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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ MacedoniaView Options:  |  |  |     

Ancient Greek Coins of Macedonia

Macedonian Kingdom, Perseus, 179 - 168 B.C.

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Perseus of Macedonia was the last king of the Antigonid dynasty, who ruled the successor state in Macedonia created after the death of Alexander the Great. After losing the Battle of Pydna on 22 June 168 B.C., Macedonia came under Roman rule.

The hero Perseus, the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths in the cult of the Twelve Olympians. Perseus was the hero who killed Medusa and claimed Andromeda, having rescued her from a sea monster.
GB83486. Bronze AE 19, cf. SNG Alpha Bank 1142, SNG Cop 1275, SNG Dreer 628, SNG Munchen -, VF, green patina, weight 5.227 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Pella or Amphipolis mint, c. 179 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet peaked with griffin head, harpa right; reverse eagle standing facing on thunderbolt, wings open, head right, B − A flanking head above wings, Π-E flanking across lower field outside wings, star in exergue; $170.00 (151.30)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS84682. Silver drachm, Price 1801, Mller Alexander 1336, VF, well struck with high relief dies, very light corrosion, scratches, weight 4.199 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - c. 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Atophoros seated left on throne, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, B left, N under throne; $170.00 (151.30)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was home to an imperial cult, worshiping the living emperor, and to a cult dedicated to Artemis Tauropolos. The obverse depicts Trajan as a military victor and probably copies an imperial statue. The reverse may depict a local statue of Artemis Tauropolos.
GB90406. Bronze AE 20, Lindgren II 978 (same dies), Varbanov 7179 (R7), AMNG III 79, Hunterian I 37, Moushmov 6068, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, SNG Tub, BMC Macedonia -, gF, centered, some porosity, weight 5.099 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 25 Jan 98 - 8/9 Aug 117 A.D.; obverse KAICAP TPAIANOC, emperor on horseback galloping right, brandishing spear to strike a prostrate foe below; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Artemis Tauropolos standing left, kalathos on head, long torch before her in right hand, small branch in left hand downward at side, grounded shield behind; rare; $160.00 (142.40)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS75252. Silver drachm, ADM II Series XIV, Price 1528, Mller Alexander 1618, SNG Cop 995, SNG Munchen 476, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, toned, full circle obverse, light marks and scratches, weight 4.140 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Troas, Abydos(?) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, MI monogram left, Z (appearing as I) under throne; $160.00 (142.40)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Pella, Macedonia

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Pella was founded in 399 B.C. by King Archelaus (413 - 399 B.C.) as his capital. It was the seat of Philip II and of his son, Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C., it was sacked by the Romans, and its treasury transported to Rome. Later the city was destroyed by an earthquake. By 180 A.D., Lucian could describe it in passing as "now insignificant, with very few inhabitants."
RB79934. Bronze AE 24, Varbanov III 3735 (R4), SNG ANS 633, Moushmov 6479, SNG Cop -, F, superb portrait, attractive green patina, tight flan, weight 11.112 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 0o, Pella mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXANDER AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL IVL AVG PELLA, city-goddess seated left, kalathos on head, right hand raised to shoulder; $160.00 (142.40)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of the Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
RB79951. Bronze AE 29, Touratsoglou p. 186, 7 (V5/R9); RPC Online III 618; Varbanov III 4295 (R4); SNG ANS 849 var. (no crescent), SNG Cop 412 var. (same); BMC Macedonia -, F, excellent portrait, dark green patina, flan adjustment marks, centration dimples, weight 16.494 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, emission 1, phase 1, 25 Jan 98 - 103 A.D.; obverse KAICAP TPAIANOC, laureate head right; reverse ΘECAΛΛONIKEWN, Victory flying right, raising wreath in extended right hand, palm frond over shoulder in left hand, small crescent with horns up in right field; $160.00 (142.40)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip V, 221 - 179 B.C.

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Philip's reign was principally marked by an unsuccessful struggle against the emerging power of Rome. Philip was attractive and charismatic as a young man. A dashing and courageous warrior, he was inevitably compared to Alexander the Great and was nicknamed the darling of all Greece.
GB83488. Bronze AE 25, Mamroth Bronze 24a; SNG Alpha Bank 1110, SNG Munchen 1181; SNG Cop 1258 ff. var. (monograms), AMNG III/2 25 var. (same), aVF, nice sea-green patina, edge bump, edge split, marks, light corrosion, weight 13.892 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 180o, Macedonian mint, 183 - 182 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Helios right; reverse winged thunderbolt, ∆I monogram over BAΣIΛEΩΣ above , ΦIΛIΠΠOY below, all within oak wreath; $160.00 (142.40)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D., Koinon of Macedonia

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The Macedonian Koinon (community) was the political organization governing the autonomous Roman province of Macedonia and responsible for issuing coinage. Member cities sent representatives to participate in the popular assembly. The Koinon held celebrations and games annually at Beroea (modern Verria) in honor of Alexander the Great and the Roman emperor.
RB83510. Bronze AE 25, SNG Cop 1345; SNG Hunterian 730; AMNG III /2 277; Varbanov 3050 (R4) var. (Ω vice W); BMC Macedonia p. 28, 156 var. (laureate), VF, nice green patina, tight flan, cut on lower obverse, weight 11.478 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 270o, 7 Mar 161 - 17 Mar 180 A.D.; obverse KAICAP ANTWNINOC, radiate head right; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ONWN, thunderbolt with four wings; $160.00 (142.40)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RP84963. Bronze AE 27, RPC IV 8302, Touratsoglou 38 ff., Varbanov 4338 (R5) var. (crescent and star right), SNG Hunterian -, BMC Macedonia -, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, VF, nice portrait, die wear, slight corrosion, tiny edge cracks, weight 12.628 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 184 - 188 A.D.; obverse AVTOK M AVP KOMM ANTΩNEINON (clockwise from upper right), laureate head right; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN (clockwise from upper right), Nike advancing right, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder, crescent right; rare; $160.00 (142.40)


Eion, Macedonia, c. 500 - 437 B.C.

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Eion was only about three miles from Amphipolis and from the late 5th century onwards served merely as a seaport of its much larger neighbor. The denomination is variously described as a diobol or trihemiobol. The significance of the obverse type is not clear, but presumably makes reference to the characteristic fauna of the region at that time.
GA77599. Silver trihemiobol, SNG ANS 280 - 283, SNG Cop 180 corr., SNG Berry 29, Klein 151, BMC Macedonia p. 75, 21, aVF, well centered, light toning, edge split, porous, weight 0.661 g, maximum diameter 11.5 mm, Eion mint, c. 500 - 437 B.C.; obverse goose standing right, looking back, lizard above; reverse quadripartite incuse square; $155.00 (137.95)




    



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Macedonia Greek Coins