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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Crisis and Decline ▸ Trajan DeciusView Options:  |  |  |     

Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D.

Trajan Decius, a general under Philip I, successfully crushed the revolt of Pacatian. His troops forced him to assume the imperial dignity and although he still protested his loyalty, Philip advanced against him. Decius was victorious and Philip was killed. The Senate then recognized Decius as Emperor, giving him the attribute Traianus as a reference to that good emperor. As the Byzantine historian Zosimus later noted: "Decius was therefore clothed in purple and forced to undertake the government, despite his reluctance and unwillingness." Decius spent the rest of his short reign combating barbarians. Sometime in the first two weeks of June 251, Trajan Decius and his son Herennius Etruscus became the first Roman emperors to die in battle against a foreign enemy. Herennius died at his father's side, struck by an arrow. Decius survived the initial confrontation, only to be slain with the rest of the army before the end of the day.


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The Dacian Kingdom existed between 82 B.C. until the Trajan's conquest in 106 A.D. This coin commemorates Trajan Decius' recovery of Roman Dacia from rebelling Carpo-Dacians. The province was abandoned by Aurelian in 275, recovered again by Constantine the Great by 336, but abandoned again permanently soon after Constantine's death.
RS74468. Silver antoninianus, RSC IV 16, RIC IV 12(b), Hunter III 7, SRCV III 9368, gVF, excellent centering, some die wear, weight 21.94 g, maximum diameter 5.190 mm, die axis 15o, Rome mint, c. 250 - 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse DACIA, Dacia standing left, wearing robe reaching feet, staff topped with a wolf's head (Draco) in right hand; SOLD


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Adventus Augustus inscriptions commemorate the emperor's arrival at Rome, either at the commencement of his reign, or on his return from a distance.
RS26710. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 11b, RSC IV 4, Hunter III 6, SRCV III 9366, EF, reverse die worn, weight 4.333 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 249 - 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ADVENTVS AVG, Trajan Decius on horseback left, raising right hand in salute, scepter in left hand; SOLD


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Commemorative Struck by Trajan Decius

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Trajan Decius struck a series of commemorative antoniniani honoring previous emperors, including this type struck for Antoninus Pius.
SH65376. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 90, VF, weight 3.295 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 249 - 251 AD.; obverse DIVO PIO, radiate head of Antoninus Pius right; reverse CONSECRATIO, flaming altar with panelled doors and horned roof; SOLD


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In 249, Trajan Decius put down a revolt in Moesia and Pannonia. After his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, he marched them to Verona, where he defeated and killed Philip the Arab.
RS74467. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 21b, RSC IV 86, Hunter III 16, SRCV III 9378, Choice aEF, some die wear, weight 3.738 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 250 - 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate draped bust right; reverse PANNONIAE, the two Pannoniae, draped and veiled, standing facing, looking away from each other, one on the right raising right hand, each holding a standard in outer hand; SOLD


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Antioch, Syria

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In 256 A.D., about six years after this coin was struck, the Persian King Shapur conquered and plundered Antioch.
RY02413. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1116(d) Prieur 528, BMC Galatia -, SNG Cop -, Choice VF, weight 10.37 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 225o, 4th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 2nd issues, 249 - 250 A.D.; obverse AVT K Γ ME KY ∆EKIOC TPAIANOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind, four pellets below; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC SC, eagle standing left on palm branch, wings spread, wreath in beak; beautiful "desert" patina; SOLD


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Samaria

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Caesarea, about 30 miles north of Joppa and about 70 miles northwest of Jerusalem, was the capital of the Roman province of Judaea, the seat of the procurators, and the headquarters of the Roman troops. It was founded by Herod the Great and named after Caesar Augustus.
JD14111. Bronze AE 28, SNG ANS 818, F, weight 18.031 g, maximum diameter 28.7 mm, die axis 180o, Caesarea Maritima mint, 249 - 250 A.D.; obverse IMP C C MES Q TRA DECIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse COL PR F AVG C CAES MET SP, Tyche seated left, bust in right, scepter in left, harbor god holding anchor at feet left; rare; SOLD


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The Dacian Kingdom existed between 82 B.C. until the Trajan's conquest in 106 A.D. This coin commemorates Trajan Decius' recovery of Roman Dacia from rebelling Carpo-Dacians. The province was abandoned by Aurelian in 275, recovered again by Constantine the Great by 336, but abandoned again permanently soon after Constantine's death.
RS38556. Silver antoninianus, RSC IV 16, RIC IV 12(b), Hunter III 7, SRCV III 9368, aEF, weight 3.830 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, c. 250 - 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse DACIA, Dacia standing half left, wearing robe reaching feet, staff topped with a wolf's head (Draco) in right hand; SOLD


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Mallos, Cilicia

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Mallos was an ancient city near the mouth of the Pyramus River (now the Ceyhan Nehri), on a hill opposite Magarsus, which served as its port. The river has changed course and the site is now inland a few km from the Mediterranean coast on an elevation, a few km from Karatas, Adana Province, Turkey. Imperial coins of Mallos are rare and usually poorly preserved.

Argive Amphilochus was a prominent seer, and founded several oracles, most importantly at Mallus and, with his half-brother Mopsus, the oracle of Apollo at Colophon in Lydia. According to Herodotus, Amphilochus traveled farther east and founded a Posideion just beyond the mountain-pass "gate" in the Amanus between Cilicia and Syria.
RB71401. Bronze medallion, SNG Levante 1291, SNG BnF 1931 var. (obv. legend), Ziegler Kilikiens 915, SNG Cop -, BMC Lycaonia -, aF, rough, weight 27.566 g, maximum diameter 36.4 mm, die axis 180o, Mallos mint, obverse IMP CAES CAI ME CVIN DECIO TRAIANO SE, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse MALLO COLONNIA, FE-LIX divided by boar left in exergue, S - C in upper field, Decius in center, standing slightly left; with right hand offers a statuette of Marsyas to Tyche, she is on left, facing him; in his left hand Decius holds reigns of yoke of zebus behind him; Amphilochus on far side of yoke crowning emperor; HUGE AE36 medallion!; very rare; SOLD


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In 249, after his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, Trajan Decius marched them to Verona, where he defeated and killed Philip I. Philip's eleven-year-old son and heir was likely killed with his father.
RS59950. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 11b, RSC IV 4, Hunter III 6, SRCV III 9366, Choice gVF, weight 5.062 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 249 - 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ADVENTVS AVG, Trajan Decius on horseback left, raising right hand in salute, scepter in left hand; SOLD


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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshipped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RB72384. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 125(a), Cohen V 93, Hunter III - (p. xcvii), cf. SRCV III 9408 (obv legend, etc.), aVF, nice portrait, weak reverse, weight 14.889 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, Jul 249 - Jun 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing facing, head left, raising olive branch in right, transverse long scepter in left, S - C flanking across fields; scarce; SOLD




    




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OBVERSE LEGENDS

IMPCAESCMESSQDECIOTRAIAVG
IMPCAESCMESSTRAIQDECIOAVG
IMPCAESQTRAIANVSDECIVS
IMPCAETRADECAVG
IMPCAETRADECIVSAVG
IMPCDECIVSAVG
IMPCMQTRAIANVSDECIVSAVG
IMPTRAIANVSAVGDECIVS
IMPTRAIANVSDECIVSAVG


REFERENCES

Banti, A. and L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Caliců, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. Two: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappťes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 5: Gordian I to Valerian II. (Paris, 1885).
Mattingly, H.B., E.A. Sydenham & C.H.V. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H.A. & D.R. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume IV, Gordian III to Postumus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, May 31, 2016.
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Roman Coins of Trajan Decius