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Home>Catalog>RomanCoins>TheLateEmpire>Eudoxia

Eudoxia, Augusta 9 January 400 - early October 404 A.D.

Eudoxia was the strong willed wife of emperor Arcadius. They were married on 27 April 395 A.D. She exercised considerable influence over government policy, much to the disgust of many high ranking Romans, notably in the Church. She was mother to five children including Theodosius II and Pulcheria. Eudoxia died in childbirth in early October 404 A.D.


Click for a larger photo Eudoxia was the strong willed wife of Arcadius. They were married on 27 April 395 A.D. She exercised considerable influence over policy, much to the disgust of many high ranking Romans, notably in the Church. She was mother to five children, including Theodosius II and Pulcheria. She died in childbirth.
SH65424. Copper AE 3, RIC X 104, LRBC 2800, SRCV 4241, gVF, fantastic desert patina, weight 1.854 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch mint, 401 - 403 A.D.; obverse AEL EVDOXIA AVG, pearl-diademed and draped bust right, crowned with wreath by the Hand of God above; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated on cuirass inscribing Christogram on shield set on cippus, ANT... (obscured) in exergue; truly beautiful in hand; scarce; $150.00 (112.50)

Click for a larger photo Manus Dei, the hand of God, reaches down to crown the Empress Eudoxia on both the obverse and reverse.

The cross was rarely used in early Christian iconography, perhaps because it symbolized a purposely painful and gruesome method of public execution that most early Christians would have personally witnessed. In 315, Constantine abolished crucifixion as punishment in the Roman Empire. The Ichthys, or fish symbol, was used by early Christians. Constantine adopted the Chi-Rho Christ monogram (Christogram) as his banner (labarum). The use of a cross as the most prevalent symbol of Christianity probably gained momentum after Saint Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, traveled to the Holy Land, c. 326 - 328, and recovered the True Cross.
RL70645. Bronze AE 3, SRCV 4240, VF, green patina with attractive earthen highlighting, weight 1.596 g, maximum diameter 13.9 mm, die axis 315o, eastern mint, 9 Jan 400 - 401 A.D.; obverse AEL EVDO-XIA AVG, pearl-diademed and draped bust right, crowned with wreath by the Hand of God above; reverse GLORIA ROMANORVM, Empress enthroned facing, hands folded over breast, crowned by the Hand of God above, cross right, mintmark in exergue (off flan); from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $45.00 (33.75)

Click for a larger photo This type with the cross in the left field was struck only at the Constantinople mint. Other mints all had the cross in the right field.
RL70647. Bronze AE 3, RIC X 77 - 78, LRBC 2218 or 2220, F, weight 1.608 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 0o, Constantinopolis (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 9 Jan 400 - 401 A.D.; obverse AEL EVDO-XIA AVG, pearl-diademed and draped bust right, crowned by Hand of God; reverse GLORIA ROMANORVM, Empress enthroned facing, hands folded over breast, crowned by the Hand of God, cross left, CON[...] in ex; scarce; $45.00 (33.75)

Click for a larger photo Manus Dei, the hand of God, reaches down to crown the Empress Eudoxia on both the obverse and reverse.

The cross was rarely used in early Christian iconography, perhaps because it symbolized a purposely painful and gruesome method of public execution that most early Christians would have personally witnessed. In 315, Constantine abolished crucifixion as punishment in the Roman Empire. The Ichthys, or fish symbol, was used by early Christians. Constantine adopted the Chi-Rho Christ monogram (Christogram) as his banner (labarum). The use of a cross as the most prevalent symbol of Christianity probably gained momentum after Saint Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, traveled to the Holy Land, c. 326 - 328, and recovered the True Cross.
RL66213. Bronze AE 3, RIC X 83, LRBC 2805, SRCV 4240, aF, weight 2.787 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 9 Jan 400 - 401 A.D.; obverse AEL EVDO-XIA AVG, pearl-diademed and draped bust right, crowned with wreath by the Hand of God above; reverse GLORIA ROMANORVM, Empress enthroned facing, hands folded over breast, crowned by the Hand of God above, cross right, ANTA in ex; ex Seaver Collection; scarce; $36.00 (27.00)

Click for a larger photo Eudoxia, married to the weak emperor Arcadius, was the effectiver ruler of the Eastern Empire. In 403, her two year old son, Theodosius II, was one of the two consuls of the Eastern Roman Empire.
RL68349. Copper AE 4, RIC X 101 ff. (various mints), SRCV 4241, Fair, weight 2.005 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 180o, eastern mint, 401 - 403 A.D.; obverse AEL EVDOXIA AVG, diademed and draped bust right with hand of God holding wreath over her head; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated on cuirass, inscribing Christogram on shield set on cippus, mintmark (obscure) in exergue; scarce; $15.00 (11.25)


ITEMS PER PAGE 13510203050



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Obverse legends:

AEL EVDOXIA AVG



Catalog current as of Wednesday, October 22, 2014.
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Roman Coins of Eudoxia