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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Secessionist Empires| ▸ |Carausius||View Options:  |  |  |   

Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

Marcus Aurelius Mausaeus Carausius was originally a fleet commander sent by the first Tetrarchs to rid the Northern seas of Saxon and Frankish pirates. He soon turned to piracy himself, before fleeing to Britain and declaring himself emperor. His natural cunning enabled him to resist all attempts to dislodge him. In 293 Constantius I captured his continental stronghold of Boulogne. Soon after Carausius was murdered by his chief minister Allectus.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RA73473. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 1014 (S), Linchmere 1136 var. (P F AVG), Hunter IV 79 var. (P F AVG, TEMPO), Webb Carausius 1136 var. (same), King Unmarked -, Bicester -, F, green patina, broad flan, weight 4.016 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 270o, unmarked mint mint, c. mid 286 - 287; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P AVG, radiate and draped bust right, early reign 'moustache' portrait; reverse TEMP FELIC (happy time), Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, grounded long caduceus vertical in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, fields blank; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; scarce; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $144.00


|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Marcus Aurelius Mausaeus Carausius was originally a fleet commander sent by the first Tetrarchs to rid the Northern seas of Saxon and Frankish pirates. He soon turned to piracy himself, before fleeing to Britain and declaring himself emperor. His natural cunning enabled him to resist all attempts to dislodge him. In 293 Constantius I captured his continental stronghold of Boulogne. Soon after Carausius was murdered by his chief minister Allectus.
RA73481. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 762 (R), Webb Carausius -, King Unmarked -, Hunter IV -, Cohen VII -, SRCV IV -, Bourne Carausius -, Linchmere -, Bicester -, gF/aF, green patina, tight flan, weight 4.137 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 225o, unmarked (London?) mint, c. mid 286 - 287 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CARAVSIVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, early reign 'moustache' portrait; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Emperor standing right clasping hands with Concordia, no mintmarks; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; very rare; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00


|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Colchester (Camulodunum) and its wall were rebuilt by the Romans after Queen Boudica led a rebellion in A.D. 60 and destroyed the town. Balkerne Gate in Colchester is the largest Roman arch in Britain. Balkerne Gate Colchester
RA73281. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 420 (S), Webb Carausius 466, Cohen VII 347, Hunter IV 150, Askew 281, SRCV IV 13731, F/aF, bumps, encrustations, corrosion, weight 2.338 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 225o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, c. mid 292 - mid 293; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse TEMPORVM FELI (happy times), Felicitas standing left, long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - P across fields, C in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; scarce; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00


|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
In The Reign and Coinage of Carausius, Percy Webb wrote that for Carausius, "...the type Providentia appears with some twenty-four varieties of reverse legend, while the joint effect of obverse and reverse variations of legend and type is to produce upwards of eighty varieties of coins dedicated to that divinity."
RA73496. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 364 (S), SRCV IV 13683, Webb Carausius 420, Hunter IV - (p. ccvi), Askew -, Bicester -, Linchmere -, Carausius Hoard -, Burton Latimer -, aVF, well centered, green patina, rough from corrosion, weight 3.096 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 225o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, 292 - 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, late reign tetrarchic portrait type; reverse PROVID AVGGG (the foresight of the three emperors), Providentia standing half left, staff in right hand grounded between feet and globe on the ground left, cornucopia in left hand, S-P flanking low across field, C in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; scarce; $135.00 SALE |PRICE| $122.00


|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Rouen (Latin: Rotomagus) is a city on the River Seine in the north of France. It is the capital of the region of Normandy. Formerly one of the largest and most prosperous cities of medieval Europe, Rouen was the seat of the Exchequer of Normandy during the Middle Ages. It was one of the capitals of the Anglo-Norman dynasties, which ruled both England and large parts of modern France from the 11th to the 15th centuries.
RA73288. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 736, RIC V-2 662 (R), Carausian Hoard 72, SRCV IV 13715 var. (legends), Hunter IV -, King Unmarked -, Bicester -, gF, green patina, earthen encrustations, some corrosion, weight 5.197 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 225o, Rotomagus (Rouen, France) mint, mid 286 - early summer 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor), Salus standing half left, from patera in her right hand, feeding snake rising from the left side of a column altar at her feet, cornucopia in left hand, nothing in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; $125.00 SALE |PRICE| $113.00


|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing. This coin, dedicated to the health of the emperor, probably indicates the emperor was at the time suffering from some disease, and sacred rites had been performed for his recovery.
RA73274. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 162 (R), Webb Carausius 181, Bourne Carausius -, Linchmere -, Burton Latimer -, Bicester -, Carausian Hoard -, aVF, dark patina, nice portrait, weak legends, scratches, corrosion, weight 3.683 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. late 289 - 291; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, middle reign portrait type; reverse SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor), Salus standing left, with right hand feeding snake rising from altar at her feet, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, B - E across fields, MLXXI in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00


|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing. This coin, dedicated to the health of the emperor, probably indicates the emperor was at the time suffering from some disease, and sacred rites had been performed for his recovery.
RA73475. Billon antoninianus, Beaujard and Huvelin 36, Webb Carausius 739, RIC V-2 666 (R), Hunter IV -, SRCV IV -, F, well centered on a tight flan, over-cleaned, porous, ragged edge, closed flan crack, weight 2.673 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 225o, Rotomagus (Rouen, France) mint, 2nd emission, c. 1st half 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front, continental portrait type; reverse SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor), Salus standing slightly left, head left, from patera in right hand feeding snake rising from altar, cornucopia in left hand, no mintmarks; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; very rare; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00


|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing. This coin, dedicated to the health of the emperor, probably indicates the emperor was at the time suffering from some disease, and sacred rites had been performed for his recovery.
RA73269. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 994 (S) var. (...P F AVG), Webb Carausius 1117 var. (same), Linchmere 812A var. (same), King Carausius -, Burton Latimer -, et al. -, gF/aF, broad flan, reverse weak, corrosion, weight 3.501 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 225o, unmarked mint, c. 288 - 291; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, middle reign portrait type; reverse SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor), Salus seated left feeding serpent and holding long staff, no field marks or mintmarks; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; scarce; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Hilaritas, the personification of rejoicing, is usually depicted as a matron, standing with a cornucopia in her left hand and a long palm frond on the ground in her right. Green branches were a sign of gladness and for special occasions, both public and private, it was the custom in ancient times to ornament streets, temples, gates, houses, and even entire cities, with branches and leaves of trees. This tradition carries on today in the form of wreaths and Christmas trees.
RA73255. Billon antoninianus, apparently unpublished, cf. RIC V-2 243 (R) (IMP C CARAVSIVS P AVG), Webb Carausius 295 (same), SRCV IV -, Hunter IV -, Linchmere -, et al. -, aVF, broad flan, green patina, some legend weak, reverse off center and double struck, weight 4.098 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 180o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, c. 288 - 291; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, middle reign portrait type; reverse HILARITAS AVG, Hilaritas standing left, long palm frond in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, C in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; very rare; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Laetitia is the Roman goddess of gaiety and joy, her name deriving from the root word laeta, meaning happy. She is typically depicted on coinage with a wreath in her right hand, and a scepter, a rudder, or an anchor in her left hand. On the coins of empresses, Laetitia may signal a birth in the Imperial family.
RA73263. Billon antoninianus, Linchmere p. 216, 55 (3 spec.), RIC V-2 50 (S), Webb Carausius -, Bourne Carausius -, Hunter IV -, SRCV IV -, Burton Latimer -, Carausian Hoard -, VF, some silvering, scratches, some corrosion, reverse legend weak, weight 4.601 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 0o, Londinium (London, England) mint, 288 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, middle reign portrait type; reverse LAETITIA AVG (the joy of the Emperor), Laetitia standing half left, wreath in right hand, anchor or staff in left hand, L in left field, ML in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; very scarce; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00




  



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OBVERSE| |LEGENDS

CARAVSIVSETFRATRESSVI
CARAVSIVSPFAVG
IMPAVRCARAVSIVSAVG
IMPCCARAVSIVSAVG
IMPCCARAVSIVSFAVG
IMPCCARAVSIVSIIG
IMPCCARAVSIVSINAVG
IMPCCARAVSIVSIVG
IMPCCARAVSIVSPAV
IMPCCARAVSIVSPAVG
IMPCCARAVSIVSPIVG
IMPCCARAVSIVSPFAG
IMPCCARAVSIVSPFAV
IMPCCARAVSIVSPFAVG
IMPCCARAVSIVSPFAVVG
IMPCCARAVSIVSPFIAVG
IMPCCARAVSIVSPFINAVG
IMPCCARAVSIVSPFINVAVG
IMPCCARAVSIVSPIVSFELAVG
IMPCMACARAVSIVSPFAVG
IMPCMAVMCARAVSIVSPFAVG
IMPCMAVRMCARAVSIVSPAVG
IMPCMCARAVSIVSAVG
IMPCMCARAVSIVSPAVG
IMPCARAVSIVSA
IMPCARAVSIVSAV
IMPCARAVSIVSAVG
IMPCARAVSIVSII
IMPCARAVSIVSIIG
IMPCARAVSIVSINIC
IMPCARAVSIVSINIVI
IMPCARAVSIVSFAVG
IMPCARAVSIVSPAVG
IMPCARAVSIVSPIAVG
IMPCARAVSIVSPEAG
IMPCARAVSIVSPEAVG
IMPCARAVSIVSPEAVIG
IMPCARAVSIVSPF
IMPCARAVSIVSPFA
IMPCARAVSIVSPFAVG
IMPCARAVSIVSPFAVIG
IMPCARAVSIVSPFIAVG
IMPCARAVSIVSPFIIG
IMPCARAVSIVSPFINAVG
IMPCARAVSIVSPIVV
IMPMCARAVSIVSAVG
INVICTOETCARAVSIOAVG
VIRTCARAVSIAVG
VIRTVSCARAVSI
VIRTVSCARAVSIA
VIRTVSCARAVSIAVG
VIRTVSCARAVSII
VIRTVSCARAVSSI


REFERENCES|

Askew, G. The Coinage of Roman Britain. (London, 1980).
Beaujard, E.B. & H. Huvelin. "Le tresor de Rouen et l'occupation de la Gaule par Carausius" in Histoire et Numismatique en Haut-Normandie. (Caen, 1980).
Bland, R. "A Hoard of Carausius and Allectus from Burton Latimer" in BNJ 54 (1984), pp. 41 - 50.
Burnett, A. & J. Casey. A Carausian Hoard from Croydon, Surrey, and a Note on Carausius's Continental Possessions" in BNJ 54 (1984), pp. 10 - 20.
Calic, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. 2: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Carson, R.A.G. "The Sequence-marks on the Coinage of Carausius and Allectus" in Essays Baldwin (1971), pp. 57 - 65.
Casey, P.J. Carausius and Allectus: The British Usurpers. (New Haven, 1995).
Challis, C.E. & M.A.S. Blackburn. Studies in the Coinages of Carausius and Allectus. (London, 1985).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 7: Carausius to Constantine & sons. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Diocltien a Constantin I (284-337). (Wetteren, 1995).
Giard, J-B. "La monnaie de Carausius Rouen: une remise en question" in RN 1995, Vol. 6, Issue 150, pp. 264 - 266.
King, C.E. "A Small Hoard of Carausius Found Near Bicester Oxfordshire" in BNJ 53, (1982), pp. 7 - 16.
King, C.E. "The Unmarked Coins of Carausius" in BNJ 54 (1984), pp. 1 - 9.
King, C.E. & D.R. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Mattingly, H., E.A. Sydenham & P. Webb. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol V, Part II, Probus to Amandus. (London, 1933).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. IV. Valerian I to Allectus. (Oxford, 1978).
Schaaff, U. Mnzen der rmischen Kaiserzeit mit Schiffsdarstellungen im Rmisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseum. (Munich, 2003).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume IV: The Tetrarchies and the Rise of the House of Constantine...Diocletian To Constantine I, AD 284 - 337. (London, 2011).
Shiel, N. The Episode of Carausius and Allectus. BAR 40. (Oxford, 1977).
Southerland, C.H.V. "'Carausius II', 'Censeris', and the Barbarous Fel. Temp. Reparatio Overstrikes" in NC 1945.
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).
Webb, P.H. The reign and coinage of Carausius. (London, 1908).
Webb, P.H. "The Linchmere Hoard" in NC 1925, pp. 173 - 235.

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