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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ MacedoniaView Options:  |  |  | ◁◁      ▷▷

Ancient Greek Coins of Macedonia

Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus, 323 - 317 B.C.

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Minted after Alexander's death, during the joint rule of Alexander's half-brother, Philip III Arrhidaeus, and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV. Philip III was mentally disabled and power was divided among his advisers and Alexander's generals. Philip was murdered in October 317 by Olympias, Alexander's mother, to ensure the succession of her grandson.
SH71983. Silver drachm, Price P52 var (thyrsus on left), SNG Cop 1104 var (thyrsus on left and inner right), SNG München 552 (dolphin left and thyrsus inner right), Choice VF, excellent centering and strike, toned, a few light scratches, weight 3.922 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, c. 323 - c. 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Zeus on enthroned left, nude to waist, himation around waist and legs, feet on footstool, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in right, thrysus inner right; although not listed in the primary references, we know of several examples from auctions; rare; $150.00 (€130.50)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 320 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Struck by Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-eyed") as strategos of Asia (320 - 306 B.C.) or as king (306 - 301 B.C.). Antigonos I was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
SH72000. Silver drachm, Price 1827, Müller Alexander 273, Thompson-Bellinger Colophon 17, SNG Cop 911, SNG München 530, SNG Alpha Bank 619, VF, centered, toned, light scrape on obverse, some tiny pitting, weight 4.092 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Colophon mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left, nude to waist, himation around waist and legs, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, right leg drawn back, crescent horns left in left field, KPA monogram under throne; $150.00 (€130.50)


lot of 7 Roman Provincial Bronzes From Stobi, Macedonia, c. 3rd - 4th Century A.D.

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LT73694. Bronze Lot, 7 Roman Provincial Bronzes From Stobi, Macedonia, c. 3rd - 4th Century A.D., unattributed but probably all Severan Dynasty, coins in the photo are the actual coins you will receive, unattributed, 7 coins; $150.00 (€130.50)


Neapolis, Macedonia, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

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While some examples of this hemiobol have an odd style gorgon, this example is of a style similar to Neapolis staters. Nevertheless, Klien's attribution of the type to Neapolis is less than certain.
GS68401. Silver hemiobol, Klein 154, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, Rosen -, Tzamalis -, VF, porosity, weight 0.345 g, maximum diameter 7.0 mm, die axis 270o, Macedonia, Neapolis mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse Gorgon; reverse Kantharos within a square incuse; very rare; $145.00 (€126.15)


Dikaia, Macedonia, 5th Century B.C.

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Apparently unpublished in major references. The referenced Pecunem Gitbud & Naumann coin is very similar, but from different dies. The referenced VAuctions coin, presumably a later issue, is also very similar but with ∆IKAI and a dotted square border around the grapes within a shallower square incuse. Dikaia was located between the rivers Nestos and Hebros.
GA69941. Silver hemiobol, cf. Pecunem Gitbud & Naumann auction 11, lot 89; VAuctions 270, lot 112; Schönert-Geiss -; SNG Cop -; SNG ANS -; BMC Macedonia -; Klein -; Rosen -, VF, weight 0.451 g, maximum diameter 7.3 mm, die axis 180o, Dikaia mint, 5th century B.C.; obverse head of bull right; reverse bunch of grapes on stem within incuse square; extremely rare; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV, c. 323 - 319 B.C.

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Struck shortly after Alexander the Great's death during the joint reign of Philip III, Alexander's brother, and the infant king Alexander IV, Alexander's son with the Bactrian princess Roxana. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C. Sardes also struck coins during this period in the name of Philip. Traditionally coins naming Alexander have been attributed to Alexander III the Great, but the Alexander named on this coin was more likely the infant son of Roxana, Alexander IV.
GS71684. Silver drachm, ADM I 283b (same dies), Price 2626, Müller Alexander 521, SNG Cop 961, VF, well struck, toned, porous, weight 4.086 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 323 - c. 319 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, bee above TI left; $140.00 (€121.80)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Struck by Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") as strategos of Asia (320 - 306 B.C.) or as king (306 - 301 B.C.). Antigonos I was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
GS72014. Silver drachm, ADM II Series XII 374a (same dies), Price 1412, Müller Alexander 1678, SNG Cop 1003, SNG München 461, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, toned, porous, light pitting, weight 4.107 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 90o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left, nude to waist, himation around waist and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, feet on footstool, right leg drawn back, ΓH monogram in left field, Θ under throne; struck by Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-eyed") as strategos of Asia (320 - 306 B.C.) or as king (306 - 301 B.C.); $140.00 (€121.80)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, 320 - 306 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") was a nobleman and strategos (general and governor) under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
SH72023. Silver drachm, SNG Alpha Bank 647, Price 2683 & 2687 var (monograms), ADM I Sardes XX 398 & 404 var (same), Müller Alexander -, SNG Cop -, SNG München -, VF, nice style, well centered on a tight flan, some marks and light corrosion, weight 3.932 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Lydia, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, as strategos of Asia, 318 - 315 B.D.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, nude to waist, himation around waist and legs, feet on footstool, right foot drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, MY monogram in circle left, HA monogram below throne; rare; $140.00 (€121.80)


Olynthos, Macedonia, Chalcidian League, c. 360 - 348 B.C.

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At the temple of Apollo at Delphi, his priestesses, the Pythia, made their prophesies while sitting on a tripod.
GB48997. Bronze AE 15, SNG Cop 247 - 249, SNG ANS 561, VF, weight 1.936 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, die axis 90o, Olynthos mint, c. 360 - 348 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse XAΛKI−∆EΩN, tripod; rare; $135.00 (€117.45)


Chalkidian League, Olynthos, Macedonia, c. 432 - 348 B.C.

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In 432 B.C. Olynthos broke away from Athens and, with several other cities, formed the Chalkidian league. In 393, Amyntas III of Macedonia temporally transferred territory to Olynthos when he was driven out of Macedonia by Illyrians. When he was restored and the league did not return his lands, he appealed to Sparta. Akanthos and Apollonia, also appealed to Sparta, claiming league membership was not voluntary but enforced at the point of a sword. After a long war, in 379 these cities were made "autonomous" subject allies of Sparta. Weakened by the division, the league was destroyed by Philip II of Macedon in 348 B.C.
SH69954. Silver tetrobol, BMC Macedonia p. 68, 13; SNG ANS 537, SNG Cop 235; SNG Dreer 266, SNG Berry 22, aVF, grainy, scratches, weight 2.146 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, die axis 315o, Olynthos mint, c. 432 - 348 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, circle of dots around; reverse XAΛKIAEΩN (clockwise from upper left), kithara (lyre) with seven strings, all within incuse; $135.00 (€117.45)




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Macedonia Greek Coins