capital of the Kingdom of Pergamon under the Attalid dynasty, 281-133 B.C. Pergamon is cited in the book of Revelation as one of the seven churches of Asia.
GB71675. Bronze AE 18, SNG BnF 1885 ff.; SNG Tübingen 2429; SNG Cop 396; BMC Mysia p. 131, 179 var. (monogram), SNGvA 1374 var. (same), VF, green patina, weight 7.193 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd century B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse AΘHNAΣ NIKHΦOPOY, trophy of captured arms, ΘΛ monogram inner left, Pergamon monogram lower right; $120.00 (€106.80)
 


Pergamene Kingdom, 282 - 133 B.C.

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Philetaerus deserted Lysimachus in 282 B.C., taking control of Pergamon and a large treasure deposited there. At first nominally a Seleukid suzerainty, Pergamon grew into a strong, prosperous and independent kingdom. These bronze coins were struck in the name of the founder throughout all succeeding reigns.
GB76464. Bronze AE 14, SNG Cop 349; BMC Mysia p. 119, 58; SNG BnF 1682 corr. (monogram in photo but not described), Choice gVF, attractive style, well centered and struck, nice green patina, weight 1.931 g, maximum diameter 13.7 mm, die axis 90o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 282 - 133 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing helmet decorated with a griffin; reverse strung bow, tiny monogram within, ΦIΛE/TAIPOY divided in two lines above and below; $70.00 (€62.30)
 


Peltai, Phrygia, 188 - 133 B.C.

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The location of Peltai is unknown but it was probably on the Meander River. In 188 B.C., in accordance with the Treaty of Apameia, Peltai came under the rule of the Pergamon Kingdom. In 133 B.C., Attalos III Philometor bequeathed his kingdom, including Peltai, to the Roman Republic.
GB69814. Bronze AE 12, HGC 7, 755 (R1); BMC Phrygia p. 347, 7 corr. (Zeus); SGCV 5169; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG München -; SNG Tübingen -; Lindgren -, F, dark green patina, weight 2.927 g, maximum diameter 12.9 mm, die axis 0o, Peltae mint, 188 - 133 B.C.; obverse head of bearded Herakles right; reverse ΠEΛTH/NΩN, club with handle upward, Nemean lion skin draped over handle; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; rare; $45.00 (€40.05)
 


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 200 - 133 B.C.

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The sanctuary and temple of Athena Polias Nikephoros (Athena of the City, Bringer of Victory) was one of the oldest and most important religious centers in Pergamon. It stood directly behind and above the theater of the acropolis, and included the famous Library of Pergamon. The propylon of the sanctuary, in the photograph on the right, is now in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin.Sanctuary

GB76479. Bronze AE 14, SNG Cop 381; SNG Tübingen 2432; BMC Mysia p. 131, 183; SGCV II 3965; SNGvA -, VF/F, dark green patina, rough areas, weight 1.940 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 200 - 133 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; reverse AΘHNAΣ NIKHΦOPOY, small owl standing slightly right, head facing, Pergamon monogram below, all within an olive wreath; $40.00 (€35.60) ON RESERVE







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REFERENCES

Davesne, A. & G. Le Rider. Le trésor de Meydancikkale. (Paris, 1989).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. III, Part 1. (London, 1926).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
MacDonald, G. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the Hunterian Collection, University of Glasgow, Vol II: Greece, & Asia Minor. (Glasgow, 1901).
Mildenberg, L. & S. Hurter, eds. The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. ACNAC 6. (New York, 1985).
Mionnet, T.E. Description de Médailles antiques grecques et romaines. (Paris, 1807-1837).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 4: Bosporus - Lesbos. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 4: Mysien-Ionien. (Berlin, 1989).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 1: Pontus, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Mysia, Troas, Aiolis, Lesbos, Ionia. (Berlin, 1957).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque Nationale, Cabinet des Médailles, Vol. 5: Mysia. (Paris, 2001).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque National, Collection Jean et Marie Delepierre. (Paris, 1983).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, Univ. of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain-Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Westermark, U. Das Bildnis des Philetairos von Pergamon, Corpus der Munzpragung. (Stockholm, 1960).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Mysia. (London, 1892).

Catalog current as of Monday, February 20, 2017.
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Pergamene Kingdom Greek Coins