Guest. Please login or register.

MAIN MENU    RECENT ADDITIONS    PRICE REDUCTIONS
ROMAN    GREEK    JUDEAN & BIBLICAL    BYZANTINE
BOOKS & SUPPLIES    COLLECTING THEMES    ANTIQUITIES   

 

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Byzantine Coins
Byzantine Coins Showcase

Byzantine Gold (33)
Byzantine Rarities (17)
Anonymous Folles (1)
Anastasius I
Justinian Dynasty (20)
Heraclean Dynasty (52)
Isaurian Dynasty (18)
Macedonian Dynasty (6)
Comnen Dynasty (13)
Dynasty of the Angeli (1)
Latin Crusader Rule (2)
Empire of Nicaea
Empire of Thessalonica
The Restored Empire (1)
Empire of Trebizond
Byzantine Mints (78)
Byzantine Specials
Byzantine Countermarked (2)
Byzantine Unattributed (1)
Byzantine Bulk Lots (3)
Unofficial & Imitative (6)
Byzantine Antiquities (12)
Byzantine Seals (11)
Byzantine Coin Books (5)

Catalog Search
View Shopping Cart
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Contact Us
FAQ

Home>Catalog>ByzantineCoins>HeracleanDynasty>ConstantineIV

Constantine IV Pogonatus, 15 July 668 - 10 July 685 A.D.

Joint rule with Constans II (his father), 13 April 654 - 15 July 668 A.D., and Heraclius and Tiberius (his brothers), 2 June 659 - autumn 681 A.D.
Constantine IV Pogonatus should be credited with saving Europe from Muslim conquest. Beginning in 674, the great siege of Constantinople, by the caliph Muawiyah I, lasted four years. The newly invented famous "Greek Fire" made the city impregnable and the Arabs were forced to retreat. In 681 he deposed his two brothers. He was succeeded by his 16 year old son Justinian II.


Click for a larger photo The first Arab siege of Constantinople began in 674. In 678, the Byzantines finaly broke the Siege when they destroyed the Arab fleet using a new incendiary liquid known as Greek fire, and then defeated the Arab army on land. Constantinople would not fall to the Muslims until 29 May 1453.
BZ68156. Bronze follis, Anastasi 249; DOC II part 2, Class IV, 63; SBCV 1210, F, weight 3.647 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 225o, Syracuse mint, 668 - 681 A.D.; obverse diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing, beardless, spear in right, shield on left ornamented with horseman; reverse large M, monogram above, SCL in ex; scarce; $90.00 (€67.50)

Click for a larger photo
BZ83141. Bronze follis, DOC II part 2, Class IV, 63; SBCV 1210, aVF, weight 3.163 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, 668 - 681 A.D.; obverse diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing, beardless, spear in right, shield on left ornamented with horseman; reverse large M, monogram above, SCL in ex; scarce; $65.00 (€48.75)

Click for a larger photo Overstruck on an earlier coin, probably of Constans II. Sear notes this is common for the type.
BZ58699. Bronze decanummium, DOC II part 2, 38; Sommer 13.19; Morrisson BN 12; Tolstoi 139; Hahn MIB 88; SBCV 1182; Wroth BMC -; Ratto -, aVF, overstruck, weight 5.122 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople mint, 669 - 674; obverse no legend, helmeted and cuirassed, beardless bust facing, globus cruciger in right; reverse large I between cross and K, another cross above, CON in exergue; rough area on reverse; scarce; $60.00 (€45.00)

Byzantine Empire, Constans II and Constantine IV, 13 April 654 - 15 July 668 A.D.
Click for a larger photo In 654, Constans II appointed his two-year old son Constantine IV as co-emperor (Augustus). In 659. Constans II also elevated Constantine IV's younger brothers, Heraclius and Tiberius, as co-emperors.
BZ69721. Bronze follis, Anastasi 204; SBCV 1110; DOC II part 2, 181; Hahn MIB 210; Morrisson BN 9; Wroth BMC 362; Tolstoi 374; Ratto 1638, aVF, overstruck, ragged flan, weight 4.545 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, 659 - 663; obverse Constans (left) in military attire with long cross in right, and Constantine in chlamys with globus cruciger in right, both crowned and stand facing; reverse large M flanked by Heraclius (left) and Tiberius, both stand facing in crown and chlamys, each holds globus cruciger in right, monogram above, SCL in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $55.00 (€41.25)

Byzantine Empire, Constans II and Constantine IV, 13 April 654 - 15 July 668 A.D.
Click for a larger photo In 665 the Arabs began a new invasion of North Africa. Resupplied by sea, the Byzantine were able to hold the coast and well-fortified Carthage for decades. In the spring of 698, however, the Arabs launched an assault by sea and land, forcing the Byzantines and their allies to evacuate Carthage. The Arabs burned the city to the ground, leaving the area desolate for the next two centuries. The Arab conquest of North Africa was then nearly complete.
BZ58714. Bronze follis, DOC II part 2, 147; Sommer 12.74; Wroth BMC 302; Tolstoi 372; Ratto 1632; Morrisson BN 53; SBCV 1055, VF, overstruck, weight 4.025 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 0o, Carthage mint, 662 - 667 A.D.; obverse Constans (left) with long cross in right, and Constantine (right), both crowned and stand facing, cross between; reverse large M flanked by Heraclius (left) and Tiberius, both stand facing in crown and chlamys, monogram above, KTG below; scarce; $50.00 (€37.50)

Click for a larger photo In 680, the Bulgars under Asparukh subjugated the area of current-day Bulgaria. In 681, after the Bulgars defeated the Byzantine Empire, a peace treaty with Constantinople and the establishment of a permanent capital at Pliska south of the Danube marked the beginning of the First Bulgarian Empire. The Bulgars gradually mixed up with the local population, adopting a common Slavonic based language.
BZ65926. Bronze follis, Anastasi 244, DOC II 61, Berk 741, Hahn 106, SBCV 1208, F, weight 5.346 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 90o, Syracuse mint, 679 - 681 A.D.; obverse diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing, beardless, spear in right, shield on left ornamented with horseman; reverse M between Heraclius (on left) and Tiberius, each stands wearing a crown with cross and chlamys, each holds globus cruciger, monogram above, SCL in ex; scarce; $40.00 (€30.00)

Click for a larger photo The first Arab siege of Constantinople began in 674. In 678, the Byzantines finaly broke the Siege when they destroyed the Arab fleet, using a new incendiary liquid known as Greek fire, and then defeated the Arab army on land. Constantinople would not fall to the Muslims until 29 May 1453.
BZ58553. Bronze follis, Anastasi 227; DOC II part 2, 62; SBCV 1209, gF, weight 5.034 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, 677 - 680 A.D.; obverse Constantine standing facing, wearing cuirass and helmet with cross and plum; spear vertical in right, left hand on hip; reverse M between Heraclius (on left) and Tiberius, each stands wearing a crown with cross and chlamys, each holds globus cruciger, monogram above, SCL in ex; scarce; $36.00 (€27.00)


ITEMS PER PAGE 13510203050



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES

Grierson, P. Catalogue of the Byzantine Coins in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection and in the Whittemore Collection: Vol. 2, Part 2: Heraclius Constantine to Theodosius III. (Washington, D.C., 1968).
Berk, H.J. Roman Gold Coins of the Medieval World, 383 - 1453 A.D. (Joliet, IL, 1986).
Carson, R.A.G., P.V. Hill & J.P.C. Kent. Late Roman Bronze Coinage. (London, 1960).
Hahn, W. Moneta Imperii Byzantini. (Vienna, 1973-81).
Hahn, W. and M.A. Metlich. Money of the Insipient Byzantine Empire. (Vienna, 2000).
Hendy, M. Coinage and Money in the Byzantine Empire 1081-1261. (Washington D.C., 1969).
Hennequin, G. Catalogue des monnaies musulmanes de la Bibliotheque Nationale. (Paris, 1985).
Metlich, M. A. The Coinage of Ostrogothic Italy. (London, 2004).
Morrisson, C. Catalogue des Monnaies Byzantines de la Bibliothèque Nationale. (Paris, 1970).
Sear, D. R. Byzantine Coins and Their Values. (London, 1987).
Ratto, R. Monnaies Byzantines et d'autre Pays contemporaines à l'époque byzantine. (Lugano, 1930).
Tolstoi, I. Monnaies byzantines. (St. Petersburg, 1913 - 14).
Wroth, W. Catalogue of the Imperial Byzantine Coins in the British Museum. (London, 1908).
Wroth, W. Catalogue of the Coins of the Vandals, Ostrogoths, Lombards and of the Empires of Thessalonica, Nicaea, and Trebizond in the British Museum. (London, 1911).

Catalog current as of Thursday, April 17, 2014.
Page created in 1.435 seconds
Byzantine Coins of Constantine IV Pogonatus