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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Severan Period| ▸ |Elagabalus||View Options:  |  |  | 

Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D.

Elagabalus came to power through the scheming of his grandmother Julia Maesa. Elagabalus repeatedly shocked the population with increasingly bizarre behavior including cross-dressing and marrying a vestal virgin. Eventually, his grandmother replaced him on the throne with Severus Alexander, and Elagabalus and his mother were murdered, dragged through the streets of Rome, and dumped into the Tiber.

Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Tarsos, Cilicia

|Cilicia|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Tarsos,| |Cilicia|, |AE| |31|
When the province of Cilicia was divided, Tarsus remained the civil and religious metropolis of Cilicia Prima, and was a grand city with palaces, marketplaces, roads and bridges, baths, fountains and waterworks, a gymnasium on the banks of the Cydnus, and a stadium. Tarsus was later eclipsed by nearby Adana, but remained important as a port and shipyard. Several Roman emperors were interred here: Tacitus, Maximinus II, and Julian the Apostate, who planned to move his capital here from Antioch if he returned from his Persian expedition.
RP88860. Bronze AE 31, SNG BnF 1566; Ziegler K 722, BMC Lycaonia p. 301, 207; SNG Levante 1078 var. (bust); SNGvA 6023 var. (same); Waddington 4646 corr. (Caracalla), F, well centered, rough, porosity, bumps, scratches, a few pits, weight 11.113 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 180o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse AVT KAI M AVP ANTWNEINOC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse TAPCOV THC MHTPOΠOΛE, demiourgos crown on garlanded alter to left, Kilikarch crown decorated with seven imperial heads and Γ B to right, A M K in exergue; $40.00 SALE |PRICE| $36.00


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

|Elagabalus|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Amphipolis,| |Macedonia|, |AE| |21|
Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
RP88228. Bronze AE 21, Varbanov III 3292 (R4); BMC Macedonia p. 60, 131; Moushmov 6117; SNG ANS 202 corr. (club in ex.); SNG Cop -, aVF, well centered, rough, earthen deposits, weight 5.434 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse AY K M AVP CEY AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, Tyche seated left on throne, kalathos on head, patera in right hand, altar before her, fish left in exergue; $4.50 (4.14)


|Elagabalus|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.|, |denarius|
This type commemorated the departure of Elagabalus from Antioch to Rome together with the sacred stone of his cult (probably a meteorite). At each summer solstice Elagabalus celebrated a great festival during which he paraded the holy stone through the city of Rome. Herodian described the spectacle: "A six horse chariot carried the divinity, the horses huge and flawlessly white, with expensive gold fittings and rich ornaments. No one held the reins, and no one rode in the chariot; the vehicle was escorted as if the god himself were the charioteer. Elagabalus ran backward in front of the chariot, facing the god and holding the horses' reins. He made the whole journey in this reverse fashion, looking up into the face of his god.
RS34938. Silver denarius, BMCRE V 284, RSC III 268, RIC IV 195, SRCV II 7545, Choice gVF, weight 2.655 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 16 May 218 - 219 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse SANCT DEO SOLI ELAGABAL (ELAGABAL in exergue, "to the holy god, the sun Elagabal"), slow quadriga right, carrying the conical Stone of Elah-Gabal ornamented on the front with an eagle and surrounded by four parasols; very rare; SOLD







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

ANTONINVSFELPIVSAVG
ANTONINVSPFELAVG ANTONINVSPIVSAVG
ANTONINVSPIVSFEL
ANTONINVSPIVSFELAVG (ALSO USED BY CARACALLA)
IMPANTONINVSAVG
IMPANTONINVSPIVSAVG
IMPANTONINVSPIVSFELIX
IMPANTONINVSPIVSFELIXAVG
IMPCAESANTONINVSAVG
IMPCAESMAVRANTONINVSAVG
IMPCAESMAVRANTONINVSPFAVG
IMPCAESMAVRANTONINVSPIVSAVG
IMPCAESMAVRSEANTONINVSAVG
IMPCMAVRANTONINVSPFAVG
IMP M AVR ANTONIN PIVS AVG


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calic, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 4, Septimius Severus to Maximinus Thrax. (Paris, 1884).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. IV: From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 5: Pertinax to Elagabalus. (London, 1950).
Online Coins of the Roman Empire (OCRE) http://numismatics.org/ocre/
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III, Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & Sear, D. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. III, Pertinax to Balbinus and Pupienus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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