Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Crisis and Decline ▸ Trajan DeciusView Options:  |  |  |     

Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D.

Trajan Decius, a general under Philip I, successfully crushed the revolt of Pacatian. His troops forced him to assume the imperial dignity and although he still protested his loyalty, Philip advanced against him. Decius was victorious and Philip was killed. The Senate then recognized Decius as Emperor, giving him the attribute Traianus as a reference to that good emperor. As the Byzantine historian Zosimus later noted: "Decius was therefore clothed in purple and forced to undertake the government, despite his reluctance and unwillingness." Decius spent the rest of his short reign combating barbarians. Sometime in the first two weeks of June 251, Trajan Decius and his son Herennius Etruscus became the first Roman emperors to die in battle against a foreign enemy. Herennius died at his father's side, struck by an arrow. Decius survived the initial confrontation, only to be slain with the rest of the army before the end of the day.


Click for a larger photo
In 249, Trajan Decius put down a revolt in Moesia and Pannonia. After his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, he marched them to Verona, where he defeated and killed Philip the Arab.
RS62572. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 21b, RSC IV 86, Hunter III 16, SRCV III 9378, Choice EF, weight 3.967 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 249 - 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate draped bust right; reverse PANNONIAE, the two Pannoniae, draped and veiled, standing facing, looking away from each other, one on the right raising right hand, each holding a standard in outer hand; excellent reverse detail for the type, slight double strike on obverse; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
His troops forced Decius to assume the imperial dignity and although he still protested his loyalty, Philip advanced against him. Decius was victorious and Philip was killed. The Senate then recognized Decius as Emperor, giving him the attribute Traianus as a reference to that good emperor. As the Byzantine historian Zosimus later noted: "Decius was therefore clothed in purple and forced to undertake the government, despite his reluctance and unwillingness."
RS35022. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 29c, Choice aEF, weight 3.905 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVG, Victory walking left, wreath raised in right hand, palm frond in left; superb style, masterpiece portrait; SOLD


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Rhesaena, Mesopotamia

Click for a larger photo
In 250 A.D., the Goths under king Cniva invaded Moesia, captured Philippopolis (modern Plovdiv) and murdered its one hundred thousand inhabitants. At the same time a group of Franks penetrated as far as Tarragona in Spain and the Alamanni drove the Romans from the modern area of Donau-Ries.
RP09253. Bronze AE 16, BMC Arabia p. 131, 35, aVF, weight 3.65 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rhesaena (Ra's al-'Ayn, Syria) mint, c. 250 A.D.; obverse [AV]TKΓMKTP∆EKIOCC[EB], laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse CEΠKOΛPHCA INHCIWNL IIIP, vexillum, with pendants from ends of cross bar, surmounted by eagle with spread wings, LEG III on the banner; SOLD


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

Click for a larger photo
In 256 A.D., about six years after this coin was struck, the Persian King Shapur conquered and plundered Antioch.
RY90506. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1125(d), Prieur 583, Dura Coins 517, gVF, superb portrait, sharp details, grainy, porous, weight 11.813 g, maximum diameter 32.2 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 249 - 250 A.D.; obverse AYT K Γ ME KY TPAIANOC ∆EKIOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right from behind, four pellets below; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC, eagle standing right on palm, head right, wings open wreath in beak, S C in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
The Dacian Kingdom existed between 82 B.C. until the Trajan's conquest in 106 A.D. This coin commemorates Trajan Decius' recovery of Roman Dacia from rebelling Carpo-Dacians. The province was abandoned by Aurelian in 275, recovered again by Constantine the Great by 336, but abandoned again permanently soon after Constantine's death.
RS74468. Silver antoninianus, RSC IV 16, RIC IV 12(b), Hunter III 7, SRCV III 9368, gVF, excellent centering, some die wear, weight 21.94 g, maximum diameter 5.190 mm, die axis 15o, Rome mint, c. 250 - 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse DACIA, Dacia standing left, wearing robe reaching feet, staff topped with a wolf's head (Draco) in right hand; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
Adventus Augustus inscriptions commemorate the emperor's arrival at Rome, either at the commencement of his reign, or on his return from a distance.
RS26710. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 11b, RSC IV 4, Hunter III 6, SRCV III 9366, EF, reverse die worn, weight 4.333 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 249 - 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ADVENTVS AVG, Trajan Decius on horseback left, raising right hand in salute, scepter in left hand; SOLD


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Commemorative Struck by Trajan Decius

Click for a larger photo
Trajan Decius struck a series of commemorative antoniniani honoring previous emperors, including this type struck for Antoninus Pius.
SH65376. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 90, VF, weight 3.295 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 249 - 251 AD.; obverse DIVO PIO, radiate head of Antoninus Pius right; reverse CONSECRATIO, flaming altar with panelled doors and horned roof; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
In 249, Trajan Decius put down a revolt in Moesia and Pannonia. After his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, he marched them to Verona, where he defeated and killed Philip the Arab.
RS74467. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 21b, RSC IV 86, Hunter III 16, SRCV III 9378, Choice aEF, some die wear, weight 3.738 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 250 - 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate draped bust right; reverse PANNONIAE, the two Pannoniae, draped and veiled, standing facing, looking away from each other, one on the right raising right hand, each holding a standard in outer hand; SOLD


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

Click for a larger photo
In 256 A.D., about six years after this coin was struck, the Persian King Shapur conquered and plundered Antioch.
RY02413. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1116(d) Prieur 528, BMC Galatia -, SNG Cop -, Choice VF, weight 10.37 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 225o, 4th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 2nd issues, 249 - 250 A.D.; obverse AVT K Γ ME KY ∆EKIOC TPAIANOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind, four pellets below; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC SC, eagle standing left on palm branch, wings spread, wreath in beak; beautiful "desert" patina; SOLD


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Samaria

Click for a larger photo
Caesarea, about 30 miles north of Joppa and about 70 miles northwest of Jerusalem, was the capital of the Roman province of Judaea, the seat of the procurators, and the headquarters of the Roman troops. It was founded by Herod the Great and named after Caesar Augustus.
JD14111. Bronze AE 28, SNG ANS 818, F, weight 18.031 g, maximum diameter 28.7 mm, die axis 180o, Caesarea Maritima mint, 249 - 250 A.D.; obverse IMP C C MES Q TRA DECIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse COL PR F AVG C CAES MET SP, Tyche seated left, bust in right, scepter in left, harbor god holding anchor at feet left; rare; SOLD




    




You are viewing a SOLD items page.
Click here to return to the page with AVAILABLE items.
The sale price for a sold item is the private information of the buyer and will not be provided.



OBVERSE LEGENDS

IMPCAESCMESSQDECIOTRAIAVG
IMPCAESCMESSTRAIQDECIOAVG
IMPCAESQTRAIANVSDECIVS
IMPCAETRADECAVG
IMPCAETRADECIVSAVG
IMPCDECIVSAVG
IMPCMQTRAIANVSDECIVSAVG
IMPTRAIANVSAVGDECIVS
IMPTRAIANVSDECIVSAVG


REFERENCES

Banti, A. and L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calic, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. Two: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 5: Gordian I to Valerian II. (Paris, 1885).
Mattingly, H.B., E.A. Sydenham & C.H.V. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H.A. & D.R. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume IV, Gordian III to Postumus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Saturday, August 27, 2016.
Page created in 1.092 seconds
Roman Coins of Trajan Decius