Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Constantinian Era| ▸ |Julian II||View Options:  |  |  |   

Julian II "the Apostate," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.

Flavius Claudius Iulianus was born in 331 or maybe 332 A.D. in Constantinople. He ruled the Western Empire as Caesar from 355 to 360 and was hailed Augustus by his legions in Lutetia (Paris) in 360. Julian was a gifted administrator and military strategist. Famed as the last pagan emperor, his reinstatement of the pagan religion earned him the moniker "the Apostate." As evidenced by his brilliant writing, some of which has survived to the present day, the title "the Philosopher" may have been more appropriate. He died from wounds suffered during the Persian campaign of 363 A.D.

|Julian| |II|, |Julian| |II| |"the| |Apostate,"| |February| |360| |-| |26| |June| |363| |A.D.|, |double| |maiorina|
The common belief which identifies the bull with the Apis bull is probably wrong. An interesting passage from Dio Chrysostom compares a good ruler to a bull. Also, Julian was most likely born in May, in the sign of Taurus. The stars are probably the two important star clusters in Taurus, Pleiades and Hyades. Taurus or Apis, this bull is pagan and this coin was the last pagan coin type issued by the Empire.
SH32850. Billon double maiorina, RIC VIII Constantinople 164, EF, weight 8.601 g, maximum diameter 28.7 mm, die axis 0o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 3 Nov 361 - 26 Jun 363 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVB (security of the Republic), bull right, two stars above, CONSP[...] in exergue; SOLD


|Julian| |II|, |Julian| |II| |"the| |Apostate,"| |February| |360| |-| |26| |June| |363| |A.D.|, |double| |maiorina|
The common belief which identifies the bull with the Apis bull is probably wrong. An interesting passage from Dio Chrysostom compares a good ruler to a bull. Also, Julian was most likely born in May, in the sign of Taurus. The stars are probably the two important star clusters in Taurus, Pleiades and Hyades. Taurus or Apis, this bull is pagan and this coin was the last pagan coin type issued by the Empire.
SH03587. Billon double maiorina, RIC VIII Constantinople 163, superb about uncirculated, weight 8.65 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 361 - 363 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, diademed draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVB (security of the Republic), Apis bull right, two stars above horns, branch CONSPB branch in exergue; SOLD


|Julian| |II|, |Julian| |II| |"the| |Apostate,"| |February| |360| |-| |26| |June| |363| |A.D.|, |double| |maiorina|
Aquileia was founded by the Romans as a Latin colony in 181 B.C. in the north-eastern corner of the plain of the Po at the northern end of the Adriatic. It grew to become one of the largest and wealthiest cities of the Roman Empire. After the city was destroyed by Attila the Hun in A.D. 453, the survivors clustered in a drastically reduced settlement around the Basilica, which is the origin of the small present-day town. Most of the ancient city lies unexcavated beneath the surrounding fields.
SH66598. Billon double maiorina, RIC VIII Aquileia 243, gVF, some corrosion, well centered and struck, weight 7.562 g, maximum diameter 29.8 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Aquileia mint, 3 Nov 361 - 26 Jun 363 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVB (security of the Republic), bull right, two stars above, AQVILP in exergue; rare mint for the type; SOLD


|Julian| |II|, |Julian| |II| |"the| |Apostate,"| |February| |360| |-| |26| |June| |363| |A.D.|, |double| |maiorina|
The only known unexcavated Roman Hippodrome in the world is in Sirmium. A colossal building about 150 meters wide and 450 meters long lies directly under the Sremska Mitrovica town center, beside the old Emperor's Palace. In early 1970s American archaeologists sponsored by the U.S. Government made an offer to the citizens of Sremska Mitrovica to completely rebuild the town on another location so Sirmium could be excavated. The request was refused and there are still no plans to excavate the arena, which would require the removal of the entire present town center.
SH21417. Billon double maiorina, RIC VIII Sirmium 106, LRBC II 1621, SRCV V 19153, Cohen VIII 38, EF, minor corrosion on reverse, weight 8.157 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Sirmium (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia) mint, summer 361 - 26 Jun 363 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, pearl diademed draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVB (security of the Republic), bull standing right, two stars above horns, *BSIRM and wreath in exergue; from the Scott Collection; SOLD


|Julian| |II|, |Julian| |II| |"the| |Apostate,"| |February| |360| |-| |26| |June| |363| |A.D.|, |double| |maiorina|
The common belief which identifies the bull with the Apis bull is probably wrong. An interesting passage from Dio Chrysostom compares a good ruler to a bull. Also, Julian was most likely born in May, in the sign of Taurus. The stars are probably the two important star clusters in Taurus, Pleiades and Hyades. Taurus or Apis, this bull is pagan and this coin was the last pagan coin type issued by the Empire.
RL51539. Billon double maiorina, RIC VIII Constantinople 163, LRBC II 2059, aEF, weight 8.808 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 30o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 3 Nov 361 - 26 Jun 363 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, pearl diademed draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVB (security of the Republic), bull right, two stars above, branch CONSPA branch in exergue; SOLD


|Julian| |II|, |Julian| |II| |"the| |Apostate,"| |February| |360| |-| |26| |June| |363| |A.D.|, |siliqua|
VOTIS V MVLTIS X means Votis Quinquennalibus Multis Decennalibus. Earlier in the empire, this inscription would have meant that Julian had completed his vows (prayers) to thank the gods on the fifth anniversary of his rule, and made more vows to the gods that they might help him achieve his tenth anniversary, but Julian only ruled for three years. Julian was named Caesar by Constantius II in 355 and used this date as the beginning of his reign, not 360 when he was named emperor by his troops in Gaul, nor 361 when Constantius died and he was acknowledged Emperor throughout the Empire. Thus the celebration of Julian's "fifth anniversary" of reign began in 360.
SH11110. Silver siliqua, RIC VIII Lyons 218, RSC V 163†a, SRCV V 19130, Hunter V 5 var. (rosette diademed), Choice EF, spectacular rainbow toning, flan crack, weight 2.073 g, maximum diameter 18.28 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 360 - 361 A.D.; obverse FL CL IVLIANVS P P AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VOTIS / V / MVLTIS / X in four lines in wreath, LVG in exergue; SOLD


|Julian| |II|, |Julian| |II| |"the| |Apostate,"| |February| |360| |-| |26| |June| |363| |A.D.|, |double| |maiorina|
On March 5, 363 Julian departed Antioch with an army of 90,000, marching against the Sassanid Empire. On 29 May Julian arrived under the walls of the Sassanid capital and defeated the army of Shapur II at the Battle of Ctesiphon, but he was unable to put the city under siege. On June 16, Julian began a retreat from the Sassanid Empire. The Sassanids attacked the retreating Romans and on 26 June Julian was killed in battle. The general Jovian was proclaimed Emperor by the troops on the battlefield.
SH58901. Billon double maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 412, Choice gVF, weight 8.974 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, summer 361 - 26 Jun 363 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, diademed draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVB (security of the Republic), bull standing right, two stars above; palm, BSIS, palm in exergue; ex Ancient Numismatic Enterprise, nice glossy black patina, excellent centering; rare; SOLD


|Julian| |II|, |Julian| |II| |"the| |Apostate,"| |February| |360| |-| |26| |June| |363| |A.D.|, |double| |maiorina|
The common belief which identifies the bull with the Apis bull is probably wrong. An interesting passage from Dio Chrysostom compares a good ruler to a bull. Also, Julian was most likely born in May, in the sign of Taurus. The stars are probably the two important star clusters in Taurus, Pleiades and Hyades. Taurus or Apis, this bull is pagan and this coin was the last pagan coin type issued by the Empire.
SH53305. Billon double maiorina, RIC VIII Sirmium 107, LRBC II 1622, SRCV V 19153, Cohen VIII 38, EF, beautiful, extraordinary sharp portrait, weight 8.192 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Sirmium (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia) mint, summer 361 - 26 Jun 363 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, pearl diademed draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVB (security of the Republic), bull standing right, two stars above horns, *ASIRM and palm frond in exergue; SOLD


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D., Ancient Counterfeit With Julian II Reverse

|Constantius| |II|, |Constantius| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |3| |November| |361| |A.D.,| |Ancient| |Counterfeit| |With| |Julian| |II| |Reverse|, |reduced| |siliqua|
This coin combines an obverse die of Constantius II, 337 - 361, with a reverse die of Julian II, 360 - 363 A.D. The unlikely hybrid of types from different emperors and issues, the light weight, and the flan flaw on the reverse indicate it is a plated ancient counterfeit.

Ancient counterfeits often have mismatched obverses and reverses. Transfer dies were made using genuine coins which were destroyed in the process. Since making each die destroyed the coin, the same coin could not be used to make both dies. The destroyed coins were undoubtedly melted to contribute to the silver foil plate.

Unlike counterfeit denarii, counterfeit siliqua are very rare. Siliqua are so thin, that striking counterfeits with a bronze core apparently could not provide an economic benefit worth the effort and risk.
SH58910. Fouree silver plated reduced siliqua, cf. official, Lugdunum mint, silver, RIC VIII Lyons 180 (for obverse, Constantius II) and 233 (for reverse, Julian II), VF, toned, reverse flan flaw, weight 1.300 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 180o, illegal mint, c. 360 - 365 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VOT / X / MVLT / XX in four lines within wreath, PLVG in exergue; extremely rare; SOLD


|Julian| |II|, |Julian| |II| |"the| |Apostate,"| |February| |360| |-| |26| |June| |363| |A.D.|, |centenionalis|
Julian begun his reign with a monetary reform, introducing the large silvered bronze (AE 1) with a bull reverse, and a votive type for the smaller denomination (AE 3). Another innovation was the change of mint mark at Heraclea, from SMH to HERACL. RIC records the old style mint mark only for the AE1's. We may assume this variant of the votive type with the old SMH mint mark was produced from a single die at the very beginning of the issue.
SH20254. Bronze centenionalis, RIC VIII Heraclea -, LRBC II -, SRCV V -, Hunter V -, gVF, weight 3.729 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 361 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust left holding spear and shield; reverse VOT / X / MVLT / XX in four lines within wreath, SMHB in exergue; extremely rare; SOLD




  




You are viewing a SOLD items page.
Click here to return to the page with AVAILABLE items.
The sale |price| for a sold item is the private information of the buyer and will not be provided.



OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

DNCLIVLANVSAVG
DNCLIVLIANVSNC
DNCLIVLIANVSNOBCAES
DNFLCLIVLIANVSPFAVG
DNIVLIANVSNOBC
DNIVLIANVSNOBCAES
DNIVLIANVSPFAVG
FLCLIVLIANVSPFAVG
FLCLIVLIANVSAVG
FLCLIVLIANVSNOBC
FLCLIVLIANVSNOBCAES
FLCLIVLIANVSPERPAVG
FLCLIVLIANVSPFAVG
FLCLIVLIANVSPPAVG
IVLIANVSAVG


REFERENCES|

Carson, R., P. Hill & J. Kent. Late Roman Bronze Coinage. (London, 1960).
Carson, R., H. Sutherland and J. Kent. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol VIII, The Family of Constantine I, A.D. 337 - 364. (London, 1981).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 8: Nepotian to Romulus Augustus, plus tesserae & cotorniates. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Constantin II Zenon (337-491). Moneta 5. (Wetteren, 1996).
Ferrando, P. L'atelier montaire d'Arles: de Constantin le Grand Romulus Augustule (313-476). (Arles, 2010).
Paolucci, R. & A. Zub. La monetazione di Aquileia Romana. (Padova, 2000).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
King, C. & Sear, D. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. V: The Christian Empire: The Later Constantinian Dynasty and the Houses of Valentinian and Theodosius and Their Successors, Constantine II to Zeno, AD 337 - 491. (London, 2014).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).
Voetter, O. Die Mnzen der romischen Kaiser, Kaiserinnen und Caesaren von Diocletianus bis Romulus: Katalog der Sammlung Paul Gerin. (Vienna, 1921).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, August 5, 2020.
Page created in 0.656 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity