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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ MacedoniaView Options:  |  |  |     

Ancient Greek Coins of Macedonia

Paroreia, Macedonia, c. 185 - 168 B.C.

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The Macedonian kingdom was administered with a three-level pyramidal organization: on the top was the King and the nation, the kingdom was divided into districts, and within the districts were the civic organizations (cities and éthne). This civic coin was struck by the City of Paroreia during the years just prior to the Macedonian Kingdom's fall to Rome.
GB58466. Bronze AE 22, BMC Macedonia, p. 15, 60; SNG Cop 254 var (monogram left), VF, weight 6.464 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 135o, Paroreia mint, c. 185 - 168 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus Dodonaios right; reverse eagle standing right on thunderbolt, head left, NK monogram upper left, ΠAP monogram lower right; scarce; $65.00 (€57.20)


Macedonia, Roman Protectorate, Quaestor Gaius Publilius, 168 - 167 B.C.

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On 22 June 168 B.C., Lucius Aemilius Paullus won the Battle of Pydna, ending the Third Macedonian War. According to Plutarch, Paullus kept too much plunder for himself, displeasing his legions. On his return to Rome, to keep them happy, Paullus stopped in Epirus, a kingdom suspected of sympathizing with Macedonia. He sacked 70 towns, enslaved 150,000, and left the region bankrupt. Paullus' return to Rome was glorious. With the immense plunder, he celebrated a spectacular triumph, featuring the captured king, Perseus of Macedonia. The senate awarded him the cognomen Macedonicus.
RP62146. Bronze AE 20, BMC Macedonia p. 18, 76; SNG Cop 1323; AMNG III 210, MacKay pl. III, 5 var (noted variant); Lindgren 1350 var (monograms), F, weight 10.403 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, Bottiaea, Pella(?) mint, 168 - 167 B.C.; obverse head of Athena Parthenos right, wearing crested Athenian helmet adorned with a griffin and foreparts of horses (as on contemporary Athenian tetradrachms); reverse ΓAIOY / TAMIOY, cow grazing right, ΠΛY (ΠOΠΛIΛIOY) monogram above right, BT (Bottiaea) monogram below; scarce; $65.00 (€57.20)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip V, 221 - 179 B.C.

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Philip's reign was principally marked by an unsuccessful struggle against the emerging power of Rome. Philip was attractive and charismatic as a young man. A dashing and courageous warrior, he was inevitably compared to Alexander the Great and was nicknamed the darling of all Greece. --
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


GB72629. Bronze AE 21, cf. SNG Alpha Bank 1116 ff., SNG Cop 1261, aVF, weight 10.358 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, Macedonian mint, 220 - 179 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦIΛIΠΠOY, harpa, ∆I(?) above, all within oak-wreath; $65.00 (€57.20)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

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Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. Perdikkas held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
GB56568. Bronze AE 17, apparently unpublished, cf. SNG ANS 972 ff. (caduceus below vice star, attributed to Philip II), SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Cop -, SNG München -, F, weight 5.418 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 0o, Macedonian mint, c. 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, rider on horse prancing to right, right arm raised, cruciform star below horses forelegs; extremely rare; $60.00 (€52.80)


Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 187 - 167 B.C.

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In 168 B.C., the Romans invaded Macedonia and overthrew King Perseus in the First Battle of Pydna. In 149 B.C., Andriskos, at that time ruler of Adramyttium only, claiming to be Perseus' son, announced his intention to retake Macedonia from Rome. Andriskos traveled to Syria to request military help from Demetrius Soter of Syria. Demetrius instead handed him over Rome. Andriskos escaped captivity, raised a Thracian army, invaded Macedonia, and defeated the Roman praetor Publius Juventius. Andriskos then declared himself King Philip VI of Macedonia. In 148 B.C., Andriskos conquered Thessaly and made an alliance with Carthage, thus bringing the Roman wrath on him. In 148 B.C., in what the Romans called the Fourth Macedonian War, he was defeated by the Roman praetor Q. Caecilius Metellus at the Second Battle of Pydna. He fled to Thrace, whose prince gave him up to Rome. Andriskos' brief reign over Macedonia was marked by cruelty and extortion. After this Macedonia was formally reduced to a Roman province.
BB62452. Bronze AE 19, SNG ANS 118 - 119, SNG Cop -, BMC Macedonia -, F, pitting, weight 7.106 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, c. 187 - 167 B.C.; obverse Laureate head of Zeus right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, two goats on their hind legs, contending head to head; green patina; rare; $60.00 (€52.80)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II of Macedonia, 359 - 336 B.C.

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Philip II became the ruler of all Greece when he defeated the Athenians at the Battle of Chaeroneia in 338 B.C. Philip personally selected the design of his coins. His horse, on the reverse of this coin, won a race in the Olympic Games in 356 B.C., the year his son Alexander the Great was born.
GB75114. Bronze AE Unit, SNG ANS 908, SNG München 165, SNG Cop 613 var (rider and trident left), VF, well centered on a tight flan, some light corrosion, weight 5.362 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 180o, Macedonian mint, c. 359 - 336 B.C.; obverse head of Apollo right wearing taenia; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, young male riding horse prancing to right, trident and AP monogram below; $60.00 (€52.80)


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander IV, c. 323 - 311 B.C.

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Struck during the reign the child king Alexander IV, Alexander's son with the Bactrian princess Roxana. He and Philip III, Alexander's brother, were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and was executed in 317 B.C. under orders from Olympias. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by his regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C.
GB76480. Bronze unit, Price 2806, SNG Cop 1132, SNG Alpha Bank 849, Müller Alexander -, Lindgren -, VF, green patina, well centered, a little rough, weight 2.864 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, Western Anatolia mint, c. 323 - 311 B.C.; obverse Macedonian shield with five double crescents and five groups of pellets around, bust of Herakles at center, facing slightly right, wearing Nemean lion skin tied at neck; reverse crested Macedonian officer's helmet, flanked by B - A (BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, King Alexander), stalk of grain (control symbol) lower left; $60.00 (€52.80)


Pella, Macedonia, c. 187 - 168 B.C.

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Pella was founded in 399 B.C. by King Archelaus (413 - 399 B.C.) as his capital. It was the seat of Philip II and of his son, Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C., it was sacked by the Romans, and its treasury transported to Rome. Later the city was destroyed by an earthquake. By 180 A.D., Lucian could describe it in passing as "now insignificant, with very few inhabitants."
GB59940. Bronze AE 24, AMNG III 18, BMC Macedonia -, SNG Cop -, SNG ANS -, aVF, weight 13.475 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 330o, Pella mint, c. 187 - 168 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse ΠEΛΛA, eagle right on thunderbolt, wings spread, head right, flanked by a monogram left and right; nice patina; scarce; $50.00 (€44.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander IV, c. 323 - 311 B.C.

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Salamis was a maritime town on the east coast of Cyprus, at the end of a fertile plain between two mountains, near the River Pediaeus.

Struck during the reign the child king Alexander IV, Alexander's son with the Bactrian princess Roxana. He and Philip III, Alexander's brother, were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and was executed in 317 B.C. under orders from Olympias. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by his regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C.
GB73568. Bronze AE 1/2 unit, Price 3162, SNG München 925, SNG Cop 1126 (N vice NK monogram, perhaps in error?), Müller Alexander -, aVF, a little rough, weight 4.417 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, Salamis mint, c. 323 - 315 B.C.; obverse Macedonian shield with five crescents around, Medusa facing at center; reverse crested Macedonian helmet, flanked by B - A (BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, King Alexander), caduceus lower left, NK monogram lower right; $50.00 (€44.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Perseus, 179 - 168 B.C.

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Perseus of Macedonia was the last king of the Antigonid dynasty, who ruled the successor state in Macedonia created after the death of Alexander the Great. After losing the Battle of Pydna on 22 June 168 B.C., Macedonia came under Roman rule.

The hero Perseus, the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths in the cult of the Twelve Olympians. Perseus was the hero who killed Medusa and claimed Andromeda, having rescued her from a sea monster.
GB56586. Bronze AE 19, SNG München 1274 ff., SNG Cop 1275, SNG Alpha Bank 1142 cor., SNG Dreer -, aVF, weight 4.125 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 0o, Pella or Amphipolis mint, c. 179 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet peaked with griffin head, harpa across shoulder; reverse eagle standing half-left on thunderbolt, head right, wings open, B - A over Π−E flanking across field, star in exergue; $45.00 (€39.60)




    



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Catalog current as of Thursday, February 11, 2016.
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Macedonia Greek Coins