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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ MacedoniaView Options:  |  |  |     

Ancient Greek Coins of Macedonia

Koinon of Macedonia, Reign of Severus Alexander, c. 231 - 235 A.D., Alexander and Bucephalus

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Plutarch tells the story of how, in 344 B.C. Philonicus the Thessalian, a horse dealer, offered a massive wild stallion to Alexander's father, King Philip II. Since no one could tame the animal, Philip was not interested. Alexander, however, seeing that the horse was afraid of his own shadow, promised to pay for the horse himself should he fail to tame it. He was given a chance and surprised all by subduing it. Alexander spoke soothingly to the horse and turned it towards the sun so that it could no longer see its shadow. Eventually Bucephalus allowed Alexander to ride him. Embarrassed, Philip commented "O my son, look thee out a kingdom equal to and worthy of thyself, for Macedonia is too little for thee." Alexander named the horse Bucephalus because the horse's head seemed "as broad as a bull's." Bucephalus died of battle wounds in 326 B.C., in Alexander's last battle. Alexander founded the city of Bucephala (thought to be the modern town of Jhelum, Pakistan) in memory of his wonderful horse.
SH90947. Bronze AE 26, AMNG III 423; BMC Macedonia p. 23, 104; Lindgren 1379; SNG Hunterian 735 var. (no star); cf. SNG Cop 1372 (2 neokorie); SNG Bar -, gVF, reverse pitted, weight 13.804 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 225o, Macedonia, Beroea(?) mint, c. 231 - 235 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, head of Alexander the Great right, as Herakles, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ONΩN NEΩ, Alexander riding his horse Bucephalus right, wearing military garb, cloak flying behind, couched spear in right hand, reins in left, star below; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Anonymous, c. 311 - 179 B.C., Struck in the Name of Alexander the Great

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Alexander the Great is arguably the most famous man of antiquity. Born a leader, his genius and charisma led the Macedonian Army creating an empire that covered most of the then-known world, from Greece to India. He was regarded as god and his fame grew even greater after his premature death at thirty-three. His reign marks the beginning of the Hellenistic Age, a time when almost every aspect of human civilization flourished. His coinage is highly complex, struck in cities all over the ancient map and spanning over two hundred years.
GB71706. Bronze AE 17, SNG Cop 1131, Price -, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, green patina, earthen deposits, corrosion on reverse, weight 3.334 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Macedonian mint, after 311 B.C.; obverse Macedonian shield with club of Herakles ornamenting boss, six double crescent-like ornaments around; reverse Macedonian officer's helmet facing with ear flaps and crest from side to side, B - A (BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY) flanking; none on Coin Archives, apparently none online; rare; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Struck by Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-eyed") as strategos of Asia (320 - 306 B.C.) or as king (306 - 301 B.C.). With the arrival of Alexander the Great, Teos gained its freedom from Persian rule. In 319 B.C., it came under the rule of the Strategos of Asia, Antigonus I Monophthalmos (the one-eyed). Antigonus declared himself King in 306. In 302 B.C., Troas fell to Lysimachus' general, Prepelaos. Lysimachus moved some of Troas' citizens to the newly built city of Ephesus.
GS75183. Silver drachm, Price 2290, Müller Alexander 766, SNG München 596, SNG Cop 899, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, toned, crowded flan, porosity, polishing marks on reverse, weight 4.247 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Teos mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, backless throne, right leg drawn back, feet on low footstool, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, H∆ monogram in left field, ΠP monogram below throne; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III & Alexander IV - Ptolemy Keraunos, c. 323 - 280 B.C., In the Name of Alexander

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Ptolemy Keraunos was the King of Macedon from 281 BC to 279 B.C. His epithet Keraunos is Greek for "Thunder" or "Thunderbolt." He was the eldest son of Ptolemy I Soter of Egypt. After his younger half-brother, also called Ptolemy, ascended to the throne as Ptolemy II, Keraunos had to leave Egypt, being a potential rival for the throne. He arrived at the first at the court of Lysimachus and then moved to the court of Seleucus. After Lysimachus' defeat and death in the Battle of Corupedium in 281 B.C., Keraunos murdered Seleucus I in order to take the power of his former protector. He then rushed to Lysimacheia where he had himself acclaimed king by the Macedonian army. He did not rule long. In 279 B.C., he was captured and killed fighting against the massive raids by Gauls into Macedonia and Greece.
GS75253. Silver drachm, cf. Price 2778, VF, toned, nice style, die wear, light cleaning marks on reverse, weight 4.068 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Western Anatolia mint, 323 - 280 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on backless throne, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, monogram left, monogram(?) or control symbol(?) under throne; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., Struck in the Name of Philip

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Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regent Perdikkas held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Olympias had Philip murdered in an attempt to ensure the rule of her grandson.
GS75254. Silver drachm, Price P57, Müller Alexander P89a, SNG Alpha Bank 857, SNG Cop -, SNG München -, VF, attractive style, toned, porous, light marks and scratches, weight 3.880 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, struck under Menander or Kleito, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg forward, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, monogram below throne; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander

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Struck after Alexander's death during the joint reign of Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and Alexander's infant son with Roxana, Alexander IV. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Olympias was Alexander the Great's mother and Alexander IV's grandmother, but not Philip III's mother. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C.
GS75257. Silver drachm, Price 2264, Prokesch-Osten I 378, SNG Berry 231, SNG München 593, Müller Alexander -, SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, well centered on a crowded flan, uneven toning, die wear, weight 3.970 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Teos mint, struck under Menander or Kleitos, 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, Πο over ∆I left; scarce; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, 320 - 306 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") was a nobleman and strategos (general and governor) under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
GS75263. Silver drachm, ADM I Series XX, Price 2683, SNG München 641, Müller Alexander 1690, SNG Cop -, VF, attractive style, toned, tight flan, scratches and scrapes, light corrosion, weight 3.879 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 270o, Lydia, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, as strategos of Asia, 319 - 315 B.D.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, nude to waist, himation around waist and legs, feet on footstool, right foot drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, K monogram in circle with base on left, HA monogram below throne; rare; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., Struck in the Name of Philip

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Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. Perdikkas held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
GS75265. Silver drachm, Price P56, SNG München 947, Müller Alexander -, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Cop -, VF, bold full circle strike on obverse, reverse struck with a worn die, weight 4.272 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, struck under Menander or Kleito, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, feet on footstool, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, IAT monogram left; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV - Kassander, c. 323 - 310 B.C.

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Herakles is most often depicted on coinage wearing the scalp of the Nemean lion over his head. The first of Herakles' twelve labors, set by King Eurystheus (his cousin), was to slay the Nemean lion and bring back its skin. Herakles discovered arrows and his club were useless against it because its golden fur was impervious to mortal weapons. Its claws were sharper than swords and could cut through any armor. Herakles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight the lion bit off one of his fingers. After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt, but failed. Wise Athena, noticing the hero's plight, told him to use one of the lion's own claws to skin the pelt.
GB76283. Bronze AE 20, Price 2800f, SNG München 919, Müller Alexander -, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Cop -, VF, well centered, green patina, scratches, pitting, weight 5.631 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 90o, uncertain Western Anatolia mint, c. 323 - 310 B.C., Possibly Struck by Antigonus I; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in lion-skin head-dress; reverse torch and club left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward in center, bow inside bow case right, A lower right, uncertain round countermark; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS76135. Silver drachm, Price 1809, Müller Alexander 263, SNG München 522, SNG Cop 922, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, toned, centered, nice style, some porosity, reverse die wear, weight 4.076 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, crescent horns left over TI monogram in left field, Π under throne; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00




    



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Macedonia Greek Coins