Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Constantinian Era ▸ Julian IIView Options:  |  |  | 

Julian II "the Apostate," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.

Flavius Claudius Iulianus was born in 331 or maybe 332 A.D. in Constantinople. He ruled the Western Empire as Caesar from 355 to 360 and was hailed Augustus by his legions in Lutetia (Paris) in 360. Julian was a gifted administrator and military strategist. Famed as the last pagan emperor, his reinstatement of the pagan religion earned him the moniker "the Apostate." As evidenced by his brilliant writing, some of which has survived to the present day, the title "the Philosopher" may have been more appropriate. He died from wounds suffered during the Persian campaign of 363 A.D.


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D., Ancient Counterfeit With Julian II Reverse

Click for a larger photo
This coin combines an obverse die of Constantius II, 337 - 361, with a reverse die of Julian II, 360 - 363 A.D. The unlikely hybrid of types from different emperors and issues, the light weight, and the flan flaw on the reverse indicate it is a plated ancient counterfeit.

Ancient counterfeits often have mismatched obverses and reverses. Transfer dies were made using genuine coins which were destroyed in the process. Since making each die destroyed the coin, the same coin could not be used to make both dies. The destroyed coins were undoubtedly melted to contribute to the silver foil plate.

Unlike counterfeit denarii, counterfeit siliqua are very rare. Siliqua are so thin, that striking counterfeits with a bronze core apparently could not provide an economic benefit worth the effort and risk.
RS79849. Fouree silver plated reduced siliqua, cf. official, Lugdunum mint, silver, RIC VIII Constantius II 180 (for obverse) and RIC VIII Julian II 233 (for reverse), aVF, well centered on a tight flan cutting off parts of legend, marks, scratches, corrosion, edge crack, edge chips, weight 1.385 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 180o, illegal mint, c. 360 - 365 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VOT / X / MVLT / XX in four lines within wreath, eagle in circle closing wreath at the top, CONST in exergue; $125.00 (€111.25)
 


Click for a larger photo
VOT X MVLT XX abbreviates Votis Decennalibus Multis Vicennalibus. Earlier in the empire, this inscription would have meant that Julian had completed his vows (prayers) to thank the gods on the tenth anniversary of his rule, and made more vows to the gods that they might help him achieve his twentieth anniversary. Julian ruled less than three and a half years. By Julian's time, votive inscriptions had come to express hopes rather than reality.
RL77939. Bronze centenionalis, RIC VIII Cyzicus 130 (S), LRBC II 2512, SRCV V 19180, Cohen VIII 151, Hunter V -, F, green patina with red earthen highlighting, centered on tight flan, scratches, weight 3.074 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 362 - 363 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust left holding spear and shield; reverse VOT / X / MVLT / XX in four lines within wreath, tied at the bottom, closed with a jewel at the top, CVZA in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex-Lindgren; scarce; $45.00 (€40.05)
 


Click for a larger photo
Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.
SH21937. Gold solidus, RIC VIII Antioch 197, Cohen VIII 79 var., SRCV 4066 var., Choice EF, weight 4.465 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 362 - 363 A.D.; obverse FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS EXERCITVS ROMANORVM (the power of the Roman army), Virtus (Julian) advancing right, head left, dragging captive with right and holding trophy across shoulder, ANTA in exergue; minor abrasion on emperor's neck and a couple light scratches, ex Freeman & Sear; very rare; SOLD







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


OBVERSE LEGENDS

DNCLIVLANVSAVG
DNCLIVLIANVSNC
DNCLIVLIANVSNOBCAES
DNFLCLIVLIANVSPFAVG
DNIVLIANVSNOBC
DNIVLIANVSNOBCAES
DNIVLIANVSPFAVG
FLCLIVLIANVSPFAVG
FLCLIVLIANVSAVG
FLCLIVLIANVSNOBC
FLCLIVLIANVSNOBCAES
FLCLIVLIANVSPERPAVG
FLCLIVLIANVSPFAVG
FLCLIVLIANVSPPAVG
IVLIANVSAVG


REFERENCES

Carson, R., P. Hill & J. Kent. Late Roman Bronze Coinage. (London, 1960).
Carson, R., H. Sutherland and J. Kent. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol VIII, The Family of Constantine I, A.D. 337 - 364. (London, 1981).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 8: Nepotian to Romulus Augustus, plus tesserae & cotorniates. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Constantin II à Zenon (337-491). Moneta 5. (Wetteren, 1996).
Ferrando, P. L'atelier monétaire d'Arles: de Constantin le Grand à Romulus Augustule (313-476). (Arles, 2010).
Paolucci, R. & A. Zub. La monetazione di Aquileia Romana. (Padova, 2000).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
King, C. & Sear, D. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. V: The Christian Empire: The Later Constantinian Dynasty and the Houses of Valentinian and Theodosius and Their Successors, Constantine II to Zeno, AD 337 - 491. (London, 2014).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).
Voetter, O. Die Münzen der romischen Kaiser, Kaiserinnen und Caesaren von Diocletianus bis Romulus: Katalog der Sammlung Paul Gerin. (Vienna, 1921).

Catalog current as of Monday, April 24, 2017.
Page created in 0.858 seconds
Roman Coins of Julian II