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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ PhoeniciaView Options:  |  |  |     

Ancient Coins of Phoenicia

Gebal (Byblos), Phoenicia, c. 450 - 410 B.C.

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The extremely rare first coinage of Byblos, struck with Egyptian types at an Egyptian weight standard (one kite). A beautiful representation of an Egyptian sphinx in the pose of the famous Giza monumental statue graces the obverse.

Head notes, "Herodotus relates (iv. 166) that Aryandes, who had been appointed satrap of Egypt by Cambyses, mortally offended Darius, son of Hystaspes, by issuing silver money which rivalled in purity the gold darics of the great king himself. If the story be true, it probably refers to ordinary Persian sigloi. No coins have come down to us which can be identified as those of Aryandes." Could this coin be the one of those issued by Aryandes?
SH38939. Silver shekel, Betlyon 1, Kraay 1051, SNG Cop -, gVF, toned, weight 8.907 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 0o, Gebal mint, obverse Sphinx seated left, wearing crown of Upper and Lower Egypt; reverse lightning bolt (or double lotus) in dotted circle within incuse square; almost equal in quality to the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and American Numismatic Society examples; extremely rare; SOLD


Persian Empire, Sidon, Phoenicia, King Strato I (Adb'ashtart I), c. 365 - 352 B.C.

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SH48909. Silver double shekel, Elayi 2004 1345-8; cf. Betlyon 21 & 35; cf. BMC Phoenicia p. 145, 29, gVF, weight 25.428 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, c. 352 B.C.; obverse armed galley with oars, advancing left, standard in stern, small figure as figurehead on bow, Phoenician regnal date year 14 (IIII-) above; reverse King of Persia with charioteer in a biga left, horses waking, Sidonian king walks behind in Asian garb carrying a cultic scepter and votive vase, Phoenician letters BA (90) above; typical weak strike, nicely centered on a full flan, lightly toned, ex Goldberg Auction 55, lot 77, 29 Oct 2009; SOLD


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C.

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An apparently unique tetradrachm with the Akko mintmark and the two letters perhaps associated with Sosibius, advisor to Ptolemy IV.

Ptolemy IV's surname Philopator means father lover, ironic since according to some authorities he poisoned his father. Ptolemy IV is a major protagonist of the apocryphal 3 Maccabees, which describes events following the Battle of Raphia, in both Jerusalem and Alexandria. He was a cruel and evil monarch.
SH64462. Silver tetradrachm, unpublished, cf. Svoronos 786 (Ptolemy II, different monogram), SNG Milan -, SNG Cop -; BMC Ptolemies -, Noeske -, Hosking -, VF, weight 13.792 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 0o, Judaea, Ptolemais (Akko) mint, 205 B.C.; obverse Diademed bust of Ptolemy right wearing aegis; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY ΣΩTHPOΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head left, wings closed, ΠTο monogram at left, retrograde ΣΩ right; perhaps unique; SOLD


Persian Empire, Gebal-Byblos, Phoenicia, King Azba'al, c. 400 - 376 B.C.

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In the Persian period (538 - 332 B.C.), Gebal was a vassal kingdom established by the Persians.

Byblos was famous for its papyrus - the word bible is derived from Byblos.
SH32538. Silver dishekel, SNG Cop 132, SGCV II 6011, Rouvier 639, Dewing 2662, attractive aEF, weight 13.187 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, Byblos mint, obverse galley left, lion-head prow, with three hoplites, each helmeted and holding shield, Phoenician monogram ayin zayin (AZ), hippocamp and murex below; reverse Phoenician legend, "Azbaal, king of Gebal", lion attacking bull; SOLD


Persian Empire, Gebal-Byblos, Phoenicia, King Azbaal, c. 365 - 350 B.C.

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In the Persian period (538 - 332 B.C.), Gebal was a vessel kingdom established by the Persians.
SH26694. Silver dishekel, SNG Cop 132, SGCV II 6011, Rouvier 639, gVF, weight 13.199 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 270o, Byblos mint, obverse galley left, lion-head prow, with three hoplites, each helmeted and holding shield, Phoenician monogram ayin zayin (AZ), hippocamp and murex below; reverse Phoenician legend, "Azbaal, king of Gebal", lion attacking bull; SOLD


Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C. Sidon, Phoenicia

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SH08321. Gold stater, Price 3471, VF, weight 8.48 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 45o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet ornamented with a sphinx; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left holding wreath and ship's mast, branch at feet left; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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SH12598. Gold stater, Price 3464, Newell Dated 6, pl.. 1, 9, VF, weight 8.543 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, 333 - 305 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet; reverse AΛEΞAN∆P−OY, Nike standing left, wreath in right, ship's mast in left, barley grain in lower right field; light scratches and dings; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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The ancient city of Byblos stood near the mouth of the Adonis River (called the Abraham River today) and was a site for the veneration of Adonis, the god of love and beauty in Greek mythology. He was said to have been killed near the river by a boar sent by Ares, the god of war (or by Ares himself disguised as a boar, depending on the version). According to the myth, Adonis' blood flowed in the river, making the water reddish for centuries and spawning a carpet of scarlet buttercups along the river's banks. In reality, the river flows red each February due to the volume of soil washed off the mountains by heavy winter rains, making it appear that the water is filled with blood. The river emerges from a huge cavern, the Aqsa Grotto, nearly 5,000 ft (1,500 m) above sea level before it drops steeply through a series of falls and passes through a sheer gorge through the mountains.The river valley contains the remains of numerous temples and shrines. Even today, local people hang out clothes of sick people at a ruined temple near the river's source in the hopes of effecting cures.
SH15299. Gold stater, Price 3423, Müller Alexander 1374, F, weight 8.473 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Byblos mint, c. 330 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing crested Corinthian helmet; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left holding wreath in right and stylus with left, AP monogram left field; ex Coin Galleries 20 Nov 1975, ex Coloseum Coin Exchange; SOLD


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

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The K behind the ear appears on a few tetradrachms from Tyre and Sidon. Perhaps the finest known of this rare variety.
SH32904. Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 715, cf. SNG Milan 141, BMC Ptolemies p. 27, 32, Hosking 98, SNG Cop -, Malter -, Hosking -, EF, nice high-relief portrait, weight 14.226 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis, signature K behind ear; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, ΣI left; very rare; SOLD


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor, 180 - 145 B.C., Arados, Phoenicia

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SH24844. Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 1207, Mørkholm 167 - 170, Choice EF, weight 14.154 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 0o, Phoenicia, Arados mint, 169 - 168 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY ΣΩTHPOΣ, eagle with wings closed standing half left atop fulmen, date PA left (year 91); SOLD


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Orthosia, Phoenicia

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This is an extremely rare issue known only from a few specimens.
SH03585. Bronze AE 21, RPC I 4502, SNG Cop 176, aF, weight 6.68 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, Phoenicia, Orthosia mint, 35 - 34 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Cleopatra right, star behind; reverse Baal of Orthosia in chariot pulled by to griffins to right, LΓ (Phoenician regnal year 3) in left field, OPΘΩCIEΩN in exergue; extremely rare; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 94 - 93 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH38447. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 241, 124, aEF, weight 14.380 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, 94 - 93 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond under wing, date ΓΛ (year 33) over club left, HAP monogram right, Aramaic beth between legs; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Tyre, Phoenicia

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SH09037. Silver tetradrachm, Prieur 1478, Choice EF, weight 14.69 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 180o, Tyre mint, 103 - 109 A.D.; obverse AVTOKP KAIC NEP - TPAIANOC CEB ΓEPM, laureate head right, eagle below, club in front, palm-branch behind; reverse ∆HMAPX - EΞ YΠAT B, laureate bust of Melqart draped in lion-skin; a touch flat on high points, very nice metal; rare; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Cleopatra and Antiochus VIII Grypus, 125 - 121 B.C.

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Antiochus VIII Grypus (Hook-Nose) was crowned as a teenager, ruling jointly with his mother Cleopatra Thea. In 121 B.C., one day when he returned from a hunt, his mother offered him a cup of wine. Since this was not common behavior for her, Grypus was suspicious and forced her to drink the wine; poisoned, it killed her. Grypus fought a civil war with his brother that ended with his murder.
GS42572. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 2271.1, SGCV II 7137, gVF, fine style, weight 15.763 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 0o, Ake-Ptolemais mint, 125 - 121 B.C.; obverse jugate busts right of Cleopatra Thea, diademed, veiled and wearing stephane, and Antiochos, diademed, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ / KΛEOΠATPAΣ / ΘEAΣ, KAI / BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY, Zeus enthroned left, Nike in right, long scepter vertical in left, v/Σ monogram outer left; ex CNG auction 223, lot 245; very scarce; SOLD


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 B.C.

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Ptolemy III Euergetes was the third ruler of the Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt. He promoted the translation of Jewish scriptures into Greek as the Septuagint. Due to a falling out at the Seleucid court, his eldest sister Berenice Phernophorus was murdered along with her infant son. In response he invaded Syria, occupied Antioch and even reached Babylon. This war, the Third Syrian War, is cryptically alluded to in Daniel XI 7-9.
SH26926. Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 1001, SNG Cop 167, gVF, weight 14.144 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 0o, Phoenician mint, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY ΣΩTHPOΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia left; nice style, high relief dies; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 107 - 106 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH62323. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 246, 176; Prieur 1374; RPC I 4628; SNG Cop 328 var. (controls), VF, weight 13.713 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 45o, Tyre mint, 38 - 37 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond under wing, date ΠΘ (year 89) over club left, o/∆I monogram right, Aramaic letter beth between legs; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 107 - 106 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH20434. Silver shekel, Cohen DCA 919 (year 88, R2), Rouvier 2067, RPC I 4627 corr., Baramki AUB 77, BMC Phoenicia -, gVF, weight 14.184 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, 39 - 38 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond under wing, date ΠH (year 88) over club left, ZN right, Aramaic letter between legs; attractive and nicely toned, reverse double-struck; rare year; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 107 - 106 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH67486. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 238, 94, VF, weight 14.070 g, maximum diameter 27.1 mm, die axis 45o, Tyre mint, c. 107 - 106 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond under wing, date LK (year 20) over club left, monogram right, Phoenician letter nun between legs; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 99 - 98 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH20281. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia, p. 241, 126 - 127, gVF, toned, weight 14.339 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, 92 - 91 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, date EΛ (year 35) over club and palm frond left, ∆ right, Phoenician kaph between legs; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 107 - 106 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH53309. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 240, 107, gVF, weight 14.255 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, 103 - 102 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, ∆K (year 24) over club and palm frond left, HAP monogram right, Phoenician letter nun between legs; heavy flow lines on the obverse, well centered; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VII Euergetes Sidetes, 138 - 129 B.C., Tyre, Phoenicia

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After his brother Demetrius was captured by the Parthians, Antiochus VII was made king. He married Demetrius' wife Cleopatra Thea. He defeated the usurper Tryphon at Dora and laid siege to Jerusalem in 134. According to Josephus, the Hasmonean king John Hyrcanus opened King David's sepulcher and removed three thousand talents, which he then paid Antiochus to spare the city. Sidetes then attacked the Parthians, supported by a body of Jews under Hyrcanus, and briefly took back Mesopotamia, Babylonia and Media before being ambushed and killed by Phraates II. His brother Demetrius II had by then been released, but the Seleucid realm was now restricted to Syria. Antiochus VII was the last Seleucid king of any stature.
SH75179. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2109.3, SNG Spaer 2008, Cohen DCA 198, HGC 9 1074, SNG Cop -, BMC Seleucid -, Choice gVF, attractive style, light toning, light marks, weight 14.169 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, 138 - 137 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Antiochos VII right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY, eagle standing left on prow, palm frond under wing, A/PE over TYP monogram on club left, AVς monogram over EOP (year 175) right, AYM monogram between eagle's legs; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 107 - 106 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH16905. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 238, 94 var. (monogram on right), gVF, weight 14.115 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, c. 107 - 106 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond under wing, date LK (year 20) over club left, M monogram right, Phoenician letter nun between legs; SOLD


Alexander the Great, Arados, Phoenicia, c. 328 - c. 320 B.C.

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Lifetime or very early posthumous issue.
SH26924. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3309, gVF, slightly grainy, toned, struck with attractive high relief dies, weight 17.130 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 90o, Arados mint, c. 328 - c. 320 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse Zeus enthroned left, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), A/P monogram under throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue; SOLD


Jerusalem or Tyre, 20 - 21 A.D., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
JD40037. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 248, 201; RPC I 4659; Prieur 1419, EF, uneven, weight 14.236 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem or Tyre mint, 20 - 21 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, letter between legs, PMς (year 146 = 20/21 A.D.) and club left, KP and monogram right; SOLD


Levant, Egypt or Arabia, Imitative Athenian Transitional Style Tetradrachm, c. 350 - 330 B.C.

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This coin is from the hoard containing at least 76 Athenian-type owls, both Athenian issues and Egyptian and Levantine imitations, and two silver "dumps" cataloged and discussed by Peter G. van Alfen, in "A New Athenian "Owl" and Bullion Hoard from the Near East" in AJN 16-17 (2004-05), pp. 47-61, and pl. 6-13. The hoard is rumored to have come from the western coast of the Arabian Peninsula.
SH66406. Silver tetradrachm, Van Alfen New p. 58 and pl. 12, 67 (this coin), VF, test cut on reverse, weight 16.983 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 270o, Athens mint, c. 353 - 294 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right with eye seen in true profile, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll; reverse owl standing right, head facing, to right AΘE in large lettering, to left olive sprig and crescent; Van Alfen plate coin; very rare; SOLD


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy I as Satrap, 323 - 305 B.C.

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Found in Israel. Overstruck on an earlier Alexander, with the undertype visible on the obverse at 180 degrees at center, and piece of dotted scepter visible below A on reverse. Struck on a weight standard of c. 15.7 g, or 22 obols, at the time of the invasion of Cyprus by Demetrios Poliorketes. Most of the tetradrachms of this weight standard are probably from Salamis, the last city to fall to the Besieger. Some are overstruck on earlier attic-weight Alexanders, reduced in weight. Most have a helmet symbol, perhaps a connection to the army. A few have an aphlaston, a stern ornament, that may symbolize the Ptolemaic Navy. Rare examples have other symbols, including the bee, which may symbolize Ephesos. Other rare symbols include the cornucopia and the dolphin. The symbol on this coin is similar to those attributed to Tyre by Price, from 305 to 290 B.C. Charles Hersh gives similar dates in his article on the Demetrios Poliorketes coinage of Tyre, "Tyrus Devicta Revisted." Sidon struck a unique tetradrachm (now in the ANS collection) of this style and Attic Weight, dated year 22 = 312/1 BC. This unpublished issue, if it is from Tyre, would show brief Ptolemaic control of a portion of the city.
SH21440. Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos -, SNG Cop -, BMC -, Noeske -, Mørkholm -, SNG Delepierre -, Hunterian -, apparently unpublished, VF, weight 12.994 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre? mint, c. 306 - 305 B.C.; obverse head of Alexander the Great right, wearing elephant-head headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Athena advancing right, eagle and monogram in circle before; overstruck, toned, grainy; extremely rare; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, c. 302 - 301 B.C.

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This era by which this type was dated is presumably that of Alexander the Great, starting with his conquest of the city in 332 B.C.
SH26477. Silver didrachm, BMC Phoenicia p. 232, 36, VF, weight 8.378 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, c. 302 - 301 B.C.; obverse bearded Melqart riding hippocamp with curled wing to right, waves and dolphin below; reverse owl standing right, head facing, crook and flail behind, date (year 30) in right field; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Tyre, Phoenicia

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SH08919. Silver tetradrachm, Prieur 1495, BMC Phoenicia 11, toned aEF, Tyre mint, 103 - 109 A.D.; obverse AVTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIANOC CEB ΓEPM ∆AK, laureate head right, eagle below, club in front; reverse ∆HMAPXEΞYΠATE, laureate bust of Melqart draped in lion-skin; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Dora, Phoenicia

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Dora, on the coast eight miles north of Caesarea, was a Canaanite city. It fell to the Philistines early in the 12th century B.C. Solomon appointed the son of Abinadab as overseer of Dor (I Kings 4:11). In the Persian period Dor was a Sidonian colony. In Hellenistic times it was a Ptolemaic seaport and royal fortress, once besieged by Antiochus VII, (1 Macc. 15. 11-14). Under the Romans, Dora was a free city. See also Josh 11:2, 17:11; and Judg 1:27.
SH09078. Bronze AE 24, BMC Phoenicia 33; Meshorer Dora 34, aVF, weight 12.41 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Dora mint, 111 - 112 A.D.; obverse AVT KAIC NEP TPAIANOC CEB ΓEPM ∆AK, laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder, star under chin; reverse ∆Ω−P, turreted bust of Tyche right in wreath, POE below; beautiful green patina with attractive natural earthen highlighting; very rare; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 94 - 93 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH16832. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 241, 124, gVF, weight 14.217 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, 94 - 93 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond under wing, date ΓΛ (year 33) over club left, HAP monogram right, Aramaic beth between legs; nicely centered, attractive coin; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 94 - 93 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH21681. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 241, 124, aEF, weight 14.170 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, 94 - 93 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond under wing, date ΓΛ (year 33) over club left, HAP monogram right, Aramaic beth between legs; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 87 - 86 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH28937. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia, p. 242, 133 var. (control symbols), nice VF, weight 13.968 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 0o, 87 - 86 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, date L M (year 40) over club and palm frond left, ∆ right, Aramaic beth between legs; well centered and struck on nice metal; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 75 - 74 B.C., The Temple Tax Coin

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Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple.

At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied on Jews was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were not always used in everyday commerce, but were the only coins accepted by the temple. Many taxpayers required a currency exchange, so money changers set up in the Temple court. Jesus found this business and their shouting (advertising rates) offensive, so he threw over their tables.
SH49483. Silver half shekel, possibly unpublished date for half shekel, Rouvier - (cf. 2039, shekel), BMC Phoenicia -, SNG Cop -, et al., VF, weight 6.516 g, maximum diameter 21.65 mm, die axis 45o, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, 75 - 74 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, BN (year 52) over club left, Z right, Aramaic letter between legs; very rare; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 76 - 75 B.C., The Temple Tax Coin

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Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple.

At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied on Jews was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were not always used in everyday commerce, but were the only coins accepted by the temple. Many taxpayers required a currency exchange, so money changers set up in the Temple court. Jesus found this business and their shouting (advertising rates) offensive, so he threw over their tables.
SH54403. Silver half shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 251, 230 var. (A right on rev); Rouvier 2036, gVF, obv. die wear, weight 6.906 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 0o, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, 76 - 75 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, AN (year 51) over club left, monogram right, Phoenician letter beth between legs; rare variant; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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Lifetime or very early posthumous issue struck under Menes or Laomedon.
SH58038. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3332; Duyrat group IV, series 11, gVF, weight 17.050 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 0o, Phoenicia, Arados mint, c. 324 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse Zeus enthroned left, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, long lotus tipped scepter vertical behind in left, kerykeion left, A over P monogram under throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue; SOLD


The Temple Tax Coin, KAP Tyrian Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 19 - 18 B.C.

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A KAP Temple Tax Coin - Important Transitional Year!

Some Tyrian shekels and all half shekels struck year 108 (19/18 B.C.) bear the Greek letters KAP. Years 109 - 111 all the coins bear the KAP ligature. In the following years until production ceased all the coins bear the Greek letters KP. Meshorer argued that the KAP and KP coins were actually struck at Jerusalem, initially by Herod. He based his opinion on a sudden stylistic and fabric degradation, find locations indicating the KP coins circulated mainly in Israel, and an end to production coinciding with the First Jewish Rebellion and the destruction of the Jerusalem Temple in A.D. 70. Under Augustus the cities in the east such as Kyzikos, Tyre and Sidon lost much of their autonomy. Perhaps Tyre lost the freedom to strike silver coins. Under Roman control the other traditional silver coinages of the area did disappear, with the exception of a debased Antioch coinage. Given Herod's influence with Augustus, it is conceivable that he successfully arranged minting Tyre type shekels in Jerusalem in order to fill the need for the accepted temple coinage. The letters KAP and KP likely abbreviate the Greek for Caesar perhaps indicating the approval of Rome.
JD79298. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 252, 233; Cohen DCA 921 (R3); RPC I 4684; Hendin 1619; HGC 10 358, Baramki AUB -, F, toned, rough, die wear, weight 5.808 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 45o, Jerusalem or Tyre mint, 19 - 18 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOYIEPAΣ KAIAΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, date PH (year 108) over club and palm frond left, KAP (Kaisar?) monogram right, Phoenician letter beth (control) between legs; rare date; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 94 - 93 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH21682. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 241, 120 ff., aEF, tight flan, weight 14.263 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, 95 - 94 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond under wing, date BΛ (year 32) over club left, HAP monogram right, Aramaic beth between legs; SOLD


The Temple Tax Coin, Tyre KP Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 49 - 50 A.D.

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SH13696. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia 210, RPC I 4674, gVF, weight 13.266 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 0o, 49 - 50 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, POE (year 175) and club left, KP / EP right, Aramaic letter between legs; SOLD


Arados, Phoenicia, 63 - 62 B.C.

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"The dated coins of this series span almost a century, from 137 to 45 B.C." - Greek Coins and Their Values by David Sear. Dates are written in Greek letters in the left field. Below the date is usually a Phoenician letter and below that usually two Greek letters. These letters may indicate magistrates.
SH19459. Silver tetradrachm, BMC Phoenicia, p 34, 279, aEF, weight 15.336 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 0o, Arados mint, 63 - 62 B.C.; obverse turreted and draped bust of Tyche right, dot border; reverse APA∆IΩN, Nike standing left, apluster in right, palm frond in left, date zqp (year 197) over Aramaic beth / EΣ left, all in laurel wreath; Ex-CNG 3/97 #691, attractive; rare; SOLD


Jerusalem or Tyre, 4 - 5 A.D., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Jesus.
The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH10967. Silver shekel, Prieur 1408, RPC I 4652, Hendin 919, BMC Phoenicia 197, EF, attractive style, weight 14.30 g, maximum diameter 24.91 mm, die axis 0o, 4 - 5 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, date PΛ (year 130=4/5 B.C.) over club on l, KP over EPH monogram on right, Phoenician beth between legs; previously graded and encapsulated by ICG as EF45, but now removed from the capsule (ICG slip with the grade will be included with the coin); SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 94 - 93 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH16829. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 241, 124, VF, weight 14.373 g, maximum diameter 30.0 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, 94 - 93 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond under wing, date ΓΛ (year 33) over club left, HAP monogram right, Aramaic beth between legs; nicely centered, attractive coin, two small nicks on cheek; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 90 - 89 B.C., The Temple Tax Coin

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Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple

At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied on Jews was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were not always used in everyday commerce, but were the only coins accepted by the temple. Many taxpayers required a currency exchange, so money changers set up in the Temple court. Jesus found this business and their shouting (advertising rates) offensive, so he threw over their tables.
SH20261. Silver half shekel, SGCV II 5921 var. (date and symbols), BMC Phoenicia -, gVF, weight 7.091 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 45o, Tyre mint, 90 - 89 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, date ZΛ (year 37) over club & palm left, monogram right, reversed Aramaic beth between legs; attractive style; SOLD


The Temple Tax Coin, Tyre KP Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 35 - 36 A.D.

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Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
After the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, some experts believe Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. These coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The Jerusalem shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.
SL62590. Silver half shekel, RPC I 4665, Prieur 1425, VF, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, 35 - 36 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond under wing, PΞA (year 161) over club left, KP and monogram right, Aramaic letter between legs; PCGS certified "genuine" (slabbed); SOLD


"Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver,"

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH05328. Silver shekel, SGCV II 5918, gVF, weight 14.19 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, date AΛ (year 31=96/95 B.C.) over club on l, monogram right, Phoenician beth between legs; SOLD


"Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver,"

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH06721. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia 153, VF, weight 14.02 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, ∆Ξ (year 64) and club left, monogram right, Phoenician beth between legs; nice example; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 76 - 75 B.C.

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Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied on Jews was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were not always used in everyday commerce, but were the only coins accepted by the temple. Many taxpayers required a currency exchange, so money changers set up in the Temple court. Jesus found this business and their shouting (advertising rates) offensive, so he threw over their tables.
SH08326. Silver half shekel, Rouvier 2036; BMC Phoenicia p. 251, 230 var. (A vice ∆); HGC 10 358; Cohen DCA 921; Hendin 1619; Baramki AUB -, aEF, some shallow pitting, weight 6.93 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre, Phoenicia mint, 76 - 75 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, AN (year 51) over club left, ∆ right, Phoenician letter beth between legs; SOLD


Phoenicia or Palestine, 401 - 395 B.C., Imitative of Tissaphernes, Persian Satrap in Lydia & Caria

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A small hoard of this type with some with traces of silver plating was found at Dor. This coin was also found near there. The type is based on the "owl Tetradrachm" of the Tissaphernes from the find of Karaman (cfr. E.S.G. Robinson in numerical control 1948, Tf. is to 5, 8). However, this type was struck not in Asia Minor, but in the Levante.
JD11874. Bronze drachm, Qedar Tissaphernes 14, Tf. 1, D.8 (same dies), F, weight 3.277 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, die axis 0o, Phoenicia or Palestine mint, obverse idealized head of Tissaphernes (Persian Satrap in Lydia & Caria 415 - 399 B.C.) with satrapal cap (kyrbasia); reverse owl standing half right, head facing, BA left, all within an incuse square; an example of this extremely rare type on coinarchives was estimated at 3500 Euros (unsold); extremely rare; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 111 - 110 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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SH15313. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia -, gVF, weight 14.221 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 45o, Tyre mint, 111 - 110 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, date ςI (year 6) over club and palm frond left, ZB right, Phoenician letter nun between legs; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 107 - 106 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH15317. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 238, 93, VF, weight 14.126 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, 107 - 106 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, date LK (year 20) over club and palm frond left, ZB monogram right, Phoenician letter nun between legs; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, c. 332 - 306 B.C.

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SH16906. Silver didrachm, BMC Phoenicia p. 231, 29; SNG Cop 307 var. (year), gVF+, weight 8.500 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, c. 330 - 329 B.C.; obverse bearded Melqart riding hippocamp with curled wing to right, waves and dolphin below; reverse owl standing right, head facing; crook and flail behind; date II (year 2) and Phoenician letter tsade in right fields; superb detail, obverse slighty off center, on reverse lower 1/5 unstruck; SOLD




    




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REFERENCES

Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Betlyon, J.W. The Coinage and Mints of Phoenicia. The Pre-Alexandrine Period. Harvard Semitic Monographs, Vol. 26. (Chico, CA, 1982).
Baramki, D.C. The Coin Collection of the American University of Beirut Museum. (Beirut, 1974).
Burnett, A. & M. Amandry. Roman Provincial Coinage II: From Vespasian to Domitian (AD 69-96). (London, 1999).
Cohen, E. Dated Coins of Antiquity: A comprehensive catalogue of the coins and how their numbers came about. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
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Hersh, C. "Tyrus Rediviva Reconsidered" in AJN 10. (New York, 1998).
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Houghton, A., C. Lorber & O. Hoover. Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalog. (Lancaster, 2002 - 2008).
Hoover, O.D. Handbook of Coins of the Southern Levant: Phoenicia, Southern Koile Syria (Including Judaea), and Arabia, Fifth to First Centuries BC. HGC 10. (Lancaster, PA, 2010).
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Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Meshorer, Y. "The Coins of Dora" in INJ 9 (1986).
Meshorer, Y. "One Hundred Ninety Years of Tyrian Shekels" in Studies Mildenberg (Wettern, 1984).
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Catalog current as of Friday, July 29, 2016.
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