Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Constantinian Era ▸ JovianView Options:  |  |  | 

Jovian, 27 June 363 - 17 February 364 A.D.

After Julian was mortally wounded and died while retreating from Persia, the soldiers made Jovian emperor. To ensure his own safety, Jovian negotiated a disgraceful peace with the Sassanians, giving up five Roman provinces and the cities Nisibis and Singara. Enroute to back to Constantinople, Jovian was found dead in his tent, suffocated by carbon monoxide fumes from a charcoal brazier. During his short reign, Jovian reestablished Christianity as the state church, ending Julian's brief pagan revival.


Click for a larger photo
At the end of the 4th century, Sirmium was brought under the sway of the Goths, and later, was again annexed to the Eastern Roman Empire. In 441, Sirmium was conquered by the Huns, and after this conquest, it remained for more than a century in the hands of various other tribes, including the Eastern Goths and Gepids. For a short time, Sirmium was the center of the Gepid State and King Cunimund minted gold coins there. After 567, Roman rule was restored again at Sirmium. The city was finally conquered and destroyed by the Avars in 582.
RL77940. Bronze centenionalis, RIC VIII Sirmium 118, LRBC II 1623, SRCV V 19229, Cohen VIII 35, VF, green patina, light marks, weight 3.442 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 30o, 2nd officina, Sirmium (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia) mint, obverse D N IOVIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VOT / V / MVLT / X in four lines within wreath, BSIRM in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren, ex Pegasi Numismatics; $32.00 (€27.20)
 


Click for a larger photo
After evacuating Persia, upon arriving at Antioch, Jovian revoked the edicts of Julian against Christians. The Labarum of Constantine the Great again became the standard of the army. He issued an edict of toleration, to the effect that, while the exercise of magical rites would be punished, his subjects should enjoy full liberty of conscience. However, soon after he ordered burning down the Library of Antioch and on 11 September issued an edict that punishing those who worshiped ancestral gods with the death penalty. He extended the same punishment on 23 December to participation in any pagan ceremony (even private ones). In Syriac literature Jovian became the hero of a Christian romance. From Jovian's reign until the 15th century Christianity remained the dominant religion of both the Western and Eastern Roman Empires, until the Fall of Constantinople to the Turks in 1453.
SH37582. Gold solidus, RIC VIII Antioch 223, VF, rim bumps, weight 4.073 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 27 Jun 363 - 16 Feb 364 A.D.; obverse D N IOVIAN-VS PE P AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE (security of the Republic), Roma holding spear, and Constantinopolis holding scepter and foot on prow, enthroned facing, holding shield inscribed VOT V MVLT X, ANTΓ in exergue; rare (RIC R2); SOLD


Click for a larger photo
In 351, Constantius Gallus built a new church in honor of Saint Babylas at Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, and transferred the remains of the bishop to it to neutralize the pagan effects of the nearby temple of Apollo. In 362, Julian consulted the oracle of Apollo at the temple in Daphne, but received no answer, and was told that it was because of the proximity of the saint. He had the sarcophagus of the martyr exhumed and removed. A few days later, on October 22, a mysterious fire broke out consuming the roof of the temple and the statue of the god, copied from Phidias' statue of Zeus at Olympia. Julian, suspecting angry Christians, closed the cathedral of Antioch and ordered an investigation. Ammianus Marcellinus reports "a frivolous rumor" laid blame on candles lit by a worshipper late the previous night (XXII, 13). John Chrysostom claimed a bolt of lightning set the temple on fire. The remains of Babylas were reinterred in a church dedicated to him on the other side of the River Orontes.
SH46443. Gold solidus, RIC VIII Antioch 223, aVF, light clipping, weight 3.894 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch, 9th officina (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 27 Jun 363 - 16 Feb 364 A.D.; obverse D N IOVIAN-VS PEP AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE (security of the Republic), Roma holding spear, and Constantinopolis holding scepter and foot on prow, enthroned facing, holding shield inscribed VOT V MVLT X, ANTΘ in exergue; rare (RIC R2); SOLD







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


OBVERSE LEGENDS

DNIOVIANVSPEPAVG
DNIOVIANVSPERPAVG
DNIOVIANVSPFAVG
DNIOVIANVSPFAVGCOS
DNIOVIANVSPFPAVG
DNIOVIANVSPFPERPAVG
DNIOVIANVSPFPPAVG


REFERENCES

Carson, R., P. Hill & J. Kent. Late Roman Bronze Coinage. (London, 1960).
Carson, R., H. Sutherland and J. Kent. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol VIII, The Family of Constantine I, A.D. 337 - 364. (London, 1981).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 8: Nepotian to Romulus Augustus, plus tesserae & cotorniates. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Constantin II à Zenon (337-491). Moneta 5. (Wetteren, 1996).
Ferrando, P. L'atelier monétaire d'Arles: de Constantin le Grand à Romulus Augustule (313-476). (Arles, 2010).
Paolucci, R. & A. Zub. La monetazione di Aquileia Romana. (Padova, 2000).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
King, C. & Sear, D. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. V: The Christian Empire: The Later Constantinian Dynasty and the Houses of Valentinian and Theodosius and Their Successors, Constantine II to Zeno, AD 337 - 491. (London, 2014).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).
Voetter, O. Die Münzen der romischen Kaiser, Kaiserinnen und Caesaren von Diocletianus bis Romulus: Katalog der Sammlung Paul Gerin. (Vienna, 1921).

Catalog current as of Sunday, November 19, 2017.
Page created in 0.92 seconds.
Roman Coins of Jovian