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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Greece||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Greece
Aetolian League, Aetolia, Greece, c. 225 - 170 B.C.

|Aetolia|, |Aetolian| |League,| |Aetolia,| |Greece,| |c.| |225| |-| |170| |B.C.||triobol|
The Aetolian League was a confederation of tribal communities and cities centered in central Greece, probably established to oppose Macedon and the Achaean League. Other Greeks considered Aetolians to be semi-barbaric, but their league had an effective political and administrative structure and a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.
GS95933. Silver triobol, Tsangari 507 (D13/R16); BCD Akarnania 472; SNG Cop III 14; BMC Thessaly p. 196, 26; HGC 4 950 (R1), aVF, attractive toning, scratches, tight flan, flan flaw rev. lower right, small edge split, weight 2.261 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 225o, Aitolian mint, c. 225 - 170 B.C.; obverse head of Aetolia right, wearing kausia; reverse the Calydonian boar standing right, AITΩΛΩN above sloping downward parallel to boar's back, (ΠA monogram) below, ∆I and spearhead right in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $200.00 (€184.00)


Aetolian League, Aetolia, Greece, c. 170 - 160 B.C.

|Aetolia|, |Aetolian| |League,| |Aetolia,| |Greece,| |c.| |170| |-| |160| |B.C.||triobol|
The Aetolian League was a confederation of tribal communities and cities centered in central Greece, probably established to oppose Macedon and the Achaean League. Other Greeks considered Aetolians to be semi-barbaric, but their league had an effective political and administrative structure and a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.
GS95934. Silver triobol, Tsangari 1243 (D109/R181), BCD Akarnania 491, HGC 4 952, BMC Thessaly p. 196, 24 var. (Πo monogram), SNG Cop III -, VF, well centered on a tight flan, uneven toning, scratches, weight 2.456 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 90o, Aitolian mint, c. 170 - 160 B.C.; obverse head of Aetolia right, wearing kausia; reverse the Calydonian boar standing right, AITΩΛΩN above, monogram in left field, ΠO below, spearhead right in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $200.00 (€184.00)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Pellene, Peloponnesos, Greece

|Peloponnesos|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Pellene,| |Peloponnesos,| |Greece||diassarion|
Pellene sided with Sparta in the Peloponnesian War, then joined the Achaean League until that League was dissolved by Alexander the Great. In the fourth century it was ruled for some time by a tyrant. In the third century, Pellene was garrisoned by the Aetolian League until the garrison was expelled by Aratus of Sicyon and the Achaeans in the 240s B.C. Pellene then joined the revived Achaean League until the League was incorporated into the Roman Empire in 146 B.C.
SH95334. Bronze diassarion, BCD Peloponnesos 607; BMC Peloponnesus p. 32, 15; Imhoof-Blumer NCP p. 92 (pl. S, XI); SNG Cop -, Dura -, aF, brown patina, legends obscure, weight 3.930 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 180o, Pellene mint, c. 198 - 205 A.D.; obverse L CEΠ CEV EPROC ΠE, laureate head right; reverse ΠEΛΛHNEΩN, Dionysus Lampter standing left, nude, pouring from kantharos in right hand, filleted thyrsus in left hand; ex J. S. Wagner Collection; very rare; $160.00 (€147.20)


Histiaia, Euboia, Greece, 168 - 146 B.C.

|Euboia|, |Histiaia,| |Euboia,| |Greece,| |168| |-| |146| |B.C.||AE| |15|NEW
From the Errett Bishop Collection.

Histiaia, named after its patron nymph, commanded a strategic position overlooking the narrows leading to the North Euboian Gulf. In the Iliad, Homer describes the surrounding plain as "rich in vines." In the early 4th century B.C., Histiaia seems to have been largely under the control of Sparta until they joined the Second Athenian Confederacy in 376 - 375. The city appears to have become a member (for the first time) of the reconstituted league of Euboian cities in 340, but its allegiance during most of the 4th century seems to have vacillated between Athens and Macedonia.
GB93815. Bronze AE 15, BCD Euboia 540; SNG Cop 547; BMC Central p. 135, 137; HGC 4 1532 (S), aVF, centered on a tight flan, mildly grainy surfaces, light earthen deposits, weight 4.181 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 90o, Histiaia (near Oreoi, Greece) mint, 168 - 146 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Histiaia right, rolled hair, wearing wreath of vine leaves and grapes, pendant earring and necklace; reverse IΣTIA−EΩN (counterclockwise), bunch of grapes on the vine, three monograms around; from the Errett Bishop Collection; very scarce; $150.00 (€138.00)


Achaean League, Patrai, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 160 - 146 B.C.

|Peloponnesos|, |Achaean| |League,| |Patrai,| |Peloponnesos,| |Greece,| |c.| |160| |-| |146| |B.C.||triobol| |or| |hemidrachm|NEW
The period of mintage begins with the Roman general, T. Quinctius Flamininus' proclamation of the "Freedom of Greece" in 196 B.C. and ends with the destruction of the League and the sack of Corinth by the Romans in 146 B.C. During this short period the league was the dominant state in Greece.
GS95952. Silver triobol or hemidrachm, Benner p. 90, 27; BCD Peloponnesos 501.6; Agrinion 298; SNG Cop 244 (Dyme); Clerk 146; McClean 6459; HGC 5 54 (S), F, toned, light scratches, small earthen encrustations, die wear, reverse double struck, weight 2.368 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Patrai (Patras, Greece) mint, c. 160 - 146 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right, ∆I behind; reverse large Achaian League (AX) monogram, ΛY above, A - P flanking at sides, dolphin right below, all within laurel wreath; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $150.00 (€138.00)


Die Munzpragung von Pharsalos

|Numismatic| |Books|, |Die| |Munzpragung| |von| |Pharsalos|
The coins of Pharsalos, in southern Thessaly, in Greece. Saarbrücken Studies of archeology and ancient history, volume 14. Pharsalos was the only important Thessalian city issuing coins in the fifth century B.C. which was not part of the groups producing Thessalian federal coinage.
BK13159. Die Munzpragung von Pharsalos by Stella Lavva, 2001, in German, 283 pages, new; $70.00 (€64.40)










REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Bishop, J.D. and R. Holloway. Wheaton College Collection of Greek and Roman Coins. (New York, 1981).
Bloesch, H. Griechische Münzen In Winterthur. (Winterthur, 1987).
Brett, A.B. Catalogue of Greek Coins, Boston Museum of Fine Arts. (Boston, 1955).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - )
Calciati, R. Pegasi. (Mortara, 1990).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber. (1922-1929).
Gardner, P. A Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thessaly to Aetolia. (London, 1883).
Grose, S.W. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fizwilliam Museum, Volume II - The Greek| mainland, the Aegaean| islands, Crete|. (Cambridge, 1926).
Head, B. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Attica-Megaris-Aegina. (London, 1888).
Head, B. Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Central Greece (Lorcris, Phocis, Boeotia, and Euboea). (London, 1884).
Head, B. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Corinth, Colonies of Corinth, Etc. (London, 1889).
Hoover, O.D. Handbook of Coins of the Islands: Adriatic, Ionian, Thracian, Aegean, and Carpathian Seas (Excluding Crete and Cyprus), 6th to 1st Centuries BC. (Lancaster, 2010).
Kraay, C.M. Archaic and Classical Greek Coins. (London, 1976).
Kroll, J.H. The Greek Coins. The Athenian Agora, vol. XXVI. (Princeton, 1993).
Lindgren, H.C. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (1989).
Lindgren, H.C. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins from the Lindgren Collection. (1993).
Mildenberg, L. and S. Hurter, eds. The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. ACNAC 6. (New York, 1985).
Naville Co. Monnaies grecques antiques S. Pozzi. Auction 1. (4 Apr 1921, Geneva).
Price, M.J. and N. Waggoner. Archaic Greek Silver Coinage, The "Asyut" Hoard. (London, 1975).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values. (London, 1978).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 3: Greece: Thessaly to Aegean Islands. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 12: Thessalien-Illyrien-Epirus-Korkyra. (Berlin, 2007).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 14: Attika, Megaris, Ägina. (Berlin, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 3: Akarnanien-Bithynien. (Berlin, 1985).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque National, Collection Jean et Marie Delepierre. (Paris, 1983).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain, Vol. III, R.C. Lockett Collection. (London, 1938 - 1949).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain, Vol. IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections: Part 4: Acarnania-Phliasia. (London, 1956).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain V, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, Part 4: Paeonia-Thessaly. (London. 1981).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece 1, Collection Réna H. Evelpidis, Part 2: Macédoine-Thessalie-Illyrie-Epire-Corcyre. (Athens, 1975).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece 6, The Alpha Bank Numismatic Collection, Thessaly to Euboea. (Athens, 2011).
Thompson, M. The Agrinion Hoard. ANSNNM 159 (New York, 1968).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Greek Coins of Crete and the Aegean Islands. (London, 1886).


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