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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Crisis and Decline ▸ VolusianView Options:  |  |  | 

Volusian, c. November 251 - July or August 253 A.D.

Gaius Vibius Afinius Gallus Vedumnianus Volusian was the son of Trebonianus Gallus and was given the rank of Caesar when his father became emperor. After emperor Hostilian was killed, he was raised to the rank of Augustus. He was assassinated along with his father in 253 A.D.


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In 251, Trajan Decius was the first Roman Emperor to die in battle against a foreign enemy. Trebonianus Gallus was proclaimed emperor by the troops. Gallus accepted Hostilian, the young son of Decius, as co-emperor, but the boy died of plague. Hostilian was the first emperor in 40 years to die of natural causes.
RS65684. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 179, RSC IV 70, SRCV III 9758, VF, toned, weight 3.959 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 251 - 252 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right from behind; reverse PAX AVGG, Pax standing left, raising olive-branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left; $85.00 (74.80)


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In 252, King Shapur I, of Persia, put down a revolt in Khorasan (Iran). He then invaded Armenia and appointed Artavazd VI as the new Armenian king. Georgia submitted peacefully to Shapur I, and was made a special province in the Sasanian Empire. In 252 or 253, Shapur I defeated a Roman army, said to have numbered 70,000 men, at Barbalissos in Syria.
RS65686. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 206, RSC IV 133, SRCV III 9776, aVF, weight 3.624 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 251 -253 A.D.; obverse IMP C C VIB VOLVSIANVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVGG, Virtus standing half right, inverted spear behind in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield; $85.00 (74.80)


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In 251, Trajan Decius was the first Roman Emperor to die in battle against a foreign enemy. Trebonianus Gallus was proclaimed emperor by the troops. Gallus accepted Hostilian, the young son of Decius, as co-emperor, but the boy died of plague. Hostilian was the first emperor in 40 years to die of natural causes.
RS65683. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 179, RSC IV 70, SRCV III 9758, VF, encrustations on reverse, weight 2.716 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 251 - 252 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right from behind; reverse PAX AVGG, Pax standing left, branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left; $75.00 (66.00)


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253 A.D. began the Roman Empire's Period of the Thirty Tyrants during which, again and again, legions on the borders proclaimed their general emperor. In 253, the legions on the Danube made Aemilian emperor. The Roman Senate declared Aemilian an "enemy of the State," but after Trebonianus Gallus and Volusian were defeated and killed by their own troops, the Senate designated him Pontifex Maximus.
RS62197. Silver antoninianus, SRCV III 9762, RIC IV 140, RSC IV 92, weight 2.398 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 253 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse P M TR P IIII COS II, Volusian standing left, branch in right hand, short transverse scepter in left; nicely centered; scarce; $45.00 (39.60)







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OBVERSE LEGENDS

CVIBIOVOLVSIANOCAES
IMCAFGALVENDVOLVSIANOAVG
IMCVAFGALVENDVOLVSIANAVG
IMCVAFGMVENDVOLVSIANOAVG
IMPCAECVIBVOLVSIANOAVG
IMPCAECVIBVOLVSIANVSAVG
IMPCCVIBVOLVSIANVSAVG
IMPCVAFGALVALVENDVOLVSIANVSAVG
IMPCVAFGALVENDVOLVSIANOAVG
IMPCVAFGALVENDVOLVSIANVSAVG
IMPCVAFGMVOLVSIANOAVG
IMPCVOLVSIANOAVG
IMPCVOLVSIANVSAVG


REFERENCES

Calic, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. Two: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 5: Gordian I to Valerian II. (Paris, 1885).
Mattingly, H.B., E.A. Sydenham & C.H.V. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H.A. & D.R. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume IV, Gordian III to Postumus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, February 10, 2016.
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Roman Coins of Volusian